The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, July 23, 1949, Page 2, Image 2

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    t The Statesman. Salem. Oregon
Five Generations
I. Of' tV : V-"' ' 'V-'r"rV V"!'.- . ,r-'
One of the Salem area's five-generation families Is plctnred above. The
jroangest Is six-menths-old Mary Lea Kamph of McMlnnville. la
the bark U her father, Donald Kamph, tt, of McMlnnville. Standing
beside him his mother. Mrs. Melba Weston. 38, of 1641 D. St Seated
la front, left to right, are Mrs. Gladys Edwards, 58, Mary Lea's
(real-grand mother, and Mrs. Mary Harris, 78, her great-great-
grandmother both of 580 N. 17th
Portland-Salem
Police Plan
Radio Hookup
Direct radio contact between
Salem and Portland police depart
ments will start about September
1. It will be the first link in a
possible law-enforcement radio
network among Oregon cities.
Equipment for Salem has been
ordered from $1,000 in funds
ulhorized by the city budget.
Police Chief Clyde W. Warren said
Friday night.
The new communication sys
tem, known as point-to-point
broadcasting, will connect only
the two city departments. But
other-Willamette valley cities are
expected to join the network
wiihin two years, said Temple
Ehmsen, chief of Portland's bur
eau of communications. Eugene is
now seeking funds, he added.
At present Salem and Portland
city police must contact each
other by other means of com
munication. The new point-to-point
system will be used prin
cipally to report stolen cars, war
rants for arrest, and other charges
Involving non-residents.
Warren cited Friday's incident
f bandits who robbed two high
way motorists between Salem
and Eugene as a case where such
a system might have aided in
bringing about their apprehen
sion. Grange Raps
Subsidy Bills
Both of Farm
PORTLAND, July 22-W)-The
national grangemaster said today
that the gange doesn't like either
the Brannan or the Aiken rarm
program.
Albert S. Goss, here from Wash
ington, D. C, to visit a brother.
said the grange would like a flex
Ible plan with a two-price sys
tern.
He suggested a bi-partisan board.
which would apply diffeernt mea
sures loans, allocations, sub
si lies lo different commodities,
all of which can not be handled
alike.
Goss said a two-price system
would assure farmers fair prices
for domestically-used products,
and apportion among them losses
on surpluses.
As an example, he cited milk
control, where producers are guar
anteed a minim price on drinking
milk, but share losses on the sur
plus milk used in manufacture.
He opposed direct subsidies
except in a few instances as
"part of the program for a wel
fare state."
5-Sr BILL PASSED
WASHINGTON, July 22 -UP)
Tie senate labor committee mov
ed today to keep the "52-20" job
less veterans law on the books.
With the law expiring Monday,
the committee unanimously ap
proved a year's extension urged
by President Truman,' but modi
fied some of the existing rights.
BEAUTY CONTEST OPENS
SEASIDE, July 22-jiP-The an
luinl "Miss Oregon" contest opened
here tonight, with 15 girls from as
r:ny Orecon towns competing.
The winner will be selected Sun
day afternoon-.
i DRIVE TO
THE ELEHOBII
GUEST DAIICH
For
SUNDAY DINNER
IS sailes east af Mehama
a the Elkbera Kaad
fr. Mrs. Kenactfc Kaadall
Saturday July 2& 1943
'r ftW VjT
4 -
f
st
Hearing Set in Salem
On Nursery Licenses
PORTLAND, July 22-()-The
state department of agriculture
said today it would not renew the
nursery i licenses of Sherwood
Bulbs Gardens and its related con
cerns' $1,500,000 nursery business.
A hearing on the license applica
tions will be held in Salem Aug.
1. The 6perator, Leslie E. Marcus,
had applied for license renewals
for Sherwood Bulb Gardens, Sher
wood; Coast Bulb Company, Al
bina; Six Corners Gardens, Sher
wood; Country Gardens," Beaver
ton; and Country Stores, Portland.
