The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, August 09, 1927, Page 8, Image 8

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THE QREGOK STATESMAN. SAtEM. OltECON
-TUESDAY -MORNING, AUGUSTO, i027.
SES OF STtlDY
,!'.-.l.'.jLiJ'VJ-
AS AIR HERO
ON TOUR OF CITIES
STSTE8f.fi
PRISON GUARDED AGAINST A
una
Till
OF KE CLI
ci
GOOD
STTIFSS
Arithmetic Review Included
; Among Requisites for
. ( J : High School Seniors
M S .
Printed la a separate volume
irons the other subjects, the new
course f study in English for
Oregon .high schools has been pub
lished and is being mailed put to
city and county superintendents
throughout the state. The course
was prepared under, the direction
ot the state department of educa
tions ' -.
Persons who assisted in pre
paring the -course of study were
Mrs. Margaret Goodall. head of
the English department, or the
university high school at Eugene;
Miss Winifred Graham of Marsh
field, Miss Ada V. Ross of Salem,
Miss Laude M. Mochel of Wood
fcurn and Dr. M. Elwood Smith of
"the Oregon Agricultural College.
" The other high school courses,
bound la, one volume, will be
ready .for distribution within the
nextf 1 days. .-
"''.In most .subjects the new high
school ' course is little different
ftom the one in use during the
last four years. The. work in one
"or two subjects has. been thor-
jOUghly revised, and provision has
teen made tot, the recall of cer
tain,! desirable,', skills acquired in
".the, elementary, grades but fre-
ciuentljf, lost through" .disuse dur
ing the high school period. Drill
In spelling, has been made -a de
finite par J of the work in English.
r;t Every department, is made res
ponsible for orderliness and legi
bility in written productions. For-
iaal classes in spelling and pen
manship are advised for high
. school students who cannot other
wise be brought up to an accept
able standard. .
'Tests I have seen reported as
welt as those I have condcted
show that high school seniors
T write and spell somewhat better
than high school freshmen," said
C, A. Howard, state suberintend
endtof schools.
. "Their , accomplishments in
. these regards, ought to be very
' much better. Through the opera
tion, ot this course of study we
hope to approach in all our high
schools, the results now being se
cured in the best of them."
. Another feature of the new
' course of study is the inclusion of
I a half-year of reviews in arithme
tic and geography which is recom
mended; as a required course tor
all seniors except those who have
takes higher arithmetic and high
school, geography as a part of
their regular work.
"Most. young people just out of
the high school flounder badly in
handling ordinary business calcu
lations.", said Mr. Howard. "This
la because they have not handled
auch calculations for a period of
four years.' It is the purpose pjf
this, .course to whet up arithmetic
skills" that have grown dull
through disuse; I am confident
that for most :- students, these
'ektlls'can be brought to a keen
edge . In. .& comparatively brief
period.'., ,
The review course provides for
thorough and persistent drill both
for.; speed and accuracy in the
fundamental operations of addi
tion: subtraction, multiplication
'and division. Common and de-
'-. clmal ' fractions, measurements,
percentage and business applica-
' tlons are, thoroughly Reviewed.
: y,The( reyiew.in geography is de
eignedto adjust jt&e,. students to
anj accurate rtew ot such, matters
vos pljgi'cpreitipn8 ".political divi
sions., trade f routes and 'world
ommerce .'before . cutting ,them
loose from high scho61.
VPopnlaf demand has -a great
deal to do with calling attention
to need of emphasis , on certain
phases " of school work involved
In ; these revisions," ; said Mr.
