The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, November 13, 1932, Page 12, Image 12

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    PAGI! TWELVE
TE DUEGON CTATTSMAIT, Cakzfr PrcT53, Esnfoy Kcrnfa?, KoreaiSsI IS, IS:3
FOXBFIEEDEB
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3
i M ,
Assp6!aWh;yWB5 Conduct
: Show at Chamber .Hereff:
:V'Hovember:29-30
?
: Tne first - pelt j t how and - sale
aver held In Oregon will be feat
ured here , Novemlpsr - 29 and SO
7 the Oregon State Fox Breed
ers! association." with the event to
fee held In, the anAltoriam of the
chamber "ot commerce.
: Plana for the show,, and sale
were formulated yesterday" at a
' meetlnc ot the state execntlre
committee held 7 here. State off!
cers are: president, E. N. Walk
er of Greaham; vice president. E.
JV- Brown of Independence; and
secretary-treasurer. L. A. Wooten
of Forest Grove. -' ! . -
' The ' two-day event Is expected
to attract a number of North
west .buyers. -representatives of
the New : Tork market . which
takes virtually all pelts raised.
' -. ' Display Many Felts
Between 00 and 1000 pelts
will be on display front all parts
f: Oregon. The annual pelt sales
In Oregon are said to ran about
1200,000.
,The state Fox Breeders' associ
ation has a membership of about
1(0, and the number of fox breed-
ers overt he state Is estimated
at 125, with between 12.009 and
14,000 foxes under car.
.There are 50 breeders within
a lS-mlle radius of Salem, of-
fleers Indicated yesterday. This ih
dflstry has .developed 'rapidly the
: past two years.
JOBLESS H O P E D FOR
- n - - -.- -V' - . ..-...,..
, 'O ',
New Deal, But Not Especially Hopeful at
ROOSEVELT ELECT I O N
IGSJUTTOilfflE
Si!
Hangers-on at the U. S.-Y. M.
C. A. Employment office on Court
street--and they are comprised of
common laborers, tradesmen of all
sorts, white collar men. transients,
Jobhanters sincere and those who
make merely a pretense ot looking
for employment were preponder
antly, in favor of . Franklin D.
Roosevelt for president before the
election.
' -So, of course, they are general
ly well pleased with the election's
outcome. But, while before the
polling day' they, talked of better
times if Hoover were downed,
now they say that there Is "not so
much added hope."
A marked change In feeling and
attitude toward the national gov
ernment, however, is evident. Be
fore election, many of the em
ployment office crowd talked of
communism and hinted at violence
Fpotball Booster
Program Features
Chamber Meeting
. Program for the chamber of
commerce luncheon Monday noon
contains a galaxy of Willamette
university talent, all of whom
will speak or sing as a means to
letting the chamber members
know of the Willamette vs. Whit
man football game to be held on
Willamette field -next Saturday
afternoon at J o'clock.
The program will include re
marks by Coach "Spec" Keene;
music by the university 10 -piece
orchestra; Miss Midge Hewitt,
song queen, the university quar
tet, talk by jProf. W. C. Jones of
the faculty and pep talk by Wal
ter Srlekson, president of the as
sociated student body.
club musician and Donald Guenzli
will be the yell leader of the
two clubs. Mrs. Ethel L. Gulvln
will be the club's leader. Other
members of the clubs are Billy
Anderson, Buddy Elliott, Eveline
Woods, violet Farmen, Louise
Looney, Dorothy Elliott and Ev-
leen Bainter.
Indian Village is
Made by Students;
Forming Endeavor
ZENA, Nov. 12 The pupils
of the Zena school are making
an attractive Indian village
which will be exhibited at the
Thanksgiving program. The first
and tbird grades are making
bowls, fourth and sixth boys.
blankets and rugs, fifth and sixth
girls, dolls and the seventh grade,
teepees. Bows and arrows and an
imals will be the next articles
made."
The young people of the three
adjacent districts of Zena, Lincoln
and Spring valley will hold a
candle' light service at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Craig Wed
nesday night, November 16 to
organize a Christian Endeavor society.
during the coming winter.. They
were bitter in their denunciation
ot the federal government and
blamed it for tbelr present lean
state of existence.
Questioned yesterday, most of
the men at the Job office seemed
to have forgotten much of their
grudge. A "change" had been ac
complished, they pointed out. Now
they-will see what comes of it. ,
Asked how he f eltv about the
election, one of the men predicted
a war In the near future.
"Always has been during a
democratic president," he ex
plained. Another unshaven, but bright
eyed one chimed In to qualify his
companions remark with:
"If they don't ent down the war
debts, there'll be another war."
Returning to politics, a third
man said he was glad of the way
the election went, because "we
were not getting anywhere with
Hoover. We'd better change."
"Say, how did prohibition come
out," one of the men asked the
reporter.
Told that the Oregon dry law
had been repealed by a large ma
jority) this man expressed approv
al but declared he didn't want to
see saloons come back.
