The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, September 03, 1956, Page 6, Image 6

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    C-("ec. I) Statesman, Salem Ore.,' Hon., Sept. 3, HQ)
Statesman, Salrm, Ore., Mon.,' Sept. 3, '56 (Sec. I) 7.
Valley
News
Statesman Nws Strvict
Valley Schools Set
Fall Opening Dates
) suuiaua Ntwt Snvtc. '
. Faculty and custodian arc busy this week dusting off textbooks
and desks (or the opening of acbooli scheduled generally throughout
the valley for next Monday. Pre-registratioa of first graders and
other pupils la scheduled for tola week at many schools.
ST. PAUL St. Paul public schools, St. Paul Academy and the anion
high school will open their doors to the new school year Monday.
I First graders in the public school
will register Friday from a.m. to
t p.m. while high school pupils !
will register Monday. Academy
youngsters have already completed I
registrations. . .
Faculty at St. Paul will begin
work Friday with a teachers meet- J
ing at which time a number of
new teachers will be welcomed.
Vocational agriculture wtU be
added to the instruction this year
with teacher Donald McNulty in I
charge. Some 28 boys are signed
up for the .daises so far. -
Other new teachers Include Miss
Muriel Lay, who will teach home
economics and physical education; I
Miss Lilian Houston, commercial i I
subjects and librarian; Miss Gert
rude Westphall, English until the
return of Leslie Weatherbill from!
Ft Knox, Ky.
PENNErS NEW BACK-TO-SCHOOL NEEDS I&TEJ
SHOP PHUtlEY'S
MORE TIME TO SAVE!
H y7 CS (; in? iy 0 IJI & I n ft W
160 NO. LIBERTY ST., SALEM, OREGON
for clover styling . . .
sound valuo . . .
quality to tho last detail!
.5 nM'U"V,v
UF Quota Set
At Mt Angel
IUIowi Ww Sank , ''
MT. ANGEL, Sept. J The quo
ta for the United Fund drive for
the ML Angel area, comprising
ML Angel, Monitor ana scons
Mills is KS84 for this year. The
drive will open September IB.
The sum to be collected in ML
Angel is $4,000, $$3,700 lot the
county and $300 to go into the
ML Angel Welfare Fund for lo
cal charities. The United Fund
Includes the Red Cross which au
tomatically eliminates the sep
arate Red Cross drive but makes
It necessary to increase the indi
vidual donatioa to make the
larger quota. Another reason for
the higher quota is that most
agencies were operating in the
red last year and must have mora
funds to carry on their work.
Hugh Naughtoa of Salem met
with the directors and Campaign
Chairman Gene Holier last week
to make drive plana. A meeting
for alt solicitors is aet for Mon
day night, September 17.
Servicemen
Visit Homes
. ' lUUnu Niva Stntn
FOUR CORNERS, Sept -SSgt.
and Mrs. Clifford Herman and
children Kay and Sonny arrived
Tuesday from Camp Lejeune, N.
Carolina where he has been sta
tioned .with the Marines for two
years. They are currently visiting
her parents Mr. and Mrs. Albert
. Brant and his parents the Tbeo
' Herrmanns. At the expiration of
his leave here he will report In at
Camp Pendleton, Calif, for further
" transfer. Mrs. Herman and the
children will remain, here indeO-
" nit ply. -
Sst Jay D. Rickmaa arrived
home Thursday from Japan. He
has been with the oversees Army
for two and one half years. From
her he will go to Fort Jackson, S.'j
Carolina.
Sgt. Robert G. Roberton of Dex
ter, Ore. is a guest in the Rickmaa
home this week. He will report in
at Ford Ord, Calif.
Shop Penney's first then Attend
Oregon's Great State Fair . .
Fair Week Store Hours: Tuesday and Friday 9:30 (
A.M. to 9:00 P.M. Other Days 9:30 A.M. to 5:30 P.M,
Ccrvais Pastor
To Be Honored
SUUuua News Batvlc
" GERVAIS. Sept. J The Rever
end George Snider non, pastor of
the Sacred Heart Catholic Church,
will be honored by his parishioners
Tuesday evening at the high school
auditorium.- ? '.. ..