Howard. "But' this is one of the
situations where popular, demand
and professional advice seem to
be ! in accord, for thq national
education association's commis
sion on reorganization of secon
dary education In its report nine
years ago, set forth seven alms
for: secondary education, and one
of those was mastery of the f unda
mentar"procesaes." i v,
INDIANS BOUND BY LAW
fivt
Exempted from
of Antl-piMhwhecl Law
Provisions
Indians of Yakima must com
ply1 with the; provisions of -; the
. law enacted by the voters at the
1927, electon prohibiting the use
of fish wheels la ' the Columbia
river and " the. operation of fish
traps : and ' seines In t the streams
cast ot tha Cascade locks, accord
ing to a legal opnion handed down j
. . . , .... 1
oy me attorney general uero ov.
yirday. :-..V.:- Z-y'i' -r-:r:'-.
. The Indians contended tha4 they
were, authorized to operate fish
wheel In the, Columbia river un
der treaty with the federal gov-,
ernment. ' v ' , v ' .
The opinon was prepared at the
request ;o( M, TV Hoy, master fsU
garden. .
If there is any- wet party Jn the
t&rapaisn next year Just think how
inuch.fun its members will have
going' around singing ."Ale., ale.
9 gang's sJJ btT9:"?l ;-
A ? , rt'
. " . - 4 . ' '
. V- v-'N' .'.-:r 'TJ&tK&itiM
Wfe . 5
Colonel Charles A. Lindbergh, now engaged in an air tour of 75 cities throughout the United States,
is snapped at Cleveland, O., home of Myron T. Herrick, ambassador to France, who officially welcomed
him at the completion of his epoch making transatlantic flight. Lindbergh is shown above with Col.
Carmi Thompson and Mrs. Herrick, wife of the ambassador. Below, left, is a close-up of the air hero
made just after he stepped from his plane, and right, a vWv of the Spirit of St. Louis hovering over
the Cleveland airport.
D
E
COLLEGE KP I WIS
Greater Oregon Committee
Outlines Courses at Two
State Schools
With a desire to aid the high
school graduates who intend to
attend college this fall and in ac
cordance with Governor Patter
son's plan for harmony between
the University of Oregon and O.
A. C, members of the Greater
Oregon committee are explaining
the courses offered by the institu
tion. Students in engineering and
agriculture are advised to attend
O. A. C. ; while those wishing
courses in the sciences, arts, anJ
literature are advised to enter tho
university.
Besides explaining the courses
offered in the different schools
of the university, members of the
committee give information in re
gard to expenses and fees, and
afd is given the student in secur
ing catalogues and other printed
informational matter.
Courses are offered at the unl
aversity through the college of
literature, science and ; the arts
consisting of 22 separate depart
ments; and the schools of law, ar
chitecture and allied arts, busi
ness administration, education,
journalism, medicine, music
physical education and sociology.
The committee, is composed of
Harold Socolofsky, Salem; general
chairman; Frank Ball, assistant
chairman; and William Biggs,
Ontario; Ted Gurney, Baker; Roy
Hernden, Freewater; Fred West,
Klamath Falls; Joe McKeown,
Marshfield; Ronald Sellers, Bend;
Harold Davis, The Dalles; Wil
liam Adams, Milwaukie; Walter
Durgan. Eugene;" Avery Thomp
son. Salem; Frank Ball, Port
land; and John H. Alderman, As
toria, who arc in charge of . the
different districts into which' the
state was divided.
Committeemen! have been ap
pointed in nearly every city and
town in the state to work under
thp district chairman.
TAPS FOR GOVERNOR
WOOD SOUNDED TODAY
; (Coatiad from pas 1.) ;
tli I area. By ? gathering ; units
from Fort Myer, f-'ort Washington
and Fort Humphreys, the 'war de
partment, however was ablo .
jiiuster all the component units o2
a nll K'glinenf. even though "tho
m:u:i1 rnmberlof men la below
that f-et forth as' the escort of a
iiajor penerai and a former chiuf
of th sriuv general staff.
