The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, July 12, 1932, Page 6, Image 6

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    The OREGON STATESMAN, Salem. - Oregon, Tuesday Morning, July 12. i932
PAGE SIX
i -
I'
'
s
on
STOCK MARKET
SPRING WHEAT FORECAST BULLISH
.
HOGS MAKE SUBSTANTIAL ADVANCE
Strength in Rails, Auburn Over Billion Bushels
Shorts' Retreat Mark Ur Supply Uutloo
itmnn I ate Rally For N America
Salem
Markets
Tops $5.75 Hundred;
Local Peaches on
Market now -
NEW YORK, July 11. (AP)
Stocks palled farther away from
the Jans lows today, making a
prigntly adrance la th last hour,
After slugginsh fluctuations ear
. Her.
- Support for the rails and a brisk
retreat of shorts in Auburn Auto
vere among the technical derelop
snenta that worked to the general
list's adrantage. Also Wall Street
saw definite signs of congression
al adjournment, a prospect which
was probably much more to the
point than any other single mar
ket influence of the day.
The short squeeze in Auburn
ttronght an (extreme gain of 13
points for that dynamic stock and
the close was only a point under
- the top. Tobaccos provided consid
erable strength, American Tobac
co "B" and Liggett & Myers B'
rising more than 2.
U. S. .Steel preferred. Interna
tional Business Machines, Case
and Allied Chemical-were also up
two or so, while Steel common,
Westinxhouse. American Can,
National biscuit. Standard Oil of
New Jersey and a few rails, includ
ing Santa Fe, New York Central
and Union Pacific, gained about 1
1 to 1.
The early market watched Am
erican Telephone, Coca Cola and
Public Service of New Jersey make
sew lows, but buying of carrier
Chares quickly put the brakes on
reactionary tendencies and by aft
ernoon the list was crawling up-
i ward. Trading eventually "became
more active, although sales total
ed only 596,117 shares.
DIXON KILLED BY
0
-ECTBlC VOLTAGE
CHICAGO, July 11. (AP)
Faced by prospects, of more than a
billion bushels of wheat supplies
in North America ' this season.
wheat values went generally down
hill today. 1
Crop advances both north land
south of the Canadian border were
optimistic regarding spring wheat.
tne French foreign wheat quota
was reduced 10 per cent, and of-1
flcial forecasts Indicated that Ger-
many's 1932 wheat crop wouM be
the largest ever known. Farther-
more, there was almost complete
absence of export demand for
wheat from North America, i and
with traders awaiting government
crop figures from Washington, fu
ture delivery dealings were reduc
ed to the smallest total in some
time. i
The government July 1 crop es
timates Issued late were construed
as decidedly bearish, Indicating
the 1932 domestic yield of all
wheat , would total 737,0001000
bushels, against latest private
forecasts of 685.000,000.
Wheat closed unsettled,
under Saturday's finish, corn
off to up, oats unchanged to
lower.
Today's closing quotations:;
Wheat: July old,47 6-8, new 47
1-2, Sep. old 50 to 50 1-8, new 50,
Dec. 63 1-4 to 3-8.
Corn: July, 29 5-8. So J 31
7-8, Dec. 31 3-4.
Oats: July 19 1-2. Sep. 19 3-8.
Dec 21 5-8.
General Markets
PRODUCE EXCHANGE
PORTLAND Ore- Jnl 11 (IP)
Produce exchange, net price: butter, ex
tras 17; standards 16; prim firsts IS hi;
firsts left; eggs, fresh extrsc IS 17;
fresh nediamt 15-16.
Grade R raw A milk,
.co-op pool price, $1.24 per
hundred.
: Smrplas 82c
(Milk bases ea Jut buttertat
average.)
Batterfat, sour, 14c
Batterfat, sweet, 10c
rUIT AKD VEGETABLES
Price paid to growers by Seism buyers.
July 11
Outdoor encumbers, box . ,. SO
Beets, local, do. .,, , ,. , .
.SO
Turnips, local, doa.
Carrots, local, doa..
Green peppers, lb.
Texas eras onions-.
IawsU cabbage 03 H
Tomatoes, local hothose1.25 to S.00
Radishes, doa. : 17
Oaioos. doa. ,20 to .SO
jts to .so
15
1.00
Potatoes, ewt.
