The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, February 21, 1928, Page 4, Image 4

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    ' THE OREGON SXATESJJANALEM, .OBEGON, JTUESDAT MORNlKa FEBRUA1SY 21, 1928
Sirdndl
er Lewis
Wrest ling i Title :-By':
.- i
Throwing
Joe
MEST GETS OFF
ToslowBEeiie
By CIIARLES W. Dt-VKLKY
Associated. Pms RporU Writer
COLISEUM. St. Lou i. Feb. 21
fAP) Ed "Strangler" Lewis won
ndisputed possession of the
sorld's championship - wrestling
rown here this morning when he
ecislvely i defeated. Joe Stecher.
odge. Nebr., in a finish match.
wis, the headlock king, won
wo falls after losing the second
o - Stecher. . He pinned Stecher
or the first in 2:16:32 with a b
rm. half Nelson and scissor hold
n the arm. ; : ' ' r.
Coming back for the second fall
."".teener flopped Lewis In 56 sec
onds for the second fall. '
Then Lewis showing fearless ag
f.Teaalrenesa tore after Stecher.
tretching his shoulders on the
Mat in 12 mlnnes and SO seconds
- Lewis won all the way.
He was . the aggressor, the
'rlckier and revealed more speed
ban his Nebraskan foe. , He also
forced the Issue from the start.
-Seplng Stecher on his defensive
H the time. Stecher only sue
needed 1 In having ' Lewis on the
...teor once.
VThe( match drew a crowd of
boat five thousand with receipts
mounting to about $50,000 or
.tjo.uou accoraing to rromoier
The i 'gruelling encounter started
t 10 o'clock and was not finished
ntil almost 1:30 a. m.
Lewis was Jubilant over his vic-
ry. he promised to defend his
' itle against any outstanding chal
eager any time suitable iuduce-
.aents were of fered.
Stecher was crushed in his de
"eat. He had nothing whatever to
COLISEUM. St. Louis. Feb. 20
(AP) -Ed. "Strangler" Lewis
wen the first fall of hi? finish
-natch with Joe Stecher to settle
" he world's heavy ight: cham
ionahlp here tonight, pinning
'teener's shoulders to the mat
f th a body hold after, wrestling
-:1.32.
And, as they came Into the ring
.' --aw. 1 a.11 r. I. A
t.pr iu secuuu inn, oi.cvuerouu-
lenly clamped on a double wrist
ock, throwing Lewis in 55 sec-
nas. n an nappenea so suaaen
y that Lewis was dumfounded
Me laid on .the floor for a few sec
nds before he realized what had
happened. v
la taking the first fall Lewi:
.ad the-advantage from the start
ieeprng the "scissors king' on thf
lefenslve. He had Stecher on the
oat five times for a total of 46
ninutes before pinning. The first
:1I did not come nntil nearly
. The hold with which Lewis won
''he fail was a bar arm. half Nelson
f isxl scissors on the arm. IJe.ap
. llcdhe scissors just as Stecher
started rolling over his back.
COLISEUM. St. Louis, Feb. 20.
CAP) Ed. "Strangler" Lewis
and Joe Stecher tangled arms and
tegs here tonight to end their sev
'M year dispute over the world's
. heavyweight . championship, with
indications that the' match, to a
two-fall finish, might develop Ino
i long drawn out struggle. The
nt was called the wrestling event
f the century.
Predictions of a "gate" exceed
pfMt wrasXUBf" (fff vfous record of
7.000 for the Gotch-Hacken-
: schmidt , match vanished as the
l iirai preliminary was -sianea. . Ai
' th hoaferewere flocks oi
empty seats In the arena giving
vindications that the receipts might
net hit 140.000.
j Sentiment favored Stecher but
- the boys with the bankrolls were
ready and eager to bet their mon
ey on Lewis with no or few takers
; la -sight. They went Into the ring
- ; at even. money, with comparative
ly few wagers of any importance
: recorded.
.' ' Opinions Differ
v 1 Tne delegation of Insiders.
- many of whom have been con
nected with wrestling 1st one capac
ity or another for many years, was
V divided in-opinion on the outcome.
. Many of the. boys with the big
: necks end the cauliflower ears
were emphatically for Lewis. As
- many others could see nothing, bat
a Stecher victory.