Reverend Snidcrhon has been
transferred to the St. Francis of
Assist parish at Roy, Oregon, after
five years here.
Reverend Francis H. Hanley of
St. Cyrils at Sherwood, who was
former assistant at Woodburn, will
replace Reverend Snidcrhon whose
transfer was effective- the last of
August. ' . ' ;,' '
Sheridan By-Pass
Due by End of '57
SUtt.ua Newt ServU.
SHERIDAN, Sept 2 The new
Sheridan-Wallace Bridge highway
by-pass should be ready for use
by the end of 1957 according to
Glen Faxton, assistant state high
way engineer.
He said the state highway de
partment is building highways
with an eye on 1973 when they
predict traffic will be double its
present volume. Right-of-way has
been purchased for a four-lane
route. When the traffic reaches
a heavy point, two more lanes
will be added to the highway and
another bridge constructed east
of Sheridan.
Former Mayor
Of Daylon Ailing
Statnaua K.wi Snvlc .
DAYTON. Sept. John Jones,
former Dayton mayor now living
In McMinnville. "was stricken with
a heart attack carry last week and
l still In a serious condition in
lU'lsnnville General Hospital.
Jnes now owns a shoe repair
aM leather goods store in McMinn
ville. , .
V:.y Season Here
IVr Onion Growers
Rlllriimt New. Srrrlra
T ' '10ILS, Sept. J Onion growers
of t s errs re busy pulling sod
X In Lifir cion crop whuh
,s.:y Is con: ' rod the b-t
f r spvcral r sis. Onion pn'I
n b out two weeks earlier
i r t years.
PRATUM - Registration for
Praturn grade school is scheduled
for Monday morning at the school
with teachers Mrs. Pearl Andrews
and Mrs. Bertha Franklin in I
charge. Regular class work will!
begin on Tuesday.'
Returning; pupils will find re-
finished floors and new desks and
chairs in tho primary room. New
windows nave been installed in one
classroom and the basement has
beea repainted. ,
MIDDLE GROVE A three-
months remodeling program which I
has included the completion of a!
new classroom and multipurpose
room has put Middle Grove school
back in shape for the new school I
year which begins Monday.
Soma work still remains to be I
done on the project whkh also
includes rearranging the old sec-1
tioa o the school to place class-!
rooms on each side of n central
ball. Tho basement room formerly
used as a classroom will be the !
library, .:.'.'; v.:
Registration is set for Friday
under the direction of Teaching I
Principal Ronald Lee and his staff
of five teachers. Classes start
Monday morning.
SUBLIMITY Registration and
classes art both due Monday at
Sublimity grade school where Mrs.
Mae Brown and Mrs. Helen Chris
tiansen will teach this year. Mrs.
Brown will have the four upper
grades and Mrs. Christiansen the
lower grades.
GERVAIS - Sacred Heart per
cental school will get the Jump
on most other valley schools Tues
day when it begins registration
for the new school year. Classes
will not begin until next Monday
nowever. '
The Mothers Club of the school j
will also start Its activity early.
scheduling its first meetinc for
Tuesday night in the old school1 1
building. Mothers of new pupils I
are invited to be present. Hostess
group for the affair includes Mrs.
Ray Matlock, Mrs. Henry Berning,
Mrsi E. J. Jungwirth and Mrs.
Clair Harvey.
DAYTON Grade school and
high school In Dayton will open
Friday at 1:45 a.m. for registration
and asemblies. School will be dis
missed at ll:is a.m. Regular
classes win start on Monday, Sep
tember 10. ,
Lunch program at the grade
scikxu will also be sin . Mondar.
Any high school students who have
not pre-registered should call at
tho high school ofifce in the morn
ing of any day this week.