New potatoes, local
Peat, local
.1.15
.3.00
The hog market opened the
week with a substantial, gain,
with tops Q u o t e d locally at
15.75 a hundred, last week closed
with top offering at 15.15. Dress
ed hogs went op to 7. cents.
First local peaches ara on the
market . now, and - the grower is
offered around 15 cents for, each
five-pound box. First offerings
are the Mayflowers.
Green peppers are mora pletl-
ful, with wholesalers offering 15
eents a pound for them.
First outdoor cucumbers ; aro
coming in at 60 - cents a box.
Local peas are off the market.
but Seattle Is supplying the de
mand at six and eight cents.
wholesale. ". .
Cukes, hot house..
Local celery, doa.
Local lettuce, crate .
Cherries
Loganberries, erata
Raspberries, crate .
Peaches, 5-Ib. box
Extras
Standards
Mediums
EOOB
Baying Prices
..03 to .03
40 to 1.00
60 to .00
85 to 1.15
03
40
90
15
Colored Bene
Mediant Bent
Light Bent
CHICKENS
Spring chickens -Leghorn
Broilers
.Id
.IB
.12
.11
.09
-07
.18
-10
GRATA AND BA1
Buying Prices
Wheat, western red to .SO
White, be. as to .00
Barley, ton. top
lists, too, top
.17.00 to 18.00
18.00
Ha. bovine nrieee
Oats and vetch, toa T.00 to 8.00
Alfalfa, Teller. 1st cutting 8.00-10.00
MEAT
Stylus Prices
Lamb S.50
Ewes ,, , , tsi
.5.75
.5.50
.04 to .05
HQgs. top
Hogs, first cuts
Steers :
Cows
Heifers
Dressed real, top
i JJressed bogs
Medium
Coarse .
Mohair
woox.
01 to .03
..03 to .03
07
.08
.06
Portland Grain
Nominal
GRAND ISLAND. July 11.
(Special) Ellis Dixon, 19, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Bob Dixon, here, was
electrocuted and five others were
thrown to the ground by the same
shock Sunday morning at the Neil
Ctoutenberg farm in the Union
vale district. The accident happen
ed about 9 o'clock.
The tragedy occurred when Dix
on .and his five companions were
taking np a pump in the barnyard
at the Stoutenberg farm. As they
raised it, it fell on a high power
electric wire. The resultant shock
struck all six. killing Dixon in
stantly.
Mr. Stoutenberg was confined
to his bed today as result of the
injury he received and his son
Pete was burned on' one side. The
other three members of the party
were Stoutenberg's sons, Harry
and Wilbur, and a neighbor boy,
Herbert Wright.
Ellis Dixon leaves his wife, Al
ice, and infant daughter Ruth, his
parents, two brothers, Marion and
Norris, and his grandparents, Mr,
and Mrs. S. C .Dixon and Mr. and
Mrs. Neil Stoutenberg. all of this
section.
No funeral arrangements had
been made today.
PORTLAND. Ore.. Julv 11 (AP
Wheat Open Hirh Low Close
July 48 49 48 48
Bept. 47 47 47 47
Dec 50 50. SOU. 50 U.
Chicken Thieves Get
All But 4 of Flock
SMOLD SHE
HUBBARD, July 11 The
Hubbard Service store, a general
.aririandt(iA atnre owned bv Mr.
and Mrs. John Smolinsky was
robbed early Saturday morning.
Fourteen pairs of shoes, oysters,
malt, and all the cigarettes in
stock were taken. The thieves
entered the store by removing
part of the plate glass In front
of the store.
Mrs. George Hosteller, an el
derly woman, suffered a painful
Injury to her hand and bruises
about the body Sunday night
when she was trying to lead a
calf out of the garden by a
chain, which she wrapped around
Iter. band. The calf was too strong
for her and dragged her some
distance, lacerating the muscles
of her hand.
Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Corbln and
-nw Mnrmin nf Mnla.Ha. were din
ner guests Sunday at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. John Blosser. Mr.
nt Mra Onrhtn neeoTJirjanled by
Barbara Blosser -will leave this
week for Newport to be the
guests of Beryl Blosser at her
eottage by the sea for several
weeks. .
TCNTKRTA1X SISTER
; TCWflWOOD. Julv 11. Mr.
ni Mr. Wllnbur P. Lewis are en
tertaining for a few days Mr. Lew
is' sister and niece, Mrs. Richard
Hughes and daughter. Miss aiar
Jorie, of Bellingham, Wash.
