The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, March 09, 1928, Page 1, Image 1

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    yKimball School of Theology Receives Presents of 500 Valuable Volumes for Its Library, Greatly Adding to
Weather Forecast: Unsettled with rains
west portion: normal temperature; strong
southerly winds on the eost. Maximum
temperature, yesterday 58, minimum" 42.
river 2.9, rainfall .47, atmosphere cloudy,
wind southeast.
' SEVENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
SALEM, OREGON, FRIDAY MORNING, MARCH 9, 1928
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BRITAIN LITTLE
7 WAR LODIUIS UP
J ,
Report That Ibn Saud Plans
Visit To Mecca Discred
its Threat Tale
OUT AFTER MONEY, HELD
Nevertheless British Forces Hold
Selves in Readiness; Wild
Rumors Float Through
Atmosphere
LONDON. Mar. 8. (AP)
British officialdom, with charac
teristic English calm, tonight view
ed the "holy war" in Arabia with
less concern. But dispatches from
the district near the head of the
Persian gulf painted a different
picture.
Official observers gave out a re
port that Ibn Saud, king oi Hed
jaz aud sultan of the Nejd, was
planning a visit to Mecca. They
pointed out that the Wahabis are
not friendly toward the holy city
of Mohammedanism and deduced
that Ibn Saud was not likely to
leave Reyadh, his capital, in the
center of Arabia If there was any
immediate prospect of putting his
own forces into the field.
Just Wants Money, Held
This estimate was easily coupl
ed with the previous analysis of
Ibn Saud's character which made
him out as more anxious for' res
toration of his yearly subsidy from
the British government than for
extension of his domain.
Dispatches from Basra, Irak,
Showed the British there and at
&weit, preparing for possible ear
lier raids on the frontier. Air
planes, armored cars and trans
port cars have been stationed out
side walls of Kower Koweit, ready
for a dash to any threatened point,
and marines and blue jackets from
a British man o'war are patrolling
the streets daily.
Rumors Grow With Space
Unconfirmed reports have reach
ed Basra that the western edge of
the desert is already blazing with
desert warfare with several vil
lages in Transjordania captured
and looted by Wahabis. But noth
ing of that sort came from points
near the Scene.
AH officers and men of the
Transjordania garrisons who are
on leave have been recalled; fron
tier patrols have been strengthen
ed and armored cars and air rein
forcements moved into the terri
tory. Another report said that the mo
tor route across the Syrian desert
from Bagdad to Damascus had
been closed. This Is the first indi
cation that disorders were threat
ened that far north, although part
of this route is within reach of
(Continued on page 3.)
SECOND HICKMAN
TRIAL NEARS END
CLOSING ARGUMENTS MADE
' IN BEHALF OF DEFENSE
Hunt's Counsel Blames Toms
Shooting Scrap on "The Fox"
As Ringleader
LOS ANGELES, Mar. 8. (AP)
The blame for the murder of C.
Ivy Toms was placed entirely upon
William Edward Hickman today
by A. Gray Gilmer, attorney de
fending Welby Hunt, in their joint
trial for the holdup killing of a
Tear ago Christmas eve.
In his closing argument the at
tbrney for the blonde haired boy
declared to the Jury of six men
and six women that it was Hick
man, the kidnaper' and murderer
of young Marian Parker, who blan
rifed the robbery of Toms drug
store, who did all the talking, and
that It was a bullet from Hick
man's gun which killed Toms. He
leaded that they would not send
"this blue-eyed boy of misfortune
to a felon's cell for life.
On the other hand Hunt Just
previously had been accused of fir
Ing the fatal shot, In the closing
' argument of Richard Cantillon
one of Hickman's defense law
yers. He told the Jury that evi
dence and testimony had proven
hat a bullet of the calibre of
Hunt's gun had killed Toms.
..; Cantillon pleaded that Hickman
be let off with a life sentence.
'I'm not asking you to set Hick
man free," he argued. "I'm ask
ing you to send him to prison for
IIfe."-He pleaded that as his client
already was sentenced to,,death
for the Parker girl murder anoth
er similar verdict would amount
to sentencing a corpse to die.
