The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, November 27, 1930, Page 3, Image 3

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    ML. Angel
Anoithev Unii &ti QpimmMniiy Club List
MIDDLE. GROVE
Edwin Cheatham and Frank
Crane have been working there
the' past week. '
The Intermediate league held
its business meeting at tbe home
of- Blanche Stelnke Tuesday eve
ning. There were nine members
and nine visitors present. A
lightful evening was ejijoyed t-y
everyone.
The Community club met for
Its monthly meeting Friday nlfrhtT
The newly-elected president, Km-
ENDING A FEUD OF MANY YEARS' STANDING
i
GETS HIGH AID
v IS CALLED
Woman's - Auxiliary and
Pioneer of Aurora Passes
Young People of Church
Sponsor Event
Away After Long; and
Active Career
neth VanCleave, presided over tee
business meeting, after which a
social hour waa enjoyed.
m mf va me:
P
HEY
IS ORGANIZED F
PLANS
BAZAAR
Fred J. Schwab Chosen
President of Commun
ity Group
MT. ANGEL., Not. 26. The Mt.
Angel Community club was re-organized
at a special meeting Tues
day ' erenlng in the St. Mary's
school building. Fred J. Schwab,
prominent local farmer, was elect"
ed president "and Sidney Jackson
secretary.
The club gave- a vote of thanks
to Jo Bernt. past president, for
the splendid work he had done for
the club and community in the
past. '
After some discussion a com
mittee consisting of the president.
secretary and J. T. Bauman "was
appointed to meet with the Mt.
Angel city council to try and work
onUparking regulations for Church
street.'
LETTERS AWARDED
IMSiilUE BOYS
AUMSV1L.LE, KOT. 2 - Stu
dents' of this year reeelTlng foot
ball letters are as follows Leon
ard Lee, Leonard . Zuber, Walter
Getchell, Charles Pomeroy, Merle
Johnson, Herbert ' Amos. George
Towle, Wilfred Ditter,-Jack Cor
ser, - Edward Hankel. .Wilbur
Tripp, Jack Kadow and Roy. Wil
cox. '
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Gilbert
are the proud parents of a f lb.
son born Sunday. - The son waa
named Howard John. Mrs. Gil
bert la known as Helen Hankel, a
graduate of Aumsrille high.
, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Walt and
A small son of Portland, Mrs. Bertie
MUlhollen and. son Keith of Mil
waukee ylalted at the P. B. Col
lins home Saturday.
ETan E. K. Bailey and wife,
left Monday "morning for Cosmo
polls, Wash., after spending the
weekend here at the Donker
home, Mr. Bailey has, been hold
ing a two weeks revival at North
Santlam.
w a. rmi and niece, Mrs.
Frank Bowers visited at Hopmere
Saturday with Mr. Keea s sisier,
Mrs. C. Tanauary. .
Ilnmnl anH hlrh SChOOl DlSTed
a practice basketball game Mon
day night the score oemg i w a
iwt tvnr at alumni's. -
t. m.-m decided Sunday the
Bethel S. S. "will have a Christmas
tree. Tuesday night was cnosen
: th. meetln nlaht to choose
committees to Jobk after the pro-.
. gram and preparations for the
.tree. ,vi : . .- , .. .
Diphtheria Case ,
Brines Total of
Year to 40-Mark
a it... .... i a jlf nhthctria.
AH VLUrJ csaar wi . -
the second found in two weeks.
- Tntuitr to the
county health officer, the patient
being an old man wno u
lem.. Investigations have reveal
ed that the case has no relation
. tk. r.nnrtH caflr last
week from among the Leslie
school faculty.
Already this year half again as
A m a rvrtnrted all
last year have appeared in the
county. Lat year there were 24
....... .nd fr this vear there
KMCl! P -
have been about 40. This year
Is a peak year in the diphtheria
cycle, and while there is no. way
of telling bow long cases will
continue to appear. It is hardly to
be believed mat .me coumj ii"
experience anything like the1 25
cases wnicn were reponea w
peak year six years ago.
