The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, December 17, 1932, Page 2, Image 2

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    PAGE TWO
Tha OREGON STATESMAN. Salem. Oregon. Saturday Morning. December 17. 1932
SUIT STARTED
SPUME
Charge $3.90 per Thousand
' Rate is Both "Excessive
And Prohibitive"
(Continued from put 1)
Introduce evidence. It to aald
showing tha rates ara tar higher
than similar charge by other
common eaniera for hauling Ion
a much shorter distance. He la
also expected to show evidence
that earnings of the Valley
Biletc line bare been excessive.
It was this railroad for which
the Oregon Electrlo offered $2,
00,000 In 1930, a proposed sale
which was rejected by the later
state commerce commission In an
order November 23, 1931. The
commission held the price agreed
upon was excessive, being $750,
000 above the read's fixed cap
ital. Tbe commission also stated
that tbe Southern Pacific gave
adequate connection for haulers
who desired to use the Valley &
Siletz and that an unneeded ex
penditure of $457,000 would be
required by the Oregon Electric
to bridge the Willamette river
at Independence and build a two
mile connecting line with the
Oregon Electric on the east bank
"of the river.
IS
(Continued frorz puce 1)
Humphreys, greatly agitated,
ran about five blocks to summon
Dr. II. A. Beauchamp, who went
immediately in his car. W. A.
Weddle, deputy coroner, arrived
on the scene shortly. Early this
evening Weddle announced that
there would be no inquest.
Was Pitcher On
Lotion Ball Team
Rodger Champ was born In
Washington March 28, 1915, and
with his parents came to Stayton
10 or 11 years ago. He was a sen
ior at Stayton high this year, and
was a popular youth, well liked
and bright. He had not previous
ly been in trouble. Humphreys is
also a high school student, al
though of necessity he has been
out of school a great deal this
year.
Rodger was a pitcher on the
American Legion baseball team
Isst funmier.
His mother says Rodger was
riding a bicycle on the ice and
fell, hurting his head. As result
of this injury he was in bed all
day Monday.
Beside hia parents, the youth
leaves a brother Donald and two
sisters, Doris and Kathleen. No
funeral arrangements have been
made.
T
L
(Continued from paga 1)
slick that keeping an automobile
on the crown of the roadway was
virtually impossible.
Broken wheels, smashed radiat
ors and crushed fenders resulted
from a number cf accidents occur
ring in the city a3 persons drove
to work over the glaze of ice and
frozen slush. In the three acci
dents which the drivers reported
to city police, none of the car oc
cupants was Injured.
Immediate resumption of river
boat traffic was not probable as
the banks still were lined with ice
which will soon bo breaking up
and floating downstream if the
warmer temperatures continue.
City fire trucks were equipped
with chains yesterday for the first
time this year.
I
T
(Continued from pare 1)
tion Army "lassies" ringing their
bells by the street corter kettles,
and from other sources.
"While we are receiving still
more names, we already have
more oa our lists than we can
supply with Christmas food next
week." said Adjutant Parsons.
"We hope that the last few days
wilt bring In sufficient funds to
enable us to kok after the
many families In need."
Drain on the Army's supply of
clothing has been so heavy that
little other than rags ia left.
Overcoats and shoes are most in
demand.
Stone Talks of
Europe ; Defends
Nation's League
Speaking before an audience
f 200 persons at the Y. M. C. A.
last night, Harry W. Stone, retir
ed Portland Y secretary, told of
eoditlons in 12 European conn-!
tries, using as his topic, "The
Hot Spots in Europe." Sixty per
ions were present at a dinner
tn the banqaet room preceding
the address.
Stone gathered his impressions
of these countries while making
a ttly with the Sherwood Eddy
party last summer. Throughout
his talk he touched on all of
the important controversial
points between European nations.
Hs spoke decisively In favor of
the l9ague of nations and some
of th steps ft has taken.
W. I. Staley presided at the
gathering;. Trumpet solos were
, Clven by Wesley Roeder accom
. faniei by Doris Ross.
MI
Ml
Ml
1
EM TODAY
GOODWILL
FUND
IS FULLING SIB
i
OLDEST CITIZEN IS MOURNED
' .i ":
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A' vi
JOSEPH A.
Joseph A. Baker, Salem's
Oldest Citizen, Passes on
o-
(Continued from paga 1)
fornla, where his father had filed
ou acreage while in the mines,
prevented tho coming true of the
dreams of young Joseph about be
coming a doctor. He learned the
trade of harness and saddlo mak
ing: then was the town's police
man, afterward city marshal, and
finally sheriff of Marion county,
which place he held for two terms,
from 1876 to 1880. He married
Frances Emma Lamb, March 2,
1865, and they had a happy wed
ded liTe that extended over a
stretch of mare than 67 years.