It was the first match since
1920 when-Lewis won the title
from Stecher Is New York in a
- ooe-f all match.
With the attendance a disap-
- pohttntent, the explanation was
made that the public would not
stand Tor the prices of $6 to $25,
the highest ever charged for a
wrestling match, jStraageJr en
- enhr ft? ieats were fairly wellj
; t Ued. but In the 110 nnd ?15 lo
ot JLlons the baslness was not so
- od. Jin f aekJiae-t.The
' gaiTery encircling the bonding was
' not even , filled to capacity, al
though the eaU sold for $5, the
Cheapest of the lot. .. -
Emergency ; Boat Held JVf
, The scheduled . . preliminaries
' were finished so quickly that ft
was decided to pat on a tub bout
before sending Lewis and Stecher
tn to the ring.: It was 9:20 p m.
when the two emergency wrestlers,
Joe Sandersda of St. Louls. one Of
' SttMiher's training mates, Jean
bo ax, of Windsor. Canada came to
Lebonz and Sanderson irere
shooed ont of the ring after wrest-
II ag 15 mlnat without a decision
so Lewis . and Stecher conld get
started. V . ; ' .1 - -
After deMrerlnr tha ljstrnctlonji
la the center ef tte ring-. Referee
' it? knt tlen.ca tiel irsy at
ti:04 o'cloci.
They alioci hands
before going to their corners.- 0
Iewis Weighs More,
' , Stecher's weight was announced
at 220 with Lewis scaling 22 S
pounds. " ' '' , ' , 1
. They came to grips in mid-ring
and Immediately began tagging
and pulling at each other's heads.
Stecher wore fall length maroon
colored tights with blue r trunks.
Lewis wore purple trunks but no
tights. . v :v-
They were exceedingly cautious
in their work at the start. Lewis'
back started to glisten with per
spiration after they had tugged at
each other in mid-ring for six min
utes. .They stood forehead to
forehead with arms wrapped about
each other's necks, each vainly
trying for an opening. After
wrestling 12 minutes. Lewis made
a grab for an arm lock, but Stech
er blocked it.
After 14 minutes Lewis tried to
clamp on a headlock but Stecher
broke It. Lewis then tried for
another head lock and Stecher
dove for his legs but Lewis antici
pated his thrust and they' resumed
'jigging, one or the other contin
ually working backwards in a
imall circle in mid-ring.
Sweat Shows On Ntcrhrr
Stecher started to drip with a
healthful perspiration after they
had wrest'.ed 23 minutes., Lewis
was trying for his favorite hold
but Stecher would not be trapped
Lewis finally clamped on s
headlock after 21 minutes, but
Stecher dropped to his knees and
Vroke the hold. Then he tripped
Stecher, after 27 minutes, with
Joe going to the mat on his side
md Lewis attempting a, toe lock
Lewis dragged Stecher to the edge
of the mat. with Joe trying for a
tcissors on the legs.
They got too close to the edge
if the ring and without being or
lered they went to their feet, re
turning tugging from a standing
position in mid-ring.
The end of the first hour found
them in mid-ring, tugging and
mauling. Lewis In the first sixty
minutes had a slight advantage.
but with Stecher making no foolish
moves. The action was so tame
ith both wrestlers working can
tiously, that one newspaper writer
?nored in peaceful sleep In his
-hair at the ringside.
Stecher Makes Dive
As the second hour started
Stecher made two dives for Lewis'
legs to trip him bat Lewis smartly
backed away. Lewis then made a
'ry for a headlock with Stecher
clipping to his knees to avoid it.
At one hour and 17 minutes, Lewis
: ripped Joe for the second time.
Stecher went to bis side, then tc
his knees with Lewis back of him
trying to get a body hold.
Stecher got a head hold after
they had wrestled two hoars and
eight minutes. Bat In upsetting
Lewis, the "Strangler" hit the mat
on top with Stecher going to his
side and on the defense. Lewis
tried a toe hold, then switched tc;
a hody hold from the front, pin
ning Stecher for the first fall tv
2:16.32. Stecher was on the mat
tight minutes before his shouldei
blades were stretched' on the can
vas.