Waconda Homes
Entertain Guests
WirnvnA. Not. it. Mr
and Mrs. T. A. Ditmars of Fair
field were dinner guests Thurs
day evening at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Arthur uonin. ,. . .
vt snd Mr. V. R. Nusom and
family and Mr. and Mrs. A. W.
Nusom visited Sunday at the
home pf Mr. and Mrs. unanes
Hoover' at Pioneer.
Mr. and Mrs. Karl Brown and
! children and Miss Gladys Brown
I and Leslie Brown were guests
Sunday at the home of Mr. and
Mrs.- Leonard ficaens ai
pendence. .
-The members of tho "Treas
ure Seekers' girls club at Wa
conda will hold their next meet
ing -In January. The 4ate has
I not been set.
s
MANY ATTEND SESSION
SILVERTON, Not. 2 The
union meeting of the Young Peo
ple's Sodalities of Marlon . eounty
held at the St. Paul parrlsh at
Sllverton Tuesday night proved
very- successful, over ISO a people
gathering at the St. Paul halL
Each aoclety contributed num
ber or two to the program follow
ing which ther H retired to the
dining room and enjoyed a mid-
night supper.'
GRANDPARENTS HAPPY
. HAZEL GREEN. Nov. 2 C Mr.
and Mrs. W. G. DavU of this com
munity are, receiving congratula
tions on the arrival -of a grahd
1 daughter, . Doris Lucille, daugh-
: ter of Mr. and Mrs. Homer Davis
of North Howell. Mrs. Davis and
" baby are doing nicely. They are
expected home ! from Sllverton
'. hospital Sunday. ; .: ;
TURKEY SHOOT HELD
MISSION BOTTOM. Nor. I
A turkey shoot waa held at the
- ""i Bert-Jonea pUee Sunday.-A Ur
crowd gathered and ;
keys were disposed of. Lunch was
erred on the fround.;
4. ... . s
(Left to right) Major Philip
Fleming, gradate manager of
athletics at West Point; Captain .
Henry D. Cook, director of
athlatica ; at Annapolis, and
' Lieut. Fred G. Relnecke, grad
uate manager 'of athletics at
Annapolis, - s!gning the papers
for the Army-Navy game to be
played in New s York -on De-
I
cember 13th for the benefit of
the unemployed. The signing1
i took place at the Army and
Navy Club ia Washington. D. C
S
OH Oil SETUP
Withdrawal Effected From
Teamsters' and Truck
Drivers' Group
Arbitration between the local
labor council and the truck driv
ers of Capital Dairies has result
ed In move to organize a dairy
men's drivers organization in the
city, this group to hold a charter
of its own. Move to that effect
was agreed upon at the central la
bor meeting Tuesday night at
the Labor temple.
In the past drivers from one
dairy, the Salem Sanitary, have
been affiliated with the teamsters
and truck drivers' local. The ac
tion taken last night ends a long
period of conferences and arbi
tration with the Capital Dairies'
drivers.
A number of communications
were read at the meeting, Includ
ing one from the Associated Gen
eral contractors of Salem asking
that men of the organised labor
and building trades reduce wages
to a scale that would amount to a
25 per cent reduction. The con
tractors argued that such action
would encourage building at the
present time.
Council Fights Wage Cut
, The central labor ' council has
taken an opposite view of the
wage cut idea, and contends that
as much money as possible should
be kept in circulation now, and
that a wage cut will- 'withdraw
money from use. The council ex
pressed itself as definitely oppos
ed to any move to reduce wages.
The national federation of la
bor has written asking the local
council to work- with eivle com
mittees and other bodies in help
ing out the unemployment situ
ation, It waa reported.
Application of the sub local un
it In'Salem of outside wlremen's
local No. 125 to be reaf filiated
with the central labor council
waa accepted and order given
for the - sub-local to be so noti
fied. There are 35 members in
the sub-local.
