The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, October 08, 1930, Page 8, Image 8

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    The OREGON STATESMAN. Salem. Oregon, Wednesday Mornlnr, October 8, 1930
PAGE EIGHT
Jimmy Maloiney Haimdls Pirimo Camera
First Deireatt: m U, 50
Stage set
1
RATER
OUTBOXES Ml
Beats big boy to Punches
And has him Missing
Badly Near end
By BILL KING
BOSTON', Oct. 7 (AP) Jlm
tay Maloney, considered a "ham
and egg" heavyweight every
where except in his home city of
Boston, upset the pugilistic world
here tonight by clearlv outpoint
ing Prinro Camera. 265 pound
Italian Behemoth, In a' wild and
Ravage 10-round battle in the
Boston Garden.
Giving 65 pounds away to the
giant, Maloney carried the battle
to him In every round except the
first two and landed the cleanest
punches throughout the furious
slugfest that caused more than
12,000 spectators to yell them
selves hoarse in every round.
Maloney, once he found a way
to prevent the giant from push
ing him Into a corner or against
the ropes, lashed Camera's head
with wide rights and shot
straight lefts into his body. None
of these blows hurt Camera
much but, from the third to the
ninth rounds, they stung, enough
to make him miss often. While
Maloney gamely slugged on to his
lead. Camera instinctively closed
in on him and battered his head
and body with short blows.
This chopping wore Maloney
down gradually but he digested
his punishment in impressive fa
shion and boat Camera to mosf
of the punches up to the ninth
round.
First Suffen-d
Of l S. Invasion '
The defeat was the first suf
fered by Camera since he start
ed his American campaign early
this year. He piled up a record "of
23 victories. 22 by speedy knock
outs, but disquieting rumors fol
lowed most of his contests. The
boxing public, however, appeared
ready to judge Mm by his show
ing against the Boston favorite.
Camera was impressive only
at close quarters. Giving away-
such weight, Maloney had to de
pend upon fast footwork, and it
was seldom that the Italian could
land a clean blow.
Even against the ropes or In a
corner, Camera was only able to
crop short head blows on Ma
loney's head, neck and body. But
he did not even stagger Maloney
at any time.
The Associated Press score
card called the third even and
gave Maloney credit for the
fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and
eighth. The card also revealed
that Camera landed a total of
195 blows to Maloney's 192 but
the latter's were cleanest.
E BITE SEIZES
linS ON ALLEYS
Taking away City league hon
ors, as If by habit, the Bate Rite
bakery boys toppled their bowl
ing pins last night to register
27C9, team high series. Kver
greepfolf with single game high
score of1007 was closest conten
der. High inividual series was
taken by L. Hall, Bake Rite, with
620, and high game by Wilkerson,
of the same team, with 255, two
points below the City league re
cord. Summary:
EVERGREEN
Xay 180 14fi
103
209
ino
221
204
519
571
48
548
576
.Sharkey 174
J.ucma 145
M. Hrmcnway 140
KantoU 212
1H8
142
160
Tot a
8jJ til 3 1007 tt)77
ELKS
Jlusey IJO
Pratt 18 J
rihielda 175
Veider 170
Young 157
1.19
190
184
166
157
131
173
146
165
510
537
532
482
479
2540
Tota'
854 856 830
CHEVROLET
II. Barr 191 191
R. Johntou 181 190
H. Htmnviy 181 163
K. Shamlcy ..167 167
G. Allen 203 180
167
168
14-2
164
164
549
639
486
498
547
2619
Toa'a 923 891 805
BAKE BITS
8. Steinhyck 145 211
V ilkemon 255 157
P. Schmidt 157 190
J. Co 190 176
L. nail 203 214
163
159
183
168
203
519
571
630
S29
620
oTtala
.950 948 871 2769
WIHTEB OASDBir
153 179 150
I.ynek
Rifla ,
I-otU
Jon
Xarr ,
482
169 190
143 147
174 177
173 159
159 - 518
127 417
148 499
190 622
Total
e2 852 773 2437
C. BEDS
184 162
154 191
154 193
179 174
159 148
Mo
ftreenlaw
Foalia
Allii
KeMillaa
ToUli
.630 867 885 2582
Good Condition
Gets Credit ior
Webioot Victory
EUGENE, Ore., Oct. 7. (AP)
The University of Oregon foot
ball team returned today from
Chicago and its 14 to 7 victory
over Drake university. Abont
3500 persons were at the station
to greet the team. '
" Several members of the team
said their - good condition.
