The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, June 29, 1927, Page 1, Image 1

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    WEATHER-' FORECAST: Fair Wednes
day and Thursday, but fog near the coast;
temperature .above normal in the interior;
gentle northerly winds. Maximum tempera
ture yesterday, 73; minimum, 57; river, .9;
atmosphere, cloudy; wind, southwest.
That nickname Lindy must hare been a-!
Godsend to, those sons' writers who were
having" a hard time' to find enough words'
to rhyme with Lindbergh,-
Inland waterwayaara all Wgnf If they
don't try to take in too much territory.
SEVENTY-SEVENTH.YEAR
SALEM, OREGON, WEDNESDAY MORNING, JUNE 29, 1927 ,
PRICE FIVE CENTS
Lffl
vf
ejLLj
ALL IIPQR
MEASURES
Extensive Civic Development Program Made
Possible by; People's Decision; Bond Issues
for Bridges and Sewers Approved; Resi
dence Qualification Repeal Only Measure
Defeated Here
All important measures proposed by the Salem city council
carried decisively in the special election Tuesday, the people's
decision making possible an extensive civic development pro
gram which was a part of the present administration's pro
gram when it took office.
These measures included the $500,000 bond issue for im
provement, extension and reconstruction of the city's drain
age and sanitary' sewer system, the $350,000 issue for con
structing permanent bridges to replace present unsafe struc
tures, and to erect some new ones; and the $40,000 issue for
construction of an incinerator or garbage disposal plant.
Of almost equal importance were the two taxation meas
ures, which were also given substantial majorities. These
were of two mills each as a maximum; one for repairing
streets, bridges, crosswalks, etc., and the other making pos
sible the establishing of fire stations in North Salem, East
Sajem and South Salem, and the installation of a 50-box
alarm system.
Only one measure lost that which sought to remove the
residence qualification of three years for election or appoint
ment to city offices. The measure providing for assessing
the cost of construction, or repair of sidewalks to the abutting
property, met with little opposition.
The measure calling for the inclusion of certain territory
in Northeast Salem within the city limits also carried de
cisively? '
The incinerator bond issue is O ;
the one which probably will please
the people of Salem most in hav-
ig passed, as the need f for it has
ten talked here for ears, and
e city council has been in a deep
quandary -a to what to do with
the garbage, every proposed site
for a city dump meeting with op
li.nition and bitter opposition
liom people living -or having busi
ness interests in that particular
locality.
The council's committee on
drainage and sewers recently an
nounced that Its first step in con
nection with the plan for remedy
ing the drainage conditions would
1 e to employ competent engineers
to make a complete survey, and
that it would he guided by the-
recommendations which these en
gineers might make.
It was noticeable that the Rich
mond district, which a week ago
v. as reported to 'be opposed to
these issues, voted for them with
a majority comparable to that in
other parts of the city..
UNUSUALLY LOW
PRICES OFFERED
MKKCHAXTSfIX BARGAIN DAY
FLAX XOW NUMBER 71
Many Out-of-town People Already
Planning to Attend Friday
Event
Not only has the list of Salem
business firms participating in the
annual bargain day program swell
ed to 71, but the proprietors of
these firms are determined to
make this bargain day, which
om-H on Friday of this week,
July l, the biggest in quality of
bargains and extent of reductions,
of any of the 10 annual bargain
days scheduled in this city..
Profits in the retail trade lie
not so much in the price asked,
these merchants point vout,' as in
lie-rapidity with wfijeh stocks are
disposed of and replaced; and
that is one of the. reasons for
which the annual bargain day Is
held.
It is not the principal reason,
however; that is to impress upon
residents of the Salem trading
iHretviiiat this is a city where their
Jian be.done more cheaply
lore conveniently than else
and .to that end. they, have
pared prices to remarkably low
levels, to remind these customers
that the; every day prices too, are
remarkably low.