A letter was also presented
from the metal trades of the
American . Federation of Labor
asking that the council and lo
cal central bodies confirm metal
trades action in placing Majestic
products of all kinds on the un
fair list because of bad condi
tions In the factory. The local
Mmncil referred the matter to
Khe arbitration committee wlrh
a view to taking the matter up
wlht local dealers. . ,
HUBBARD HAS
NEW POULTRY CLUB
HUBBARD. Not. 26 The
tear her of - the . Hnhbard school
organized a study club Tuesday
arternoon lor tne purpose oi a en
veloping an appreciation of poet
ry. JT. Tt. Bidsrood. the nrlncloal.
was chosen the chairman. The
club will meet the first and third
Mondays of each month at the
school house.
The first meeting will be held
December 1, Monday , evening at
7:30 o'clock at whicn time "iwip
llnr and his poems" will be the
subject for discussion.
. The club is open to memoersmp
to persons outside the school who
are Interested in the study of
poetry.
John Bidwell
Dies in China
WOODBURN, Nov. 2e.- Word
wets received here Sunday by
Mr. and Mrs. J. Bidwell that
their son, John Bidwell, who en
tered the navy- two years ago
was burned to death In a chem
ical fire in China.
John Bidwell lived in Wood
burn practically all his life until
he Joined the navy with a friend.
Frank Butt erf I eld. He attended
the Woodburn grade school and
finished his second year in high
school. He was a popular stu
dent in school and a football
letterman.
GUESTS AT DINNER
SCIO, Not. 2 Mr. and Mrs.
R. s. Thurston, son Glen, daughter
Lorena and Gloria Long went to
Jefferson Sunday to attend a
birthday anniversary dinner for
Mrs. Bit S. Thurston.
PHI EDUCATION
WORK
INTEIST G
Former Oregon Normal In
structor Directing Pro
gram, McNeil Island
MONMOUTH, Nov. 21. Mrs.
N. A. Nelson, accompanied by
her son. Melford, and her daugh
ter, Juanlta, enjoyed a weekend
visit with Mr. and Mrs. Robert
MntiionhArr nf Tacoma: and with
Mr. and Mrs. H. M. ; Stiles of
Stellacoom. Washington.
While stopping with the Stiles
famllv thoT made a trio in a
government speed boat to Mc
Neil's Island, tnree miies irom
tit mainland at Stellacoom. and
n which the federal prison Is lo
cated. Stiles, a former member
ef the Oregon Normal's teacn
lng staff, now is director of edu
oatlnnal work anions the con
victs of the prison. He has two
highly educated assistants, ana
a corps of 14 subsidiary teach
ers, all ef whom are rrom tne
convict ranks.
Tm fiTstem Used
.Stiles has worked out an
elaborate system of mental In
taiitvttnn tAat for the prison
ers. as a means of determining
each one's capability to pursue
hit rhosen educational project.
Cards of various colors are used
to designate the Intelligence rat
ing of eaen inamauai. -mere
are now between sou ana ivuu
MtnvlMa there.
" The educational venture Is the
rii-at in ka trtd at McNeil's Isl
and, its mission being largely to
assist in preparing tne prison
era toward rehabilitation when
IfhArated.
Tha Island la about tWO miles
wide by three miles long, and
contains more tnan loov acres
of land. It presents a rocky
coast line facing the mainland,
but much of it ia cultivable and
is utilized as a large prison
farm, in aaaiuon xo me ran
vMm there are about 200 off!
cials and others living on the
Island.
Melford Nelson and- Stiles at
tended a U. of W. vs. wasntng
ton 9. C. football game at Seat
tle Saturday afternoon.
NEW 1930
Glhievfolet Sixes
In order to make room for our new
1931 cars we are offering a few new
1930 cars at the following prices:
Coupe . . . . . $660
Coach
$670
Club Sedan .
$700
Standard Coupe . $760
SDort Sedan
$775
, j J;rDveMTy Equipped .
Compare tlicse prices with any new automobile old in
W - Your own car in trade and 18 months to pay.
Sa-
TlfT vr
Ms mam
430 North Commercial ,
let
Telephone 1802
AURORA. Not. 26. One of the
oldest pioneers belonging to the
Aurora colony was William Mlley.
familiarly known as "Cap" Miley,
who crossed the plains In 1863,
driving a four-yoke ox team, and
enduring with pioneer eeurage
and patience the trials and priva
tions Incident to the life of the
early settler.
