The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, May 16, 1949, Page 11, Image 11

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    Shanghai Evacuees Reach United States
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AH FRANCISCO A mw Htlbi nationalities stand In Um tboard the liner President WUon as
It steasas p Sib TnirlK bey Ma 14). bringing Um from Communist-threatened Shanghai. Most
t the paaenera hold their pa porta for clearance by immigration authorities. ( AP Wirephoto te tho
Htatf
Rodeo Producer Is Hurt
-
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UVERMORE, Califs Mar IS Ilia far battered. Harry J. Kowell.
57. on of the weota best known rodeo producers is comforted by
' companions after Row ell's horse fell with him and pitched him 45
feet down-a bank. It took IS hoars to get him to a hospital at
I J vermore. Calif., near the soono of the accident. His Injuries were
eriona. (AP Wirephoto to The Statesman). 1
SHS Science Fair to Feature
Ceiger Counter, Guinea Pigs
Guinea pigs and Genjer counters, photographs and collections of
It irU will be up ffi public view Tuesday evening; at Sa'em hmh
lt -t . a students present a Science fair, first bt its jk'tnd here. The
hittt will be from 7 ? to 9 3 p m
The idea originated with th h ol Biology ilub. and the Science
and Photography club? ha.e joined in as co-sprnsort But students
from the entire schc-I are parti
ci(atin
Prizes are to be offeied t.ip n
tris in ki divisions . ( iiet tions,
live antmal. motle's. i if ftce pho
tography, plants and f o-rue pro
Jet u.
Auied for the an mal exhibit
are mink, some gu.r ea pigs and
Requirements
For Women
Mariijes Listed
hmpv 1 1 and some ea intmonM j Informatits regarding enlist-:
M-mbera cf the Sorint club, m-r.t of women in the marine'
will tiy to fchow how to make a corps has tcen roC!ed by M Sgt. j
teigM counter, wnicn measures! i.uis E. Pa:f.t"r who is in charge
Demo Bill Aims
To Cut Budget
By $3 Billion
Bv Jack Cell
WASHINGTON. May 15-i.-p.-A
bill to slice about S3.0O0.0O0.0O0
off federal operating funds is be
ing drafted by some democratic
members of the senate appropria
tions commit te
Disclosing this today. Senator
Russell (D-Ga) said it will pro
pose this cutback in money con
gress is expected to vote for the
fiscal year beginning July 1. The
aim is to avoid a huge deficit.
Only yesterday, congressional
tax experts estimated that the
government will run 000,000. 000
into the red in the coming fiscal
year, on the bas,s of proposed
budget expenditures. This is S2.
100.0O0.0iMJ more than' President
Truman hns estimated The ex
perts coos- the htgh'-r deficit fig
ure in anticipation of a revenue
decline.
The $3.000 .000.000 spending cut
bill was un ler preparation before
the $3,000,000,000 deficit estimate
was announced. Russell did not
say whether studies of the tax ex
perts had influenced the bill's
economy goal.
Ordered to Cut Costs
Senator Maybank (D-SC) said
tho reduction move will have his
whole-hearted support. Both he
and Russell have opposed republi
can moves to sena individual ap
propriations bills back to commit
tees with orders to cut operating
costs 5 per cent.
"We're trying to do as scien
tific a job as possib'e to cut ex
penses and try to balance the
budget." Russell told a reporter.
"It's the only v. ay we'll get an
real economy ."
As Ruell outlined if. it would
bo his plan to let the appropria
tions bills ko through the senate
in the regular way. without sup
porting the efforts republican
have said thev will make to en
force a 5 per cent cut in each
The house already has passed all
f h regular depar tmental money
bills b'it only one. the treaiir-postofn--t
measure, thus far has
cleare i the "lena'e
To Offer Reduction
When ie final bill arrive on
the striate floor. Russell said he
may otter his reduction proposal
as an mendmert.
"I think we'll get substantial
suppor for it." he s;i;d "Bv then
we will haea pre'ty good idea
of what the revenues are going t
be and w will kn.-w exactly what
congre- has appropriated. I think
it will be demonstrated that econ
omy will be necessary
R'iseM -.-1 he will make no
Federal Survey
Shows Oregon
Roads Deficient
SAVANNAH. Ga, May 14
Oregon's deficient highways were
cited by Deguty Commissioner J.