Cash markets: wheat: Big Bend blue-
stem 59; soft white 50; western white
49; bard winter, northern spring 48;
western red 47.
Oats, No. 2 white 821.50.
Corn No, 3 E. Y. 822.50. !
Millrun standard $14.50.
Portland Produce
PORTLAND. Ore.. Julr 11 AP)
Butter prints, 02 score or better. 19-20e;
atanaaros, lo-ivc. 1
Eggs Pacific poultry producers' sell
ing prices: fresh extras, 16c; standards.
loe; mediums 15c.
Country meats selling price to retail
ers: country-killed bogs, best butchers
under 100 lbs., 6 -7c; vealers, 80 to 100
lbs.. 8e lb.; lsmbs, 6-8c lb.: yeaillnrs.
4-5e lb.; heavy ewes, 2-3e lb.; canner
cows, Se lb.; bulls, 5-5 e lb.
Nuts Oregon wslnuts, 15-19e; pea-
ants, 12e lb.; Brazils, 12-14e lb.; al
monds, 1516c lb.; filberts, 20-22e lb.;
pecans, 20c lb.
Csscara bark baying price, 1933 peel,
2e lb.
Hops nominal 1931, 1213c lb. J eon
tracts, 1932, 12c lb.
Butterfat direct to shippers: station,
1113c; Portland delivery prices, 1415c
pound.
Live poultry net buying price: heavy
hen, colored. 4H lbs., up, 11-1 3c; do
mediums. 10c; lights, 8c; light broilers,
lOe; colored roasters, over 2 lbs.. 15c;
eld roosters, 5e; ducks, Pekin, ll-12e.
Onions selling price to retailers; new
eocbella wax, $1; yeliow, 90c-$l crate;
new red, $1.75 cental; new yellow, 81.75
cental. Walla Walla, $1.25 cental.
Potatoea local, 85c-$l; Parkdale,
$1.25; Deschutes. $1.35; eastern Wash
ington, $1-1.25.
- New potatoes northwest, $1.75-1.85
eentsl.
Strawberries Oregon 24s, $1-1.25
crate.
Wool 1932 clip, nominal; Willamette
valley, 6e lb. ; . eastern Oregon, 6-8e lb.
Hsy buying price from producer; al
falfa, $13-13.50; clover, $9-9.50; eastern
Oregon timothy $17.50; osts and vetch,
$9-9.50. i
FALLS CITY, July 11 Chick
en thieves made a raid on A. Pa
ment's chicken - roosts here re
cently taking 150 of his flock
They drove boldly up In a truck
and helped themselves. Pament
heard the truck pass but thought
nothing of it as trucks have been
passing frequently during the
berry season. He did not miss
them until feeding time the next
morning when he found but four
fowls left.
HMIPIM
M S SU END
LARGE CLASS GETS
SB
E
FAIRFIELD. July 11 A large
class of candidates was given the
third and fourth degree work at
the regular grange meeting held
Friday night at Fairfield grange.
They were Mr. and Mrs. , Ivan
Brundldge, Mr. and Mrs. Allyn
Nusom, Carl Francis Jr. and Da
vid Moses.
There will be no social meeting
in . July and the regular grange
session will be held Friday, night
August 12. A detailed report was
given by Frank Saalfeld, dele
gate to the state grange conven
tion at Silverton.
Supper was served In the base
ment by the following commit
tee, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Hill, Mr
and Mrs. C. M. Hall. . Mr. and
Mrs. C. H. Hannlgan and John
Harper.
The serving committee -for
August Is Mr. and Mrs. Chris
Jorgenson, Ed Johnson, Mr. and
Mrs. Carter Keene and Miss Nan
cy Keene.
Boy to 31 ahoney's
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Mahoney
are receiving congratulations
upon the arrival of a nine pound
boy born Friday, July 8.
PHILLIPS TO MEHAMA
MEHAMA, July 11 Mr. and
Mrs. H. N. Phillips and children
of Buckley, Wash., arrived Sat
urday to spend the remainder of
the vacation with relatives here
and in Wendllng.
