The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, May 11, 1949, Page 7, Image 7

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    to
omimrin
by most ! that Siam would need
much more than ! its customary
palace revolution to bring about a
Iorrromnt favorable to the com
munist philosophy.
As for Burma, that tortured land
is split live or more ways with
varied armies fighting In anarchic
abandon.: Recently there have been
reports the strong tribal Karens
are considering Joining forces with
the white flag communists (the
Moscow brand). Whether they'll be
strong enough to handle the other
fighting groups is something else
again. u
Gala Cpser Head
In Malaya the British military
seem to be getting: the upper hand
in Jungle fighting against Chinese
communist guerrillas. The oppor
tunity for stronger communist ac
tio can only come about, it is be
lieved, it communist Irregulars
can reach Malaya over the Siam
ese border.
Singapore itself,! although 83 per
cent Chinese in population, is
calm. There is no: terrorism there.
There is no timetable for forth
coming events. Most western ob
servers believe firm action can
hold back communism, but they
seem certain that rough weather
and protracted struggle is just
around the corner.
'is
War Troubled Southeast Asia
n sr ' : rwi - 1 1
sees luore 1 roume
., Chinese Commuriists Drive
Br MHtea If si si
BANGKOK, Siam. May 10 -VP)
The rich lands of southeast Asia.
. basking in the eternal summer of
the tropics, already are beginning
to shiver in the first gusts of the
1 winds of communism blowing in
k from the north.
The Chinese communists are
, driving down to Canton and there
,1s hardly a foreign observer, a
Chinese merchant, or a persistent
taxi driver who doesn't ask?
What of tomorrow for already
turbulent French IndoChina, Bur
ma. Siam and Malaya?
There are 65.000.000 people In
the 800.000 or so square miles of
southeast Asia and very few of
them, it seems, want commun
ism. But all are caught in the
fever of hustiry making changes
and all seem' to feel that the
.future will bring a new pattern
.of existence.
The view most often expressed
la that the third world war has
long been under way in Asia,
but is being fought with entirely
new methods. Instead of open at
tacks by one nation on another,
the attacked nation is struck from
within by foreign-inspired revo
lution. These revolts take various
shapes, ranging from terrorist
, guerrilla raids to full scale civil
'war with huge armies in the field.
Civil War Treablee
French IndoChina has been
rent by civil war - for several
.years. The forces of communist
trained Ho Chi Minn control most
of the territory of the three Viet
namese provinces: Tonkin in the
north. Annuo in the center and
Cochin China in the south. The
- French military and its sponsored
central provisional government
control the cities.
From the military point of view,
both aides admit a stalemate. But
what will happen when the Chin
,ese communists are" on the north
ern IndoCHina border?
The French hope the return of
the former Emperor of Annam,
Bao Dai. may rally enough of Ho
Chi Minh's nationalist patriots to
the provisional government to off
set the VietmiruYs present and fu
ture strength. In the eyes of most
observers this is but a hope.
Should Indochina go the way of
China, the next question mark is
.Slam.
Slam Qeestien Mark
None seriously thinks the, com
munists have any great strength
now in Siam. THe Siamese people
f enerally have no interest in polir
ics. They have a rich country and
few starve, although the living
standard is not high by western
standards.
But Siam is noted in recent his
tory as a malleable land and its
governments are considered -quick
te bend with the wind. In the last
war it. quickly capitulated to the
Japanese and collaborated.
Of Siam's 17.500,000 residents,
,some 5,000.000 are Chinese with
-ties to their homeland. They are
organized into societies and on
certain holidays display excellent
ly organised parades. It is doubted
; .
It
k :
Price of CARE
Packets Down
CARS parcels destined lor Ber
lin will drop back! to their original
prices with the ; lifting of the
blockade, an announcement from
the gift parcel organization's New
York City headquarters disclosed
Tuesday.
Extra shipping charges of $1.50
will be eliminated on the 22-pound
food parcel, making the cost $10
effective Friday. May ! Refunds
will be made on j orders received
after that data which have re
mitted at the higher rate. The 10
pound lard package will be 75
cents cheaper, while baby food
and textile packages will' be flO
each.