S. Bright of the-public roods ad
ministrator. Washington. D.C. to
day as one of the arresting reasons
why the United States must spend
$47 billions over a 10-year period
to meet the nation's existing trans
portation needs.
Bright told the American Road
Builders' association that surveys
made in eight states disclosed that
this group alone had highway de
ficienies needing immediate cor
rection in the amount of $6,627.
000.000. Oregon's particular re-
omrementc n-ere Jt?11 37 OOO to
improve .iu mues. ine otner
states studied were Illinois. Kan-
r- tr If isKiitn Vatt- T T i m k i ra
California. ermont and W ashing
ton. At Legislatures' Request
He emphasized that the surveys
were made at the regxiest of state
legislatures or the executive de
partments of state governments.
If the pattern of deficiency found
in 17 states holds true in the re
mainder of the 43 states, "the es
timated cost of correcting all the
highway deficiencies over a period
of 10 rears would be at least $47,
000.000.000." he said.
This means "that the rate of
highway construction expenditures
should be double the 1948 rate to
meet highway transportation
needs." he went on. In 1948, the
$1,569,000,000 which was spent by
all states, counties and cities on
highway construction work
amounted only to one-half the
sum President Truman suggested
as necessary in his economic re
port to congress in January of this
year.
Deficiencies Brought to Light
Deficiencies brought to light by
the state surveys. Mr. Bright said,
occur as follows: 55 per cent of
state highway mileage. 49 per cent
of county and local mileage, and
41 per cent of city streets need
immediate and considerable at
tention. State highways, while
they constitute only 10 per cent
of the nation's entire mileage,
carry 38 per cent of all traffic;
secondary and local roads, com
prising 81 per cent of the total
mileage, carry only 12 per cent;
and city streets, constituting only
9 per cent of the total mileage,
bear 50 per cent of all traffic.
"Improvements made a quarter
of a century ago. and now obsolete
because of traffic growth, hae
lung since paid for themselves,"
Mr. Bright pointed out. He urged
a better public understanding of
the ratio between the cost of high
ways and the cost of highway
transportation. Saving by restrict - '
ing expenditures in building is lost
through excessive vehicle operat
ing costs," he explained.
leacTtng wcam ob rrori to Install
him as the favorite in the four
cornered race.
Tammany has recognized the
election as crucial point in its
160-year existence. It has poured
workers into the 20th from all
over the borough.
The stock of the Manhattan
democratic organization reached a
low point Last year when it failed
to win an important fight in its
own bailiwick. It also was unable
to deliver the votes which would
have swung New York state to
President Truman.
A city election is coming up this
fall in which Hugo Rogers, Tarn
Polk County,
Dallas io Rule
On Time Issue
DALLAS. May 13 (Special)
Daylight saving time decisions are
expected to come to a head rapidly
in this Polk county seat Monday
and Tuesday.
many leader, will be a candidate ! The city council will decide the
for re-election as Manhattan issue at a regular meeting Mnndar
borough president. Mayor William
CDwyer, w ho also probably will i
seek a new term, already has i
snubbed Tammany.
Thus the organization desper
ately wants a victory Tuesday to
help its tattered prestige.
Tn4 Statsmncm. Bcimm, Orsxyon, Monday, May it 1I4H
"THE YOUNG IDEA" By Mossier
Economy Drive
Aims at Armed
Forces Raise
Br William F. Arbogast
WASHINGTON. May 15-r-A
multi-million dollar armed services
pay raise bill was threatened to
day with defeat in a congressional ! ws there will report for work on j
night, and the Polk county court
plans to follow Tuesday with a
decision that will govern the court
house. Both Mayor Hollis Smith, i
and County Judge C. F. Hayes !
said Sunday that they considered
acceptance of early time by the j
respective groups quite probable, j
Last year the courthouse and its j
tower clock, the town's principle
timepiece, lagged several days be- s
hind Dallas in adopting daylight
time. An informal poll of council- ,
men indicated a change of time is ,
favored only if this can be avoided j
this year, said Smith. A new Polk
county court has been seated since
last summer. ;
Meanwhile, the Willamette Lum- '
ber company mill here has an-
nounced adoption of early time i
simultaneously with Salem. Work
tl''
Tammany Hall
"'Stages Battle to
Beat FDR. Jr.