Miss Lamb, with her people,
were among the first passengers
over the Tunama railroad, after
it was finished in 1853. She came
to Salem from California to re
gain her then failing health, along
with the ramily of Mr. Strong,
who was at the time. 1862, build
ing the first telegraph line joining
Oregon with California and the
rest of the world.
AmoDg the schoolmates at the
Oregon Institute of young Joe
Baker were John and Lafayette
Lane, sons of General Joe Lane,
along with many then youngsters
whose names were written large
across the pages of Oregon his
tory. Lafayette Lane served his
state in congress.
Joseph A. Baker held many po
sitions of trust in official and
business life here. He was a part
ner with K. M. Wade & Co., pio
neer hardware and machinery
dealers of Salem, Mr. Wade after
ward being one of the wealthiest
wholesale merchants of Portland.
He was a director of the Williams
& England bank of Salem. He was
active in many lines up to a few
years ago, and a considerable
holder of. real property in the
capital city. He lived a life of
strict honesty and great industry,
and he has left a high mark on
the life of the city with which he
grew up from small beginnings.
In the old days, he was a member
of one of the pioneer bands, and
in every worth while community
enterprise he was affiliated for
three generations.
Up to the very last, Mr. Baker
retained his remarkable memory.
He was the greatest repository of
information concerning pioneer
days and people, and in this re
spect, as in others, his going will
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BAKER
leave a place that cannot be filled.
Funeral services will take place
this afternoon at 3:15 o'clock
from Rigdon's mortuary, with
Rev. W. C. Kantner officiating.
Interment will be in the I. O. O. F.
cemetery.
A prominent Salem man tele
phoned last evening, saying all Sa
lem should honor the name of her
oldest citizen; suggesting that
business places might be closed at
least for a short period during the
funeral services.
. EIST STILL
(Continued from race I)
with rain in south Texas.
Kentucky Man frozen to death
at Barlow. It was 12 below at
Carrollton with zero weather re
ported over the state.
Ohio Five dead, two by coast
ing; Mahoning river frozen for the
first time in years.
Illinois Several dead from ex
treme cold, trains hours behind
schedule, 16 below and coldest in
25 years at Hoopeston, four inches
of snow in southern section.
FALL RELATIVE FOUND
In answer to his recent news
paper request for information con
cerning relatives of William Fall,
killed in action in 1918, William
Bliven, adjutant of Capital post,
American Legion, yesterday re
ceived word from Mrs. Rovena
Fall Davidson, now living at Cor
nelius, Ore., saying that she was
the Rovena Fall who lived in Sa
lem during the war and was a sis
ter of William Fall. Bliven relayed
this information to the war de
partment, which bad requested It
AGED COUPLE ILL
GERVAIS, Dec. 16 Mr. and
Mrs. Martin Dietrich are both ill
at this time. Their children who
live in other cities have been call
ed home. Mr. and Mrs. Dietrich
celebrated their golden wedding
anniversary two years ago.
M
SUFFER FIM COLD
OF TOEWEST m I y'J
KIH FESTIVAL
ISWHUTI1D
Veried Program U Offered
By High School Bands
And Vocal Groups
erowd of. 750 high school
students and parents from most
of th cities and towns la Marlon
eonntr, attended the musical fes
tival held la tbe Salem high
school auditorium last night, Tbe
well-enjoyed program was spon
sored by the Marlon County
School Principals' association and
arranged by Miss Lena Bella Tar
tar, head of tha mnsle department
of Salem high school.
Choruses, bands and orchestras
from AumsYtlle. Mill City. Salem,
SllTerton and Woodbunr partici
pated In the program, which
ended by the singing of Christmas
carols alternately led by the Tari
ons schools. Particularly enjoyed
was the music rendered by tbe
Sllverton band, which, although
depleted by tbe loss of 10 mem
bers who were unable to be pres
ent, played through Its numbers
without hesitation. Also deserving
special mention were the efforts
of Miss Helen Purrine, of Salem,
with her violin. She was heartily
encored at the conclusion of her
performance.
The stage was decorated beaut!
fully with a setting reminiscent
of a cathedral choir room, when
the curtains were opened. With
the curtains closed as was the
case during the quartet and other
vocal numbers an equally fine ef
fect was procured by varl-colored
lights and Christmas trees at each
end of the stage. Throughout the
auditorium the colored lights
were also placed.
Miss Ruth Brauty. teacher in
the art department at Salem, had
charge of the stage setting, while
John Llndon placed the electrical
fittings.