. In this particular train were 40
wagons and 180 persons, who ex
perienced little trouble with the
Indiana, nor were their ranks les
sened ' by serious epidemics and
other physical ills. They crossed
the Missouri river May 5, 1863,
and arrived in Aurora October 4,
1863.- William Miley was born in
Columbia county,. Ohio. August 1,
1844, and comes of German an
cestry, hi father, John Fred Mil
ey, having been born in the fatherland.
At an early age William was
taught the shoemaker's trade and
supplied the colonists with shoes.
After the eolony disbanded he con-
tinned this occupation until with
in a few years of his death.
Ia Early Colony
In 1865, with a mule and two
blankets, "Cap" retraced his steps
to Boise, Idaho, at the request of
Dr. Keil, to meet another caravan
and pilot them to the land of op
portunity. A brother of Dr. Keil
was In this train. Having saved
his hard-earned dollars, Mr. Miley
purchased a quarter section of
land, which he cleared and im
proved in the most primitive way.
the work being done by hand In
spare timej Mr. Mlley was a part
of the famous colony band, play
ing the cornet, and he will be re
membered by old-timers as a con
stant whistler. ...
For a short time during his ac
tive career he and his brother
were in the mercantile business in
Wllsonvllle. He later disposed of
his Interest to his brother, and
also sold the farm, maintaining a
residence in town, where he lived
alone until his death, Monday,
November 24. I
lAie Was Varied
During his long life he was a
bachelor, politician, f shoemaker,
farmer and man of affairs. On the
"CP.
I
A bailiff and four aids were all set
to put the furniture of Mr. and
Mrs. Barry K. Curtis (she's shown)
out on the sidewalk for non-pay
ment of rent in a Chicago apart
ment, when Mrs. Curtis phoned to
the Vice-President of the. United
States, who sent her $400. savin
the day..
renubllcan ticket he was elected
county commissioner for two
terms, where his thrifty habits ap
plied to the money belonging to
the county, saving the taxpayers
manr dollars. He was an Interest
lng conversationalist, and served
afs city councilman two terms and
waa .tnwm m nth B.1 TT mi abso
lutely trustworthy and was re
spected throughout nis long me.
Surviving him is one brother,
VrArierlrV ef Rreenc&stle. Mo., and
a large number of nephews and
kIckm John TT and William J.
Miley. Aurora; Donda Campbell
ant TTata AtipaI of Sherwood! Al-
vln Mlley; Portland; Mrs. Hum
bert, Long Beacn, cai.; vaie
Beck, Sopnia K.eii. aiary. Aaim
ant wmiam Kfoinhftch. Aurora:
Leon Miley. and two sisters, Wil-
hamina and Mrs. Davis or ron
land.
INDEPENDENCE, Nov. 26.
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Perry of An
chorage, Alaska, arrived here
Saturday and will- be the guests
or inenas nere iur
n..OT- vaa a ah. -tlntik In
charge of the creamery in this
place. . .
xt TrnT.TT! r.Rft'E. Nov. 26. -On
Satnriiav ftrnooii. November 29.
there will be a bazaar at the Mid
dle Grove school. The bazaar is
sponsored by the ladles' auxiliary
of the Middle Grove church and
the Intermediate league, the lat
ter having chaj-ge of a cauay
booth. L
is be-inr orecared to
entertain during the afternoon
and evening. Refreshments will
be served. J ,
The Middle Grove church Is in
tha nmcAM of redecorstlon. Rev.
H. H. Scheuerman, Frank Scharf,
Alaskan Power
Rights Granted
WASHINGTON, Nov. 2f.
(AP) The federal power com
mission Tuesday granted appli
cations of George Cameron, .rl
I. and J. D. Zftllerbach, all of kan
Francisco, for a license to con
struct power and paper pulp pro
jects near Juneau, and KetcH
kan, Alaska, which would cot
approximately 115,000.000 each.
WILL IT RAIN TOMORROW?
