The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, January 30, 1930, Page 10, Image 10

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The OimGON STATESMAN." Salem. 7)rgoh, Thursday Morning, January 30, 1930
ISLES IY CET :
iriDEPEODEfJGE
PRINCESSES RARELY SEEN
!
!
J
Philippine Issue Taken Up
By United States' Con
gress Shortly
WASHINGTON. Jan. 29
(AP)-I Tne 32 year old controver-
iisnMwd liknl-r tnd&v to come nP
for decision by the senate daring
, nl Un nf lo tor.
v4tnria nmmittpp announced In
tbV senate that his committee
hoped! to complete hearings on
Philippine Independence by Feb
ruary 10 and tnat nu woi
be reported to the senate as soon
thereafter aa nosslble. Honse
actlojxj appears unlikely, howeTer.
Two nave been eonsiaercu
by the! committee, one by Senator
King, democrat, uian, o iree me
Filipinos and the other by Bing
ham to appoint a commission to
Investigate the question and re
port r necommenaaiions o con
areas. It also was disclosed to
day that Senator Vandenberg. of
Michigan, an administration
member of the territories com
mittee,! is preparing a bill which
would ffre the Filipinos indepen
dence In ten years and gradual
tariff atutomomy.
"I am for Philippine. Indepen
dence if and when the islands are
politically and economically
ready! he said. "I will not be
satisfied that they are poli
cally and Economically ready un
til we hare a 10-year laboratory
test." I
Discussion of Philippine inde
pendence broke oat in the senate
when Senator Tydings. democrat,
, Maryland, asserted that recent la
bor riots on the west coast af
forded imple grounds for grant
ing independence In the near fu
ture, j
Tydings said this country al
ready has race problems on lti
hands and Philippine immigra
tion would make solution more
difficult! as long as freedom of
the Islands is postponed and no
cribed. j
He described as "illogical" the
United States Immigration poli
cy which excludes Japanese and
Chinese land admits Filipinos.
Senator Johnson, republican,
California, said the authorities of
his state would safeguard the In
terests of Filipinos as far as pos
sible, but added that "something
must bej done."
"Whether the difficulties can
be met jby granting the Filipinos
independence I do not know,'' he
added.
SenatAra Tlill Washington and
Hawes, Missouri, democrats join
ed in urging independence.
Local Insurance
Company Holds
Annual Meeting
Frank! A. Bell of Sublimity was
reelected president of the Farm
ers Firef Relief association of
Sublimity at the recent meeting.
Other officers reelected were,
Henry Steinkamp, Tlce president;
and Chairles ' Hottinger, Stayton,
secretary. Directors of the com
B pany are? Frank Saalfeld, Salem;
'John Pender, Scio; Q. A. Sandner,
Scio and Andrew Fery, Aumsville.
The annual report showed that
the average cost for fire loss and
running I expenses during the S3
years of! the companies existance
, averaged! less than $2 per $1000
of the Insurance in force.
During the past year 68 poli
cies were Issued, Insuring 117
'' buildings and contents for the
amount jof $80,430.00 On Janu-
- ary 1, '1330 there were 709 poli
ties In fbrce insuring property to
the value of $847,000.
Receipts for the year were:
Premium and Assessments $2,
I90.4S; jlnterest $394.00; Total
Receipt were $3,284.45. This
year we! experienced ,the largest
fire loes since our organization
thirty-three years ago, with three
i tire losses amounting to $2,180.
i ' The total' fire losses-paid In thirty-three;
years was : $11,114.00.
Of fleers ; salaries and agents' fees
were $735.00 Net gain for 1929
- was $46.00 ;
.The company has on deposit in
the Bank of Stayton, checking ac
count of $1,845.31 and on sayings
- 1391.04,1 and has six farm loans,
bearing i per cent interest total
ing $8,400. Total Resources
Sl.lS3.Sj5. .
'.. ,'
Liniield Expects
' More Students
U !
McMlKNVILlE. Jan. 29 En
rollment at Idnfield college; la
expected to be higher during the
second semester than at any time
la the. history of the school, ac
cording j to an announcement
made- by? 7. Kenneth Riley, regis
trar this) l week. More than 300
students will register; he believes.
Final (examinations for the fall
semester j are being held this
week. Registration f or the spring
term will open February 3.
Dallas to Hear
Fame s Lecture
1 DALLAS. Jan. 29 Rev. W.
T. Tapscott of Suver, Oregon,
retired pastor of the Baptist
enmrch, will give Dr. Russell Con
lr ell's noted lecture "Acres of Di
amonds'' at the Methodist church
oa Thursday evening, January
- Seta beginning at 7:S.
1 Ur. Tapscott who is regarded
aa aa excellent 'speaker will re-
arodace this wonderful; lecture
which . haj been delivered ' from
- the pabUe - platform more than
- 1,101 tUox':;'--
. ' LOCAL WEATHER BOLD -
JXJTIRSON. Jan. 31. Mrs.