New Residents1 "
At Four Corners
SUUnua M.ws Strvlre
FOUR CORNERS. Sept i-New
residents in the communty are Mr,
and Mrs. Richard Eisele, Char
lene. LaDonna and Ronald who
have purchased a new homo at
254 Evelyn Ave. The Eiscles are
from Emporia, Kans, and have
been ,. staying with his mother,
Mrs. Ella Carsten, while locating
a noma.. ., , . . .
Mr, and Mrs. George Crowe.
Leland and Linda have moved to
the residence at 124 S. 45th St
They came from Corvallis.
r l r:;-i:ro
i. . ; i. J Fi':y Linn
i - ' -i ? f ' vied fr
' ' f " 1 ' r tri m c f
' 1 '1 ,!". V bv
( i J' M. I.j li and
Turner Firemen
Battle Grass Fire
ItitrniM N.wi s.rvice '
TURNER, Sept. 1 Fire burned I
over about 20 acres of stubble and I
grass Saturday afternoon on the
Fay Webb and the E. H. Burrell
farms near the north edge of Tur
ner. .A1-; . . .
Turner volunteer firemen foueht
the blaze for over an hour. The
tire was believed to have started
from a burning operation. ,
Substitute Teacher
Appointed at Dayton
luttnui N.wi Service
DAYTON, Sept. 2 Mrs. Ivan
Gubser, Dayton, has been named
as substitute teacher for the sev
enth grade at Dayton grade
school whenthe school opens
September T.
She replaces Vrs. Fcrtha Sev
ering accidental shooting victim,
who will not be able to teach for
sometime. Sirs. Gubser will teach
until Mrs. Severin can return to
school.
.V.
r
' j.'KW V" i
1 m Mi .it?.teN 1
t Z -J IB
Women's
i -
t Hi-Fashion
CORDUROY
RAIN SET...
Lyi mKff',
mi
ania1'' Tt1ajas1iaw'
I
me m
UFE"
nes
I to It
Girls' silts 7 to 14 9 90
Hi-fajhion rain set . , . slim back-belted
coat of rsin-repellenf pinwale corduroy,
lined with Chromspun plaid to match its
own umbrella! 8 -to 18.
SECOND FLOOR
WASH 'N WEAR PLAIDS
CARE - FREE . . . UTILE IRON
Schonf-berie plofds cost fittle at Penney's . . .
take littler tore, Mom! Smartly designed of
machine-washable Dan Rivercotton, Dri
Don finished to jiffy-iron or 'get away with
no ironing at all. Full hems, too. Multicolor
plaids. Sizes 7 to 14. Also sizes 3 to 6x. 2.93
! SECOND FLOOR
98
All-Wool
Skirts in
Proportioned
Sizes . . .
90
T f
X
sizes
I to IS
Girls' sixes 7 to 14
.4.91
It's a beautiful top quality yarn-dyed
wool with fully lined seat, a twelve
inch walking pleat, and side zipper.
SECOND FLOOR
:-iJ'-io.-riW V-ribsatss feiiAlft a
f. 4
GENUINE HOCKMEYER
WHITE CORDS FOR MEN
Styled for campus er c a s u s 1
wear in Penney's populsrcos.it
model! Cut over Penney's gen
erous proportioned patterns for
non-binding comfort Machine
washable.
MAIN FLOOR
50
IK m lis
..jjgr.... . . .... .s. , fg,. . -
siios 29 to 42
;nICII. WOOL FLANNELS
m. . . RICHLY TAILORED!
990.
sizes 29 to 42
VJr 1 ?-- : ih'. J
1
Resilient, soft-draping all wools
an unusually fin combine-
tioa of fabric and Penney qua
lity tailoring ... at a Penney
price which consistently defies
comparison. In 3 shades of gray,
other wanted colors.
MAIW FLOOR
a.
IV-
G
(3
Vf
4
...j-. - -,,.(, mmmm, t ri
THE "DRAGSTER" JACKET . .