PLEAS FOB BUS
( Continued from pas 1)
Governor Moore said earlier today
he would receive the officers
when he returns to his Trenton
office Monday.
The Georgia warden said the
Burns case was "just a matter of
business" for him. He declared
his state wanted Burns only to
serve his term, which, he added,
now Is four years, six months, 24
days. The author of a book des
cribing his experiences was sen
tenced to six to 10 years for rob
bery in 1922, escaped a few
months later and was rearrested
in Chicago seven years later.
The fugitive was arrested again
in Newark Wednesday night and
is now being held in default of
$25,000 bail.
Hardy denied Burns ever had
been treated with cruelty as he
had written in the book that gavo
him national prominence. Asked
if he had read the book, Hardy
said he bought it yesterday, but
had not had a chance to read it.
Meanwhile, telegrams poured
Into the state from all sections
of the country asking Governor
Moore not to grant extradition.
MILLER'S CAROLS START
The annual Christmas caroling
at Miller's department store will
begin this morning with a pro
gram from 8:45 to 9 o'clock for
which Earl Jennison will be the
soloist. The managers each year
Invite all persons interested to
visit the store th mornings of
the week before Christmas to hear
carols sung by the 50-voice chorus
of employes.
LAST TIMES
REACH
ssaiaajasaaaawaBBBaaMB
3
The Call
Board
Bj OLIVE M. DOAR
WARNER BROS. ELSIKORB
Today Tallnlah Bankhead
and Robert Montgomery la
"Faithless." Midnite Pre-
view "Red Dust."
WARNER BROS. CAPITOL
Today Randolph Scott In
Zane Orey story.
GRAND
Today Marlon Nixon ia
"Rebecca of Sunny Brook
Farm".
THE HOLLYWOOD
Today Bill Cody in "Mason
of the Mounted".
Leoffler is Given
6 Months and $500
Fine But Appeals
WOODBURN. Dec. 16 Tried
before Judge Overton today on
charge of drunken driving. Jack
Leoffler of Portland was found
guilty and fined $500 and sen
tenced to six months In Jail.
Leoffler immediately appealed
the case.
Defendant, the night of No
vember 29, ran his car into a
machine driven by Dr. L. R.
Springer. Witnesses Included
Louis Ruzicka, former local mar
shal. Officer Leverldge of the
state police, Mrs. Leoffler and
Jack Leoffler. John Mlnto band!
ed the defense case, and Deputy
District Attorney Lyle Page the
state s case.
Nellie Robinson
Elected Head of
Royal Neighbors
SCOTTS MILLS. Dec. 16 The
Royal Neighbors at their regular
meeting Wednesday afternoon
elected the following officers: Or
acle, Nellie Robinson; vice oracle,
Margraeth Fry; past oracle, Nel
lie Amundson; recorder, Pauline
Swartout; receiver, Reva Dent;
chancellor, Grace Dart; inner sen
tinel, Annette Hicks; outer senti
nel, Elva Landwlng; marshal,
Doris Hogg; musician, Edith
Hogg; manager, Vina Losinger;
physician. Dr. Hume; delegate to
the state camp convention, Nellie
Robinson; alternate, Mrs. Jennie
Saueressig.
14 Chix Are Hatched
In Coldest Weather
OAK POINT, Dec. 16 Mrs
G. A. Peterson had a hen steal
her nest out and comt off with
14 Buff Orphington baby chicks
during this cold spell. Aside from
two freezing to death, the hatch
is doing nicely.
SAWDUST SHORTAGE FEARED
Possibility of further snowfall
here is giving anxiety to large
consumers of hog fuel and saw
dust. Already the available sup
plies have dwindled dangerously
and continuation of the cold
weather would cause all mills pro
ducing; the fuel to shut down, it
is said. Cordwood is being used in
stead of hog fuel to keep up steam
in boilers of many downtown
buildings. The T. M. C. A., which
suffered a serious fuel shortage
last winter, has a 100-load re
serve of hog fuel in storage at
West Salem. Th Portland Gen
eral Electric company switched
over to oil at its steam plant here
two months ago.
TODAY I
ZANE GREYS
greatest western
thriller I
HEMTAGlc tft
'DEJECT
EASDOLPU SCOTT
Auy a lam
XMMtUUC0ONAL .rtSiff
STARTS
It's Real-
neVWSBBBBBBSBBBHlSftMAi
A drama oi ra domnti . . Brutally
nal . . . ft will send th bood povnd
ing fhrovQ your veins ond sef V to
your deepest amononsf
With TOM DROWN
ROCHELLE HUDSON
ALSO
A IASQURS COMEDY
THB BRIDE'S BEREAVEMENT'
BOSWELL SISTERS XKWS
pi
IJIU Ui
SCHEDULE TODAY
Decrease la the occurrence of
smallpox and diphtheria cases.
noted here this year. Is not less
bnt rather all the more reason for
parents to have tht-tr children im
munised against both, declared
Dr. Vernon A. Douglas, county
health officer, yesterday In an
nouncing the toxoid and vaccina
tion clinle to be held at the health
center, 201 Ma?ontc building, be
tween 8:30 and 10 o'clock this
morning.