Logan Pack at Woodburn
Cannery Greater. Than
At First Thoifght
WOODBURN. July 11, The
last loganberries to be canned
this year by the Ray-Brown can
nery will be received Tuesday,
according to notices on the black
board at the receiving porch. The
cannery ' has put up many more
oganberrles this year than it was
first thought it would. The crews
packing the berries have been
working several hours a day for
over two weeks.. The berries have
been received during the day
and packed at night, the pro
cess of canning taking from two
to eight hours.
Montmorency -pie cherries were
being . pitted and packed at the
cannery up to a few days ago.
The pitter broke . down recently,
so the remainder of the crop is
being received here and shipped
to Hillsboro, to be canned at.
the sister plant in that city., The
canning of Royal Anne cherries
was terminated some time ago.
After Tuesday the cannery will
probably be shut down for at
least six weeks, until the black
berries and pears get ripe. Wheth
er or not there will be any
blackberries and pears canned
has not been learned. However,
it la thought that the packing
plant will can some pears, at
least. In former years there was
quite a god market here for the
evergreens.
Mrs. C. J. Rica was nostess
to the Woodburn chapter of the
W; T. C. U. Friday afternoon
at her home on East Cleveland
street. There was a good attend
ance of members. An interesting
program was held.
Mr. and Mrs. Jo Ramos, resi
dents of Echo, Ore., are visiting
here with the B. J. Byers, Ivan
Byers and Herman Bontrager
families. Mrs. Ramos is a niece
of Ivan and Bert Byers.
By DOROTHY HUTCHASON.
CAMP SANTALY, Jnly 11.
The girls at Camp Santaly are
proceeding wiith Interesting ac
tivities la spite of rainy weather.
The first evening In camp was
pent about the warm tire biasing
In the huge living room fireplace.
Stories were told by Mrs. Galla
her and Girl Reserve songs were
sung by the group.
Sunday .morning after inspec
tion, of the camp Mrs. Gallaher
led the worship hour. Her topic
was God, the Creator of Beauty."
In her talk 'she stressed the loveli
ness of life, beauty In nature, and
the way we may see the beauty in
things about us.
After the service the girls occu
pied themselves indoors and later
went for a short hike, as the
weather appeared to be clearing
P.
The sirls on Monday and the
days which follow will take part
In setting-up exercises on arising,
Grummel Dies at
Home of Daughter,
. Mehama District
MEHAMA, July 11 Mr. Grum
mels, father of Mrs. Floyd Boy
lngton, died early Monday morn
ing at the Boyington home here.
He had spent part of last winter
in a hospital at Salem, but return
ed here this spring. He suffered a
relapse recently.
The remains are at the Weddle
mortuary in Stayton. No further
arrangements have been made for
the funeral.
GirlResefves
Hum;
Camp
Group
Organized
si
1 the
1 1
games both indoors and out as
weather permits, hikes, swimming
or wading In the cool, clear river,
and songs and stories about the
fireplace in the evening.
' The girls have been divided into
four groups, each) with; a compe
tent advisor,' as follows: '
Trilllams Esther McMlnimee,
leader; Edna Seherzlnger, Patsy
Livesley. Carol Rae Potter, Lois
Bella Wilson, Jean Lawrence and
Eleanor Blewert. '
. Santiam Lilies rGladys Taylor,
leader; Doris Morley, Mary Ellen
Mills, Betty Simmons, Mary Lee
Fry, Jean Frink and Beula Peder
son. i . .
larkspurs Elisabeth Hughes,
leader; Edith Mohr, Mary Collar,
Margaret Birtchet, Janet Fryer,
Arlyn Thrapp, Wilda Jarman and
Mirxel Mohr. 0
Silverton Us Dorothy Hatcha?
son, leader; Ada Collar, Carrol
Ferguson, Dorothy Pro, Gertrude
Brooks, Virginia Steed, Helen Os
tiin and Priscilla Walsh.
CHURCH
sens
T fJORTH U
NORTH HOWELL, July 11
Lack of Interest and attendance
has caused .the Christian Mis
sionary Alliance church to cease
holding services in the little
North Howell church near the
grange hall.
Soma effort will be put forth
by the community to hold Inter
denominational or undemonlta
tlonal Sunday school services as
soon as some plan Is offered tor
consideration.
The church building and acre
of land surrounding it which
Joins the grange half acre prop
erty was purchased by the North
Howell grange three years ago
and the building Itself was erect
ed nearly 50 years ago, by J. H.
Baughman, who was aided by old
friends and neighbors.
