The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, April 15, 1928, Page 4, Image 4

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    THE OREGON STATESMAN, SALEM, OREGON, SUNDAY MORNING, APRIL 15, 1928
D
(IS Till
GETTING PLAN
t
EUP
eVTWAlEK KENT FOUNDATION AGAIN
OPENS OPPORTUNITY FOR SINGER
Altitude of Over 6000 Feet
- In Arizona Makes
- Take Off Hard
WILLIAMS, Arts.. Apr. 14
(AP) Colonel Charles A. Lind
bergh, flier de luxe, spent the
morning hopping up and down in
the ratified atmosphere of this
lofty district today. The altitude
ls i.7 feet. .
The last hop took the colonel
Into an isolated wooded area six
miles from Williams. Neither he
nor his partner was damaged in
the unexpected descent.
;.j Lindbergh brought his brand
new ship Into Williams last night
from California, Apologized for
not starting earlier, and turned
In for an early rise today. Lear
Lag his two companions. H. M
Bixby and Harry Ball Knight be
hind, Llndy "lone eagled" out to
ward the Grand Canyon area. In
fire' minutes he was back, made
no comment and started again.
This time he did not return.
When rumors reached town
'Chat the flier was "forced down
headed toward the spot. There
on the window of the smart mono
plane .was the note "Gone to
lunch."
They found Lindbergh a few
hundred yards away eating lunch
- at a farm house whose owner had
not yet recovered from the shock
f having so illustrious a visitor.
Meanwhile it was whispered
about Williams that Lindbergh
wanted to work on his plane and
decided to do it in the "sticks"
where he would not be bothered
by crowding hero-worshfppers.
Whether this report was true or
not. the flier found a sizeable
gathering about his ship when he
returned from his lunch.
i Lindbergh promptly denied be
fog forced down but declared that
what he was looking for was a
field with a runway big enough
to successfully take off with two
jassengers and a full load of gaso
line. , The Williams field, he said.
was not large enough.
Lindbergh said he expected to
leave this afternoon for the new
tamlllar "unannounced" destination.
w h - Air
nT -is) i-w3:; &
wflBVH.W VXk y ' I vast
A. Atwater ICeat, president ef The FouadatiM, mmi the rt-plc wis
a art ta the National Radi Audition for 1527. Mr. Kent has just
announced plana for repeating tho aation-wid song contort tnio yoni
Rumors Say Bremen May
Have Fuel for Short Hop
MM GETS
IS
INCHES
SHOW
Mercury In South Dakota
T Drops Down To Six De
' grees Above Zero
f CHICAGO. Apr. H (AP)
Spring today meant 18 Inches of
now1- In Minnesota, a temperature
f six degrees above zero In South
Dakota, and snow and freed nr
Weather In Illinois, North Dakota.
Wisconsin and Iowa.
J Unpaved highways In Wiscon
sin and Minnesota, softened by
thaws, were buried under, snow
i that snowplows were V. pnable to
!te the J-oad!.irere too
fT ' Ult the ms.chL)-'''
1" ' ' thai winter had pas
jj? ' 3w;'enees used to break
.L, snow had been removed
e In most of the northwest, and as
I result virtually all highways
j were covered with drifts. In Mara
; toon county, Wise, only one-road
open. In the vicinity of
Chippewa Falls, trains were being
operated with two locomotives.
The nnseasonal storm swept in
from the southwest, rain turning
to snow yesterday. Bus service in
Minnesota and Wisconsin, was in
any instances, discontinued. One
driver returned to Minneapolis to
import drifts seven feet high cov
ering the highways.