'We find." said the doctor.
''that when there are few cases of
smallpox or diphtheria, fewer
children come for immunisation;
then an epidemic does break out
because of thi slack of immun
isation."
Dr. Douglas and Miss Margaret
McAIplne, Miss Grace Taylor and
Miss Juanita JoJhnson, health
nurses, yesterday finished admin
istering first doses of toxoid, for
diphtheria immunization, to Salem
school children for the present
year. About 130 children were
treated. The second doses will be
given at the health center on Jan
uary 6. In the spring, these chil
dren will be given Schick tests to
determine whether or not the tox
oid has taken effect.
The next major activity of the
health staff will be to give further
tuberculin tests to grade school
children. Already during 1932,
1650 students, mostly ia the sen
ior and junior high schools, have
been tested for tuberculosis. Dr.
Douglas found that around 15 per
cent showed positive reactions ne
cessitating examinations under
the fluoroscope at the state tuber
culosis hospital. A few were later
x-rayed.
Veterans Plan
Yuletide Party
A Christmas party to which
all local veterans who received
service wounds, and their fam
ilies, are invited, will be held by
Salem chapter No. 6. Disabled
American veterans, at Yew Park
hall, 12th and Leslie streets, at
7:30 o'clock next Wednesday
night, the new commander, Ed
ward L. Clark, announced yester
day. The program, not yet com
pleted, will consist of enter
tainment for both adults and
children and will include Santa
Clans.
Scarlet Fever
Case Reported
The first scarlet fever case oc
curring in Salem in many weeks
was reported yesterday by Dr.
Vernon A. Douglas, county health
officer. The patient Is a preschool
boy living in the McKinley school
area. A school child In the family
has been quarantined. The case
is only a mild one.
No cases of the disease were
reported here last month.
GIRLS MEET TO SEW
HUBBARD. Dec. 1 Mrs. Ad
eline Fields had a group of high
school girls in to sew Thursday
night. Dainty refreshments were
served. Those present were Iris
Moomaw, Leah Kromllng, Marjor
le Wolfer, Betty Brown and Mrs.
Fields.
HUGE HAWK KILLED
WACONDA, Dec. 18. A
chicken hawk was killed in the
act of eating his breakfast Wed
nesday morning near the Herny
Stafford horns. Mlcheal Mahoney
shot the bird, which had a wing
spread of tour feet, seven inches.
x a co
MICKEY MOUSE SPECIAL!
"SKIPPY"
1 P.M
Show
Only
Jackie Cooper -
LAST TIMES TODAY!
Midnite
3111:3
4
Jt
-4
a
"
II v I
n YJ0a
Cupid's Business .
Improvesi Three
Couples Wedding
Marriage license business con
tinued to show Improvement yes
terday at the courthouse. Three
couples received permits from
the county clerk's office.
George Pickens, 21, 2022
Broadway, Salem, laborer, is to
wed Arl:ne Smaller, 18, 1110
Norway. Salem domestic.
Joe Papenfua, 23, route threj,
Salem, farmer, is to marry Lucy
ette Pla-k. 18, route three, Sa
lem, housekeeper.
J. T. Fairbanks, 28. Sllverton,
farmer. Is to marry Rosina Rn
fer, 19, Sllverton, housekeeper.
ESDI
IS SCENE OF FIRE
MILL CITY. Dec. 1C While
Mr. and Mrs. Georgo Harri and
two neighbor women were sitting
by their fireside Tuesday fore
noon talking about a fire which
destroyed the home of a mutual
friend about this time of year,
some three years ago, another
neighbor. H. P. Lake, rushed in
and told them that their own
house was on fire. For a few min
utes there was considerable ex
citement.
The roof had caught fire in five
different places and in a few mo
ments it is probable that the
house would hare been in flames.
Due to Quick work palls of water
were paused from along to the
men and the fire was soon extin
guished. Luckily Mr. Harris has
always kept a long ladder at one
side of the house in case an em
ergency such as this would arise,
and this was quickly put up and
one party went to the roof where
he could throw water on the
flames.