Pirates Strike
On Canadian
Fish Buyers
VANCOUVER, B. C, July 22
(CP)- pirates struck last night
in the ! storm-swept waters of
British Columbia's salmon fishing
grounds; escaping with $3,000 In
a daring sea-robbery.
According to scant reports from
police, ;the pirates boarded the
Alco, a; fish-buyer's boat, while
the vessel was cruising in River's
inlet. 200 miles north of Van
couver. The victim: has been Identified
as a man named Weaver.
Provincial ; police at coastal
points between Prince Rupert and
Vancouver immediately threw out
an air-sea search net for the arm
ed sea-bandits.
The provincial police boat
P.M.L. ill, of Ocean Falls, is
taking part in the investigation.
Corp. M. N. MccAlpine was flown
in to Rivers inlet from Ocean
Falls. He is in charge of the in
vestigation, i
Reports indicate the money was
to be used by Weaver for buying
fish from gul-netters and seiners
on the sock-eye grounds.
At the present time. Rivers inlet
area Is the center of a salmon
fishery Industry, comprising about
1,000 boats.
All fish buyers have been warn
ed Dy radio-telephone by pro
vincial police to take special pre
cautions; aboard their boats. Po
lice fear that the pirates may at
tempt other holdups on the fish
buying boats which carry a total
of several hundreds of thousands
of dollars during the sock-eye
season. ; :
Wolves apparently mate for life,
and the father aids in rearing the
family. ; 1
Trj DJUICE
' Ta the music af
LEE and the
MELODY RAMBLERS
Erary SaL Nlcjht
ALBANY ARMORY
Adas. C5e IncL tax.
Seml-Modera
in
Every SaL Nil
i . jAt Th
CoUonwoods
7 ml East of Albany
on Highway 20
Music by
'fUrs" Wolfers
OrcHesira
90 to 1:00 O'clock
BritishTold
Conservative
LONDON, Saturday. July 23-
(P)-Winston Churchill's conserva
tive party told Britons today jt
would retain most of the major
socialist laws already enacted, but
halt further nationalization of in
dustry ii voted back into power
in 11950.
The party unveiled its campaign
platform for the parliamentary
election next year in a 20,000-
word statement of policy entitled
The Right Road for Britain. A
foreward by Churchill said the
out-come would be the most mo
mentous decision in Britain's his
tory.
The wartime prime minister is
to; elaborate on the policy in a
speech this afternoon at Wolver
hampton, a labor stronghold.
Seeking to oust the labor gov
ernment that has ruled Britain
since 1945, the conservatives pled
ged to:
Overhaul but continue state op
eration of all but one of the in
dustries nationalized by the labor
ites. ,
. Restore parts of the nationalized
road transport industry to private
or municipal ownersnip.
Halt the rest of the labor party's
Iftiationalizauon program.
tional health scheme, but make it
more efficient and less costly.
Resist the expansion of com
mumsm.
Give prior treatment to British
Commonwealth nations in trade,
investment and immigration
though, in relations between Brit
ain and the United States "it will
be conservative policy to encour
age ever-increasing cooperation
and intimacy between our two
countries, whether it be economic
or cultural affairs."
ECA Fund Use
f z
Starts Debate
WASHINGTON, July 22--The
senate broke out in a wrangle
today over a proposal to force the
economic cooperation administra
tion to earmark an estimated $1,
500,000,000 of its funds from Am
erican surplus farm products.
Senator Robertson (D-Va.),
opening debate on a bill to pay
for the second year of the Eur
opean recovery program, said the
proposal would have "most ser
ious consequences."
It was set forth in an amend
ment by Senator McClellan CD
Ark.) and voted into the bill by
the senate appropriations commit
tee. It provides that ECA must
buy farm surpluses of the kind
and amount listed in ECA's seti
mates three months ago of what
the recovery program would need.
The monye could be spent for no
thing else.
Robertson contended that the
surplus estimates were only tent
ative and that the amendment
would force the purchase of cot
ton and other farm products whe
ther or not they now are needed
by the European nations.