MILIUM LINED ALL WOOL 3IELTON
Superb sofl-finished virgin wool melton warm-up
jackets, just loaded jwith quality features. Ill
tho popular snap-front model with wool-and-cot-ton
knit trims edged with contrast-color. Set-in
sleeves, double welted leather pockets. Milium
treated reyorf lining. 10 terrific Colorsl
boys sizes I to 18 ...... '.. ...9.90
MAIN FLOOR
11
.i
75
men's slits 36 to 46
l
1
4 ?'o
-I
- a - 1- . e
V
. ,v . a . m wm- mm
- ' 'V tr ' wv
f'
fcaw flrfi
4 Wefe.
...
Girls' Cotton
Tailored
Briefs ... ...
pair
Girls' tailored briefs sre Pen-oey-priced
for savingK, Mom!
j They're soft combed cotton
with nylon-reinforced bands at
legs. Sizes 2-14. Machine washable.
Save! Girls'
Cotton Plisse
Slips ...
Back-To-School
Favorites . . .
ALL
WOOL
Novelties
Milium Lined .
r L .... ,
T "
tr -
.fa
X. , "V,
Hey Fellas Lo ok ! !
THICK SOLED
CORDOVAN COLOR
OXFORDS
Q90
' (LP
Leather uppers
Composition soles
Storm welt j
Sizes
614 to 12
Boys' Sizes, 3 to A 6.90
Comfortable, smart-looking, styled
with clean-cut lines, these shoes
really take a polish. Thick-soled,
a cordovan-color oxfords are tops
1 for back-to-school. Comoosition
f soles and heels for miles and miles'
of wear.
v DOWNSTAIRS STORE
1 . 1 . 1. 1 n mi 1 m 1 in 1.1 11 11 1 " ' 1 1
f ::vii I0f mk
X fc.f .Jv..B f t v 1 4
jMeii's Combed
Cotton Argyles
69
pair
Men's soft, absorbent combed
cotton argyles by Penney's
Towncraft! Long-wearing ny-
Men's Dan
River Plaids
98
Sizes S, M, L
lon-reiniorcea neeis ana toes.y sleeves, I pockets, rou
main fLUUK s collar. MAIN
sizes
7 to 14
sizes 4 to 14
r" r
V" - ..V i
' .. t
Very excellent quality fabric inJK i 'Juf L 1
Sub-teen sizes
...197S
SECOND FLOOR
Penney's presents Girls' Cotton
I Plisse Slips, charmingly styled
lnd embroidered! Elaiticized $
side inserts. Machine washable
j -lukewarm water. White, pink. 4
SECOND FLOOR I
I 100 wool fsbnet with an ex-
tremcly soft finish. It's a want-
ed style with full sleeves, round-
I ed yoke. It's lined with rayon
taffeta milium. Choose from
fall colors.
SECOND FLOOR
I: ' k 1
4. .
: ST f
durable woven gingham,
collar. MAIN FLOOR
israel
Men's Faded
i Denim Slacks
39
Sizes 29-42
Penney's colorful Dan River 1 Styled with continuous waist-
. . LJ... .... - I I 1.11 1 ... . .
liaiu .hum lut iikii ui u.iiu, luu picaiea ironi, regu-
fliirnKlA Urntmtt ninnh. rn T nr. Pi In .U. uuL.I. nnJ ...... , W
1"
lar side pockets, and two patch
in Dack.
. pockets i
MAIN FLOOR
Leather
Moccasins . .
Rubber Soles
Sizes
3 to 6
Sizes
6' to 12
Comfortable all-leather moccasins
with rubber soles . . : Built for i
long wear ... $
I
DOWNSTAIRS STORE
Boys' 2
Eyelet Cre.
Sole Oxfords
98
550'
4 Sizes Sizes
I H to 12 12ita3
i These are of smooth leather with
buoyant cushion crepe soles.
Brown. Sanitized to keep them
hygienically clean.
DOWNSTAIRS STORE
V
v
p.--,V. .,'. '.Y!',v.--- tm m
BETTER! because they re knit of ,
Penney's Own Lani-Fur
90
, r i. Tba softest, richest fur blendl
BETTER STILL ... our classics arc FULL FASH
IONED for ,iha .smoothest fit In sweaters , . .