NEW YORK. May 15-,P-T m
rr. inv Hall is putting up the bat
tle of its life in trying to beat
Franklin D. Roosevelt, jr.. for con
gress in the 20th district special
election next Tuesday.
Tjmmarv leaders refused to
gr e h,m the liemix ratic nomina
tion in the district after the death
of tb veteran congressman Sol
Bloom, naming Municipal Court
Justice Benjamin Shaileck in
ste.id .
Unof vclt. lanky, handsome and
affabie. is runn-ng on the liberal
pa:tv and four freedoms party
tH kfK, He his drawn large
crowds at all of his appearances,
a!!-mpt to enforce blanket cuts on
asencies. He said the bill may
provide, for example, that depart
ments must cut their purchasing 7
per cent and their administrative
expenses 5 per cent.
They
such
have already
a project in
radioactivity;
accomplished
class work.
Other experiments will be going
on during the evening n physics,
chemistry and biology. Cutdes will
aid visitors tn finding the labora
tories. Also on display will be hobbies
of teachers, which aie to be in
trophy cases at the school atl
Tuesday.
Biology club members arranging
the rtow are Caroiyn MaUer,
chairman. Jim Todd, prizes. Mac
Morris, entrtes; Joyce Folsom.
teac!i!ts" hobbies; Dorothy Dyke.
Ky Perrin, Shir lev leupe. Jerry
Viilespie and Waldo Willeke
Club advisors are Irene Hollen
bet k. Biology; June Phdpott. Sci
ence; George Birrell and Carmeli
Barquist. Photography.
of recruiting here ?
Present age limits are 20 to 30
inclusive, and candidates must be
high school graduates, single
and without dependents. Those
accepted for enlistments of two.
three or four years will be sent
to a six-weeks boot ramp at
Pans Island. S C following which
90 per cent; will be assigned to
stations east of the Mississippi
river. j
Enlistments also are being ac
cepted for all men, again. Painter
said. A special drive is on for
18-year-olds for one-year enlist
ments. Further information is availa
ble at the recruiting office on the
second floor; of Salem post office.
i:
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COltfMHA tiwitllf, TACOMA, WASHINGTON
GEMC-JOll tares
laaaatli Falls
aa Frajaetaee
AM
tit
Lm Aaelea
Com Bay
Seattle
. S.6
res savimo on iovmi ra
THiHi Altt NO LOW I FARtSI
V. H. Switzr 450 N. Church SL
Phoo 2-UXS
clamor for economy.
The bill, product of months of
study by the house armed services
committee, comes to a vote in the
house next week.
The possibility of adverse action ;
on the bill was admitted by rep
resentatives Kilday (D-Tex), head
of a subcommittee that drafted it
the new schedule Monday.
i
'But, Pep. that's the wrong color te go with my sew parse ...
It's GREEN, seer
Your health
Writtesj by
Dr. Herman S.
Buodensen. M.D.
By Herman N. Bnndesen. M.D. cause the condition to subside more
Though goiter is by far the most rapidly.
and assigned him the job of pilot- common disorder of the thyroii
ing it through the house. gland, it is not the only disease
We are likely to have trouble ... .
getting it passed." Kilday told ! which can affect ll"
newspapermen. "It comes up at a Tns butterfly-shaped gland at
time when everyone is calling for the base of the throat is also sub
economy in federal spending. ' 3 to inflammation which, in
There are going to be objections 1 many instances. may produce
because the larper raise co to symptoms similar to those caused
dv toxic goner, uince. nowever.
services committee approved but
the facts justify this action."
The armed services committee
approved the bill last Friday by
unanimous vote, with Chairm3n
Vinson (D-Ga) openly predicting
that "it will be sniped at all along
the line."
The estimated cost for the first
full year of operation is $400,000,
000. Since the proposed raises
wouldn't go into effect until next
October 1. the estimated cost for
the fiscal vear ending Julv 1, 19.30
toxic goiter.
these disorders will not respond to
the treatment for goiter, it is al
ways necessary that they be cor
rectly diagnosed before they can
be dealt with successfully.