Pvt. Rodger Young
Given Final Rite
CLYDE O., July 22-iIP)-Private
Rodger Young, hero of every foot
slogging soldier of World War II,
was laid to final rest here today.
The shy Ohioan won the con
gressional medal of honor in the
steaming jungle of New Georgia
in the Solomons. He was buried
with full military rites in a grave
on the edge of circular McPherson
cemetery.
: Wolves may have five to four
teen young in a single litter.
Merlain Dandna School
peasants
Gay Musical Rrrue
at
Paradise Islands
4 miles east Airport Road
Sunday, July 24
Picnldng O Swimming
Opn Air Dancing
(New Modem Dressing Rooms)
Admission 20c par parson
doii't rnss
Daylon
Buckaroo
Sainrday and
Sunday
July 23-24
l:3QP.ILDaify
Parado Saturday Morning
Dayton. Oregon
Party Policy
i
- ; . - - . , ,',J. ;-- - -
k- , ; - -- I.- - - v - "V
' LJ. ... ...
r v '.;4vT i r--L,-' - : - v . - - y
1 w - ?l l ; - - " , ii ii i ii " i 1 v
. u'''- V ( V
Englewd school ta the northeast section mt Salem Is being completely
remodeled sad enlarged with s 54 by 45 foot addition. The addition,
af concrete brick veneer construction will be fireproof and Is at right
foregroond above. Other work lnelades tearing down old roof over
hang, building brick firewall around top, remodeling Interior of old
section, installation af complete new oil-fired heating system uid
lavatories. The work being done by Vlesko and Post, general con
tractors, will make 2t classrooms available and will cost S17S,OO0.
(Statesman photo.)
Salem Order of
Purple Heart
Club Organized
William Exline was elected com
mander of Salem chapter 305, Mil
itary order of the Purple Heart, at
an organizational meeting here
Friday night.
Re-established by Gen. Douglas
MacArthur in 1932, the first order
of the Purple Heart was commis
sioned by George Washington in
1782.
Current aim of the new Salem
chapter is to bring in all of the
estimated 200 Marion county vet
erans who were awarded the Pur
ple Heart medal for wounds re
ceived in action. It was the first
medal authorized for enlisted men.
Gov. Douglas McKay, currently
a member of the order at Portland,
plans to transfer his membership
here, it was announced Friday.
Two Portland men commission
ed the Salem chapter. They are
Ray DorrTs, past national comman
der and Lester Hawkins, state
commander. The local chapter al
ready is receiving consideration
for the 1950 state convention, it
was reported.
Other Salem officers elected
Friday night were: Senior vice
commander, Verne Ostrander;
junior vice-commander Bernard
F. Kenny; ftnance officer and ad
jutant, Arthur G. Ring; chaplain,
Kenneth Ballweber; historian,
Wilfred Wilier; judge advocate,
Lyle Blackman. and sergeant-at-arms;
Arthur Arnold.
FAILURE HALTS TRAINS
NEW YORK. July 2 -UP)- Sig
nals failed along two-thirds of
New York City's vast subway sys
tem tonight, halting trains laden
with thousands of sweltering pas
sengers. Full service was restored
at 7:15 p.m. (EST).
The eastern timber wolf once
ranged east throughout the Atlan
tic states as far south as Georgia.
; DANCE
Saturday Nite
Aamsville Pavilioa
Featuring
Tommy His
Northwest Ramblers
t:3t to 12:3
It Miles S. E. of Salem
Old Time
DAIICE
Ever Sainrday
Ilighi
Over Western Anto
259 Court St.
Jobs the Crowd and Have s
Good Time
MUSIC BY
Ben's Orchestra
Pablie Dance
Adas.. COc. Ise. Tax
ENJOY
DANCING
TOIUTE .
t to
Wayne Slrachan'x
Ilnsic
vTWHall
Hood and Church SU.