brought abont by two weeks of
hard scrimmage, had more to do
with tbelr victory over Drake
180 626
150 495
163 509
1BO 543
'202 509
than anything else,
for Dramatic Climax Today
Can he Tame
Hawahanc
The lad who .shut out the Athletics
for the Cardinals in the sixth
Philadelphia.
' - ") Mill t '
' a "It - ' f 1 ,
- ; I
Red and Black Gridmen
Working Hard as Game
With Silverton Looms
Practices are becoming more
intense and offensive work Is be
ing stressed as Salem high's first
game approaches.
Friday the red and black
horde will engage Silverton high,
Its first antagonist of the season,
at Silverton. Dope on the two
teams is quite lacking since Jt is
the first - game for Salem and
Silverton has net yet had its
strength tested. Silverton must
havgome hopes or it would not
have scheduled the game.
Sale has shown strength in
some departments of the game
during the two weeks' practice
but no test has been made as
yet to determine how it will car
ry on in a full game. Should
Silverton discover a few weak
spots and keep pounding at
them, it would make things In
teresting for '"Holly's" men.
Salem will probably have the
edge over Silverton as far as re
serve material is concerned.
"Holly'' Huntington has an ex
tra center, two extra guards, and
an extra tackle on the line who
can replace the regulars without
weakening the team noticeably.
However he is not so sure of
his reserve strength at the end
positions and may have to rely
on his first string ends to last
full game.
In the backfield there is an
alternate fulTback, an alternate
quarterback and a couple of al
ternate halves. In addition to
these men there are many others
of untried ability who may be
called on to play both on the
line and in the backfield.
Practices' have been Intense
from the first of the season and
offensive work has been empha
sized. This will mean that Sa
lem should have scoring power
but must be careful or Silverton
will slip over some counters. .
Captain Giese and Adapis are
the wing men and have plenty
of weight to make the flanks po
sitions of strength. Both are
hard tacklers and also know how
to get rid of tackles standing in
the way of plays. Otjen and
Coomler are working at tackle
positions and Friday's game will
show just how much strength
they add to the line. They have
been doing well in practice bnt
a first team usually does look
better than the second. "Red"
Rhoten and Lowell Wright are
work li g at guard positions as
are Query and Coffee. Coffee
shows up well both as a play
smearer and as an offensive
man.
Reid and Sanford are working'
at center with Held holding the
edge a little. Should the line
have any weak spots, it is not
likely that the center will be one
of them.
The backfield is strong In all
positions. Weiseer at fullback Is
one of the hardest tackling backs
Salem has had. H also shows
McCarthy Won't
Manage Red Sox
PHILADELPHIA. Oct. 7.
(AP) Robert Quinn, president
of the Boston American league
baseball teaai,' announced to
night he had' called off all nego
tiations with Joe McCarthy, re
cently deposed manager of the
Chicago Cuba..' to manage the
Boston Red.. BOX and that under
no circumstances . would the Red
Sox consider him as manager.
Jack McBride, Shlro, Texas,
flier, landed his plane safely af
ter the propeller had been shat
tered by rifle fire.
'em Again?
Saturday and is slated to pitch
game of the world series today at
his drive when knifing through
the line.
Sugal and James at halfbacks
make perhaps the fastest pair in
the district. ugai is shifty and
does not stop for casual tackles.
He is also a good defensive man
against running plays. James
though not so shifty has speed
enough that he need not worry
about the men behind.
Foreman will have a chance to
display what kind of a field gen
eral he Is. If the backs are able
to advance readily things will be
easy for him but should Silver
ton's defense be hard to pene
trate he will have to show some
resourcefulness. Foreman is a
nice ball packer himself and Is
good at returning punts.
Frank Cross who plays full
back is also a hard driving and
hard working- man. "Holly" ex
pects to use him plenty this sea
son. Grimes and De Marais are
also halfbacks of experience who
may be called on.