In the half century since, it
has constantly stood for the
steadfast faith and enduring
courage which has made the pio
neer's place in this community
wormy or respect .and reverence.
Four Are Slightly
Injured as Cars
Collide Head-on
HOPEWELL. JuIt 11. A col
llsion occured a quarter mile south
of the Falrvlew school Wednesday
morning when a car driven by
John Juntunen of Yamhill headed
into one driven by Buck Wan less
of Amity. Wanless was accompan
ied by his sister Edith. Mrs. Earl
Burch and Betty Lou Rosen ban m,
and ' Juntunen was driving with
his brother.
The women, who were riding in
the back seat, were hurled to the
ground, but received only slight
bruises. Juntunen suffered a cut
under one eye due to shattered
glass, and the others escaped In
Jury.
Bath cars were badly damaged
YOUTH COUFERETfCE
AT HER CLOSES
Hayesville Children
On Clinic Wednesday
HAYESVILLE. Julv 11 A nre-
school clinic Tor children of tbe
Hayesville district will be held
Wednesday afternoon at the
health center on North High
street in Salem.
TURNER, - July 11. The
Young Peoples conference of the
Christian churches of Oregon,
closed Its weeks season Sunday
afternoon, at the Turner-taber
nacle, having , had an attendance
of about 40 from various part
of the state.' The mornings were
spent in lesson studies and con
ferences and the afternoons were
given over, to recreation. A mis
sionary pageant was put on Sat
urday night. .
uy mvttauon or tne pastor 01
the Turner Christian church,
members of the conference had
charge of the 11 o'clock Sunday
church service. Miss Lois .Ann
Eby of Nantungehow, China, oc
cupied the pulpit.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Stand
ley are receiving the congratula
tions of their friends upon the
arrival, June I, of a 10 pound
son.
Rev. and Mrs. N. S. Hawk,
and son John ard daughter Cath
erine, arrived the middle of the
week from Wasco, having been
located there for four years. The
son will enter Willamette uni
versity in the fall. Rev. Hawk
gave his first sermon at the Meth
odist church Sunday night, as it
was decided to attend the San
tiam Sunday School conference
during the day at North San
tiam. Willard Bear entertained at
his home Saturday for Albany
college friends. The young people
left soon after noon tor Mill
City, where they attended a
Christian Endeavor district con
ference. The group included Ruth
Knott and Evelyn Achlson, Dick
Knott, Tryon Richards and Vern
on Meyers.
CHARIVARI SHERMANS
KDNGWOOD. Jnlr 11. Mr snit
Mrs. Victor John Sherman (Opal
Tan ey) returned Friday from a
wedding trip to coast resorts and
were tendered an old-time char
ivari tnat night at the home of the
bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. R.
A. Tanser. The newlrvadi raw
sponded to the musical demonstra
tion witn a treat of welners and
clears. Ther are llrlnr In Salom
where Mr. Sherman is an employe
or tne Ennis Wait meat plant.
WILSOX IN HOHriTAL
MEHAMA. JuIt 11 Ralnh
Wilson was taken to 'Salem to
tne hospital early Monday morn
ing. Mr. Wilson has been ill
for over a year, and lately has
oeen mucn worse.
FARMERS
1
GETS 0 1
!
AMITY, July 11 A big farm
er's community picnic was held
Saturday at the Amity city park.
There were plenty of amusements
and attractions. Horse shoe
games were played throughout
the day, and there were also foot
races, bicycle races, log sawing
and other contests for prixes.
A picnic dinner was enjoyed at
noon. There was also an auction
sale after the dinner.
A baseball game was played by.
two teams composed of farmers
of this community.
The pavement dance slated for
in the evening was called off due
to the rain.
MICKEY MOUSE
The Last Hike
M:
CKtvt
HAS
Come!
bound and
sagged, unable
TO FIGHT
Of. TALK,
HE" AND Ml Utile
ARE LED ON
deck ov their
CAPTORS
PETE
And
SKVSTER.
By WALT DISNEY
I I S I ll i J ' ' a " 11
R I DSf ( WUTOEOTOPUTUSOUT Hi, M NOW VOU'RE HEADED fcN THE W CT ' 1
. ' i
THIMBLE THEATRE Starring Popeye
Now Showing "The Girl He Left Behind"
Portland Livestock
POETLAND. Ore- Jnlr 11 f API
Usltls 2300; calves 50: fed staff strong.