BAPTISTS RAP
INTERFERENCE
PASS RESOLUTION AIMED AT
MINORITY COUNCIL ,
Refuse to Hear Report of Confer
ence; Trustees Chairman 1
Removed
By a vote of 208 to 116, the
membership of the First Baptist
church at the monthly business
meeting last night passed a reso
lution deploring and resenting ill
outside Interference, and particu
larly aimed at the minority coun
cil report prepared by a meeting
of representatives of other
churches in the Willamette valley
here Monday.
The church was filled to capa
city for this meeting. The reso
lution follows: ,
Be it resolved, that the First
Baptist church of Salem, Oregon,
deplore and resent any and all
outside Interference of other or
ganizations. Be it further resolved, that in
view of the fact that the First
Baptist church of Salem. Oregon,
has on numerous occasions gone
on record as opposing outside in
terference, therefore we again re
quest and insist that all outside
meddling in our affairs be stop
ped unless, authorized by a vote
of the First Baptist church of Sa
lem, Oregon.
Be It further resolved that a
copy of these resolutions be sent
to the clerk, pastor and delegates
to the so-called conference held in
the Baptist church at Salem, Ore
gon, Monday, March 5, 1928. It
is further requested that the re
spective clerks of the churches
mentioned below, be asked to read
said resolutions at their regular
Sunday service.
Following is the list of
churches:
Albany, McMinnville, Oregon
City, Eugene, Corvallis, Forest
Grove.
The church also voted 183 to
112 to declare the office of chair
man of the board of trustees va
cant. This office had been, held
by H. S. Gile, and the action was
taken following his attempt to
present the report of the' confer
ence referred to. -r
TOO OLD TO BE MARRIED
Wlfe, 05, Leaves Hubby, 103, After
8 ears Together
SALT LAKE CITY, Utah. Mar.
8. (AP) Declaring that mar
riage at their age was not a suc
cess and that they could be more
contented apart, Martin VanBuren
Reeves, 103 years of age, and Mrs.
Elizabeth Reeves, 95, have sep
arated.
Accompanied to the station by
her husband, Mrs. Reeves depart
ed for Coupeville, Wash., where
she has relatives. They were
married eight years ago.
WRECK KILLS CHILDREN
Fast Passenger Train Crashes Into
School Bus; Two Die
CHARLES CITY, Iowa; Mar. 8.
(AP) Two children were kill
ed and 15 others were injured this
evening when a speeding Rock Isl
and passenger train, crashed Into
a school bus bearing 17 children
home from a country school about
12 miles southwest of here.
The children killed were Roger
Schaffer, 10, and Harrison May,
12, both of whom live on farms
near Greene.
Eight of the injured were seri
ously hurt and were taken to a
Waterloo hospital on 'the train.
Seven others were treated by phy
sicians hurriedly called to the
scene and later were taken to their
homes.
The bus driver, Harry Arthur,
was among the injured taken to
Waterloo.
No explanation of the accident
has been obtained from the bus
driver, the train crew, or the
children. ,
ELDERLY WOMAN KILLED
Mrs. Laura Yeager Passes Away
at Hospital Last Night
Mrs. Laura Yeager, 74, who was
struck by a car driven by Robert
Ramsden as he was backing out
of his garage at 171 South Winter
street Wednesday evening, died at
the Salem general hospital Thurs
day night.'
- Ramsden stated after the acci
dent that he believed the woman
had already fallen for some rea
son and was lying upon the walk
before he began to remove his ma
chine -from the"gaage." -,;-'v-
J Mrs. Yeager was rushed to the
hospital immediately following tho
accident, but Internal Injuries be
came apparent and death occurred
at about S:S0 last night.
' She is survived., by a husband.
Chris Yeager, and six children.
1U NB
DISPLAY FIXED
Oil HUGE SCALE
Details Made Public In En
tertainment Furnished
By Merchants
PLAN AUTO EXHIBITION
Free Dance Slated for Armory on
Tuesday Night of Next Week; -Band
and Drum Corps
to be on Hand
Here's last minute news on the
Spring Window Display, formal
presentation of new spring wares
of Salem mercnants which the Ad
club is putting over next week, be
ginning Tuesday, March 13:
The auto show will be held on
Court street, between High and
Commercial.
Everyone is Invited to partici-
(Continued on page 2.)
WOMAN HEADING BOARD
Miss Beatrice Walton Presides ati
Parole Session
For the first time In many
years a woman Thursday presided
at the monthly meeting of the
state parole board held" in the
state penitentiary.