Starting late, Salem will have
a game a week with only one
exception until the end of the
season when they meet Chemawa
4 here for the Turkey day classic,
Best Center in West
i "w"iiyiww, mnunn., r . ,imii),jj iu
' VWV- ISP- - - . '
. - c v f- 'j- y l - h
-4. r j j . If, y -a -jJ
,t- ., ;V 1
v',:-v ( "
V - -l , J '
-vvvj - - vv
IJw-aV5sr '''' it??-
I t -t. v i ,
ir;t( - j
t"' ' i
I . . . ti"
Mel Heia, center of Wasbingtoa
coach. Babe Hollingbcrry, Hcin la going to be the all-conference
center this year. Helnhas shown plenty of class on the pivot Job
this season. - -
QUAKER
T
GETSJEXGITED
Interest in Annual Classic
Redoubled as Foemen"
Show Strength
By EDWARD J. NEIL
PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 7
(AP) Staid old Philadelphia,
suddenly aware that the closing
act of a highly dramatic world
series is to be staged upon her
doorstep, went slightly baseball
batty today.
Pride in the hammering Athlet
ics of Connie Mack, surprise at
the gallant comeback of the St.
Louis Cardinals, mingled to stir
np the excitement lacking when
the A's swept the opening two
games of the annual classic here.
The rally of the Cards which re
sulted in the capture of two of
the three battles in St. Louis has
sent the whole town to scrambling
for a chance to be in at the death
when the sixth game starts to
morrow in Shibe park.
The baseball bugs of William
Penn's colony had no idea the
mighty sluggers of Mack would
ever be back to wind up the ser
ies, in their own back yard. They
saw the Cardinal aces, Burleigh
Grimes and Flint Rhem, go down
under the clouting of the boyish
Jimmy Foxx, smiling Al Simmons
and the fighting Micky Cochrane,
saw Lefty Grove and big George
Earnshaw dominate the pitching
situation, and concluded there
was not enough opposition In the
thing to really get excited about.
American League
Domination Faced
But the Cardinals, grim and
determined, rolled back into Phil
adelphia today faced with the
problem of winning tomorrow or
joining in defeat three national
league champions In a row before
them; the Pittsburgh Pirates in
1927, the Cardinals of 1928 and
the Cubs of 1929.
With the Cardinals berthed for
the afternoon in movies or about
the hotel lobby, thinking, talking,
acting out baseball and the Ath
letics Just arrived in their special
train from St. Louis the city it
self went back to talking baseball
and figuring ways and means of
getting Into Shibe park tomorrow.
The 30,000 reserved seats in
the park have been sold but spec
ulators have enough of the paste
boards to make the hunt interest
ing. Prices tonight were rising
steadily with single seats for the
sixth fray selling readily at 15
apiece and up.
There seemed to be consider
able eeling amsng the fans in
the street that a seventh game
will be necessary if Bill Hallahan,
already nominated to do the hurl
ing for the Cardinals, pitches any
where close to his shutout per
formance last Saturday. The gen
eral impression is that Lefty
Grove will be on the hill for the
Athletics again tomorrow. Grove
captured the opener, lost to
Haines in a tight duel Sunday and
came back to hold the Cards safe
after Earnshaw retired for a
pinch hitter in the eighth yester
day. The general belief, is that
Mack will hold Earnshaw in re
serve for the final battle Thurs
day if Lefty fails tomorrow.
State Cougars. According to his
OWN
or Thursday to Hard Fought Series
Bearcat Offense Appears
Ragged in Scrimmage With
Albany College Gridders
CONSIDERABLE raggedness in the offense of the Wil
lamette university football team was uncovered Tues
day afternoon when an informaal scrimmage was indulged
in against the Albany college squad, brought to Salem by
Coach Balcom for the purpose. It was not in any sense a
game and no score was kept. .
Coach "Spec" Keene's varsity
On the
Sidelines
By BRIAN BELL
The world's series attracted an
unusually large quota of former
baseball players, several who had
been stars in the classic in, other
days. Among the heroes of yes
terday was Casey Stengel who
hit home runs to win two games
for the New York Giants. Casey
now is manager of the Toledo
team of the American associa
tion. Another sun browned played
who had much less to say than
the affable Stengel was Tom
Zachary of the Boston Braves,
late of Washington, St. Louis
and New York in the American
league.