Penney-priced in tin with your budgetl They're
..prized-quality . . , made of lambs wool-fur fiber
nylon. Looped craw necklines always keep in
shape. Scads of rich Fall colors. Sizes 34 to 42.
Long sleeve slipon, 6.90. I
SECOND FLOOR
' Short
Sleeve
Slipon
long sleeve cardigan 7.90
Women's Suede
Petti-Shell
Flats . l. .
Q98
sizes
4 to 9
Penney-priced to go easy on
your budgetl The peti-shell
of soft butery kid or suede,
cut lower, streamlined, Sani
tized. '' DOWNSTAIRS STORE
Brown and
White
Saddles
498550
White Suede
Red Soled
a
Saddles
Mercerized
Cotton
Cuffed Socks
zas
Vi to 12
sizes
12Vi to 3
Good-looking, priced-right at
Penney's! Sleek saddle oxford
comes in brown and white
smooth leather, has white rub
ber moulded soles.
DOWNSTAIRS ' STORE ,
88
slzat
4V to 9
Good-looking, priced - right!
That's Penney's sleek saddle
oxford of bright white suede
with a salmon colored rubber
sole. . Sanitized for all-day
freshness. . ,
DOWNSTAIRS STORE
,alr
Mercerized cotton cuffed socks
will be with girls all semester
. . , nylon-reinforced through
out- Machine washable. Sixes
SECOND rLOOR
MORE TIME TO SAVE!
M
p.m.
J
now even
better at
new low
Penney
price!
Wash and Wear Finish .
Gold Print Cottons
Colorful gold prints in assorted
pstterns and stripes . . Back-to-school
favorites . , Machine
wsshsble. Requires very little
ironing. Smart continental' col
lar,' too , . . ' , '
MAIN FLOOR
98
sizes -
S, M, L ).'v
,2.
'!" ""4 I t
I A. ' f
Hi mil mi liimi ,, -
TOWNCRAFT INTERLOCK ORLON
SLIPOVERS -11 FASHION COLORS .
Now at fenney's spectacular new low price it's easy
to own wardree of Ortons lo go vlfh all your
Important Fall outfits . . . and Penney'g has every
color you need I 'You'll enjoy the warmth gnd
comfort of this fine interlock Orion i , . its easy
care, too! Your Towncraft rinses quiekly, dries
without fuss.,. . with no shrinkan nrohlem!
Keys' Sizes, 10 to 1 : 3.98
' 0 charcoal gray ' cognac llstht green o dark grera light blue navy
peacock camel maize o cranberry white
MAtN KLOOfl '
f98
i-
Reds Admit Downing Plane; ;
Reject U. S. Compensation j
By COLIN FROST
LONDON. Sept. J ( Comma
nist China today admitted attack
ing an American plane shot down
last month but threw out U.S. de
mands tor compensation as "un
justified." - - . -
Instead the Chinese slammed
a "serious protest" against U.S.
Naval and Air operations in the
Far East and demanded "that the
United States stop its provocative
activities."
Red China's stand was an
nounced in a Foreign Ministry
statement broadcast -by Pelping
radio. ... ...
Tho plane-a t'.S. Navy Merca-
Push Buttons
Pick Potential
Executives
By FRANK CAREY .
AP Science Iteawrter
, CHICAGO, Sept. 1 (V-A push
button "logic-testing" machine
ooios promise for eventual use in
helping select proper candidates
for high-level executive and other
complex Jobs, two commercial
psychologists said today.
The devicewhich would go big
id a penny arcaoe amusement
centerhas a circle of lights ar
ranged around a center light. The
idea is to make the center light
glow by pushing one or more ef
three red buttons at the bottom
a panel,
" But the pathway to the "Jack
pot" involves figuring . out which
lights - In- the - outer- circle -will
"trigger" the payoff light. All
kinds of intricate patterns art in
volved in solving the problem.'