.As th funeral; party passm
alonq; r nnsylvanla avnui and
the road leading to tho cemetory
situated 'on the Virginia -'Hills' ov
crlooklns: th cttf , a hore .will 1m
Ud In th icur of the. flax drap.d
casket with the.tots in the fctir
rnpireveTHed - - - -'
f lags"pn( foerjne&r build
ings will be at half staff and all
high government and army offic
ials now in Washington are ex
pected to attend the ceremonies at
the grave
The iuneral procession probab
ly -.vill leave the station about one
hour and a half after the body ar
rives. The military escort will b
commanded by Major General
Hanson Ely, commandant of the
army war college.
The body also will be accompan
ied to L; grave by the widow and
the genoral's three children, Leon
ard, Jr.. Osborne and Lusita, and
the escort from Boston.
Colonel John T. Ax ton, chiof of
army chaplains, and Chaplain W.
H. Watts, have been selected to
conduct the services at the grave.
MESS CALL POPULAR
COURT SESSION'S HKLt AT KLK
LAKE CA3IP 1A1LV
ELK LAKE YMCA CAMP, Aug.
8 . (Special.) When tie direct
ors of the camp want to get the
boys together in a hurry, theyj
have the busier blow the "mulli
gan call." The cook served what
he called "slumgooey hominy" last
night, but in spite of its name, the
boys liked; it. .
' The boys hel court 'every day
or so, to take care of cases of dis
ciplined In the court the other
day, Biir East, the lodge, called
"Order, order In the court!" Scot
ty Marr,-who'dld not sleep well
the night before, and who was on
the jury that day, said sleepily,
"I'll take coffee and an egg sand
wich." In the first aid class, Ed Cross
distinguished himself; by answer
ing to the question of how-to cure
a hemorrhage of the lungs, "Put
a tourniquet around the neck." !
Virgil Harrison, with a name
which is a combination of poet
and president, doesn't seem to be
worrying about living up to either
of 1 the names, from the difficulty
his tent mates have in getting him
up in the morning.
Another, fishing . party went to
HIGHLY E1ID0RSED METHODS
np,HE CHas.7. Dchn'rionsurgi-:
x cai metnoq of treating Jt'iles
and other Rectal and Colon disorders,
used exclusively by the Dean -clinics In
Portland. Saa Francisco and Seattle, i recog
nized throushour Ula Wut for simpUcity at
application met ccrUinty iituO. Patml cm
and arc tent from many distant tfrt. Tht crn
fidewe e viTenrc by a WRITTEN ASSUR
ANCE TO ' SUCCKSSri LLY TREAT ANY
CASE OF FILES r acd oa IS ycara of
nttaaHacd1 practte. In wklck
the most extreme cac haw
" keen, permanently relieved. Om
FREE 100-pase lllutrrttetf
book of utmost value t
every nficrer. Send for tt ta-.'a
'DEAM.M . D.. fi ru
FOaTiaNrypsllCE I 'AM RLD6.Stfc bHUh
Humbug creek, and although it
was twice as large as the last par
ty to go there, it only brought
back about the same amount of
fish. '
President Coolidge and Presi
dent Hindenberg exchanged greet
ings over the new trans-Atlantic
cable but there is no report to the
effect that their conversation was
anything like that between the
governors of North and South
Carolina.
';i IS COMMEIED
An Unseifish Effort Calling
'Attention to Salem and
the Salem District
Editor Statesman: '
I don't very often break into
print, but the present occasion
warrants a few words of praise,
and I always found more pleasure
and profit In one word of praise
th'i- h whole pa-jo if criticism. T
now have in mind the quarter
page advertisement that appeared
in The Statesman of July 28th,
run and paid for by the U. 5- Re
alty coniLany. I don't know who
wrote this ad. but it w the best
thing in the nay of a lroM f- r
Salem and the Williamettc valley
that has appeared in the press or
anywhere else so far as I haye seen
and apparently without any selfish
motive.