She was Miss Beatrice Walton
who, because of the resignation of
Hal Hoss, private secretary to
Governor Patterson, recently as
sumed temporarily the duties of
confidential agent of the execu
tive. The governor's private sec
retary, under the law, is chair
man of the state parole board.
Mlsa Walton, who has served in
the executive department since
the inauguration of Governor Pat
terson, has the title of assistant
secretary to the governor.
Prison officials said a number
of "hard boiled" convicts appear
ed before the parole board at
Thursday' meeting in quest of
conditional pardons. Any recom
mendation that will be made by
the parole board probably will
not reach Governor Patterson un
til next week.
The parole board is composed
of Rev. Norman K. Tully of Sa
lem and Jay Lewis of Corvallis.
Miss Walton is an acting member
of the board pending the appoint -
ment of a permanent secretary to
the governor.
The advisory board is composed
of Mrs. Lola G. Baldwin, Port
land; Mrs. A. B. Todd, Forest
Grove, and Mrs. Martha Randall,
Portland.
ANOTHER PLACE WHERE "TEAM WORK" MIGHT
FIRE DESTROYS
SCHOOL BUILDING
BUILDING AT CENTRAL
HOWELL TOTAL LOSS
CIase Probably Vi lli oe Resumed
In Church Structure,
Reported .
Although the 68 pupils of the
school at Central Howell between
Salem and Silverton, stood by
while their two-room frame school
building burned to the ground a
half hour after classes had con
vened yesterday morning, none
was injured and it is probable
school will be resumed immediate
ly in a small church In that com
munity. The only ' thing saved in the
blaze, besides a few books, the
students carried as they filed from
the burning structure, was the
school piano. Fixtures, echool li
brary, pictures and other belong
ings were destroyed. Total loss
was estimated around 7,000. The
building, constructed in the school
year 1922-23 at a cost of $5100,
trarried 84,000 insurance.
The fire, firet discovered when
flames were seen shooting from
the roof, is thought to have ori
ginated in the attic from a defec
tive heating plant, J. V.'Starrett,
principal, reported In a visit to
the office of the county school
superintendent later in the day.
While a new heating plant had
only recently been installed,
there had been some difficulty in
gating it to work smoothly.
The Silverton fire department
was called to help combat the
flames, but the fire spread so rap
idly the fire fighters from Central
to when Principal Starrett was in
voted their efforts to Seeping the
fire from spreading to nearby
buildings.
Although no arrangements for
(Continued on pare 2)
B00ZE TO BE DESTROYED
Judge Kelly Hands Down Order
Here Yesterday Afternoon
Hailed in some quarters as the
saddest news that has transpired
in these parts for many a moon,
a court order was handed down
yesterday directing the county
sheriff to destroy a quantity of
liquor that had been held as evi
dence in three Marion county
criminal cases.
The three criminal defendants
against whom the evidence had
been used were Louie All Overton,
B. W. Wagner and Rose M. Kurre.
All three have been disposed of
so long ago that they have been
nearly forgotten
The orders were handed down
ye8terday by Circuit Judge Percy
R Kelly noon motion by District
Attorney John Carson.
Sheriff Oscar Bower asserted
late yesterday that his force would
need no assistance In disposing of
the evidence. It was indicated
that already there had been sev
eral offers.
OIL BOND MONEY
TRACED TO G. O. P.
PROCEEDS .WENT TO WIPE
. t
OUT DEFICIT, WORD
Chicago Grain Dealer Gives Direct
Testimony Incriminating
Republicans
WASHINGTON, Mar. 8. (AP)
Direct evidence was received to
day by the senate Teapot Dome
committee that at least some of
the 1260,000 in Continental Trad
ing company Liberty bonds which
Harry F. Sinclair turned over to
the republican national committee
in 1923 were parcelled out to in
dividuals for sale on the open
market and proceeds used to help
extinguish the party deficit before
the 1924 campaign.
James A. Patten, a Chicago
grain commission merchant who
years ago startled the world by
obtaining a near corner on the
wheat market, testified that the
late Fred W. Upham, treasurer of
the republican committee at that
time gave him 125,000 in Liberty
bonds in December, 1923, and
asked him to make a contribution
in an equal sum to the party to
help wipe out a deficit which Up
ham then placed between 3 600,000
and $800,000.