This clever pitcher won three
world's series games, two for
Washington and one for New
York, and never lost one. Tha
lefthander has changed his al
legiance since he last ippeared
in the blue ribbon event. Then
he was an American leaguer, but
now he is all for the National.
Zachary won 12 "games for the
Yankees last year and did not
lose one. This year he won 11
games for the Craves and lost
only five, giving him a percent
age far ahead of his team.
Bill McKechnie, former man
ager of the Cardinals whose
1928 team was defeated in four
straight games by the Yankees,
Zachary administering a defeat,
praised the Cardinals and Zach
ary In the same breath.
"They have a great team," he
said. "And they made a great
finish." !-1pi
"Zachary? I'll say he helped
us. He's a wonderful pitcher
and knows what he is doing all
the time.''
Bill had known what it was to
win a world's series before he
lost one, for he piloted Pitts
burgh to victory over Washing
ton in 1925.
Dan Howley, manager of the
Cincinnati Reds, who has yet to
get in his first series, was not
down-hearted although his
team's performance this yeir
must have disappointed
greatly.
"Well the season did us
In one way, at least," he
him
good
said.
"It taught us where we had to
patch up our baseball fences. We
will be able to proceed to better
purpose another year."
Tris Speaker, who is always
mentioned one-two-three in any
discussion of "greatest outfield
ers" was an interested bystand
er. "Spoke"' resigned in the
closing days of the season as
manager of Newark in the Inter
national league.
"No, I have not signed to
manage a club next year and
have no baseball plans," said the
gray eagle.
"I saw BobJy Jones win his
fourth golf title of the year and
got a great kick out of that and
I always get a kick out of the
series."
The biggest "kick" Tris got
was in 1920 when nis Cleveland
Jndians defeated Brooklyn to
win the worlds championship.
Before this year's series Tris
was asked what he thought of
the approaching "battles.
"Well I like the A's," he said.
"That's natural of course for I
played with them, and all my
major league experience was in
the American league with Bos
ton, Cleveland and Philadelphia.
"Of course I never have seen
the Cardinals play and don't
know a thing about them."
FIRST GOLF ROUND
WOODBURN, Oct. 7. Many of
the member of the Wood burn
Golf club hare finished the first
round in the fall tournament play.
In the first round the net score
were taken so the committee
could establish each player's han
dicap. . Nearly all of the men had fin
ished their first round Sunday,
bnt so far only about 18 women
have shot the initial round. El
burn T. Sims, last year's cup win
ner, placed -third . in ' the first
round with a 75: J.H. Nathman
headed the list with It 72 and Bill
Hughes was a close second with
a 74. About fire more men have
yet to play the round.
Scores among the men so far
are: i
Nathman 73, Hughes 74, Sims
T5, Scollard 79r Shorey Paint
er 81, Proctor 81, Withers 81,
Espy M, Olson 82, Gulss 83, Ma
honey 83. Blair 84, Courtney 84,
Hoefer 85, Leasard 85, McCord 85,
Owell 85, C. P. Whitman 86,
Schooler 87, Austin 88, Balllie 88.
DeJardln 88, Macb 90, Harde 91,
Gill 2. Walling 92, Beck 96,
Brown 96, Schwab 98. Harper 99.
Ebner 101, Smolinski 103, Cuts-
forth 116.
Egypt is to have a 81,000,000
agricultural museum.
EMM
men
madfl considerable yardage
on the 1' :hter and less experi
enced Albany players, but Keene
was far from satisfied with the
Bearcats' work and has sched
uled some intensive scrimmage
for the remainder of this week
with a view to improving the
timing of plays.
In fact, Keene said Tuesday
night, his tentative "third
string" eleven looked better
against the Albany lads than did
either the first or second elevens
and if things continue to go that
way, there will be a general
Ehakeup. Paul and Gibson made
some good yardage for "Hiram"
French's third stringers.