Steers 600-900 lbs., rood 6.35-7.00: me
diant 4.75 8.35; common 2.75-4.75; 900-
1100 lbs., rood 6.35-7.00: medium 4.75-
8.35; common 2.75-4.75: 1100-1300 lbs..
goo4 6.00-8.75; medium 4.25-8.00: Heifers
550-850 lbs., rood 5.50-6.50: medium
3.75-4.50; common 2.50-3.75. Cows good
8. 0u-4.su: cutter and medium 2.OO-3.50:
low cutter and cotter 1.00-2.00. Bolls.
yearlings excluded, good and choice (beef)
2.75-B.Z5; cutter, common and medium
1.75-3.75. Vealera. milk fed. rood and
choice, 4.25-5.00; medium 3.50-4.50: cull 1
ana common z.uu-o.ou. calves zau-auo ids.
food and choice 8.50-4.50; common and
medium 3.00-3.50.
Hors 2100, includin 174 through: gen
erally 50 a hither.
Light lights 140-160 lbs., good and
ehoica 5.00-6.00; lightweights 160-180
lbs., 5.75 6.00; 180-200 lbs 5.756.00.
Medium weight 200-220 lbs.. 5.004.00:
220-250 lbi 4.85-5.75. Heavyweights 250-
290 lbs.. 4.75-5.50: 290-850 lbs.. 4.25-
5.25. Packing sows 275-500 lbs., medium
and good 8. SO 4.50. Feedera-stoekeTS, 70
130 lbs., good and choice 4.50-5,00,
Slancnter sheep and lambs 3000 j 50c
higher.
Lambs 90 lbs. down, good -and choice
4.00-4.50; medium 3.25-4.00; all weights,
common .c.ao-s.zs. xaarling weathers 0-
110 lbs. medium to choie 1.00-2.25.
Ewes 120 lbs., medium to choice 1.00- !
1.25; 120-150 lb... .75-1.25; all weights,
cull -to common .50-1.25. 1
I Klr4 MOT TAKE "J
(JUWt rMONtt ON
-pW! LET ME 10056
t M G0IM6 tUITH PoPey, ) ACCOUNT OF UJB AlHT
AM. I Aft! YM I r0T HO SHf?PYR0oa
to.
0WT ANCHOR, Ya
Q2 SEA Coweoy
'STa
Jl
ii r-x' er u- w
o;ait for me
By SEGAR
LITTLE ANNIE ROONEY
By Special Appointment
Fruits, Vegetables
Radio
Piograms
Tutsaay, jnijr is
. IT nan kko rinrt
6:30 Mssleal lya Opeaara.
T :00 loaaorda.
8:00 Morniag eoacart.
10:00 Home eeanomiea ebsarrar.
11:00 Treating speech defects in toll
drea, Florence Johnson, Oregon
Normal school.
11:15 Vacation Books for Girls, Edaa
Minrua, Oregon Xanaal sehooL :
11:20 ''Beauty Spot to Oregon," Lyam
T. Cronamiller.
11:85 Market reperta, erops and Weatk-
1 . forecsst.
3:15 Aeolian echoes. J
tif0 Kzploring the Heavens, Dr. A. ,
Caswell, University of Oregon, r-
520 Musical, University f Oreroa
- school d Mnsie, Kobert Mo
Knight, bsriUae. .
, S :10 Large scale production and is
. 2Ployment, lr. Elmer Pendell.
. 8:00 The Institute at International Ra
"Mobs Qeaume el Proeeedings.
, - lr. John . K. Mea, - University
' Oregon. -f:18
p Fsveaolory f Personality:
. Dr. Harold E. Orosland, Cniver-
PORTLAND. Ore.. July 11 (AP)
Anrieota Oregon, 50-55e lng. Oranges
California Talencias. S2.50-2.75: stand
ards, $2.35; flats, 0e-Sl crate; DeLano
iock aaont a 00 higher. 1
Grapefmit CahfoTBla. S3.253.75:
Plerida, $4.75-5.50. Lemons California.
S6.25-6.75 eaae. Limes 5-dox. cartons, j
$3.25. Bananas bunches, 6e: bands,
Welb. i
Btrawberriea Oregon. 24s. $1-1.25
crate. Raspberries loeaL S0e-$1 erate.