Ah Unselfish Effort
A paper going out ever the
country as The Statesman docs is
sure to be read by w good many
people outside of Oregon, and
when any person or firm adver
tising in its pages goes out of the
way to set forth thV advantages
of 5aiin and ihn surrounding
rom 'ry. knowiag when they pty
for the space Urn it. does other
Tnuch good as it toes themsel
ves, i seems to me they ar entl-
.- a good da! af credit. It
thore are any ba.-.l;r.:-c 6 other
hn-iiness men in Salem who have
nrst read that .advertisement I
hope they will jt a opjrfo! The
Statesman of July 28th and look it
up. As a rule, I am hot much in-t-r?sted
in boos3 or boosters and
I don't spend m t-h time reading
t."i.- .ids In the pajer. Hut I am
j taxpayer and horn'? owner here,
and when any firm In Salem, or
individual eith.r, "spend9 o'ul
monev to tell tho :ut3ido4 of the
resources of this cour.rrr and th?
opporturities awaiting him here,
I feHl ihat.I and v?rv other prop
erty owner in this section has be?n
benf'ted. We need more public
ity of the same kind.
E. W. POWERS.
Salem, Ore., Aug. 2, 1927.
What He Refers To
The part of the advertisement
referred to by Mr. Powers is no
d"jbt. the foliowtn;:
If you are a stranger in Salem,
looking for a farm; a home in the
city or a vacant lot or an acre
tract upon which to build a house,!
we have It for you. Maybe we
can save yon time and money by
putting you in touch withhe very
thing you are looking for.
"Who ever saw better crops
anywhere than the Williamette
T -y-a-'-Nw:-:---:--- 1 - It
1
i , i
'Aw::-:-'-:vxc-x-:-:-:':-:-x- T
"i "
C . m. y j, J
T
-x- ' ' din fc "
S- "' h
4
i M
T Special armed guards are shown on duty outside the walls of the
Charlestown, Mass., prison, as Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti,
'radicals', prepared for execution on murder charges and sympathizers
throughout the world were holding demonstrations. - '
; The eighth- annual reunion or
the Bonney clan was held at Col
vin,'s grove, near Aurora, on Sun
day. There were about 150 .pres
ent, from -points In Oregon and
Washington, and - as ' far awav as
California and Colorado. "J. M. W.
("Wlke'J Bonney of Carlton was
elected president for the ensuing
year, and Ed. Tyler of Woodburn
vice president, and Bonnie Scott
Eerthelsoii or Salem was reelected
as secretary. ; 4
For the ninth annual reunion,
the first Sunday in Eugust of next
year, McMlnnyillc was chosen. A
further account of the meeting of
last Sunday will appear In The
Statesman of next Sunday.
ValleV has produced this year?
Wlio ever saw a more perfect sea
ton anywhere than this has been?
"Oregon has been spoken of as
the Green Land. No wonder!
With her green mountains, green
hills and green valleys, ' her cool
streams cutt'ng like ribbon tf
silver; her refreshing springs that
splash along the highways for the
del-slit of the t;ir3ty traveler
airth'ese go rlnake this the most
perfect home-country; this si.i of
Paradise itself. i
If.yu want toStve in Salem;
buy now. If Vou want a farm near
Salem, tyoui will never get it foj;
less money tnan riilhl; now. 1
rAnd listen! You haven't heard
of; any business failures in Salem,
have you? You haven't heard of
anv broken or shaky banks in
Salem, either, have you. Of
course not there aren't any.
"Then this is the place to live.
We know you could do a lot
worse, but we don't think you
could do better than locate here."
Sergeant Returns To Desk
Sergeant Jack. Cutler, night
clerk officer at the police station,
returned Sunday from a two
weeks vacation spent at various
points on the coast, where he has
been fishing and "resting," he
says. He reports the jack salmon
running eary this season, but fail
ed to bring any of them home to
show for it. He has been at
Oceanside, Netarts, and on Wilson
River.
Return from Week-end at Lake
Harvey Brock, P. j H. Bell,
Glenn L. Adams, and Hugh Adams
returned Sunday evening from a
Week-end spent at lEk-Lake, vis
iting the boys in the YMCA camp
there, bringing back with them
letters and messages , to fi Sends
and relative "of the boys. All
are well and having a good time
they report.