Mr. Lake lives Just across from
the Harris's and was preparing
to burn a stump in one of his
fields near his barn. He heard the
crackling of flames and soon no
ticed tbe flames. Frank Rencyi
and sons and two other men as
sisted in putting the fire out. The
damage is estimated at clote to
$50.
Tuberculosis Seal
Sale Money Taken
From Two Schools
CLOVERDALE. Dec. 17 When
the teachers of both the Illlhee
and the Cloverdale schools ar
rived to open the buildings Thurs
day morning they found that they
had been broken into during the
night, the former by a window
and the latter by breaking the
lock on the front door.
At the Cloverdale school Miss
Berg discovered the money from
the Christmas Eeals was taken
and Miss Gregerson found that
money from seals and a phono
graph which belonged to her was
taken from the Illlhee. A report
was sent to the state police.
KITCHEN SLIDES OS ICR
The trailer bearing the demon
stration kitchen which was being
brought to Salem by the General
Electric company, skidded Into
the ditch near Oregon City yester
day morning and as a result the
exhibition planned for the after
noon was postponed. The large
kitchen, being towed by an auto
mobile, slid from the pavement
on a curve and overturned. Little
damage was done but the demon
strations were called off until
travel conditions should Improve.
1 P.M.
Show
Only
Robert Coogan
Preview!
!?
n ii
I 1
rci&lfK5M7
Together.
In a Roman ca more
turbulent than a tropical
atorm. . . A lore that sears
the hearts of men!
M
IS
Asalatinr th vIimIi nf fnaJIra
along, Era McKInsey, of Indepen-
aence, wno eaugnt the puouc eye
several years ago by carrying
away a safe from the Tour Conr
ers service station, yesterday at
ternoon started serrlnsr a throe.
year sentence In tho state peniten
tiary, his third incarceration
there, this time for thaft of a wo
man's wrist watch from tho resi
dence of Adrain Fisher, at In
dependence. Earlier in tho day
ha Waived nrAlImlnarr 1nl.
hearing at West Salem and grand
jury investigation, then Pleaded
guilty to the grand larceny charge
before Judge Arlie O. Walker, at
Dallas.
Citr and stat nnli(A irrui
McKinsey Wednesday. Officers re-
coverea me watch and returned it
to its owner, a woman friend of
Fisher.
McKlnser sHnno.d on tn
Four Corners Job when the heavy
safe fall from his csr and brok
the bumper. Finding the piece of
broken bumper, officers matched
it with the bumper on McKlnsey's
car. then arrested him.
Before serving three years for
tho safe theft, McKinsey had done
two years' time in the peniten
tiary for another crime.
Woman of Many
Names Arrested;
Is Wanted Here
State police were notified yes
terday that a woman operating
under a doxen different names,
had been arrested at Corvallis on
charges of passing; worthless
checks. She also Is wanted la
Nebraska 'for the theft of an au
tomobile owned by Don Patsios.
While In Corvallis she operated
using the name of Anna Braden.
Police said she passed worthless
checks in Salem, Independence.
Newberg. McMlnnville, Dallas
and Jefferson.
Other names given by the
woman at various times are: Mrs.
R. W. Stevens. Carolyn C. Stev
ens, Clara C. Stevens. Clara Ben
son, Carolyn C. Braden. Anna M.
Braden and Clara C. Jensen.
Purple Heart is
Awarded Clark
Edward L. Clark, new com
mander of Salem chapter, Disabl
ed American veterans, is one of
the latest local reteraus to receive
the Purple Heart medallion
awarded by the United States for
acts of military merit In the world
war. Clark, as a member of the
Sixth regiment, TJ. S. marines, was
wounded at the start of the
Meuse-Argonne drive.
Election of Clark as chapter
commander here followed the re
cent resignation of George V.
Malstrom.
LIQUID - TABLETS - SALVE
VS.
EPIDEMICS
AHmeOwncdlhtttre fft
tOLLYVOOP
LAST TIMES TODAY
Home of 25c Talkies
Mickey Mouse Matinee
1 :30 P. M.
Also Mickey Mouse In
"Maslad Farm
News, Comedy A Harry Carey
la -The Last of tho Mohican a-
Attend oar 9 o'clock show
Saturday night and remain
for our midnight matinee
(11:15 p. m.) Fre
unsr showixq in salem
Starring J. Farrell Mac Donald
Jason Roberts X. Moot-head
Snnday, Mondaj and
Tuesday
Contianoaa Performa&ce
8aaday, 8 te 11 P. M.
LIBERTY MAGAZINE GAVE
IT FOUB STARS!
First Showing la Saletn
Hero' Entertainment!
ArJECS" '
LgsWfuueacvu.
E! US
to on
666