Foreclosure Suit
Affirmed by Court
The state supreme court Tues
day affirmed a decree of the Mar
ion county circuit j court In which
Mrs. Marie Mumper won her suit
to foreclose a $2,000 mortgage.
Mrs. Mumper's suit was against
Mrs. Lewis C. Matthes, adminis
tratrix of her deceased husband's
estate, end Katharine Mumford
and Homer L. Mumford.
Circuit Judge C M. Page of
the Marion county circuit court
held in favor of Mrs. Mumper.
Justice James T. Brand wrote the
supreme court opinion.
The human brain contains from
nine to IS billion nerve ceils and
neurons.
! 1
Preparing for End of Berlin Blockade
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Helmetedt. Oeraaaar, May It A mobile erase lifts a workman high en a telephone pole which be
ts -r at a British check-paint at Be hasted t aa preparations seared eampletlea today fee the
Ilfttag mt the Berlin hlackade ea May 12. . (AT vTtrepfeete e wwwwi,
.car:
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A
SEW YORK At 111 as Inter's slab here, Chie Yeang. creator ef the
world-faaasas eeeate strip. "Bleaie". reeetvee the BUlj Be Beck
Meaaerlal award aa the ewieiessalng eartaaaht ef 14. The silver
ela-aret hex award, ess-raved with the cheeaasera freea Ranter
GeecU. la voted enee each year br aae sabers ef the Natteaal Car
teeaists' society, and was proasated by Mrs. Mary DeBeek Berg
saaa. widew ef the Ute earteealst. Left U right are Cartoonist AJ
Cape. Mrs. Berasaaa and Mr. Yeang.
Darlene Eugdahl
Wins Scholarship
For Year's Study
Aa art scholarship by Scholas
ti, a national magazine, haa been
awarded to Darlene Engdahl. 17,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. M.
Engdahl of 178S Park ave., as a
result of her work entered In a
nation-wide high school art eon
test. Miss Engdahl, a senior at Salem
high school, has been majoring in
art for eeveral years and la pro
ficient in most phaaee of the sub
ject. The soholarship will enable
her to attend the Rudolph Schaei
fer school of design in San Trmm
deco for one yeer, and Is subject
to renewal upon satisfactory work.
Miss Engdahl will specialize in in
terior design.
25e. SSS V
i 9'
Rust is trichy, T.lr. Jones
tX3
W11 have that hinra loom and you'U be off to tha party quick,
Mr. Jonas) . . . but ruat--wkich cornea from tha oondanaatioa of
apor as your angina cool asT-ia not so simple. It can causa up to
80 of all motor waax. That's why RPM Motor OH ia specially
cooapounded to rust-proof as It lubricatas by coatinf pistons sod
cylinder walls with a praisciivs film soother raason why it's
fim choice m tb Woatl
We take better care off your car
' v.
I sassw- - js
mum
IK-'
Phillips Joins
Budget Group
Rex Klmmell and Charles McEl
biany will continue as members
of the Salem budget committee,
as a result of action taken by the
city council Monday night, and
William L. Phillips will replace
Gardner Knapp who will be ab
sent from the city during budget
meetings.
i The council also declined to act
favorably on a petition of Jl bar
bers for a barbershop schedule of
a a.m. to i p.m.
; The council, in other actions:
Approved applications of the
Court Street Christian church and
the Church of God for permission
to construct additions; adopted
resolutions favoring the improve
ment of Mountain View drive
from Candalaria to Hanson, Madi
son from Cottage to Winter, and
favored the widening of Union
from Capitol 460 feet east and
of Marion from Capitol to 12th.
AAF Reserve
To Return to
Portland Base
PORTLAND, May l-VPh The
Portland air force base wf3 go
back into use July 1 as a reserve
training center,; Li- Col. Jackson
W. Lewis amiounced here today.
The commanding officer of the
2345th air force icserTe training
center at McChord Field said the
70 buildings at the base damaged
la last year's flood would be re
novated at a cost of about $500,000.