"111 tell you," said another,
"the saloon was bad because of
the treats. We'd stand around
and the treats would go around
and before we knew it. It had got
us. But I think prohibition is
worse."
None of the dozen or more men
in the employment bureau wait
ing room said he favored the sa
loon and most averred they did
not want to see it return.
Children of Rural
.School Organizing
Four-H Clubs Again
JEFFERSON; Nov. 12 The
pupils of the Looney Butte school
have organized two 4-H clubs.
The boys of the school will take
up a Forestry project, and the
girls will do sewing.
. Officers of the boys club are
president, James Anderson; vice
president, John Finlay; secre
tary, Edgar Husted. Officers of
the girls' club are president, Ha
i el Farmen; vice president, Millie
: Oleman; and secretary, Lorena
Oleman. Arthur Bainter will be
160 Bales Hops at
Aurora Purchased
For England Trade
AURORA, Nov. ll.-Lee Hing
and George Clark sold jointly 128
bales of hops to Luckenbaugh, to
be shipped to Schiedenburg of
England. Norman Gergen sold 32
bales to the same buyer.
Both transactions were- made
election day, at 17 cents.
BOYS! GIRLS!
Enroll now in the,
BIG PRIZE CONTEST
46 prices Xot a drawing
Woolpert and Legg
Druggists
Court at Liberty Tel. 3444
DO YOU WALK
or do you
HOBBLE?
PUT YOUR
FEET IN
MY HANDS
BE COMFORTABLE AND
WALK GRACEFULLY IN
CANTILEVER
SCOUT
World's Most Com- Of
fortable Shoe now pOOD
Sold only by
Acklin Bootery
121 N. High
o
IP
n
SALE STARTS MONDAY AT 9 A. M.
I
MSI
2 p air $1.0 0
Full Fashioned -pure
thread '
silk hose in
semi-service.
and chiffon.
- Cradle foot
and all new
'v fall shades
J
m
POSSES n
SELES-; wniESIS "
; at Refliiced Prtees ; specially, reduced
EADr PAST WEEK
PORTLAND. Not. 12.-AP)
Cattle receipts were 1498, calves
53 for the week. Steers showed
more or less weakness from the
start. Trading la general appear
ed with a loss ot around 25c with
an early top of $5.25 and $5 there
after. Most ot the aales of good
steer were around li.tl-lS;
low grade was Bown to IS and
lower. Yearling heifers sold at
$4.35-4.50. with hearler staff
$3.85 down; a lot ot mixed steers
and yearling heifers sold at $5.50;
high medium eows sold at $3. with
some' good sorts up to $3.10-3.35
and low cutters and cutters $1-2;
bulls wero around 50c-$2, but a
few sold at $2.60; calree and Teal
era had a spread of $2-5.50,10 a
steady market. ;
Hogs receipts were 4369 for the
week. Trade was generally steady
at the start with a top of $1.15.
which was stretched 15e to $4 lat
er In the week. This C the dos
ing top on light ' butchers. Heary
butcher sorts, wero down -to" $2
with a largo per cent $3.25 and
better; packing sows wero $2.50-3
-generally with the bulk. 2.75 and
better; feeder pigs sold at 4 3.35
$.60. - . ,
Sheep and lambs receipts were
2525 for the week. Trade was gen
erally steady. No real tops arrived
in the lamb alleys, the best avail
able moving at $4. with strictly
choice Quoted to $4-25-4.60, com
mon and medium sorts were $3
3.76 with thin throwouts In nom
inal . call around $2; yearlings
wero I2-2.50 with strictly choice
quoted to $2.T5 and better; cull to
choice ewes wero 60c-1.25.
Tompkins Loses
ToW;B.Duerst
W. B. Duerst, farmer of Belle-;
rue. defeated. . Morton Tompkins
of Grand Island as member of the
legislature from Yamhill county.
Arthur McPhilllps, -McMinnvllle
banker, was reelected. Peter Zim
merman was elected Joint sena
tor for Yamhill-Washlngton-TIl-l&mook-Lineoln
eountles.
DRIVE
A CAR?
Your eyes need & ebec&ihg:
up even if you don't suspect
trouble. We invite;you to
call for an examination.
Thompton-GluUch
OPTOMETRISTS
; , 833 State St.
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Make Your
Selections
Do Not be Disappointed
Quantities Limited
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FIKiEE
Every Lady Attending This
Extraordinary Sale
Tues., Nov. 15th
2:30 Sharp
Will Receive a Beautiful
Souvenir Free
i
s ssi m i wsr mr n l st . ..dBssssBSBSBWeH
Remember .
Buy Early at
Your Own Price
o
TO THE PUBUC
We are determined to close out our present stock to
gether with the new seasonable - goods recently
purchased
NOTHING RESERVED
You can buy with perfect confidence
OUR GUARANTEE ....
stands back of every article sold
REMEMBER....
W tr not going out of businee.
BURNETT BROS.
A Deposit
Holds ,
Any Article
Two Sales Daily 82
Afternoons
GIFTS THAT ENDURE AND EN-DEAR
Evenings
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Salem,
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