Charles Randolph arrived Satur
day from The Dalles for a TUlt
with her sisters, Lydla and Emma
: Trabes. the states that two art
aavtag mild weather compared to
1 1 ha below aero - 'temperatures
there, the temperature coins to
,11 and 23 degrees below aero.
a
Salem Heights School
'.'.
Princesses
Sink (left)
and Elisabeth,
aged 9 and 7,
respective! f,
are Hying
in exile with
their mother,
the beautiful
: ex-Empress
Zita, widow
oi the late
Kng Charles
I el Austria,
T recently
moved from
: Spain to
Belgium.
SALEM HEIGHTS SCHOOL,
Jan. 2$. (S p e c 1 a 1) Students
averaging a grade of A for the
last school term are:
Eighth grade: Erika Ohm, Dor
is Battles, Harvey Larsen, Eliza
beth Casebeer.
Seventh grade: Jack Bohan-
non, Eileen Van Eaton, Marjorie
Pruitt,
Fifth grade: Lillian Berg, Paul
Jones.
Sixth: Paul Burger, Isabelle
Rothweller, Robert Williams,
Shirley Stevenson.
Fourth grade; Arthur Miller.
Helen Kasberg, Eunice Wright.
Third grade: Lois Douglas.
Pauline Herschback.
First grade: Doris Polanskl.
Muriel Ginser, Lois Polk.
The seventh grade held Its reg
ular class meeting Friday after
school. Following a brief business
meeting games were played and
light refreshments were served
by the girls.
A camp cookery club has been
organized by the eighth grade.
The name chosen for the club is
The Fast Workers.
Many Interesting health Eng
lish and safety first posters have
been made by the pupils of the
upper grades.
Friday la to be the English tag
day for the pupils of the seventh
and eighth grades. Each pupil
has made a tag correcting mis
takes which have been made In
English. The original Idea of
each pupil will make this event
very interesting as they will be
various shapes, eolors and slo
gans displayed. Each one will
wear his tag Friday.
Billy McReynolds was very un
fortunate last week. While coast
ing, bis sled struck a telephone
pole, throwing him against It and
breaking his leg. Billy was very
determined so returned to school
after two day's absence.
MOVE TO TOLEDO
MONMOUTH, Jan. 29. Clay
Taylor, formerly eity marshal of
MSnmouth, has been appointed a
member of the Newport police
force and will move there with
his family, February t. For sev
eral years Mr. and Mrs. Taylor
conducted "Virginia Hurst, one
of the moapopulr . student homes
Prohibition Problem to Be
Gone Over Again Before
Committee
By CECIL B. DICKSON
Associated Press Staff Writer
WASHINGTON, Jan. 19 (AP)
The whole prohibition question
from repealing the eighteenth
amendment to modifying the dry
laws, will be opened t- the wets
and drys in hearings to begin be
fore the house udiciary commit
tee on February 12.
This course was decided on by
Representative George S. Gra
ham, chairman of the committee,
because he felt "that the propon
ents of measures to repeal the
eighteenth amendment and . to
modify the prohibition laws, are
entitled to a hearing."
With the exception of a short
session held by a subcommittee In
1121, this will be the first time
the legislative proposals to repeal
the dry act have been brought be
fore the Important house com
mittees. The full committee will
take testimony on seven resolu
tions to repeal the controverted
amendment; and a subcommittee
headed by Representative Dyer,
republican, Missouri, later will
consider a score of proposals to
modify the Volstead act. Includ
ing Dyer's z.75 per cent beer pin.
The house expenditures com
mittee prepared to end Its consid
eration tomorrow of the William
son bill to transfer the prohibition
unit from the treasury to 4he
justice department. Modifications
to make It obligatory but not
compulsory tor the latter to in
vestigate Industrial alcohol per
mits Issued by the treasury were
agreed on today. A subcommittee
in town, located on Monmouth
avenue. After disposing of prop
erty Interests here they bought a
service station at Vancouver, Wn.,
which they sold last September.
Here is your new
SPRIN
G
SUIT
and what you need
Select your new suit first, for on this selecfjoq
depends everything else you will need, Our
young men's, two-button, single-breasted mode
with peak or notch lapel Is especially popular
this year. Choose from a number of excellent
fabrics in the light and medium shades of Spring.
$19.75
160 N, Liberty St.
to go
with it I
Baying your Spring outfit these
days, means more than buying a
new suit, You need the acces
sories, Htm little tilings without
which, no outfit is complete, .
We bare concentrated fa oar
comfortable men's department,
all of the thlngi that a man
needs for these Spring days
and for many days after.
Marathon
Hats
3.93
Broadcloth
Shirjs
1.98
Fancy
Socks
49c
Dress
Oxfords
4.98
appointed - to perfect the prork
alon. walcn would prevent the
secretary ef the treasury n from
having anything to do with pro
hibition enforcement, even though
the Industrial alcohol permits are
Issued by the . treasury and Justice
departments Jointly.
IT
DIES
Wife of Jefferson's Pioneer
Methodist Minister Pass
es Away
JEFFERSON, Jan. 29 The
many friends of Mrs. Martha A.