TIB llll KILLED
Mil ILL CAVES
Crushed To Death 16 Feet
Below Surface of Port
; i land Street
QUEBEC. April 14. (AP)
Brief messages today indicated
that the marooned transatlantic
monoplane Bremen may have
saved enough fuel so that it can
continue its flight if necessary re
pairs can be made with what few
tools are available on Greenly
Island in the straits of Belle Isle
At nrst it was heueved that a
forced landing on the tiny island
had been necessitated by exhaus
tion of the fuel supply but frag
mentary reports today led to tLe
belief that the Bremen came down
chiefly because the pilots bgave
up hope of establishing their posi
tion in the dense fog through
which they wandered for hoars.
If this Is indeed the fact and if
repairs can be made, only enough
fuel would be necessary to fly to
rort baunaers. 50 miles away,
only six or eight gallons, where a
supply suffiicent to continue to
Bill In Congress Would
Transfer Indian Lands
WASHINGTON, April 14.
(AP) A bill to authorize the
secretary of war to transfer a tract
of land in Oregon to the secretary
of the Interior for use by Indiana
now occupying it as a fish camp
site was Introduced today by Rep
resentative Leavltt. republican, of
Montana. The land originally
was acquired as right of way for a
projected boat railway in connec
tion with improvements of The
DaUes-Cellilo section of the Co
lumbia river.
New York could be obtained. Only
regular commercial gasoline is
available at Port Saunders, but it
was believed that the Gremen en
glne could be adjusted to use this
Instead of the special fuel It
burned on its ocean flight.
In the meantime while the fliers
were preparing to get out from
their Island prison, plans were
under way from the outside to get
in to them. Because of the nature
o fthe1 ice pack surrounding the
Island and separating it from the
mainland, it was believed to be
accessible to planes only if they
were equipped with sklis.
The first plane of this type left
Mursny bay, Quebec, today pilot
ed by Dr. Louis Culslnier, and was
expected to reach the island dur
ing the night, leaving again to
morrow with the transatlantic1
fliers if they were willing to leave
their own ship behind for the time
being. Another plane was to
start for the island ni the morn
ing.
These planes are equipped with
420 horsepower engines and are
capable of 10 miles an hour,
They are In the transcontinental
mail service.
Beside the planes the govern
ment ice steamer Montcalm was
heading for the island but It was
2 SO miles away tonight and no
estimate was possible as to the
time of its probable arrival. It
was hoped to avoid arctic ice in
the Gulf of St. Lawrence by keep
ing well in to shore but heavy ice
was reported close packed in the
straits of Belle Isle, which it was
felt might slacken the Montcalm's
speed considerably.
DEATH TOTAL 3 .
DICE HALL BUST
Casualties Mount Following
Explosion At West
Plains, Missouri
WEST PLAINS. Mo April 14.
(AP) -. Thirty-seven persons
are known to hare been killed and
twenty injured in an explosion and
fire which destroyed a dance hall
here last night.
Of the S? charred bodies which
had been recovered at noon today
only IS had been positively iden
tified. Twenty-four persons were
reported missing hot most of
these were believed to be among
the unidentified dead. Many bod
lee were bnrned almost beyond
recognition.
Digging in the ruins continued
and . searchers believed a few
more bodies would be found.
A coroner's Jury was impanel
led and heard several witnesses.
but was not able to determine the
cause of the explosion. The pre
vailing theory is that J. W. Wels-
er, owner of a garage under the
dance hall, struck a match ignit
ing gasoline fumes. Welser was
killed. The coroner's Jury ad
journed until Wednesday.
Two buildings adjoining the
dance hall were destroyed. Prop
erty damage was estimated be
tween $150,000 and $175,000.
Legion Commander Now
At St. Paul, Minnesota
ST. PAUL, Minn., April 14.
(AP) Forced by snow to aban
don his airplane at Butte, Mont.,
Commander E. E. Spa f ford of the
American Legion reached here to
day by train to participate in the
annual spring cnoference of the
commanders and adjutants of the
Minnesota department.
New Store Will Be Built
At Liberty By R. Coffee
LIBERTY. April 14. (Spec
ial.) Liberty is to hare another
store. Roy Coffey wiM soon put
in a line of goods In the building
across the highway from the pres
ent store.