Keene has scheduled a game
for Friday afternoon between the j
"old men, those who were on !
the "new men.'' The losers will
entertain the winners at dinner,
it has been agreed.
Walt Erickson's injured wrist
is not improving as rapidly as
was expected and it is probable
that he will not play in the game
with College of Idaho October
18. Another casualty is Eugene
Ferguson, quarterback, who has
not practiced since the Oregon
game. Charley Gill renewed th:
injury to his ankle, in Ure prac
tice with Albany Tuesday.
COAST LEAGUE
W. L. IVt. w. l. rvt.
60 28 .6H2! Seattle 40 4r. .471
48 3fi ..STliOakl. 39 49 .443
44 43 .506!Portland 37 4S .435
41 46 .471! Mission 34 51 .420
Holly.
I.os A.
San F.
Sac'to
SACRAMENTO. Oct. 7 (AP)
Hollywood made a wild finish
of a close ball game here tonight
and tallied six times in the ninth
inning to win the series opener 7
to 4. The Sacs came back with
three in their last half. Hubbell
and Wetzel were the pitchers.
R H E
Hollywood 7
Sacramento 3
Wetzel and Bassler;
and Wirts.
11 1
7 3
Hubbel
Ducks win Easily
SAN FRANCISCO. Oct. 7
(AP) Portland's Beavers pound
ed George Caster and Herman
Pillette for eighteen hits today to
score an easy 13-3 victory over
the Mission Reds. A six run ral
ly in the first frame put the visi
tors well in the lead. The locals
nicked Lahti for a dozen hits but
the latter Teceived good support.
Hale and Kramer hit homers for
Portland.
R H E
Portland 13 18 0
Missions 3 12 3
Lahti and Palmisano; Caster,
H. Pillette and Brenzel.
OAKLAND, Oct. 7 (AP)
San Francisco 7 13
Oakland F 1 2
Douglas, Turpin and Penebsky
Phebus, Hurst, Joiner and Read.
LOS ANGELES, Oct. 7 (AP)
R H E
Seattle 15 13 6
Los Angeles 13 16 3
Reuthcr and Cox; Gabler and
Skiff.
R H E
Seattle 11 17' 0
Los Angeles 1 3 2
House and Borreani; Barfoot
and Warren.
(7 innings by agreement).
E
OREGON STATE COLLEGE,
CorvaUhi, Oct. 7. George Dra
per, a former Salem high school
football star, Is one of the 80 or
more freshman football aspir
ants who turned out for practice
under the direction of Coach
Dick Newman. He is showing
up well in practice and will prob
ably see plenty of action during
the coming season. Drager Is 6
feet 11 Inches in height and
weighs 160 pounds. He plays
end on the team.
The freshman schedule In
cludes - five - games, four to be
played In Corvallis, and one in
Eugene. All of the contests will
be staged at- night under the
lights. Here is the complete
freshman schedule:
October 3, Chemawa at Cor
vallis. October 11, open..
October 17, Ashland Normal
at Corvallis.
October 24, Oregon frosh at
Corvallis.
October 31. St. Martin's col
lege at Corvallis.
November 14, Oregon frosh at
Eugene.
PETE CERKAX W1XS
SAN JOSE. Cal., Oct. 7.
(AP) -Pete Cerkan, 173, Port
land, stopped JoeRed" Neilsen,
185, Monterey, in the second
round here tonight. Neilsen held
nis own in the nrst round but a
stiff left that Cerkan drove into
his mid-section early In the sec
WILD FINISH WINS
FI HOLLYWOOD M
BOOKS
SQUAD
ond brought down the -entrain.
1
OJIEI
COMMENTS
CURTIS
From the casual -ctator's
standpoint, football hasn't
changed ninth ! the last 20
years; from the standpoint of
coaches and players- it lias
changed greatly.
I
There mav be some persons
who habitually a:tend football
games yet don't know that the
game has changed at all since
1910 except for the moving of
the goal posts and the changing
of rules about the try for point
after touchdown.
Most of the major changes
were made in the few years
prior to 1910; the forward
pass, the direct pass to the
ball carrier and ten yards in
four downs.