Root of Trouble
One of the conditions in which :
inflammation of the thyroid gland '
occurs is known as subacute thy-j
roiditis. Here it seems possib;0;
that an infection with a virus j
may be at the root of the trouble, j
Symptoms include pain and ten-
noincr aisoraer in wnicn inerej
is inflammation of the thyroii j
gland is struma lymphomatosa. In '
this condition, the entire thyioii
gland is usually involved. The
disease starts gradually and again
produces symptoms much like
those in toxic goiter. The thyroid
gland itself feels firm. This dis
order also is treated with X-'-ay.
If X-ray treatments do not caue
the condition to subside, an opera
tion is performed and a portion of
the thyroid gland removed.
Affects One Side
Still another type of thyroii
eland inflammation is called Rie
del's struma. This usually affects
only one side of the thyroid gland,
causing hard swellings. The gland
is usually fastened to the sur
rounding tissues. In most cases,
there l pressure of the thyroid
Deweys Meet
Queen Mdtlier
! LONDON. May 13-fP)-New
York's governor Thomas E. Dewey
and his wife met Queen Mother
Mary In Westminster abbey this
morning. j
i Dewey's private secretary said
Queen Mary greeted Gov. and Mrs.
; Dewey as they left the abbey. He
said the queen mother and the
Deweys "passed the timeof day."
Pressed for more information,
the secretary conferred with Dew
ey and then said: "The governor
regards it as a private ctnversa
, tion, not to be divulged."
The Deweys are in Britain on
the first leg of a F.uro.ean tour.
is $360,000,000. The annual cost is derness in the thyroid gland, slight gland on the surrounding struct-
expected to decline slowly.
The defense department endors
ed the bill. Kilday said that the
big increases for top ranks would
help meet private industry compe
tition for executives.
fever, and an increase in the sedi-; ures. such as the windpipe, so that
mentation rate which means that I shortness of breath may In? one of
The Roman emperor Claudius
took with him to Britain many
elephants, camels and African
black men with which his generals
defeated the Britons, in 43 B.C.
The first life insurance policy
on record was issued in England
in 1583.
the blood cells settle out of the
blood faster than normal.
There also may be symptoms :
like those in toxic goiter, rapid,
heart beat, nervousness, sweating.;
and loss of weight and strength.
However, the basal metabolism
rate is not raised a!ove normal
as is always the case in toxic goi
ter. The basal metabolism rate
refers to the srjeed with which the : actly what form of
the symptoms of the disease In
this condition. X-ray treatment
are of little value However, sur
gical removal of the affected arci
of the thyroid gland relieves the
pressure and the condition rapidly
subsides.
Of course, these thyroid disturb
ances demand prompt attention by
the physician who will decide ex-
treatment
Individual
Nine big dams of the TV'A stair
step the Tennessee river in its
6"0 mile, course from Knoxville
to its mouth on the Ohio river and
Paducah. Kn. I-
nes on arising In the morning?
I have a full, bloated feeling after
meals, and some pain oii the left
side of my alxlomen. i
Answer: The symptom you de
scribe may be due to some bowel
inflammation or to a stomach dis
order. You are In need of a thorough
chemical activities go on in the; should be used in the individual j siuay. including jv-rays oi nm
body. Subacute thyroiditis usuatly ! case. stomach, bowel, and gallbladder,
clears up without treatment. How- QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS (Copyright. 1949, King Features
ever. X-rav treatments seem to A Reader: What causes dizzl- Syndicate, Inc.)
There's a
Home in
Your
Future
IT
"J
sa, 1 m . m m i
What ever your income there's a home in your
future! It's the right way to raise your family . . .
it's the right way to save money. Your home will
provide security, both while your children are
young and when it's time to retire. Investigate your
chances of owning a home now . . . they're good!
f -,.,;r' 4 1
.-an tm I
z--i. . "r-u ksz-jb ,9 7- ie
The right way to find a
horn la through the Ore
gon Statesman Classified
Ads, What Tr your
means, what erer your
needs there's a horns list'
ed today that will meet
your requirements.
House hunt the easy
way, find your futuro
horn In ths Statesman
classified ads.
FIND YOUR HOME IN THE
n n
Mil
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