" The psychologists said the Itffl
experlmental machine dubbed
"The Monster" because of ' its
challenging complexity to anyone
being tested by it has indicated
possibilities for help in delecting:
1. Candidates for "high-level de-
cision jobs of an executive na
ture." ' . y! '
2. Trainees for operating highly
complex electronic computing
machines that are used for every
thing from weather forecasting to
plotting the trajecory of "baby
moon" artificial satellites.
I. Potentially good diagnosti
cians among candidates for medi
cal schools. t
Engineering Field
4. Logical-thinking "trouble-
shooters" in electronic, engineer
ing and other fields. .
Declaring that the machine is
designed to test a man's ability
to solve a given problem by logi
cal analysis, psychologist George
Bennett of " The Psychological
Corp.. New York, told a reporter
at tho annual convention of the
Amerlcaa Psychological Assn.;
"Promising research results la
the oast year or so make us very
enthusiastic about the possibilities
and have given us Increased con
fidence tha' this eventually will
be a very useful device, We have
tested it on several hundred en
gineers. ' psychologists and psy-
cista. Individual whom we know
to be documented problem-solvers
have done very well in tests on
the machine." ,V'
Bur bo and psychologist Charles
Lsngmuir of tie same company
said the machine la being con
stantly refined, and any prosp' t
of making It available for general
use must await the working out ot
standardized procedures for using
it. -
More Experleiet
For example, they said more
experience is needed to determine
more exactly wnat constitutes
"normal" performance by a test.
ed person.
The device was first developed
couple of years ago, they said,
by Prof. James G. Miller, former
ly of the University of Chicago,
and now at the University of
Michigan, and a number ef asso
ciates.
It's conceivable, they declared,
that the instrument might even
have usefulness in the mental
health field in study! the reac
tions of the mentally ill to, a "prob
lem" situation.
TPC. they said, is "a business
corporation owned by psycholo
gists and designed to make re
search results in psychology ppli-
cable In the world of business af
fairs." They said it was 'otmded
in 1921 by a group of "eminent
psychologists including the late
Edward L. Thorndike of Colum
bia University."
tor went down off fbe China coaat . !
with the loss of II crewmen. Arner j.
lean officials placed the time of :
the shooting as early Aug. 23 Far ','
Eastern time. , -
AtUch Justified' ' . '
The broadcast went oa to claim
that the attack was "entirely jus
tified" because the C imui'sts
thought the- plane on a routuio Lf
U.S. Navy patrol was a Chines
Nationalist warplane.
The U.S. Navy has prvlouxly
said the Chinese Nationalist air
force had no Mercatora and none
of similar typo. A Navy official
also said today in response to a
question there Is a difference la
the markings of Chinese Nation :
Hat plane and the U.S. planes. Tho
Chinese Nationalist marking, ho
said, includes a white circle on a '
blue field, with a blac' band on, i
the circumference, from which ex '
tend outward 13 points or trk v
angles. The U.S. marking Includes
a blue circle with a white star ia '
it. A horizontal band extends "
across the star with markings of
red, white and blue.) ...
Two days ago the U.S. State and
Defense departments announced : :.
they were demanding damages for "
tho loss of life and for the piano. ',
They said H was well off shoro '
and over International waters. 1 t
They asserted an unjustified attack
was made without warning. "Tho
responsibility for this loss of lifo '
and destruction of U.S. property
Ilea with the Communist .Chinese '
regime," the United States said.
N. Cmaeaaatlm ... . '
The Peiping statement said tha v
American demand for compensa
tion "was quite unjustified." -
"The Chinese government," It
said "considers that the charges ' ,
made by the United States Is un '
acceptable and its , demand ia t
groundless." ' - t-
The.- Chinese statement said:
'The spot where the mlll'ary
plane was damaged bjf our air . !
force . . is evideillyJtlieJW-
ritorlal air or China and not over ',
the open sea. ? s
'It is well knows that this area
la a combat area to which tho
Chiang Chinese Nationalist ,'
clique has Incessantly dispatched .. '
its military aircraft to carry out .
war acts of harassment and de
struction. .
x .