Longsworth were grieved to learn
of her andden death last Thurs
day at the home of her daughter,
Mrs.-Alma Denby at Hillsboro,
where she has made her home for
the past two years.
Mrs. Longsworth was born in
Iowa, April 10, 1843, and with
her parents. F. M. and Nancy
Cook crossed the plains in 1851,
stopping at the site of Salt Lake
City for a year. When they came
to Oregon, taking up a donation
land claim in Lane county.
On August 6, 1859 she was
united in marriage, to B, M.
Longsworth. who was pastor of
the first Methodist church in Jef
ferson, located on the site of the
present stage terminal. Mr.
Longsworth preceded her more
than 40 years ago.
The greater part of her life was
spent in the vicinity of Jefferson
where she was held In high es
teem, always Interested and loy
al to the work of the church. She
was a good Christian, and always
willing to go where help was
needed. Surviving her are her
daughter Mrs. Alma Denby and
Mrs. Addle Tildon of Hillsboro
and one son Grant Longsworth of
Portland.
SNOW BREAKS AWNING
BILVERTON, Jan. 29. The
wooden awning over the Kubber
ness creamery on North Water
street went down this week un
der the weight of snow and Ice.
The awning was fastened with
heavy cables and chains and no
fear had. been felt' that It would
not hold. The awning was 1
feet wide and IS feet long. It will
be rebuilt as soon as 'the weath
er Clears up. .
JEFFERSON, Jan. St. Mr.
and Mrs. R. A. Golden returned
to Portland Monday after a
week's vialt with their mother,
Mr. Anna Vaughn, and sister.
Flora.
Mrs. F. Mathews :
Funeral Services
At Silverton
SILVfcRTON, Jan. 29. Funer
al services for Mrs. Frances
Mathews, who died here Tuesday
mornlpf, will be held Thursday
afternoon at 2:00 o'clock from the
Jack and Ekman chapel.
Mrs. Mathews, wno was J
years old, has been at Silverton
for the past several years, com
ing here from South Dakota, She
has been ill for the past year.
She died at the . home of her
daughter, Mrs. Sylvia Herbison.
VTftTTOftA TX firLVKRTON
SirfVERTON. Jan- 19. Mr.
and Mrs. Edwin Winger were call
ers at Sllrerton this week. The
Wingers hare just returned from
a trio to Iowa, returning by the
aouthe.u route.
The Dixie Bakery
Now Under New Management
Mr. S. A. Moore - - ("Del" Moore)
has taken over the Dixie Bakery plant
and will operate it as
NOTICE
Beginning Feb. 1st the plant will be open on Saturdays and
Our Salesman will Call on all Customers
(Formerly Dixie Bakery)
445 Court Street
Tel. 954
B.B-B-B-B-B-B-B-B-B-B-B-B-B-B-B.Bte
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Commer
cial St. at
Marion
Low Everyday Prices Assure Daily Savings
Open Eve
nings Tin
9 o'clock
Fisher's Blend. Scones
FREE!
Fisher Milling Co., manufacturers of Blend Flour, will serve steaming hot
scones free all day Saturday at the Market. We invite every one. It's not
necessary to buy anything to get these scones. Come, bring the youngsters,
too
Fisher's Blend
49 Lb. Sack
$1.95
Fisher's Blend
24 2 Lb. Sacks
$1.05
Fisher's Blend
10 Lb. Sacks
53c
DEL MONTE
COFFEE
Vacuum Packed
One of the Brand
.1 Lb. Cans 41c
Lb. Cans 80c
FANCY PEABERRY
COFFEE
Freshly Roasted
Ground to order
Lbs.
95c
BUSICK'S BLEND
COFFEE
la a biz vataeat
25C per Lb.
Shasta Tea
Green or Black
Lb. Pkf. 29c
Vi
Summer Time
FRUIT
FRESH
Loganberries
2 Lbs. 35c
RED
Raspberries
2 Lbs. 35c
Strawberries
35c
Pounds
TEXAS
Grape Fruit
Juicy
3 for 25c
Fancy Large Size
ORANGES
NAVEL
Doz.
63c
WAGNER
APPLES
Nice even size sound fruit
Per Box $1.59
FRESH VEGETABLES ARE
MORE PLENTIFUL AND
OF BTSTTBR QUALITY
THIS WEEK. AS USUAL
YOU WILL FIND THE
ON DISPLAY HERE
Pure Lard
t Lb. Pails 65c
Fancy Sugar Cured
BACON
Squares 16c
SUGAR CURED
HAMS
Vt or Whole, Lb. 29c
UMECO
Margarine
3 Lbs. 45c
Steaming Hot
Scones Free.
Fresh Crisp
Soda Crackers
Cadys 43c
Satin Finish CANDY
Per Pound 10c
Jolly Time POP CORN
3 xs. 25c
Small White
Beans -
3 Lbs. 25c
Blue Rose
RICE
6 Lbs. 45c
Son Ripe ROLLED OATS
No. 10 Sack 45C
White er Yellow .
CORN MEAL 39c
3'B'BB- BtB-B - B - B - B-B - B - B- B-B-B-B-
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