I CONSULT THIS
WEATHER PROPHET
.a arsar A MrKTII
IT PREDICTS THE WIAim v n-
It's a fine thin to
know In advance Just
what . turn the wea
ther Is going to take.
no n. tm Wa.thar
Prophet will tU you
i m. anr rallatila
manner.
Cat Out This
' Coupon
Get m
WEATHER
PROPHET "
1 for
69c
i
Reg. 1 Value
Mail orders 10c extra
Quaint rractteal
Attractive
gorprUlntly , Accurate
' . w ... ahi. tli. anattiar la SO
Vrl& ther. wVuh me. u f -4 hour.
atysftd of run or -mow.
-" - 1 ' ' . 'J -- a a aa awlatai aAttAJA eirvlev. ft. 11 ft !
deoor?UdS1n tha plrtuS. with thermometer, tlk'a bird houw
etc. It has four windows and two doors.
WOOLPERT & HUNT, Druggists
COURT LIBERTY STw SALEM
$$$$$$$$$ $ $ f $ $$ $ 5 $ $ ?-$' 9.9-4 $
w
r
6
w
w
V
V
w
CO-
w
w
lm pertiity
6 Hiac3SGC 5ottc
Regular price $57.50 to $75.00; Spe-
aal offering at j,Lj mrr
$2-500
You must see these coats to realize
their value. Sizes 16 to 40 only.
Sport and dress coats included with
and without fur collars. Regular price
$12.48 to $25.00. Special offering at
$5
oo
Wash Dress
Complete cleanup of all
Fall Wash Dresses .
Beautiful Styles
and
Materials
Sold for Regular Price
.I1.9S to $2.98
: at
Special Sale Price of
o
3
j -
One Lot of
by the yard
! Plain Colors and Fancy
Crepes, Messalines, Taffetas,
Travel Crepes and Satin
Back Crepes
Our first Silk Clean Up
Sale
Values up to $3.00 a yard
at
a' yd. 1 '
Boys' Wool
Long Pants
Wool - Lone Pants
An Asst. of colors
1kg. Price $1.98
Special Price
$1.39
Boys' Long
Corduroy Pants
drey. Tan, Brown
A wonderful value
at
98c.
pair
Boys' Ruff neck
Sweaters
Coat Style
35 Wool
Reg. Price $3.18
Special Sale Price
$2.23
Boys Extra Heavy
60 Wool
RaHneck Sweaers
Coat Style
Reg. Price $3.98
Special Sale Price
$2.48
Mens Ruff neck Sweaters
Coat Style, 65 Wool
Reg. Price $4.48
Special Sale 2.(0
Boys Ruf fneck Sweaters
An Wool, Coat Style
Reg. Price $4.48
Special Sale
Mens Ruf fneck Sweaters
AH Wool - Coat Styles
Regular Prfce $5.98
Specials 3.73
Free, Free, Free! With every Purchase of $10, one
large $2.50 Doll or $2.50 Zeppelin Airship!
Fi?n. & Sati.
Srttltin . f HDnvrr. nG S S BDavn.
Remember, thee prices are positively the lowest offered and merchandise will
be higher again in the very near future. All market reports are to that effect
and manufacturers' stocks are very low.'
36 in. Baronet
Satin
2 yds.
for
$1.00
36 in. Art Taffeta
S3 $1.00
81 la. or 9-4 Half
I Bleached
Foxcraft Sheeting
8 rds
for
$1.00
Boys 65 Wool
: Unionsuits
a Suit
$1.00
Ladies' Felt Hats
All Latest Styles
$1.00
a Hat
AND MANY OTHER SUCH VALUES STILL LEFT, AS ADVER-
USED LAST WEEK
Those Who Trade at.
dlosihi'g ssiiin)isEvr EaiyriiES oircsEirs -
Salem, Oregon. . JJsj
Save a Substantial Difference ; t ' V:
4A
4A
4
CO
$ 9
$$$$$$$$$$ 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 55 5 5 5 5 jg 55 5 5 S O
4
4r
CO
"CO
CO
v
CO
CO
4A
CO
CO
CO
-co
CO
CO
CO
"CO
CO
CO
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