Jesse Jones
Estate Tops
Eidit Million
HOUSTON. Tex., Sept. 3 iff -
Jesse H. Jones, former commerce
secretary and head of the RFC,
left an estate valued at 8,765,
302.26, according to an appraise
ment and inventory approved by
county-Judge Bob Casey.
A major portion of Jones
wealth had been given in recent
years to Houston Endowment Inc.,
a 'philanthropic foundation which
he and hia wie established in 1934.
ine inventory i rioi; imru
assets of 3,389,701.63 in cash at
the lime of his death on June 1;
$230,972.57 in clnlms and notes re
ceivable; stock and bonds val
ued at $3,978,52. 16; four parcels
of real estate and a cemetery lot
totaling $41,200 jn value; and per
sonal effects appraised at $5,100.
The Inventory stated Jones
owned no separate property at the
time of his death. His widow
wsived her claim- to one half of
the community estate at the time
Jones will was filed for probate.
Jones' will made numerous be
quests to relatives and friends and
set np funds totaling $300,000 for
distribution among' more than 2,
MO employees of the companies
Ration Expert
Of Two World
Wars Dies
i i
CHICAGO Sept. S lV-tr. Anloa
Julius Carlson, one of the most
colorful figures la medical re
search, died today of cancer at
the age of SL n ; , "
He, was Herbert Hoover's nutri
tion expert In feeding millions of
Europeans after World War L and
was consultant to the Army oq
packaged rations during , World
War II. , . ... l'
The Swedish-bora scientist heaoV
ed the University of Chicago phy
siology department from 191$ to
1929. v,v- .;. --
He fasted once for IS daya with
a balloon in his stomach to test
his theories about hunger coo
tractions. He existed two weeka
on World War II "K ' rations-but
didn't like them. His early re
search on diabetes helped pave
the way for manufacture and
common use of Insulin.
Dr. Carlson's work also dealt
with alcoholism and the aging
processes of man. ,
la 1953, he received the Ameri
can Medical Assn. distinguished
service gold medal and was voted
humanitarian of the year.
Bora on a farm at Bohuslao, ;
Sweden, he came to the United
States at the age of 1.
Room Found
Filled With 4
Knives , Cashx
PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 1 I
Police have padlocked the room
of a dead meat cutter here after
a preliminary aearch revealed
$12,600 in cash secreted there
along with a collection of 237
knives. ' -
The meat cutter. Stephen Pile-
vlch, lived in a $iS-a month room
ing house in the Germantown sec
tion of the city. He had no elec
tricity and a pot-bellied stove was
hi only heat. After he died on
Aug. 4 no relatives could be found.
Finally the state appointed an ad
ministrator. '
Last week officials went into the
room to sort his effects. They
found two worn suits oacked with
money and a $10 gold piece. A
further search revealed the mat
tress was stuffed with $2,000 in
cash; a secret ledge under the
table gave up $1,400; burled under
kindling wood In a box by the
stove was $2. son. The search will
be continued Tuesday.. " "
Papers found in the room re
vealed that . Pllevich, who earned
$4,400 a year, came here from
Russia in 1913. Neighbors said he '
spent most of his time polishing
his meat cutting knives by the "
light of an oil lamp. '
Also turned un by Investigator !
was a draft notice, it was dated
191S from the Ccars government
saying the country was mobilizing -and
calling for Pllevich to return.
RED NAMES DISAPPEAR
VIENNA. Austria, Sept, 3 w :
Hungary's Communist gov
ernment, abolishing "the last rem
nants of the personality cult," has
decreed no streets, buildings, state
factories or public institutions
may be named for living -statesmen
and politicians. The norr of
recently ousted Hiinssrla Com
mutuit prt" boss Mstya RA'I
Is the first disappewring from
sign and plaques all over the
which no controlled.
counlrjr.