The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, September 02, 1956, Page 2, Image 2

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    r-(Pcc. 1) Statesman, Sakm. Ore., Sun,., Sept. 2 1956
i , Jail, 3: Women Take
State Fair Flo wer
Duane Mcllolick, Woodburn, was
v Ji'iic man. among three women to
- pbce first in " Where Kolli the
Mighty Columbia." tha hobby
flower arrangers division, in the
vi rnrninj day of the (1st annual
Oregon State Fair. The other
. three blue ribbon winners ia thia
divig'on of the popular atate fair
tin. show were Mrs. J.M. Rat.
- ( nmssen. Aurora and Mrs. Deaa
f-'oni and Mrs. Newton Mathews,
I to.'h of Portland. v-.-.v-:;
. The Hobby arrangers will" have
'-' hew displays Monday and seam
. on Thursday. Entries in this sec-
tn may be made and arrange
" 'nienfs completed1 by 10 a.m.-on
' Truman Hits
: Farm Policy
Cf President
rm'MWA, Towa. Sept. t Wl-F'Tiif-r
Pre.-sMrnt Harry S. Tru
. r. i declared today that. "If Ei-
' r is re-elected, the farm
e v I roihnue their place in
t, - i e. ,
"i. 0 .t now, in this election year.
of course, the Eisenhower admin-Mra'-.on
is makin an effort to
appear more friendly to the farm
er," Truman continued -ta a
simvh to an estimated 1,000 per
sons attending the first of a three-
i iy farmer-labor ponnred Labor
Day observance. Iowa Democratic
lf j l-rs and candidates took part
h the former President.
Trn-nan said that, "When an
election year comes around, and
t!e r.rnulilscans want some farm
voips, they raise support prices
ltl. .
" mi will remember that when
Eke-Sower vetoed the farm bill
Uie f.: t one passed by Congress
1- t Frying he said he would raise
t e pi.ee support levels on the
t '.c commodities. And be did
s t em above the low levels
he Y.i.i originally planned for 195
but ant above the levels to which
they had sunk in 1535. ..
Flood Toll Reaches
91, India Reveals
KEW DELHI. India. Sept. 1 (
The government announced today
SI persons vdied and 2,300,000 per
son! have been affected so far
during the present flood season. '
; . Damage through the end of
August was estimated at over nine
niiiion dollars. ?-..' i. j
A statement filed in Parliament
giving a "partial assessment" of
tha flood situation said the flood
waters covered about 1,000 square
miles. ' ' . . ,
y VrA
THE HILARIOUS LOW-DOWNON HIGH LIFE9
X
c::leste holm john lund
LOUIS CALIIERN SIDNEY BLACKMER ., ,
- LOUIS ARMSTRONG and his band . 4iwCOLE
l-mmr ilCi:NPATR!CK S-srhrWHufcalW .. itmm hfM mi ASm4 l XWNNY CKtM
CJmt wTiaiNIOOLOR tmmm kf CHAKLtS WALTERS I
either or both of these days.
The Flower and Garden Show
of the State Pair proved one
the most popular divisions of the
fair Saturday. A huge line was
awaiting opening at 1 p.m. and
the oak-ebaded garden was filled
throughout the afternoon. Can
Starker, nationally knows arrang
er, drew a Urge following at his
demonstrations which will go on
at 1:30 each day of. the fair,
Taalatia auk-
Tualatin Garden Club, following
the Westfard Ho theme of the
State Fair Garden show, placed
first among the SO garden club
exhibiting. A Navajo rug. with Its
grey and white coloring, formed
a perfect backdrop for the goldea
rod, red dahlias and bright lla
mas, inry were arranges in
handsome black leather boot, at
the side of which were placed
spur and lariet to complete the
arrangement. '
Little Garden Club of ' Salem
Heights made second place, with
Hilltop of Colton, third, and Cor-
vallis Garden club fourth.
Blue ribbon winners in the
Dahia division were Swan Island
Gardens, Edretfa Gardens and
Jas-Mar Gardens, all of Portland;
Gladstone Dahlia Gardens, Glad
stone, Copley of Salem. Blue rib-
mon winners in the gladiolus di vi
sion were John Langon, Eugene;
Marvia Peck. Portland. Weeks
Gladiolus Gardens, Salem and
Harvey HalleU's Gardens, Silver-
ton. ,
Faehslas Division
Fuchsias and begonias are many
at the garden show, with baskets
hung from the trees, and others
arranged in gardens about the
division. Blue ribbons winners in
the fuchsia division were Ralph
SuteD, Tigard; Mrs. E. C CaxzeU,
Mrs., Marion "Shindler, C M. Har
vey, frank Crawford. Salem: Mrs.
Jack Paoloa, Milwaukie.