At the cooking demonstration
given in Liberty hall Friday night.
a boy, James Wolfe, won
nHU on his cake. Veneta Rains
received second prise, and Carol
Dasch third, i The fudges were
u. Tj.inh Gibson. Mrs. Fred
RontY and Mrs. Dwight Hoag.
During the meeting the club
members nresented tneir leader
in. .Williams, with a cook
book, as a token of their apprecta-j
Uon for her capable ana raitnrai
work. . - i '
Mrs. Hubbard To Teach
At Liberty Coming Year
LIBERTY. April 14. (Spec
ial i At i meeting of the school
board Friday night; Mrs. Dorothy
Krsklne-Hubbard was elected to
fill the vacancy in the teaching
staff for next year caused by the
resignation of the primary teach
er, Mls Dorothy Sloop. Miss
Sine has accepted a position in
the Salem school system.
The community is united in re
gret orer losing her. but are glad
that bar nlace is to be filled by
Mrs. Hubbard, who is no strang
er at Liberty, as she waa the in
termediate teacher here a few
years ago.
Little News Filters
Through From Flyers
ST. JOHNS. N. F.. April 14.
(AP) Because of a congestion of
messages on the Marconi wireless,
very little news from the mar
ooned transatlantic plane Bremen
waa received today.
Representatives of Canadian
and American newspapers were
busy attempting to charter sealing
steamers or obtain airplanes to
take them to Greenly Island. No
planes are available here for such
a flight.
BOB
HIGHWAY
IELT
ASSOCIATION MEETS
250 Delegates Attend Con
vention At Waldport;
. Patterson Grilled
Water Utility Required
To Make Improvements
The public service commission
Saturday issued an order requlr
in the Rufus Water Works to
mako certain Improvements look
ing to more efficient and adequate
service.
The commission dismissed a
complaint in connection with an
alleged hazardous grade crossing
on the Gibson Hill road in Benton
county. It was said that the con
dition of this crossing would be
determined in an investigation to
be launched covering all grade
crossings in the state.
WALDPORT. Ore.. April 14.
(AP) More than 250 delegates
representing points from Astoria
to the north, to Florence in the
suoth. attended a meeting of the
Oregon Beaches Roosevelt High
way association here today.
On motion of V. P. Mtichell of
Yachats. a committee was annotat
ed to draft a resolution, asking
Governor Patterson why he "did
not make good his pre-election
promise of doing all In his pwoer
to complete and ride over the
highway from the northern to the
southern border of Oregon." dur
ing his term of office.
On this committee. Clyde Mas
on. Seaside, and D. C. Miller. Till
amrfok, were appointed.
At the night session Countv
Judge James of Toledo spoke to
the delegates and assured them
that all aid possible would be ex
tended by the county court in the
work of road building.
F. S. Godfrey of Seaside intro
duced a resolution asking for the
conservation of scenic points along
the Roosevelt highway.
The next meeting of the associ
ation will be held at Reedsport In
November.
miles north of her course when
she landed on Greenly Island in
the Gulf of St. Lawrence today re
called the theory advanced last
summer by Commander Donald A.
MaeMillan, arctic, explorer. In con
nection with the disappearance of
Nungesser and Coll, French pilots
who attempted the east to west
trans-Atlantic passage.
Commander MaeMillan eaid h
believed that compass variation
led the French flyers far north
ward of their course and that they
came down in the wild Labrador
interior where they perished. He
said his opinion was that they had
toaehed Labrador coast above St.
Mary's bay, which is a short dis
tance north of Battle Harbor.
Football Star Sustains
Crushed Head and Dies
EUGENE. April 14. -(AP)
Abbott "A. Eddy. 28. former foot
ball star of Bellingham. Wash..
and CoFvallls, Ore., high schools, -wu
killed Jresterday when bis .
head was crushed under a log at
a sawmill a short distance iroui j
... . V. . ...I4.nl -
isugene. iu one w mo w ,
but a log apparently slipped from
a loading platform, pinning Eddy
beneath It. He leaves a widow
and wo children. His father,
Frank Fay Eddy, was formerly
pastor of the Eugene Unitarian .
church.