Visit Relatives Here
Misses Vera and Ruth Berthel
son of Spokane are visiting at the
home of their uncle, T. H. Ber
thelson, 2280 Fairgrounds Koad,
and their' cousin, H. W. Berthel
son 1810 North Commercial St.
Accident at Commercial Corner
, An auto -accident was. reported
to police last night, involving cars
4riven by Lillian Denytt. 275 S.
14th street, and -Paul Traglio at
the intersection of Commercial and
Ferry. The traglio car failed to
stop at a .stop sign, it was said,
and struck the other car, bending
the fender and bumper..
Two Report Accidents
William C. Dick and L. W. Pul
ley both of Hubbard reported the
minor accident whieh occurred
when their cars collided there
Saturday. Dick reported that
Pulley gave no signal when he
started to tunu while Pulley gave
"sleepy driver" as "his version of
the cause of the accident.
Spend Vacation On Trip
Mr. and Mrs. Alvin B. Stewart,
347 Court street, returned recent
ly from a vacation of a week, dur
ing which time they fished at
Thomas Creek and. Indian lake,
and drove around by the Dalles
California highway loop through
Bend and back by way of the Mc-
Kenzie pass. .
Salem Girl Married Sunday-
Sunday morning, at 9:30, oc
curred the marriage of Jennie
Lucille Hill, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. P. M. Hill, of 195 South 24th
street, to Leonard Brockett, of
Raymond. Wash., at the Hill resi
dence. The couple left immediately-after
the ceremony for Til
lamook, where they will make
their home for the rest of the
summer. "'" ' " ' '
Auto Reported Stolen
W. J. Timme. Rt. 8. Box 153.
reported last night to police that
his Maxwell touring car. license
nu mbe.r 139-617, had been stolen
sometime yesterday.
to Sana
Special reduced rare good
in speedy, all'coach train
every Sunday, Tuesday and
hriday. Ride in roomy, all
steel coaches.' Room to relax
and rest. Free observation
lounge and open platform.
Low-cost msBui in diner and
lunch cat.
Trains leave11 :S A- M
arriving San Fran
cisco 1000 a. m. 'Over scenic-'
Cascade Line inlyiight.
Similar service returning
from San Francisco every
Monday, Wednesday and
Saturday.
-ftSA roundtrip Coach fare
f good for 15 days re
turning on anv train carrying
. Coaches. 4 " J-.';: "'
S'UQtE2GE'Eu
City Ticket Office
.184 No. Liberty' Telephone 80
T
to
the
O '!
wrang lmoiurs
of
Protect Family
With The, Statesman's
TRAVEL
ACCIDENT
POLICY
One year for .........
Newspaper Registration Free
Moraiirig
When you are asleep, widows,
whose husbands provided no
accident insurance, are busy
with mop and pail!
Protection Afforded By
The Statesman Policy
PART ONE
17,500.00 if the insured is killed as a passenger sn a street
car "or railroad train. ,
PART TWO .i .
. Jl.000.00 if the insured is killed in a private automobile,,
taxicab, bus, auto stage, horse drawn vehicles, passenger
elevator or by storm, tornado, lightning or falling walls of
a building, or by fire in'a public building.' j
PART THREE " . ,
- " SI, 000.00 If the insured Is killed by being b truck by a mov
ing vehicle. while walking or standing on the street.
Losses reimbursed according to , the
Accident described In . v Part 1
For Loss of Life C . , i .S7.5O0.0O
For Loss of Both Hands. ; .7,500.00
For Loss of Both Feet . . , .$7,500.00
For Ix)ss of Sight of Both v
h Eyes ...... ; .";
For Loss of One Hand and
; One: Foot . . . . '. i . . . ; . .
For Loss of .One Hand and
Sight. of One Eye .. ....
For Loss of One Foot and
Sight of One Eye . . .
For Loss of ' Either .Hand. i.
For Loss of 'Either Foot . .