II umireds of out-of-town people
have already slgnifjfr,their Inten
tion of attending bargain day
here this year, and not only vis
iting the stores but attending the
entertainment attractions that will
fee available.
v Following are the firms that
are ' cooperating . la. the annual
fevent, the list having swelled con-
MKT GITYi
APPROVED
CHERRY GROWERS
REQUEST TARIFF
MAX tiKHLHAR, OTHERS PRE
SENT WESTERN' VIEWPOINT
Duty Increase on Pitted Cherries
ProtesUI by Italian
Officials
WASHINGTON, June 28 (AP)
Italian competition was .pictured
as making serious inroads into the
cherry growing Industry of the
Pacific coast at a hearing today
before the tariff commission on
the application of growers in four
western states for a 50. per cent
increase in the duty on pitted cher
ries. Representatives of importers
and Signor Romolo Angelone,
commercial attache of the Italian
embassy, were on hand to oppose
the proposed increase. .
Arguments in support of the ap
plication,, filed in behalf of Cali
fornia, Oregon, Washington and
Idaho cherry growers, were pre
sented by E. A. Smith, of Napa,
and Merrill Sickles, representing
the California Cherry Growers as
sociation. Max Cehlhar, represent
ing the Salem, Ore., Cherry Grow
ers' association and The Dalles and
Eugene Fruit Growers associa
tion; W. D. Bennett, of the Cali
fornia Fruit Exchange, W. R. Ogg.
a representative of the American
Farm Bureau Federation, and
Representative Rhinestrom, Cin
cinnati, and C. M. Pitts, Baltimore.
While ,the spokesman for the
American Cherry Growers' com
plained of increasing competition
from Italy which they said was
shutting the western product out
of the eastern American Marasch
ino market, those opposed to the
tariff increase, told the commis
sion that western cherries were
too large and too juicy for Mar
aschino nse, and that a small,
firm cherry, such as grown in
Italy was preferred.-
The Pacific toast representa
tives argued ,hat.. Italy had the
advantage of cheaper labor and
transportation f-to New York, and
estimated that Maraschino cherry
imports from Italy were approx
imately 1J million, pounds annu
ally. ; They want the , 2 cents a
pound duty increased to three
cents, the' maximum permitted
under .the flexible provisions of
the tariff law. J
KILLED BY FALLING TREE
Mrs. Mary Meyer,? 4b, Wairhlng
Husband Cot Trees, Struck
' MARSHFIELp. Ore., June 28-r-AP)
Mrs-, Mary Mfyer, 40 was
killed ' today fc when strock by 'a
railing tree near Lkkeslde. ' a She
had been watching! her husband
cut lireesr She was; killed when"
tree , unexpectedly ; fe;i; In :the
wrong direction, 'W " . ' 1 ;
BINE CHERRIES
START ROLLING
TO EAST COAST
Two Cars of Fancy Fruit
Leave Salem Today for
Far Away Markets
SHIPMENTS TO BE HEAVY
Severn! Consignments Em-h Day
Will Go Out Hereafter; Grow
ers ami Packers Hope for
Good Weather
Almost out of a clear sky, all
the black cherry deals have open
ed up in Salem. Two cars of
Bin.s are expected to roll today.
O. E. Brooks, manager of the
SakT Cherry Grower. association,
got busy at 1 o'closk yesterday,
with about 50 people, 4 0 ot them
being girls and women at the
tables, sorting cherries. They are
bo, far receiving Bings only. Mr.
Brooks expects to roll a car oi
Bings today for the eastern mar
kets. This force is working at the
plant of the Pacific Fruit & Pro
duce company, the same as last
year; but a new addition has betn
built in the rear. 35 by 121 feet,
for the use of the cherry associa
tion during the season.
The space will be used for stor
ing potatoes and onions, etc., at
other seasons.
Mr. Brooks expects to put up
two cars a day, and he hopes to
ship 40 to 50 cars, weather favor
ing. 'Marion Quality Fancy Cher
ries, Grown and Packed by Salem
Cherry Growers Association," is
the way" the labels on the boxes
read.