France Cutting Down
Upon Divorce Rates
PARIS. (AP) France U cut
ting down her divorce rate. There
now is only one divorce to every.
18 marriages while a year ago
they ran one to seventeen. This
Is somewhat due to the: general
tightening on divorces of foreign
ers but also is attributed to a gen
eral settling back to normal after
the war.
Arctic Explorer Says
Bremen Compass Off
PORTLAND, Maine. April 14.
(AP) The fact that the Jun
kers plane Bremen was nearly 500
FREE
Proof
w n t s
If TOO haf ITnilemav Vitar n; QI.V-...
.w - m---bp j i U wivku a si
or CoonUioiu no matter how bad writ
toaar wunoDC lall. Attacki itoppad
n mrmiui arug. Satisfaction or
Dr. O. M. Simpson Co., 1205 W. 44th 8tJ
Calllnx a fellow ant "oil can" in
days gone by was only a mild in
sult at most. Now it would be the
flrstbasls for a big libel suit.
it's a FACT, Men
Our genuine hand-tailored-to-measure
UMTS
at
$32.50
Give you perfect fit, long wear
and up-to-the-minute style.
The latest spring fabrics are now on display.
D. H. MGSHER
Tailor J 474 Court St.
THE BATTLE OF
ARMAGEDDON
or
The War That Will Exterminate
The Human Race
Subject at the
Seventh Day Adventist Church
Corner of North Fifth and Gaines Sts.
Sunday Night, April 15, at 7:45
Darwin Tulips
are beginning to blossom
AN INVITATION
, is extended to the people of Salem and the
United States to visit our planting on the
Wallace road one-half mile north of the Wil
lamette River Bridge. Come and see the
many new varieties of Darwins, May Flower
ing, and Breeder tulips and make your choice
of bulbs for fall delivery.
THE 17. C. FRANKLIN TULIP FARM
(On the hill west side Wallace Rd.)
HART PREFERRED Ollj
BURNER
This Is the latest improved oil
burner on tbe market todar.
Ia less complicated than ibt
otner oil burner made.
Gives less trouble, and better
results than all others.
We can prove these facts.
litre us a ring, and we will
gladly call and look your heat-
mg plant over.
We are maklnr snecial nrli
on an installations, through
me montb of April.
BERNARDI &
PATTERSON
Plumbers St Steam Fitters
458 South Hiarh St.
Phone 1422J Phone 182431
Pyorrhea Damage
Visible
Pyorrhea is an ailment caused by irritation and sub
sequent infection. It sweeps along the gums with the
fury, if not the speed, of an Ohio twister, destroying
all the tissues in its path. First the gums are inflamed
and bleed easily. Then the bony support of the' teeth
is gradually nibbled away and destroyed by the germs
and their products which were the originators of the
disease.
The result of all this destruction is the forming of a
pocket all around the sides and base of the tooth. The
more bone that is lost the deeper becomes the pocket.
This pocket acts as a trap for bacterial filth to collect
in. You have probably seen screen wire traps wherein
it was very easy for flies to enter but very hard for
them to get out. That is the sort of trap that is formed
by these pockets.
Bacteria which are so small that they cannot be seen
with the naked eye easily slide down into these pockets
and form pus. Even food debris can work itself down
into permanent residence at the base of the tooth. This
combination of germs, plus food, plus warmth, spells
a further development and increase of pyorrhea.
When the pus and bacteria and general irritation are
removed before too great damage has been done, the
gums heal and again form tightly around the roots.
They can be kept clean with ordinary care.
While surgical treatment of pyorrhea affords a sat
isfactory method of eliminating the disease, many
cases will respond as rapidly and more certainly with
other forms of treatment. The dentist determines how
far the disease has progressed in the mouth and which
method of treatment is advisable in each particular
instance.
vaiip obi n AVQtnlnAil vwIaa m M !.