After the fall both Lewis and
Stecher went to their dressing:
rooms for twenty minutes rest be
fore resuming their tussle.
ii
DA YTONA BEACH. Fla.. Feb
20. (AP) -Motor trouble and i
minor accident today prevented 5
drivers from making attempts to
shatter the world's speed record
of 206.956 miles an hoar, estab
lished yesterday by Captain Mal
colm Campbell of England.
Ray Keech. 27 year old Phila
delphia driver, tor J. M. M. White
suffered minor barns about Ms
right' leg and hip when a water
pipe connection on . the forward
motor of his machine loosened and
allowed steam and boiling water
to spray over his clothing. He was
taken to a hospital where attend
ands said he was not seriously
hart.
The accident occurred Just be
fore Keech crossed the mile mark
on an unofficial trial ran In
White's hnge 36 cylindered triplex
macnine wane traveling at an es
timated speed of 186 miles an
hour.
Keech however, was able to
keep the racer under control and
bring It to a atop after running
four miles down the beach. , He
walked to an ambulance unassisted
while the giant car later was tow
ed from the course, ; "
LFrank -Lockhaft;""TndUnapoUj(
who places his hopes - for ; a new
record on his Stuta "blackhawk
specUI made a trlaLjn .today.
swt. rarnuretor trouble caused him
to postpone until tomorrow his of
ficial trial for a new mark. His
preliminary ran was not timed.
Whether White will order an
other trial tomorrow was not an
novaced.-
Wade Morton ot Indianapolis es
tablished a new world's record for
stock cart when he drove his Au
burn special over the mile 'course
ror an average twd way speed of
1 0 4.3 4 7; miles aa - hour. - His ave
rage elapsed time for the mile was
34.6 seconds: and his fastest time
was 108.411 mile an hour.
""-JXJBlF TEAR PROPOSAIj
Philadelphia; ;reb. 20.
(A?). Frank Tlnney, : blackface
comedian, haa no Intention of ac
cepting reported "leap year pro-
posalT of his former; wlM, Mrs.
Edna Davenport Tlnney,; ' accord-
lug to Hugh Tlnney; LU lather.:.
DENTSEH
DH KB
iOOBllP
H By STANLEY BROWX
WOODBURN, Feb. 20. (Spe
cial i r-Woodburn high school's
basketball quintet will Journey to
West Linn Tuesday night where
it will engage the fast hoop squad
of that city in a return game, the
previous meeting of the two teams
last Thursday night on the Wood
barn floor having resulted in a
West Linn victory by a score of
33-16. ..
Wednesday afternoon, Washing
ton birthday, the " Woodburn
quint will play Turner on the tat
ter's maple court. " A hard-fought
game Is expected as Turner has a
jrecord of only one defeatbn their
home floor in the past two sea
sons. - "Woodburn high has completed
nine games of its 12-game sched
ule and has won two of these con
tests. The season's record is as
follows:
Woodburn 18; Oregon City 31.
Woodburn 38; Turner 14.
Woodburn 12; Silverton 21.
Woodburn 20; Molalla 28
Woodburn 17; Molalla 24.
Woodburn 9; Willamette Fresh
men 23.
Woodburn 10; Willamette
Freshmen 25.
Woodburn 20; Silverton 17.
Woodhurn 16; West Linn 33.
Total: Woodburn 160; oppon
ents J16.
OF BEATING SALEM
ALBANY. Ore.. Feb.. 20.
(Special) Confidence of a victory
over the highly-touted Salem high
school team pervades the Albany
high camp. The Red and Black
play here In a return game tomor
row night.
Coach "Bill" Mudra points oui
that Salem high barely eked out
a tnree point victory over Eugene
high at Eugene last Friday. Cor-
rallls -defeated Eugene 20 to 12.
and Albany high in turn wiped ur
on Corvallls by a 34 to 20 score.
Salem high defeated Albany in
an early season game at Salem,
but one of Albany's best men was
out of the line-up on account ot
an. Injury at that time. AH of the
Pirates are now in tip-top condi
tion and '"hopped" for victory.
The gam, against Albany to
night may not be an easy one. for
on the Albany floor. Coach
Mudra's team is strong, and the
way Albany has been performing
h late games, utmost efforts may
have to be put forth by Coach An-
lerson's men to win.