He said It would be one ef S3
to be activated throughout the
country.
The center will have an author
ized strength of 1041 airmen and
427 officers of the reserve. In
addition there will be 50 regular
air force officers, 450 enlisted men
and 190 civilian employes, he said.
It- will be a medium troop car
rier outfit, equipped with nearly
SO multi-engined planes, Lewis
continued. He will command the
unit.
Road Damage
Biggest in West
Part of State
Western Oregon highways suf
fered more damage than those In
eastern Oregon as a result of the
past winter's severe weather. State
Highway Engineer R. H. Baldock
reported here following his re
turn from a six-day read tour by
members of the state highway
commission.
The commission covered approx
imately 1,700 miles, Baldock said,
and visited several southern and
southeastern Oregon counties. He
declared the state now has a large
number of maintenance crews la
the field.
Baldock estimated that K will
eoet the state $2,600,000 to repair
the damage to its highways with
the counties faced with even larg
er expenditures. Some counties, he
said, will have no funds for new
road construction because of the
maintenance and repair oosta. -
TySlotsnan. ?W Oroym. Wadnosdar. May 11. M-J
Co. Road Fund
Gls 5100,000 Loan
The Marion county road fund
had an extra $100,000 in Its cof
fers Tuesday, received from the
state under terms of a bin passed
by the recent' legislature which,
permits counties, to borrow front
state funds. The bill was passed
to aid counties in repairing roads
damaged by the severe weather oi
the past winter. :
Repayment of the loan will start
in 1950 at the rats of $50,000 i
year. -, '
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!OlVMBIA SKIWIftllf, NC. O fACOSsA, WASHINST0M
i
X. I. du Pont de Nemours, Mead
of Thomas Jefferson, learned to
make gun-powder from Lavoisier,
chemist and superintendent of the
French government powder works.
Eofl fcsnranco I . .
Uo Save M
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OI spselna Issseeeet to lea as ess la est IscUirr lee wistfa
Had Insmnss eat awedsv beery as hwe arafM. Ask ssbewt
M 4ss7
INSURANCE
tra n.
Inleaa
! Phone Mill
tau Sedeaa. Coos Bar. Myrtle Peent. Oei4 leesek
CUSTOMZ PAUmia AT OUB NEW LOCATlOrf
PILE THE
1
Hundreds of telephone pcoplo In tho
Vest keep night patrol tc help moot
emergencies and kocp scrvico reliable
i
x. iMrtasM n't stop th ialapkoQs mssi m tSkay
basist am importsml stnarrsosy anbls npsir a Blf&tu
ForsmaxtaIy thass ss&asncisj ssr net gcsnsvc...ea.
By hm rapairsd la dsjlfcht. Bat. mp and dovm fen
tmtpbtmm will work for yov whan jro wwrt tX
If
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2. One) importsuit nlrht-Uma job is don by this elec
tronic tester. It checks lines to make stirs they're) ia
rood shape. At the game time, other telephone men are
acuum cleaning; and inspecting; sen si tire switching;
equipment... you might any ifs stopping trouble before
it start. And night is the beat tune to do it, while most
"sssesxueeBsJi
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4. Yo eemlel; YTjoreelfgthem
your teliphntie.a eerrant that ia oonstantly
Krowina; in vmlna. You can do it by using the
telephone ia the most eSoent way: being
aura of the right nmnber before yon call...
girins tha called person plenty of time to
rat to the telepbrjB...pedny your calls so
othera may gat a call through to you. '
3. In the quiet henurs of the night operatora handle
ralatiTely lew calls . . . but many of them are vitally im
portant. Repairmen are onj call for service on important
Hnes...doctors, hospitals and the like. Garagemea check
and equip trucks for the next day's installation rounds.
Building; service workers make offices epic and span...
H a part of providing good. reliahU service to you.
Tb Pacific Tc!c:::no
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0
and Tcbgrcph Cc;:ny
Your telephone i one of today t
biggest bargains