-Tha Coolast Ballroom
Tho Bast Dane Hoar '
1 In Salon
Englewood School Enlarges
Twelve Infants Die
In Dysentery Seige
MATT AW A, 6nt., July 22-.T)
An epidemic of dysentery has kill
ed 12 infants, -sent six to hispitals
and stricken 40 to 50 others in
their homes, public and private
medical authorities reported to
day. Dr. J. A. Bergson, Mattawa's
medical health officer, said the
out-break has developed steadily
since mid-June. He urged parents
to boil all water before use and
keep food for infants away from
flies.
Ten Millions
Estimated in
Russ Bondage
GENEVA, Switzerland, July 22
(JP)- The British government ex
pressed belief today that 10,000,-
000 persons, a tenth pf Russia's
working population, are in Soviet
forced labor camps, and said it
had documentary proof that
rforced labor is the approved legal
policy of the Soviet Union.
The British delegate to the
United Nations economic and so
cial, council made public a set
of documents which he described
as Soviet laws and regulations
covering the forced labor policy.
In an accompanying statement
he said the persons exiled to
camps, often in remote, desolate
areas of Russia, are believed by
the British to represent "upward
of 10 per cent of the working
population of the Soviet Union."
i
Theatre
WOODBURN, ORE.
HOWnHBMBlOMMBHOlBM
Now Playing
"Northwest
StampadV'
And
"If I Know Susie"
Baseball Tonighl
Salem Senators
vs.
Bremerton
8:00 P. II.
WATERS FIELD
Box Seat Reservations
Phone J-4147
- An Apology
The
Salem Supper Club
Wishes to Apologize
To the People
Who Have Been Turned Away
and
To Announce the Opening
Of a New
Banquet and Dining Room
In About Six Weeks
To Acxommoelate Parties
Of Any Size
o
i ;
Now Featuring
"lovely Frances Conger
At the Piano land Solo vox
end
Nick Marino's
Famous Italian Food
Jnst West of galena Toward
2-S242
J
Suspect Red
Eludes Press
OKLAHOMA CTYJuly 22 -
(JP)- Giovannie Rossi Lomanitz,
accused of communist activities
by the house un-American activ
ities committee, sat atop a 110 foot
water tower in 100 -degree tem
peratures today to avoid talking
with newsmen.
The un-American a c 1 1 v i t i es
committee has charged Lomanitz,
now 28, was the principal com
munist party organizer among a
group of young scientists working
on part of the atom bomb project
at Berkeley, Calif, in the early
1940s.
Lomanitz now is working as a
$1.20 an hour laborer at the Okla
homa Gas and Electric company's
Mustang power plant being built
northwest of here. When fellow
workers told him this afternoon
that a reporter and a photogra
pher wanted to talk with him.
Lomanitz scaled he steel girders
of the water tank and remained
perched atop it until they left
hours later.
Doors Open 1:0 P-M. for .
Hollywood Kids Club
Stage Program
Drawing for Prises
Cartoons Serial
Special Matinee Feature:
-TEXAS JAMBOREE"
with the Hoosler Hotshots
also
Benton's Birthday Cake
For
Jack Maxwell. Barbara Hupp,
Clarence Chris man, Jan Tbede,
Bob Jarvill, Bonnie Swart r,
Herbert Graves, Bobby Miller,
Joan Bnehanan. Mareia Hewitt
Nancy VYaite. Janet Chapet
Frank Worden. Lorraine Owen,
Eddie Hamilton. Rose marie
Jones, Howard H oaken, Pat
ricia Godlove. .
Eve. Show Cent After 5:39 p.m.
ENDS TODAY.
"I WONDER WHOS KISSING
HER NOW"
"SEALED VERDICT
Starts Tomorrow - Cont 1:45
also "SEC GUN MUSIC"
HEY KIDS!
CLIP THIS AD
FOR
ONE FREE
ADIIISSION
To Show Grounds On Our
Special School
Children's Matinee
State Falrgroands
18th St Entrance
July 23rd and 24th
r pjn. to S p jb.