The tilt haa no bearing on the
listrlct championship.
Coach Anderson will start hit
usual line-up. Beechler, the cent
t, has developed Into a high-point
jcorer. Duffy and Lyons will be
it forward, and Ecker and R
Kelly at guard.
QUINN MAKES
BRILLIANT RUN
NEW YORK, Feb. 20. (AP)-
After equalling the world's Indoor
record In a trial heat, J. T. Qulnn.
zraca tioiy uross sprinter, com
pleted his conquest over a stellar
Held of dash men by capturing the
final of the 60 yard event from
Karl Wlldermnth ot Georgetown,
'he national champion In one of
he features of the New York A.
C. track and field carnival.
Qulnn 's best time, made In his
rirst heat, was 6 and 1-5 seconds,
equalling the world's mark set by
Loren Murchison five yeara ago.
but he won the final In and 1-5
eeonda to beat out Wlldermnth
by Inches.
; Sabln Carr of Yale, narrowly
missed In three attempts to shat
ter his own world's Indoor pole
vault record of IS feet, 9 inch
es, after clearing is feet, Inch
es to wtn-the event. Carr bumped
off the bar three times at 12 feet
10 Inches.
SEWELL ASPIRES
TO NEW RECORD
CLEVELAND. ( AP) Joseph
Wheeler Sewell of the, Alabama
Se wells has a pet ambition. Ho la
out to hang up a new consecutive
playing record for ball players In
all leagues, loops and circuits. ;
. Sewell Is the chunky little
short-stop of the Cleveland In
liana. Joey, or -"Little Joe as
he la more affectionately known.
now haa cavorted 575 straight
games. He haant missed a fray
since the fag end of the 1922 cam
paign. I.:.. Z 7 ;";'-
He haa quite a road yet to travel
to; attain his ambition. v Everett
Scott nunc up baseball's' straight
gam record - i,x7. -" sewell
need three mora seasons to tie
and pass that mark. But the
squatty one from Titus,. Alai, is
only , 29; and should 4m- goodr tor
fire more years of big time play.
Scott was . 32 when . ha. wound
up his remarkable streak. Sewell
can pass the Deaoon'a premier per
formance at 32. i So Sewell has a
good chancer apparently of . beat-
ng a recora mai iooaea unoeai-
ahle-wben It' wU'netrTJrr?"-!
Sewell Joined the Indians late
in 1920, after, the tragic death of
Jlxy Chapman," lie , heiped5he
ALBANY
COHENT
Tribe win Its first and only Amer-t
lean, League pennant and - world
series. Joey played, In 22 league
tilts that fall and In every one of;
the 154 games the next season.
He had close to 300 consecutive
contests to his credit when, to
wards the end of the 1922 chase.
Manager Ttls Speaker yanked
Sewell. patting Bill Wamby In
Joe's ; place. After being out pf
me line-up ior iwo aays. nowever,
Sewell got back In the game and
has remained In ever since.
But for missing that pair of
frays six years ago Sewell's mark
would be close to the 1,200 figure.
Moreover, the chunky Cleveland
star also would have had a good
claim on being one of the few
players In history, if not the only
one, to go through his first seven
full . seasons without having!
missed a fray.
FILES CIH, BETHEL
SPLIT 10 GAMES
FALLS CITY. Ore.. Feb. 20.
(Special.) Falls City high school
divided a double header with
Bethel high school here last Fri
day night. Bethel girls won 16 to
18. and the Fails City boys de
feated Bethel 23 to 12.
The girls' game was close
throughout. At half time the
score was tied at 9-9. Through
out the second half the acore was
either tied or showed 1 or 2 points
difference.
Near the close of the game
Bethel forged ahead and main
tained a two point lead until the
final whistle.
Falls City boys ran up an early
lead on Bethel and maintained
their advantage. At half time
Falls City led 13 to 5 and finished
the game with a 23 to 12 score.
Line-up:
Falls City Bethel
Speerstra (4)..F (2) Beyerle
Grant (6) ..F (3) Graves
Hatch (10)...C (4) Chrlstensen
Otte (1) .G (3) Stewart
Paul (2) O Shields
Referee: Wilkinson, Albany.