Copley Gardens of Salem domi
nated the begonia displays, al
though, some blues were taken by
SutelL Crawford and Harvey.
Copleys also took the only Glox
inia blue. ' v - ;.
The Geranium" division b larger
this year than usual, with many
varieties not common to the Will
amette Valley, being shown. First
place winners in this division were
Mrs. Christine French and P.-E.
Ward, Salem; Blanche Grelle,
Mrs. Enos Noah, Mrs. Ross Glass,
Tangent.
Mrs. Orvule Olson, Albany, and
Marvin Black. Salem, were win
ners ia the Chrysanthemum divi
sion. ,
Other Winners
Winners In the amateur horti-
rultural division were Frank
Crawford, Marie Frederic kson,
Mrs. Meri D. Curtis, Mrs. C. R.
Walling. Mrs. Ray Martin, all of
j
1
mo ,j
t . I "... ' v II i
' x
First in
Arranging
Salem: Stella Frederlckion. Mrs.
John Henny, .Brooks; " Steven
Holmes, McMinnville; Glad
Marshal, Cornelius; Alice Mar
shal, Forest Grove; Mrs. John
Zumstein, JUrs. Elizabeth Weisner
and Mrs. John Schwaixer, Tilla
mook; Mrs. C A. Richards," Day
ton; Mrs. J. M. Rasmussen, Au
rora, Mrs. John Langon, Eugene,
suiie wowe, acta.
A non-competitive display at
tracting a great deal of attention
in the show is that of Arnold :
Clematis Garden of Park Avenue,
Milwaukie. A large number of var
ious colored blooms are on dis
play here,
Army Uniform
Color Change
Starts Monday
WASHINGTON. Sept 1 Ift-The
Army on Monday goes Into the
first phase of a switch to a new
uniform, changing its shoes and
socks from tan te black,
Next month the second phase
starts with soldiers changing their
olive drab uniforms for a green
one to be worn on occasions other
than when they are in formation.
The change was decided upon lirj
1954, At a style show then, when
proposed styles - were modeled.
Army officers said a soldier is en
titled te a uniform "he can wear
with pride." They said the olive
aran jacsec worn ny ine ui was
too informal" for dress because
a soldier feels as if he's wearing
hunting Jacket at a banquet.
The green uniforms are single-
brested and identical for officers
and men except for insignia. The
coats have pleated patch pockets
and lapels. Trousers are euffless.
Present plans now are for the
off duty wear starting next month.
Olive . drab will continue ,te be
used on other occasions. .
Eventually both visored and
overseas caps will be green, with
black Mather trim on the visored
ones.'" .
Aa Army spokesman said sol
diers are being permitted to dye
black their tan shoes, so the shoes
can be worn out.- ; -
5ILYERT0:i
Drive-In theatre
. Sunday and Monday '
. "HA. AND PA KETTU IT HOME
Marjorie Main
Pins
A UWIBJ JTSEir
Kaadolpa Scott
- M-G-M PRESENTS
" IN V1STAVISION AND TECHNICOLOR
A SOL C SIEGEL PRODUCTION
starring (together for the Cm time I) ;
BING CROSBY .
GRACE KELLY
FRANK SINATRA
1
V !
i NEW COLE
"Yen SamatieMr "Wat M Ym Evakr
u
$tiii lojii
No Romance
t
NEW YORK Mrs. Dorothy
Vredenburgh of Birming
ham, Ala., secretary of the
Democratic National Com
mittee, described talk of ro
mantic interest between her
self and Adlsl Stevenson as
"strictly rumor." Mrs. Vred-
enburgh said the Democrat
ic presidential nominee is a
"great man . ; . but we're
Just good, friends.1 . (AP
Wirephoto)
Woman Doctor.
Unhampered by
Auto Accidents
PITTSBURGH. Sept'. 1 W-Dr.
Mary Catherine Armey, a 33-year-
old obstetrician, doesn't let things
like auto wrecks interfere with
work..' ; r'
She was driving, from St. CXair
Memorial Hospital to St. Margaret
Memorial Hospital early today
wnen her auto crashed against a
pole. She told police her foot
slipped from the brake to the ac
celerator while making a turn.
.Refusing medical attention, she
hailed a cab, and hurried en to. St
Margaret A few minutes later the
hospital reported she wu
busy
with her patients.
White bread prices rose 70 ner
cent between W and 1956,
Woodburn Drive-In
. Sunday Monday Tuesday
"THE FAI tOUNTir
Jasnes Stewart
Plus '
7RIVATlWUtfMAJ.ioO0l-
' Charlton Hestoa
PORTER SONGS lJ
Hik S6et Calysis "TmsLaW
-m Wants TllA MuVoftairsT
UHsOes" 'NmTos Nsslso
Min4 h I Maks lam Ts Yea" ,
1 Lavs Tos, twnarha I
PORTER
mi tAUl CHAMIH
.'Sunday
FTC Issues
Warning of
Gyp Schools
WASHINGTON". Sept. 1 Wt-Be-
ware the correspondence school
that,, promises draft exemption
when you graduate, that approach
es you si "one of a select list,'
that offers I ."partial scholarship'
because of your record, that
claims employers will be practic
ally standing in 'line to hire you.