9'
ALL HIDES
To School
Co Children at the
Special Matinee
SEE ... The 4 Baritt'es special
serial performance at 4 TJL
I
Follow the) Twin
Gun M
lights to tho 21? Show!
Home Repair
Costs High in
County Towns
Repairs to homes in Salem and
other Marion county cities will
u
total $1,884,000 during 1949, ac-f
cording to an estimate released I
Friday by the Tile Company of I "
America.
And J. Harold Davis, Salem's
city engineer, thought the figure j
was "about right." Big as it
sounds, though, he said that build
ing permit totals here are running
11 behind last year, and pulled
oat a sheaf of statistics to prove it
Dwelling unit permits for the
first six months of this year total
ed but 132. compared with 244 for
the same period last year. In
these figures a duplex is consid
ered two units, and each apart
ment in a multiple dwelling adds
to the total.
Big construction followed th
same trend, Davis noted, with 15
permits of $25,000 or more issued
during the first half of last year,
and 13 up to June 30 this year.
Davis thought there was less
speculative building here this
year, while many people, he said,
seem to be waiting, uncertain just
what to do.
The tile council survey indica
ted 30 per cent of the money spent
on home repairs here would be
for heating equipment with paint
ing and redecorating accounting
for 24 per cent and roofing about
18 per cent A check on these
figures is not possible at the en
gineer's office since totals are not
broken down in this manner.
Plumbing and tiling of bath
rooms will avount for $7 of every
$100 spent for repairs and replace
ments, the survey continued, with
carpenters getting $5. Home re
pairs throughout the United States
are expected to total $2,500,000 to
$3,100,000.
Free Shetland Pony
Rides for the Kid
dies Starting Daily
' At t P. M.
Marjorte Main
Percy Kilbride
Richard Long
Meg Randall
Ma it Pa Kettle"
o
Dick Powell
Lizabeth Scott
"PITFALL"
COMPLETE 07L
SHOW AFTER
10:55 PJA.
-ggvrwa
Mat Dally from 1 F.M.
Kings Of The
Olympics"
Cont from 1 P.M.
HELD OVER!
NOW SHOWING!
Thrill Co-ntt!
Maria Montes
Jon llall Tarhaa Bey
"AH Boba & 40 Thieres"
KARTOON
KARNTVAL
Tomorrow
At Ul with
Reg. Show
Last Tims Today I
Randolph Scoff
"CUNO HO"
Robert Stack
"EAGLE SQUADRON
l Late Owl Show loniio. 1
mat. Daily rrom l rM. e
IBS
Ice Skaie Tcnigll!
and orery nloht except Sunday
' t
SALEII ICE ADEiiiV
S10 No. Capnol
Gorilla Killed in
Fight tcith Panther
SPOKANE, July! O Mfl. A
black panther and a 300-pound
gorilla locked on a bloody two
hour Tight tonight after the cat
slipped under the gate of an ad
joining cake at a l traveling wild
animal show. ':
The gorilla was finally shot and
killed after attendants made vain
attempts to get thel animals
apart They fotuzht in i a heavv
6x8 foot cake at hearbv Libertr
lake. j
Riaht Now
Doris Day
Jack Carson in
"MY DREAM I
IS TOUltS- I
- and-
lllSOEli
Healthfully AhCondtJoned.
L
LAST TIMES TODAY I
The Strotton Story'
and "Feathered Serve
starts TOMORROW I A
Drrrcp rnnFRPV
$m mt Item Mi
ALDOt r tACHAtT f
SMKCOH!
And! ,
"This Theatre V Tea"
' f
Color CartoOn
Hoose of Tomorrow
Warner News
i in
Ii
) Randolph Scott In II J
"WALKING Jf I
' vv UILLS" iy J
V
(Ft' 1 V I
j r t V . I V Warner
If J I 1 Bros
I I - I B'8
HI a i .Summer
III f ,7 1 Hit
S - ' That'll
- V. ' Keep You
t. - lhing
1 h ' f 1 1 M I
I I II -X Winter! I
I somms vncoa I sooa
I
S7tl
Ftu48eS
1