The dfrect pas idea was rath
er slow in catching on. As Jate
as 1919 we were still somewhat
adept at takfng the ball from
center
in
the old quarterback
position and
poking it into the
j tummy of a ball earner, ract
. i, many roaches considered that
i system still good even though
j not required, because the ball
carrier had nothing to think
about hut petting out of there.
On a- direct pass, he has -also to
rnako sure of getting the ball,
v.hile the center lias t tie problem
of leading him to the" loft or
right as the case may be. Wheth
er the theory was light or not,
the quarterback pass is "out"
completely now, at least in its
original form.
O
But beyond all these ob
vious changes, there have been
numerous developments which
the lay observer scarcely can
discern. Tventy years ago the
first fundamentals taught
I
O-
Business
AMUSEMENTS
SaVm Oolf Course 2 miles south
on River Drive. 18 hole watered fair
wavs, lari?e Krens. I'ecs 7 5c, Sundays
and holidays, H-OO.
RKKTEE GOLF, driving practice,
20 balls for 10c. For men and wom
en. Winter Garden, 333 N. High.
AUCTIONEERS
F. N
IS Tears Palrm's Leading Auctioneer
and Furniture Dealer
Residence and Store
1C10 North Summer St
Telephone til
AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLIES
V. E. Burns Dan Burns. S. High
St. at Ferry. Tel. 422 or 2300.
BATHS
Turkish baths and massage.
Logan. Tr-leplione 2214. New
S. H.
BATTERY ELECTRICIAN
R. D. Barton National Batteries
Starter and generator work. 202
South High.
BICYCLE REPAIRING
LLOYD E. RAMSDEN Columbia
Bicycles and repairing. 387 Court.
The best In bicycles and repairing.
H W. Scott. 147 S. Com'l. Tel. 68.
CHIMNEY SWEEP
Telephone 110. R. E. Northness.
FURNACES and chimneys defined
and repaired by expert furnace man.
use stet-1 brushes nr.d a vacuum
cleaner. 5 yrv. experience. Call
2S38J.
CHIROPRACTORS
Dr. O. L. SCOTT. PSC. Chiropractor.
2S6 N. High. Tel. 87. Res. 2J04-J.
DRS. SCOFIELD. Palmer Chiro
practors. X-Ray and N". G. M. New
Bank Bldg.
MAGNKCTIC treatments for. neuri
tis, gas, flu, etc. Will call at the home
bv request. Tel. 2079-W. 330 N. Hirh
CLEANING SERVICE
Center St. Valeterla. TeL 2227.
Stand. Cleaners A Pyr. Call 1433.
ELECTRICIANS
HALIK ELECTRIC CO. New kw.
tlon, 337 Court St. Tel. No. t.
FLOOR CONTRACTING
FLOORS
of all kinds sanded and
finished.
OJjojToorOjJTOFront.
FLORISTS
FLOWERS FOR AT.T. ium,lnfi
Olsen'B, Court St High St. Tey. 881.
CUT Flower. VMMInf twnunuta
funeral wreaths, decorations. C P.
Brelthanst. florist til Ktata tttrt
TeL 380
WE make ud jti
our flower. Lota.
Florist, 16th Mf
Market. Tel. 1124.
GARBAGE
Salem Scavenger. TeL 1C7 r 2290.
Loe Garbage Co. Tel. 15C1.
HEMSTITCHING
NEEDLEWORK.
415 Court
Margaret's Shop.
INSURANCE
WILLAMETTE INS. AGENCY
t- i- Bllven, Mgr.
... Exclusive ButUvIUe Agent
315 Masonic Bldg. TeL 18J.
BECKE
189 K. High
HENDEJCKE
TeL 111
were falling on the ball block
ing and tackling. Some years
later there was a great hulla
baloo because some Princeton .
man had violated precedent,
and picked up the b?ll instead
of falling on it.
That much the non-playing
fan causht, but probably le
doesn't know that tackling and
blocking have aiso cnanged in
the last 20 years yes, in tie
last ten.
Ten years ago blockers went,
out ami took a dive at their
man; so did tacklers. If they
didn't, they raoglit pluty
from the coaching staff. There,
are still occasions when that's
done, but it isn't the rule.