Patten Bald he sent the national
committee his check for this
amount, collected the bonds later
and turned them over to the Jef
ferson hospital in Chicago to which
he had promised a donation of
$25,000. The one-time wheat
king said he was "mad and indig
nant" at the size of the deficit but
saw the necessity of paying it off.
"I wondered why Upham . gave
me the bonds Instead of selling
them in the New York market
where the best price might be ob
tained," Patten said, adding that
at the time he hda no idea of the
origin of the bonds. He furnished
the committee a list of the serial
numbers and a check of these
against those of the Continental
Walsh, committee prosecutor,
bonds by the secretary to Senator
showed that $20,000 or the $25.
000 once had been in the posses
sion of the Continental Trading
company.
COMBAT PLANE CRASHES
Captain and Pilot Both Killed in
Nicaragoan Warfare
MANAGUA, Nicaragua,-Mar. 8
(AP) Captain William C. Byrd
pilot, and Sergeant Rudolph A.
Frankforter, observer, were killed
this afternoon when an American
observation plane crashed near
Estile, 40 miles to the northwest
of Matagalpa.
Captain Byrd's home w s a
Orangeburg, S. C, where his wi
dow resides.
Sergeant Frankfurter's widow
lives at Quantico, Va. Both men
arrived in Nicaragua recently.
Meager, advices received here in
dicate that the accident occurred
near the landing field at Estill and
that the two men were killed in
stantly. The bodies will be brought
to Managua.
COME IN HANDY
SMITH SCORES
SENATE GROUP
OPENING DRIVE.
Illinois Candidate Insinuates
He Has Been Malicious
ly Slandered
INITIAL ADDRESS MADE
Seeks Reelection After Being Re
fused Seat Due To Fraud and
Scandal Connected With
First Vote
BLOOMINGTON, III., Mar. 8.
(AP) Terming the United States
senate chamber the "supreme and
safest vantage point In all this
world from which to launch at
tacks upon the character, morals.
politics or religion of anyone
whomsoever," Colonel Frank L.
Smith, twice barred from a sen
ate seat, tonight opened his second
campaign for the republican nom
ination. "No one is exempt from either
Blander or libel in the United
States senate no one from the
president of the nation to the pris
oner in the penitentiary except
members of the club," said Col.
Smith.
His speech was also the first
detailed statement since being
named senator three times, once
by election and twice by designa
tion of Governor Len Small. He
was unable to take his seat be
cause the senate barred him for
accepting campaign contributions
from public utilities.
Bitter Attack Made
"What are 800,000 citizens of
Illinois to half a hundred sen
ators?" he asked in referring to
the 800,000 votes he received in
the election more than a year ago
"What, indeed, are the whole
7,000,000 of our people in Illinois
to that little half hundred, when
presidential nominating conven
tions are approaching ... ?"
(Con tinned ca page 2)
PORTLAND KEEPS MILL
Million Dollar Woolen Textile In
dustry to be Saved
PORTLAND, Mar. 8. (AP)
Through the cooperation of busi
ness interests of this city, the fu
ture of the one million dollar
woolen textile Industry represent
ed by the Portland woolen mills
seems safely insured. This an
nouncement wat made today by
W. P. Olds, Portland business
man.
Complete reorganization of the
corporation, substantial increase
of its capital and sweeping reduc
tion of plant operating costs were
said to assure profitable manufac
ture af full capacity.
WOMAN RELATES
HER LOVE AFFAIR
WALLA WALLA WIDOW TESTI
FIES AT TRIAL
Mrs. Bessie Mae Bidwell Takes
Stand in Own Defense ln
Murder Case
WALLA WALLA, Mar. 8.
(AP) Mrs. Bessie Mae Bidwell
middle aged woman accused of
poisoning her husband, took the
stand in her own defense today
and related the story of her love
affair with Preston Clark. She
declared that Clark who 1b jointly
accused of the murder, forced his
attentions upon her.
She married Alpheus Bidwell
who was poisoned last December
21. years ago, she stated, under
direct examination by her lawyer,
and said they quarreled occasion
ally but had no serious difficul
ties. Calmly she related that Clark,
boarder In their home, laugh
ingly kissed her one day. then
tried to "force attentions" upon
her but that these were repulsed
at first. '. Finally, she said, she
gave ln.M
Clark ;was subject to "fita" or
'spells,' she said, and came home
one day with a bottle of poison
ous medicine "which he was go
ing to take for his spells."