Next Friday night the boys and
girls' teams will play their last
home game for the season, meet-
ina- Monmouth high boys' andl
girls' teams.
JAPANESE GIRLS
AID BASKETBALL
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) Bas
ketball in Japan la only four years
old but It promises to outrip base
ball in popularity chiefly because
of its appeal to feminine fans, says
G. Tomita. captain of the Waseds
University five. His team is
hampion ot Japan and is the first
ever to invade the United States.
"You know college athletes al
ways are at their best when hun-
Ireds of fair eyes are fastened on
hem," explained Tomita. "This
s why basketball has become so
jopnlar in Japan In tour years.
31rls-flke to watch as well as to
jlay basketball. They can't play
baseball so well and aren't so
ond of watching it played.
"There are nearly as many col
'ege men turning out for basket
ball now as there are for baseball
ud It looks as though It will soon
be the biggest college sport there.
"Fencing haa been about crowd
ed out of the picture and lt'a only
the older ones who go in for It
tny more."
The Waseda team which was
taught basketball by an Ameri
can Y. M. C. A. coach with the
aid of an interpreter Is playing
games on the Pacific Coast only.
but may schedule eastern teams
later. ,VZ.
NEW ASSISTANT
JOINS TEN EYCK
SYRACUSE, N Y. (AP) Char
lie Whiteside, stroke ot the inter
collegiate champion Syracuse crew
of 1916. has arrived to take up his
new duties aa assistant to James
A. Ten Eyck, 75-year-old coach Of
the Orange oarsmen.
Since his graduation. Whiteside
has rowed for the Duluth, Minn.,
Boat Club under the tutelage of
Jim Ten Eyck, jr., and more re
cently has served with considera
ble euceesa as coach of football,
basketball and swimming at
North Central high school In Spo
kane. : Wash. -,
Ten Eyck and Whiteside have
four varsity veterans of last year
and seven-eights of a good 1927
freshman crew to work with aa In
door practice gets' under way.
SIX FOOT TEAM
OUT FOR TITLE
NORMAN, Okla.- (AP) Coach
IL ,V. McDemott of the University
of Oklahoma is making history
with a basketball team ot six-foot
sharpahootera. I 1 -:. -: 'V ' '
ThsrOklahoma team apparently
is well on its way to wrest the
Missouri 5 Yellay - championship
from " the University of Kansas,
which won It six years - In - snc-
7; Four of the Oklahoma" regulars
are mom, than , six feet. tgll. their
average height being nearly six
feet,? three lnehee, Victor HHolt,
lan-a-year , center. - ana - a leading
Valley scorer, scales six feet, six
inches , Tom ChurcWn Is'slx'feet,
tiro inches, and Captain LeRoy L.
Crone and Granville Norria meas
ure six fset, one. Inch. All are
-xitialtn 4.uVtjWtm . i
'nil
111 llL.il
CHARGE OF FOULING
. NEW YORK. Feb. 20. (AP)
Lloyd Hahn came back from the
middlewest today to augment the
athletic tempest growing out ot
his flat charges of unsportsman
like conduct againat Ray Conger
who defeated the Boston A. A. star
in a record-breaking j.,0 00 yard
race at Kansas City Saturday
night.
Hahn told the Associated Press
that unless be is influenced to do
otherwise by his coach, he consid
ers withdrawing from the most
heralded running event of the in
door season the one mile race at
the Knights of Columbus meet
Feb. 29. fn Madison Square Gard
en' against Conger. Dr. Otto Pelt
ier of Germany and possibly Pole
Ray, of the Illinois Athletic club.
Hahn has planned his winter cam
paign all along with the Idea of
alternating to lower the world's
indoor mile record of 4:12 at the
K of C meet.
"It Is not a question of tern
perament." the stocky Nebraskan
said, "it's a qnestion of sports
manship and whether I care to
compete against a man who fouled
me twice, deliberately, in that
1,000 yard race in Kansas City
Saturday night."
"Jack Ryder, my coach, mast
convince - me that I'm wrong,
Hahn rumbled.