Loganberries local. 75e-$l erate. i Cur-
raata red. $1.50 crate. I
Uas a 6 as Ja Ii torn i a, 3HJb. Honey
wwi ua uiornia, f x.ou erate. 1
Cherries Bin g. 45-47s 15-tb. 'bos:
Royal Annea, 4V75e 15-lb. box. 1-te lb.
Watermelons California Klondike, 14-
se IB. 1
Cauliflower local 50-75s erate. Cucum
bers The Dalle. 50-65a bos. Spinach
local, $1 orange . box. Celery Oregoa,
$1.40 half erate; liearts, $1 dos. bunches. 1
Peppers Eell, Calioroia, 7c; Tbe Dalles,
-8e lb, - (
Peas local, $-6e lb.; lower Colotnbfa,
l-oe in, tsweet potatoea southern yama,
S0-75e ba. erate. Tomatoes botbemee,
7-12e lb.; The Dalles; $1.25 box; Calif or- 1
I. tt 4( ,
Lettuce The Dalles and local, 73 90e
erate. Asparagus mid-Columbia, f 1.75-3
pyramid; local $1.50 pyramid. Beans lo
eal. -7e lb. Corn The Dalles, 35e doa.
si nnci i4Euo.Mf2s. 3
j ;
TV
ErrrEcnvE6 aee. watchiwg voue. ti
HOUSE AU.TrTTME?X-n3USMTfiO-. M
TMAT5 WW I OOWr COME KJEAKVtXJ
MEAM THAT MCE MAM WHO OVMS
"TWE&SDRV-
GOOD5 COWPAklV
???
1 I V
t"-i s s . ass v.
A jaw v-- TTT
i f& mw
m
72 1
I9M. atieg Ttmnm SytvfccMe. Iwf . Cecal Hum cirCT anened
TOOTS AND CASPER
By DARRELL McCLURE
HM UP AW LET ME KkJOW WHM J
i- 5MCAK IWTO HIS OFFICE
w. UC1 I B O A mm mm, . mmm . .
iii.aubMoW iu eHekU'maV'-
MICE IF HE
COUVD??.
0N
JThat Time La Kentncky"
eity ef Oregon. '
7:00 Our Growing CiUsens,' Prof. W. 6.
, - - Beattie. University of Oregon.
T:13 How Primitive Think, Dr. Ales
under Goldenweiser; V, of Onegon.
7:45 Market reports, crops and Weath
. er iore5t. . - j , .
8 :00 r-Scenes i rom The Riralt, by drama
- department, Univt-nity ef Oregon
SOPHIE IS STILL FUPWUS TnOT
aair ir vm. . . , . . - . . '
""Wir luvjaAlx I ALK HrK 1NTU
MAKING UP WITH ME I'LL' CERTAINLY
AfMVlr-s! JtVf anaS .
r-vTcciMit 11 ; -Ht. IN THE
UVlNj-ROOM N0W1
UO. TOOTS' I'LL NEVER FORGIVE MY HUSBAND
TOR THE WAY HET5 MADE A FOOL. OUT OF ME!
HE SAID HE WAS A DUKE AND I BELIEVED
HIM! I THOUGHT I YiX ADUCHSSS! HE LET
. ME PARADE AROUND AS A DUCHESS!
WHY DID HE HAVE TO DRA& ME INTO HIS
CRAZY HOAX?
By JDV1MY MURPHY
I MADE A FATAL. MISTAKE WHEtf I MARRIED
HIM! I MADE A MISTAKE WHEN I DIDnT DIVORCE
t m saa. A AaV a t A f I a a si lAt aai a a aaessa t a mf a mmmmm m. m.
rtin UUT4CI HtiUl HD rvMUUt ui-t rvo oct.r4
A VXCEION OF MISTAKES AND OL PROVE
IT TO YOU! RI&HT NOW rLL TELL
YOU ABOUT THAT TIME
IN KEMTUCKY-r-
DONT"
TELU
ABOUT,
THAT:
'SOPHIE!
t M sae?rl
eitn.tiai
(law Si mim I
r?0
iSyndicatnla.
rr looks
ukc -
WERI
NOW
- THE
ON THE
SECRET
CCL0NEL
HOOFER'S
UFE ' ;
o-trf
CONTlNLrEO.
TOMORROW
v.
V
i
j