. Then Mrs. Bidwell described
her preparations of the food which
Bidwell ate on the morning of his
death. She offered some to Clark,
she avowed, . but he "hung : hif
head and refused. Bidwell com
plained ' during the meal that Jiis
food ; tasted "bitter,? hie widow
averred; and later became ill, tell
ing her it was his heart- V She de
nied patting poison Into the dish
and said - that a doctor had told
her that - BldwelTi death was
caused by his "heart.
FLYERS FORCED
DOWN BY STORM
STIXSON AND HALDEMAN NOT
ABLE TO STAY UP.
Failure Meet Attempt to Remain
Aloft Until Sat-
nrday
DETR0IT Jfaf,j:?; 9. (AP)-
Tbe big Stinson-Detrolt - mono
plane in Wiiich Eddie Stinson and
George Haldeman were attempt
ing to break the world's endur
ance record was forced down at
Self ridge field shortly after three
o'clock this morning in a blinding
snowstorm.
The plane was circling around
a huge beacon light at Self ridge
field and the snow fall became so
thick that. Stinson said he could
no longer see the light. Although
the field was in total darkness the
plane was brought to a safe land
ing on the field after it had been
decided that further attempts to
remain aloft were futile.
The plane, an old one which
had been recently overhauled, had
been In the air since 8:29 yester
day morning and had been "flying
at an altitude of approximately
1,700 feet.
DETROIT, March 8. (AP).
Eddie Stinson and George Halde-
man circling low over Selfridge recently filed ln ohio and wiu op :f
field barracks in their orange-;poge Senator Frank q. Willis, al- x
winged Stinson monoplane in anlfi0 a fftTOrffe -nn , .1
attempt to break the world's rec
ord for continuous flight prepar
ed to meet their first serious ob
stacle, stormy weather as dark
ness descended on the field today.
With a load-of 3,845 pounds
gradually decreasing as gasoline
and oil were consumed, Selfridge
observers hoped the flyere would
be able to take an altitude suffi
cient to avoid predicted rain
storms late tonight.
The heavily loaded plane left
the ice of Lake St. Clair at 8:29
a. m. and for several hours Stin
son, who was at the control, was
able to make only about 200 feet
altitude.
The flyers declared before they
took off that barring motor trou
ble they would remain in the air
until 2 p. m. Saturday providing
their gasoline supply held out
The -present endurance record is
52 hours, 22 minutes and 31 sec
onds, which must be exceeded by
one hour to be officially recog
nized. Stinson, Detroit airplane manu
facturer, decided to take off from
Lake SL Clair, because the snow-
covered ice formed a perfectly
smooth three mile runway.
FINDS CAR MINUS TIRES
Pilferers Out In Force; Car Stol
en Also; No Clues
Pilferers were out in full force
last night when they stripped the
car owned by C. F. Temple of this
city, of five tires last night while
it was parked in front of the Elks
temple. Mr. Temple attended
lodge during the evening and when
he was ready, to leave he found
that his car was minus the four
tires and the spare. It was imme
diately reported to the local po
lice, but no trace
of the thieves
could be found.
E. S. Lauderdeck, Salem, Route
5, reported to Salem police that
his Ford touring car had been
stolen from in front of the local
Elks temple last night. He had
parked his car there about 7:30
o'clock in the evening and after
lodge found it missing: .
It is, thought by local police that
the same gang which relieved the
Temple car of its tires are respon
sible for the theft of the Lauder-;
deck car. Both were stolen at
about the same time and from the!
same place. Local officers Imme
diately notified Portland police to
watch for the stolen car.
Austin McDermott of Portland
was arrested by Officer Kuyken
dall last night charged with being
drunk and panhandling. He was
given a lovely room in the city
Jail to think the matter over.