"There is no qnestion In my
mind that Conger fouled me de
liberately. On the back curve,
forty yars from home, he bumped
me on the shoulder from behind
and knocked me off the track. I
fell in behind him, thinking it an
accident. In the final drive I
caught him and was ready to pass
again, when Conger stepped over
directly In front of me and
knocked me out of stride. Then I
realised that the first foul was de
liberate too, so I stopped and
walked In. There was no use run
ning farther. He probably would
have foaled me again."
f
TO BET LEAD SLIM
If Cardinal, Willamette center
is to outstrip Croxdale, Whitman
guard, as high point average per
game scorer of the northwest
conference, he will have to collect
20 points against Pacific next
Wednesday.
Counting only seven pointf
against Puget Sound Saturday
night, he lowered his percentage
Adams, Willamette forward.
crept Into a Tie for fourth place In
total points scored with Wilson
Puget Sound center.
Summary:
FG
Cardinal, c. W. ..42
Croxdale, g. WH..23
Buck, g, WH 23
Adams, f, W.. ... .23
Wilson, c, CPS. . .23
Hank. g. W. 22
FT PT AV
15 99 ll.C
13
8
13
13
9
8
8
8
- 7
1
3
5
3
5
5
7
3
4
59
54
59
59
53
52
48
46
41
40
39
33
31
31
23
23
23
19
18
11.1
10.1
8.4
i.i
5.9
Litchfield, f,.W.. . .22
Stensland. f. L....20
Wood, f. WH .19
Miller, g, Pac 17
Mills, f. Pac 17
Crow, f, CPS 19
Norberg, f, WH..15
Barton, c. L.. . . .'13
Ginn, g. CPS' 14
Dreexen, c, Pac. . . 9
Gilllhan, f. CPS. . 9
Ferguson, g, CPS. S
Warren, 1. L. . . . . 8
Holmgren, c, WH. . 7
5.8
9.6
9
6.8
6.7
5.f
6.6
10.3
4.4
4.f
3.S
3.3
3.8
3.6
FIGHT TICKETS 60
Tickets tor the Phil Bayes-
WUlie Gordon fight, February 29,
will be oa. sale next Wednesday,
Harry Plant, matchmaker, an
nounced yesterday. ; To care for
the' big crowd expected to see
Bayea attempt to defeat the Sailor
and add to hi laurels. Plant has
arranged to Increase the seating
capacity of the armory. ;
Interest all up and down the
valley haa been aroused in the
match, and the Portlanders who
saw wuiie Gordon rough it np
with Bennie Pels there eome time
ago will probably flock down for
the event. The Gordon-Pels show
was declared to be one of the best
sin g-f est s ever staged in Portland,
rivaled only by the Auerbach-
Dixon setto.
PIRATES ARRIVE
BEGIN TRAINING
PASO ROBLES, CaL. Feb. 20.
(AP) Manager Donle Bush
Women, Weak, Tired,
Rundown and Semms
or k svffor ori pains, pal a la tfca
lawar part at the stomach. baavMf dawa
paiaa, (aamala vaakaaaaaa, ka4aaea,
aackaaha, aMlatiefeolia, Saapaadaacy, aarv
aa - AavaafaBMnta. flaahaa t haat. fiaaV
iaa aa4 iadaftadto vaiaa. whltaa. oaiafsi
t trrantar f ariaaa aheM-wrta to Mrs.
rilaa Lavail, 1S02S Mass., Kaaaaa City,
Ma.
Hha witl amtlralr TS1TC aaa vithaat
chart- to th iaaairer adrita of a raa-
I boaa airtaaa wt.rrra aaa aaa
atkoc .wian mx .thay Jai aaceaaatallr
raliaaad aiaulav troublaa. t - -
Tha saoat naaoi aroraaiiaa at thaaa
theakf aj woswa WI f aal Jik m mmm
woaan.' Ana atbara. I 4ea't hav say
faiaa- whatarar aayara.,'."t eae hsrii
if baKeva . atraaU that roar ' Waaaarfal
Vatha4 haa eoaa aa aah co4 tot ata (a
aoeh a ahart tiasa." vWrita toaar. Tata
la. aaMrwy.jraa- t; . hat
LLMiffiEwS
CARDIIiiflL'S CHANGE
0 SSI E
TOMORROW
and his band of Buccaneers from
Pittsburgh, 87 strong, arrived
here today after an . uneventful
Journey.