,,petent dentist and prevent this disease. - t
Ifthe readers of these articles have any questions
that they would like to ask pertaining to dentistry,
mail them to the Salem Progressive Dental Club, First
National Bank Bldg. Your question and answer will
be published in connection with these articles.
' This article is sponsored by IthV Salem Progressive
Dentists club, members are as follows:
DR. F. K. ALBRICH DR.
DR. E. R. BENNETT DR.
DR. FRED W. BURGER DR.
DR. E. Lu BRUNK DR.
DR. O. WARD DAVIS DR.
DR. CHAJLMER LEE GEORGE DR.
DR. W. A. JOHNSON DR.
DR. MAX A. MOON DR.
DR. O. A. OLSON DR.
DR. L. R. SPRINGER DR.
DR. F. L. UTTER DR.
L. E. BARRICK
A. E. BERGER
B. BLATCHFORD
DALPH L. CRAIG
FRED ELLIS
DAVID B. HILL
GEORGE E. LEWIS
CARL E. MILLER
BEN F. POUND
L. .B. SCHMIDT
F. D. VOIQT
PORTLAND. Anril 14 fAP
Crushed sixteen feet below the
surface of the street by the cave-
In of sewer construction. Peter
Puhja. of Tlgard, Ore., a laborer,
was killed at noon todav. Other
workmen risked death between
crumbling walls of the deen nar
row ditch as they nressed their
j tutile efforts to release their com-
! panioo.
Ah hour afetr the cave-in, the
workers had succeeded ! nnor.
4ng many feet of soil and had
fastened ropes about Pulsa's
ahdhlders. Whether he still was
live could not be determined.
Offly his feet remained to be loos
ened.'
Then the second cave-In came
-and the workers fought for their
lives as they leaped up the
crumbling walls.
Another hour passed with sixty
men laboring with Dicks and
hovels as they formed a broad I
crater and lined It with planking
to prevent collapse of the walls.
When finally Pulsa's body , was
t.Menea h was dead. .Efforts to
revive- him with a pulmotor were
You MUST be registered before you can vote.
No one can be SWORN IN on Election day.
ALL VOTERS must be REGISTERED 30 DATS before any
Election. This law la an amendment to the Constitution and
was voted in by the People at the Jane 1127 Election.
Registration closes April 17th
A voter who is now registered and moved out of his precinct,
or wishes to change his politics, or a woman who has married
must REREGISTER.
If yon are registered, and voted once In the two years last
passed, and have not moved yon need not register.
To register call at the County Clerk's Office, or any of th
Registrar' in the different parts of the ' County all are au
thorized by law to register you free of charge.
Do this-now. If not already registered, so you can vole on
Election day.
U. G. BOYER, County Clerk
65 Rooms of Hotel Furnishings
By the Piece
Tuesday 10 a. m., Apr. 17
548 ft Washington Street, Portland, Oregon
Consisting in Part:
DRESSERS, CHAIRS, ROCKERS, STANDS,
COMMODES, BEDS-COMPLETE, BEDDING,
LINEN, RUGS, CARPETS, DISHES, CUR
TAINS, STOVES, AND ETC.
DEALERS ATTENTION:
Allow Us To Cordially Invite You to Attend This
Mammoth Sale ,
SOLD BY THE
Auction Liquidators ,
C. DWIGHT HAMMOND, Auctioneer
I J wCi BEacon 6813
S3
aaa
Children's Pumps
and Oxfords
$4.00 and $5.00 Values
Now 2)
2nd Floor
98
2nd Floor
These are Buster Brown welt Soles Styles and come
in Patent Tan and Elk Colors.
Women's Full Fashioned Silk Hose Fashionable Shades
Every Pair Guaranteed OjI-CO
Buster
Brown Shoe Store
lutiie. . -