I. 0. 0. F. HEAD TO VISIT
Supreme Monarch of Shrine Divi
sion Here Next Tuesday
- Edgar Mosher, of New York, su
preme monarch of the Ancient and
Mystic Order of Samaritans, the
Shrine division of the Odd Fellows
lodge, will visit the Salem Sanctor-
lum next Tuesday evenmg. ; This
will be the first time since the or
ganization as perfected that the
local chapter Jias been honored by
a visit from the grand lodge. ;
Mosher. will visit with six .other
lodges In the state before he re-
tnrnn tn New "Vorlr He fa tnalrlnr
a tour of the west and will go aa!
far north as Vancouver, B. C. -
' This will be an open meeting so
that all members will hare an op
portunity jto meet the grand of fl
eer, and will not be limited k to
Samaritans only. t.-".,-'v:"
The local lodge is also arrang
lng : program In - honor of the
grand officer,-, which, will be giv
en the same evening.
nnnurn nnnim. .
milium II mi r 1
NUUtf Lll IIIJIIVLU
i m i nnnii'i mi i ii
LiyinHI.ULII.IU n
Secretary of Commerce Fin
ally Persuaded To Let
Name Be Filed
OPPOSED BY NATIVE SON 3
Senator James E. Watson Already
In Field For Support of Own f
State; Forces Express ConfU
denco
INDIANAPOLIS, Mar. 8. (AP)'
Herbert Hoover, secretary of
commerce, entered another favor
m
ite son field late today when he fil-
ed notice of republican preslden-
tial candidacy and thus becomes an K
opponent of United States Senator jjY
James E. Watson in the Indiana '
Drimarv to be held Mav 8. Hoover
The cabinet member's entry
followed two hectic days of cross ,
country telephoning, speedily tak-
en canvasses of various Indiana f
counties and the refusal of Hoos
ier boosters to give way to some
eastern advisers that his name not
be filed. Late today however, and-!
with only a few hours remaining j
in which to conform to the pri- ;
mary law, Oscar G. Foelllnger, .
Fort Wayne publisher, won his
point and was told by Hoover to J.
enter him' in the contest. " J
Lowden Keeps Out j
Following Hoover's announce
ment word was received from
Chicago definitely stating that
Frank O. Lowden, Illinois war "
governor, would enter the Indiana
presidential contest. ,
M. Burt Therman, national 4
campaign manager for Senator
Watson, declared he regretted .
"that Mr. Hoover has deemed it .
best to strike at party harmony
by invading our state." We arej
"prepared however to meet the "I;
challenge that has been offered to ;?
Senator Watson in his native state-'
and we have no fear of the out-
come," he concluded. k
National Effect Viewed
The secretary and his advisers ,
consulted with friends as to the J
effect on his national campaign of
failure to enter the Indiana race, i
It is said to have been the belief?
of a majority that it would be
harmful to his candidacy, parti-'
cularly in Ohio. It was argued that -
such a decision might make it ap-!
pear that he had singled out Wil- ;
11a for a foe. and that this imnreiu. '
sion among voters might work to4
Willis' advantage in the April 24 w
primaries ln Ohio.
While the situations in the two
states were regarded in the Hoo,'
ver camp as similar in many re-
specis mey were looked on as
.1
(Continued en page 2.)
KIMBALL LIBRARY!
GETS 500 BOOKSi
VALUABLE VOLUMES COMB
FROM JENNINGS COLLECTION 4
Highly Prized Text On Church
History and Religion Are
v Dicluded
More than S00 books from the
large private library of Dr. Henry
C. Jennings of PortlandraTrivedr
at the Kimball School of Theology
Wednesday evening.-Most of these'
books are very valuable and Will i
be of great help to students of.
Kimball and of the university.
Dr. Jennings, who resided in.
Portland for several years, died la
the east a few weeks ago. He s
had been one of the leading m in-
isters of the Methodist Episcopal'
church for many ' years, having
represented his Minnesota confer-
ence at general conferences in for-
mer years. It was largely under,
his wise leadership that the Meth-?
odiat book concern made Its rapid j
stride in the last quarter century S.
Being a great lover of books, he?
accumulated what was considered
a very large private library. ; Also-
there came ; to his desk .many '
choice ediUons from jt lead ingi
American and English jjubllshers.
f some years ago he placed in hia "
will the gift of his books on Meth
11"0 to hu own mater:
Hamline ' School of Theology, at;
Himllne, ; Minn, .' Together- with :
his wife he decided to give to Kim
ball -School of Theology the re- :
main ing books' that would be -of
any particular .value tp-a semin
ary. " ; ' -
- Two consignments from his IP
brary had previously been ln-i
(Co Una 4 a f a.)
St
t