They are to go into training
here for the seventh consecutive
year and will find a nearly perfect
ball park to work out in.
Aside from 15 pitchers and
four catchers, Floyd Scott, the
outfielder from Stockton, who
was obtained from Chicago, is the
only active player present.
The first practice is scheduled
for ten a. m. tomorrow.
SANTA ANA, Cal.. Feb. 20.
(AP). The spring training sea
son of the Portland rlub of the
Pacific Coast Baseball league was
opened here today.
Carl Yerkes, holdover pitcher,
was the first of the Beaver play
ers to report to Manager Ernie
Johnson at the Orange county fair
grounds, site of the club's train
ing camp. A new pitching acqui
sition, Wetzell, obtained from
Philadelphia, was among the early
arrivals.
Manager Johnson announced
that one training session would
be dally from 10:30 to 2:30.
CHICAGO. Feb 20. (AP) A
clearer conception ot the meaning
of the rules and a more friendly
relationship between the umpires.
players and fans Is seen as an out
growth of the two day conference
of the American League umpires
which closed Saturday.
Called at the instigation of Pros
ident E. S. Barnard, the 12 recent
ly appointed arbiters went over
every phase of the game. Sitting
with the umpires and the presi
dent was Henry P. Edwards, vet
eran baseballwriter and fan. Ed
wards now Is head of the newly
organized service bureau of the
league.
"Out of this meeting," said
President Barnard, "we hope to
bring a uniform interpretation of
the rules, so that one umpire, one
week, will not give a certain slant
to a rule, and another umpire,
the following week, exactly the
opposite."
The conference also served to
acquaint the nine veterans with
the three new umpires.
SPORTS ON HOOD
ENJOYED BY 16
Sixteen Salem winter snorts en
thuslasts motored 'to Mount Hood
3aturday for skiing and toboggan
ing. Tne sports were enjoyed at
the natural coarse near Swim.
Dr. J. O. Hall, one time cham
pion ice skater of Europe, and a
top-notch- skiler In his younger
days spent in Norway, was one of
the party. Others who went were
O. W. 1 Emmons, Ross . BIdwell.
Fred Duncan, Ben Ricklr, Connell
Ward. Hugh Ward. Walter Lottls.
Colby Herenden. Emmett Kleinke
David Willis. Ira Jorgenson. Rol
lin Graber, Fiord Query. Carlton
Roth, and Julius WUson.
The course was particularly fast
Saturday evening.
The party was sponsored bv the
Salem Y.M.C,A.
lexnenetroll
.their first
step to ward etjle cnUa for
hoes that are distinctive
correct. It it tbeae Utile
: poinU of dress tiiat betray
tate.l1iereisaaimplieity
. to Boetoniane axnartneas
tluit joacandeperidfapon.
Mtody$7$o$10thpair;
OM CLUB
OPENS
TIB
LEAGUE UMPIRES
HOLD CONFERENCE
. hI '0 I '" " '
LOCALS 0UISH00T
HEME
I
By turning In a score of 73, Sa
lem gunners were victorious Sun
day over Union and Prlnevllle in
the state telegraphic trap shooting
competition. Union shot only 67,
and Prineville 67. Coqullle de
feated the locals, boweverwlth a
perfect score of 75.
The three high men whose
scores counted were. Art Funk,
25: Clarence Bowne. 24; and. Dr.
G. 15. Prime. 24.
Foggy weather prevented a bet
ter showing by .local artists, the
shooting being delayed almost un
til 10 o'clock while the gunners
waited for the fog to lift, some
what. Several boosters motored
to the grounds to watch the clay
birds winged.
Scores were as follows: Art
Funk, 26; Clarence Bowne, 24;
Dr. G. E. Prime. 24; Grant Fer
ris, 24; Jim Lewis. 24; George
Vlsesko. 24; Bert McKay. 23;
Carl Bahlburg. 23; Tom , Wolga-
mott, 23; Tom Curry, 23.' Cuyler
Van Patten. 23; O. K. DeWitt
22; George Palmer, 22; Bud
Welch, 22; Cliff Evans. 22;
George Evans, 22; Frank Evans.
