The skanner. (Portland, Or.) 1975-2014, September 20, 2017, Image 1

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    SEPTEMBER 20, 2017
Portland and Seattle Volume XXXIX, No. 51
25
CENTS
News .............................. 3,8-12 A & E .....................................6-7
Opinion ...................................2 Public Records Secrecy ..9
Calendars ........................... 4-5 Bids/Classifieds ....................11
CHALLENGING PEOPLE TO SHAPE A BETTER FUTURE NOW
COURTESY OF MULTNOMAH COUNTY
SUPPORTING BENNETT
Tricia Tillman, director of Multnomah County
public health, told the audience the county is
committed to getting the community more
information.
By Melanie Sevcenko
Of The Skanner News
T
hree days after The Skanner pub-
lished the story of Tricia Tillman’s
forced exit from Multnomah
County, Chair Deborah Kafoury
announced a strategy to address com-
plaints of racist and unjust employ-
ment practices.
Karfoury’s official announcement
last Friday came on the heels of a pub-
lic hearing where more than a dozen
people testified about experiencing or
observing systemic racism within the
county’s workforce.
“I want employees at Multnomah
SANCHEZ FAMILY PHOTO VIA AP
See TILLMAN on page 3
Magdiel Sanchez is
pictured in an undated
photo. Sanchez was
shot and killed when
Oklahoma City police
officers opened fire
on him in front of
his home Sept. 19 as
he approached them
holding a metal pipe.
A department official
said the police officers
didn’t hear witnesses
yelling that Sanchez
was deaf.
Cop Shoots
Deaf Man page 10
New Hope for a Cure for
Sickle Cell Disease
page 8
Katrina Johnson, a cousin of Charleena Lyles, and Reshaud Bennett, younger brother of Seahawk defensive player Michael Bennett, joined several dozen
people in a march to Century Link Stadium after the “Standing with Kaepernick, Supporting Michael Bennett” rally on Sept. 17 before the Seahawks’
first home game. Similar rallies in support of Colin Kaepernick will be held before the first home game of every NFL team this season. The protestors
in Seattle wanted to show support for Seahawk Defensive player Michael Bennett after he said was recently subjected to excessive force by the Las
Vegas Police Department. Speakers at the rally included Katrina, Reshaud and Gerald Hankerson, President, Seattle King County and Washington State
NAACP, Dave Zirin, Nation Sports Editor and co-author of Michael Bennett’s forthcoming book, Jesse Hagopian, a high school teacher and member of
Social Equality Educators, and Nikkita Oliver, social justice activist and former mayoral candidate.
Sessions: Sanctuary Cities Undermine Law
Comments came after judge rules administration cannot withhold funding
By STEVEN DUBOIS
Associated Press
PORTLAND — U.S. Attor-
ney General Jeff Sessions
on Tuesday criticized
sanctuary cities that try to
protect immigrants in the
country illegally as places
that “undermine the moral
authority of the law.”
He made the comments
a day after the Trump ad-
ministration appealed a
judge’s ruling blocking its
efforts to withhold money
from the cities.
Sessions, speaking to
law enforcement officers
in a sanctuary city in the
sanctuary state of Ore-
gon, urged officials who
have decided that local po-
lice should not cooperate
with federal immigration
agents to reconsider those
policies.
As he spoke, protesters
lined the streets outside
the Portland field office of
the U.S. Citizenship and
Immigration
Services.
Their chants could faintly
be heard inside the room
where Sessions appeared.
Sessions said the federal
grant money that U.S. cities
receive are not an entitle-
ment, and cannot be given
to sanctuary cities that he
said frustrate efforts to re-
duce crime.
“Rather than reconsider
their policies, these sanc-
tuary jurisdictions feign
outrage when they lose
federal funds as a direct re-
sult of actions designed to
nullify plain federal law,”
Sessions said.
A Chicago judge last Fri-
day at least temporarily
blocked the administra-
tion’s attempt to withhold
one particular public safe-
ty grant from cities that
don’t cooperate.
On Monday, U.S. govern-
ment lawyers appealed a
judge’s ruling in lawsuits
by San Francisco and an-
other California county
challenging
President
Donald Trump’s broader
executive order threaten-
ing to cut off funding to
sanctuary cities.
U.S. District Judge Wil-
liam Orrick rejected the
administration’s argument
that the executive order
applies only to a relative-
ly small pot of money and
said Trump cannot set new
See SESSIONS on page 3
‘Hands Up’ Series Has Second Run in Portland
The seven-monologue theatrical performance
explores Black perspective on police profiling
By Melanie Sevcenko
Of The Skanner News
T
he August Wilson Red Door
Project in North Portland will
be presenting “Hands Up” for
a second time in Portland Sept.
22 – 24.
As an African American-led non-
profit, the theater is working to
change the racial ecology of the city
through the arts – and “Hands Up”
aligns poignantly with its mission.
In the wake of 2014’s police shoot-
ing of Michael Brown in Fergu-
son, Mo., and John Crawford III in
Beavercreek, Ohio, The New Black
Fest in Brooklyn commissioned
seven  emerging Black  playwrights
to write monologues about the state-
of-mind of African Americans in an
COURTESY OF REGIONAL ARTS & CULTURE COUNCIL
First non-White public
health director abruptly
forced out of position
PHOTO BY SUSAN FRIED
Firing
Ignites Plan
to Address
Racism
See HANDS on page 3 2016 performance of “Hands Up” in Portland