Fact is, th rule is the eat
opposite. It used to be "leave
your feet." Now It's "keep
your feet under you and keep
driving."
Chief reason for that ehango,
in turn, is a change in style of
ball carrying of which Red
Grange was the most notable ex
ponent. In the old days ball
toters were taugh-t to keep mov
ing straight ahead and use th
stiff-arm; never dodge. Now,
loose hips are at a premium.
And the tackier who dives ii
sure to meet thin air. That
isn't the same with blocking, but
as a matter of fact, the old sys
tem never was so hot. It wat
so easy to "stick the blocks in
the ground."
You may not know it, hut
Hoi I is Huntington, our pi-e
ent hih school coach, was one
of the (level est blockers f
the old type who ever donned
a Heated sho. Throughout
his college football career hr
invariably had a lone assign
ment to take cure of the Mf,
when not packing the ball
himself. Anil Knute Rockm
later mentioned, in a coaching
class where Hoi lis was pres
ent, that Holli.4 hm the only
man he'd ever seen who could
do it consistently.
Directory
LAUNDRIES
THE NEW SALEM LAUNDRY
TIFE WEIDEP. LAUNDRY
Telephone 25 263 S. lli:h
CAPITAL CITY LAUNDRY
"The Laundrv of Pure Materials"
Telerbon
1?4 Brno. In-.TV
MATTRESSES
New spring-filled mattresses retail
ed directly from factory to you. Capi
tal Citv Bedding Co. Tel. 19. So 30
North Capital.
GEO. C. WILL Pianos, Phono
graphs, sewing machines, sheet music
and piano studies. Repairing phono
irraphs and sowing machines. t'-'2
Stnte otTpct. P.ilim.
OFFICE SUPPLIES
Everything in off!-e "ipplles. Com
mercial Boo'.; Store, 152 N Com I.
Tel K4
PAPER HANGING
PHONE GLENN
decorating, paji.r
etc. Relinl.l.i v..r
ADAMS for hoi ire
.Vangir,. tinting.
PLUMBING and HEATING
PLUMBING an!
work. Graber Br is..
Sonera rep.-, if
155 So. Liberty.
PLUMBING & SUPPLIES
Mesher Plumhlng Supply Co.,
PnnimorH.T 1 T.'l ST'IO
171 S.
PRINTING
FOR STATIONERY, cards, pamph
lets, programs, books or any kind of
printing, call at T!v Statesman Print
ing Department. ZZ S. Commercial.
TelephonM ."OK
RADIO
FOR every purpose, for every purse
All standard sizes of Radio Tu)r
EOFF ELECTRICAL SHOR C-!7
Court St. Tel. 33.'..
REPAIRING
LAWN mowers sharpened, saw fii
Ing. kevs. etc. Sla'irt. 251 Court.
STOVES
STOVES and stove repairing. Stovr
for sale, rebuilt anil repaired. All
kinda of woven wire fence, fancy an.l
plain, hop baskets and books, loran
hook. Saletn Fenr and Stove Works.
22 Cbemeteeta ictrct. R. B. Fleming.
TAILORS
D. H. MOSHER Tailor
and women. 4 7 Court St.
for men
TRANSFER
CAPITAL. City Transfer Co. 22
State St. TeL 23. Distributing, for
warding and storag our specialty.
Get our rates.
FOR local or distant transfer stor
age, call 3121. Larmer Transfer rv
TruckoPortlajjdJally
WASHING MACHINES
WASHING machine repairlnr.
all
makes. TeL 221 S.
Real Estate
Directory
BECKS
1S N. High
HENDRICKS
TeL 1C1
... ' . S. VL EARLE
224 K. fclgh St.
TeL 2142
J.
4S SUte
LINCOLN
ELLIS
TeL 37t
HOMER D, FOSTER REALTY CO.
370 Vs State SC TeL S4 3
- W. H. ORABELNHORST ft CO. -134
a Liberty St. TeL 518
SOCOLOFSKY 80fI
804-5 First Nat. BJfc Bldg. TeL 970
J. F. ULBJCH
129 N. Commercial
TeL 1354
F. I WOOD
i
I
I
I
I
4
I
TeL 794
f .
441 SUte SC