21; Ken Btown, 21; George Ha
berman, 20; Cliff Parker. 19;
Lawrence Imlah, 19; Walter ,81-
mon, 19; Fred Leise, 19 L Morris
Race, 19: Lowell White, 18; Fred
Miller. 18; L. M. Stanley." 18; C.
C. George, 17; K. Bernard. 17;
R. Gouley, 16.
CONGER CHALKS
UP NEW RECORD
KANSAS CITY. Mo.. Feb. 20.
(AP) Lloyd Hahn, Boston A.A.A
filer, lost his first race in two
years and dropped one of his four
world's indoor records when Ray
Conger, Illinois A.C. flash, led him
to the tape in a special 1,000 yard
race here in the record time of 2
minutes 11 seconds. "
The race was the feature event
of the Kansas City Athletic club
indoor meet. Hahn, who held the
record of 2:12 4-5 finished under
protest after .Conger passed him
within 50 yards of the tape and
lodged an immediate protest with
the referee claiming he had been
elbowed off the track by his op
ponent.
Hahn 's old record was set at ,
PAID FOR
MANUFACTURING,
. FREIGHT AND
SELLING COSTS
Jyf paid to o
A PRODUCER 0 V
ffiJ LIVE STOCK 'A
U! FOR H$ ANIMAL -A
Swift & Company's
Cattle Dollar
A thousand pound beef steer will yield on an
average of 550 pounds of beef and 150 pounds of
bide and other finished by-products.
Swift ft Company, at its various packing
plants, buys thousands of cattle each week, trans
forms them Into beef and by-products, sells the
beef. to retail dealers and the by-products to
various kinds of manufacturers to be worked up
into forms which the consumer desires.
From every dollar which Swift ft Company
received in 1927 from sales of beef and by
products an average of 85 cents was paid to the
producer of live stock for his animal; 14 cents
waa required Jo pay manufacturing; freight and
selling costs, and one cent remained aa earnings.
. Out of his 85 cents the farmer has to pay tbeT
cost of the animal and the expense of feeding and
marketing before he makes any profit.
Theetory of beef Is as interesting one. Some
thing of tins, as well aa many other details of
the packing Industry, are told in the new Swift
ft Company Year Book for 1928.
A copy Is yours free for the asking. Just fill
out the coupon below and maiL
' Swift & Company
Our profit from a7 ewtrces average
. .ony at fraction of m cant a pound.
Swift ft Company, ; .-"
4001 Packers Ave., US yards, Chicago
Please send a copy of
IS
5.
x 1 , -
nta.m ,.
jt EEC.
New. York last year., T. V
defeat was his first since T V
ber, 1926. He had won 2u . f
secutive races. Hahn Jumped into,
a two pace- lead at the sound 0p
the gun and held this advant t-"
until the back stretch of the f..ui
lap when Conger pulled abreast -j?
him. It was on the tarn ana
of sight of the finish line
Hahn claimed the former? .
state star nudged him ; of ;
boards. . ,- . ,
: ry
LOMSKI ROUTE5
JIMMY FRANC
PHILADELPHIA. Feb. 20
(AP). Leo Lomekl of Aberd.e n
Wash., punched Jimmy FrancW .j.
to such condition tonight t!:
their 10 round bout was stoo-..i
In the middle of the third r
by the refree to save Francis f
f urther punishment. Lomskl
Into his man from the begin
and soon had him groggy. Fra
went down for a count of nlr
the third and the referee
called a halt. Lomskl weigh
170. Francis 164.
WALKERWILLIS
ALREADY TO G'
BAN FRANCISCO. Feb. 20
(AP) Mlrkey Walker, inl.li:...
weight tltleholder and Jack Wi'Au.
hard hitting Texas, finished hjvy
training today for their ten ror.nl
uou-champlonshlp fight at tlw
armory Wednesday afternoon.
Walker battered a ' group of
Husky opponents through e''i'
rounds while Willis also clo i
his workout sessions at a fast ill').
Chectcs theBoMcfi
the Fever
Tonet
Stops
BILL'S Caacara-Bro.
taide-Chiinina atouaa
Colds
cold in 24 hours. Luk
for the red box with pnr
trait. 30c Ail dm gut.
EARNINGS
1
the 1928 Year Book tot
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