And. above all, the Federal
Trade Commission, cautioned to
day., beware the correspondence
school salesman who tells you that
you must "act now."
The FTC reported It had issued
10 cease and desist orders against
gyp schools the last II months.
Executive director- Alex Akerman
Jr. said it was intensifying its ef
forts against them as stories of
hastily-signed contracts for tuition
of S300 to $400 flood into FTC head
quarters. Principal offenders, the FTC
said, are schools offering training
in civu service work, home han
dicraft and mechanical trades and
courses in motel management,
nursing, horticulture even medi
cine- and music. '
Among the outfits aiainst which
orders have been issued, the FTC
listed: ,
An Oklahoma City "coUegeH
wlth a one-man faculty offering
degrees in audiometry, the science
of fitting bearing aids. It was or
dered to drop the college designa
tion and quit issuing degrees.
A Chicago school that promised
to teach the art of reweaving to
anyone regardless of his eyesight
It was ordered to stop making
this promise.
BEAVERS BUST
. TORONTO, Sept 1 ia-Ah, the
busy little beavers. Three put on
display at an exhibition chewed
up prop branches and started
damming an artificial stream
running through their cage. Work
men tore the dam down to nrevmt
flooding.
ENJOY ONE OF
THESE TOP
PICTURES TODAY
MOW
COMING
SOON
Bus
Stop
PLUS
AISO-
FAUl HAUN-
G0LF ARTIST"
We Art Proud To
Be Participating
With Portland on
The World
Premiere of -This
Picture
COMING
WED.
Dr. Silkini1
"Scream
Stage
Show!
START WED.
MlAx7 ':',:r.i;,'",
Sub-Standdhd
Many Alien
NEW YORK. Sept. t Ul
Columbls University doctor said
today more , than 25 per cent of
the physicians on house staffs of
hospitals in the United States are
aliens and that many lack, a satis
factory professional education.
Dr. Willard C Rappleye. dean
of the faculty of medicine, made
the observation in his annual re
port to the university president
"At s time when the American
medical schools are struggling to
maintain mgn standards, - the
country is' welcoming . doctors
from every part of the world,'
Rappleye said.
'Many are excellent individuals
with good personal and intelle-
tual qualifications but most of
them have had no opportunity in
tneir native lands to acquire
professional education that could
be regarded as satisfactory.
f ereiga Degrees
"Also included are several
thousand Americans who have
gone abroad to study medicine be-
11 of U.S.
School Pupils
Left-Handed
WASHINGTON. Sept X (V-
Eleven per cent of the nation's
school children are left-handed, the
U. S. office of education reported
Saturday, and this will make a dif
ference ia future school house
plans.- ; .',
"School architects, ' designers
snd manufacturers of school furn
iture and equipment and school
administrators are . planning
changes , snd improvements in
school facilities," the office said
in Jorecssting another record en
rollment, " ' ' "
"Included in this planning are
provisions for the 11 per cent of
the nation's children who are left
handed.' ' j
AT SAILM'S
FINEST FAMILY
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER
CONT. fHOM 1 fM.:
THE WHOLE HEART Of
AN EMOTIONAL
is(o!ti3?fJi
! c4tamna)
THELMA RITTER-DEWEY MARTIN
wh VSLLIAM nZQrmxa Product ky WiNwnl lvMr
JWrkiwScmtn4 0mcMkaorfiSHlM
CONT. FROM
I .
RjC0
4SJh. iHaih. -dHBi- flasa
STASatNO
ft " . " - - - - ' v
V i4 "1 i
RICHARD WIQMARK
i ' FELICIA FARR
DOUGLAS KENNEDY TOMMY RETTtG
TWO TOP TECHNICOLOR HITS
ON THE SAME PROCRAMI
For These Who Want
- A Good Laugh!
K 1 r
Training of
Doctors Cited
cause they could not get into an
American scnooi."
His report said the influx
foreign . physicians stemmed from
a national policy of permitting
Immigration of a large number ef
displaced persons without requir
ing, in the esse of doctors, suf
ficient evidence of their profes
sional quaiuicauons.
It. has been predicted recently
that over 8,000 foreign-trained
physicians will enter the country
this year, compared with a total
of 1,977 graduates of all the Amer
ican medical schools," Rappeleye
continued.