For Loss of "Sight ot Either
. Eye
7,500.00
7.8O0.0O
following schedule: . y
;Part'fl A Part 8
fl.OOO.OO fl.OOO.OO
Sl.ooo.oo : I
Sl.OOOK)
1 ,000.00
' 1,000.00 ' ' -
' 1,000.00',
.7MrO.OO
3,7RO.OO
3,750.00
3,750.00-
l.OOO.OO '
, 500.00 '
i SOO.OO
soo.00 :
rf 10.00 a week will.be paid the Insured for not more than
'fifteen weeks If Injured while traveling in a vehicle or hurt
.while walking, by a moving vehicle. .. . " ' :
. Policies issued by . ttie North American Accident Insurance
'.Company Ohrough representative at the office of The State-
man.
,"All claims settled by a company representative located with
'lit oiatesraau ,1-uoiisning vompnu.-r - j i
THE STATESMAN OFFERS YOU
A -$7,501? TRAVEL 'ACCIDiasrt4
INSURANCE POLICY FOR YOUR
FAMILY'S PROTECTION GET
IT NOW!
Every Statesman Reader and every
one who is how ready, to become a
Statesman subscriber may have the
,. benefits of this wonderful Travel Acci
dent Policy upon payment of ONLY
i a NewsDaper Recnstrabon Fee of ONE
DOLLAR.-Use Ha Bfanlis Herwit!
PRIVILEGE CARD
FOR JfEW SUBSCRIBERS
Insurance Department.
Oregon Statesman. "
Salem. Oregon. .
I 4lf to U dintg ot yonr
TRAVEIi ACCIDENT INSURANCE th.r
ff ple ntr y b,tiptio to Th
Orer SUtunin, which 1 frM to tk
for oB yer m follow: .' .
(CHECK
By Carrier I will py Us
HERE).
emrrier 60e atOBth.
By Mail $5.00 P yor
In adTaBco-enelojed kr-
wit. - : - - - -- -
I bIra brwitB ipply for :tko S7.S00
Pablie Serriea' Accidcat Iaanranca Poliej
ad rncloaa herewith the Sl.OO Newspa
per rremiura Fee, which . I omierataad
ia la addition to tho abora anbicriptioa
rata.s. -
. XT SUBSCEIPTlOll IS roX-l4PE
BT MAIL YOtrB;TOTAI-J8XaaX- '
TAJTCE MTJ4T BB $6.00 or papar
aaa Framiost ' -
Signed . . . . . .... .Age. .-.
'Address R. F. O. mm . v
- .. -
Town ......... ...Stats.... .
Occupation r
XL
s TW'Q sccrtc may be painted too awful to describe
i, Ji the suffering thai widows and' families are
I forced ia'eodurc because of lyeglecttdp'roTide
" protection ajrainst- accidental fcleath ' or injury.
-Awake to. YOUft duty If ydu have not already done
. so Don Vgo another day f "
li i v - ' " '.v
L& Your Application and Subscription
W . . m - - ... . . ..
into i Statesman Office Now!
APPUCATION
For Old Subscribers
FOB TRAVEL ACCIDENT
' INSURANCE 1
Inanntneo Department, -Tho
Oreron Stataamaa,
Baieat, Oragoa,
I hereby apply for the 17,500
Public Service Travel Accident In
surance Policy which yon are sup
plying to your Teaders. I here
with enclose One Dollar ($1.00)
covering yonr newspaper registra
tion fee tor 'paper by carrier in
city or; $6.00 for one year sub
scription by mail and registration.
It Is understood that there will be
no further cost to me.
Signed (. . Age. . .
Address -
.
Town .'. .". ..... f . State
Occvpatlon -
; HOTB: Peraooa who oro no ow atataa
aaaa. roaera ahoaitt aioo aao "tlri
tofo Card"
i : ' t . . : - - -.'-. -; ' -
i 2 15 South Commercial
. -1 i Salem, Orcson