Most of the foreigners will be
graduates of unapproved medical
schools. - '
Twe Classes' - ;
"In many sections of the coun
try there are now two classes of
citizens as far as medical services
are concerned: Those who are to
be cared for by physicians who
have had a satisfactory prepara
tion for medical practice, and
those whose medical care will be
provided for by physicians who
are graduates of substandard
schools."
He said that in some, states
more than SO per cent of the
physicians on the bouse staffs of
hospitals are aliens.
BUS PLUNGE KILLS 11
V1CENZA. Italy, Sept 1 A
oassenser bus negotiating a near
ly mne nign mountain pass
plunged hundreds of feet over a
sharp cliff today, killing 13 Ital
ians snd injuring 11 others. Only
one passenger escaped unhurt. '
DALLAS MOTOR-YU
Gates Opea 7:04, Shew at Dusk
James Stewart, Doris Day ia
' "IHI MAM WHO IMEW TW) HU0T
-- Vista Vision - -.-
Second Feature
Jeff Richards ia
"m a D06i irrr
- Cinemascope
TAKE THE
FAMILY TO
THE MOVIES
WOMAN LAID BAIttl
. MASTERPfECei .
. ,
1 P.M.
PLUS
"POSTMARK
FOR
DANGER"
. with .
Terry Moere
. For These Who Like
Westera Adveaturet '
THE $UGLE BLAST
Poll Indicates
Near Draw
Fop dlai, Ike
MINNEAPOLIS, Sept. J 11 - A
survey conducted by the Minne
apolis Tribune's Minnesota poll
following the national political
conventions shows Minnesota sup
port for the Republican and Dem
ocratic president vice president
slates' is almost evenly divided.
The survey, in which 1,000 Min
nesota voting-age mln an women
were interviewed, Aug. 24 23,
showed 47 per cent favored the re
election of President Eisenhower
and Vice President Nixon. Forty
six per cent favored Adlai Steven
son for president snd Sen. Estes
neisuver u-xennj tor vice presi
dent.
Six per cent of those interviewed
were undecided and the other one
per cent either gave another an
swer or refused to state his
choice. ' i
The question, asked was:
"Which of the two tickets Eisen-
hower snd Nixon, or Stevenson
snd Kefsuver do you favor right
now in the 1956 elections"
At the same stage of the 1952
campaign, when a Minnesota soil
Trail Heat ' pitted Elsenhower
ttfte iltlaTatTla JiTiT7i
His go K' (f lLimsl oedjrj
OPEN
ALL FIRST RUN SHOW!
. . ITAMWa
Ford Grain Crawford
Russ Lot jiffJfeta .
land Dps the SWf "DC LAST NOTOT ky FtW B. fiLBT
DbscM SI iKStl ISS. . Pfotfwad k, tUm GtHS'silllrMs
PIUS
M G-M's ALL-TIME BIGGEST
Teeiiucd&l MUSICAL!
turn
m
ft
It
sfomog
i II II 1 1 1 l is
lmLJLlJLlU
BWBsT SJSWBBlSSP sssnsisn aBSaBWBW"
BETTY 1UTT0I3
HOIVARD tlEEL
LOUIS J. CARROL
CALHERN NAISH
EDWARD KEENAN
ARNOLD WYNN
s Theatre Time
Table ;
KLsiNoaa
'Continuous from t'm.l
, "THE PROUD FROFANV
1:00, 4 (ft. 7:14, 10:11
LIVING SWAMP1? IJ1, Ija,
" . - CAr-iTOt,
(Continuous (ram 1 p.m.)
-THB LAST WAGON" 1:00, 4.M,
t:M. 11:17 '
POSTMARKED FOR- DAN
CER 1:0. S:3T, 10:0S
NORTH SALEM DRIVI-IN
(Galea open at l:M. Show at dusk.)
"BIRDS BEES" Gor GobeL
"GREAT DAY IN THiT MORN
ING ' Vlrsinia Mayo.
HOLLYWOOD -THE
. FASTEST GUI ALIVE"
1:45, 1:40, S. 40
"ANNIE GET YOUR GUN" 1 IS
t:0. UM ,
against Stevenson without refer
ence to their vice-presidential run
ning mates, the statewide results
were:
Prefer Eisenhower, 49 per cent;
prefer Stevenson, 38 per cent;
other or refused to say, 1 per
cent; no opinion, 12 per cent. .
Eisenhower received SS.6 per
cent of the-votes cast in Minnesota
on election day in 1952; Stevenson
got 44.4 per cent.
r anuria lavurca uie iemocrai-
Ic nominees 49 per cent t per ectes.
Want a hot foot? The sands la
Arabian deserts sometimes reach
170 degrees Fahrenheit
1:30
7
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SAFARI
Raw Hide Years
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TECMNICOLOn
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