Only Bings will go out for a
few days. -Lamberts then will be
gin to move, the height of the
Lambert season coming perhaps
10 days from now.
Other Plant
Of course, some of the can
Bings yesterday, at their plant at
the Salem end of the bridge across
the Willamette. L. W. Wells is
rOoo tinned on ?tx S.)
STENOGRAPHERS LEAVE
Say People Don't Distate While
Drinking Beer Anymore
PARIS. June 28. (AP) Sten
ographers have disappeared from
Paris cafes. The first few cus
tomers who dictated their corre
spondence while they drank their
beer had their pictures published
in the newspapers. Cafe proprie
tors have learned, however, that
the busy business man of France
isn't busy enough to work while
he's playing.
The stenographers failed to
earn their salt after the first few
days, and the click of a type
writer no longer bothers the old
school gentlemen, who regard
their aperitif hour on the side
walk, just before dinner, as a sol
emn, traditional rite.
CITY OF SALEM CHARTER AMENDMENTS
SO
Precincts
5 F
s
T
3
YES
NO YES
1571 194
NO
107"
66
51
66
, 68
31
61
66
80
37
41
60
68
. 54
53
92
Salem
Salem
Salem
Salem
Salem
Salem
Salem
Salem
Salem
No
No.
No
No
No
No
No,
No
No,
. 1
-Y8
135j
1121
93j
68
170
137
97
98
48
87
128
257
106
134
114
71
78
103
202
.3
92
9.3 j.
80
47j
76
98
154
85!
81f
102
4
6
6
7
8
66
33
68
80
166
58
93
173
S6
Salem No
Salem No.
Salem No.
BalemKo.
Salem No.
Salem No.
Salem. .No.
10
11
12
14
16 V
67
85
17
66
146
3
IS
13
Total ...:.l4791549j2024 981
v- -V" Precinct l? and f.l laued t
BERNING CHILD
KILLED BY CAR
ACCIDENT OCCURS OX PACIFIC
HIGHWAY AT GERVAIS
Automobile Driven by R. G. Sim
mons of Salem; Inquest
Tomorrow'
Bede Berning, 1 year old son of
Mr. and Mrs. Otto Berning of Ger
vais, was killed yesterday evening
when an automobile driven by R.
G. Simmons, a salesman, ran over
him on the Pacific highway. The
accident happened about 5 o'clock.
Witnesses stated that tbe child
fan from behind another car out
in front of Simmons, who was
driving south. In an attempt to
avoid hitting the child and to bring
his car to a quick stop, Simmons
prove into a ditch and turned com
pletely around, about 12 feet from
where the boy was struck.
Simmons immediately hailed a
passing car to take him to Wood
burn where officials were notified.
An inquest will be held tomor
row afternoon at Gervais to fix
blame for the accident.
Simmons is a salesman for the
American Druggists' syndicate of
San Francisco. He lives in Sa
lem. GLOOM IN SMITH CAMP
Shattered Windshield Makes Re
turn Necessary; Flight Oft?
MUNICIPAL AIRPORT, Oak
land. Cal., June 28. (AP)
Gloom hung heavily over the camp
of Aviator Ernest L. Smith here
tonight, for .instead of winging its
way across the Pacific toward the
island goal the -little' silver TmSnflP
plane was out of the anticipated
race with the army Fokker, and
dissension waged between Smith
and his navigator, Charles H.
Carter of Los Angeles, to a de
gree that it was doubted if the
two would ever make the flight.
Smith's backers postponed the
fight indefinitely today when the
machine was returned to the field
from its first hop-off for repairs to
a windshield that had collapsed
under pressure of the wind.
ACTOR RALLIES SLIGHTLY
John Drew Making Brave Fight
Against Attack of arthritis
SAN FRANCISCO, June 28.
(AP) John Drew, 73, veteran
actor, who has been ill at a hos
pital, here, since May 31, rallied
slightly today, after suffering a
relapse, and tonight, was continu
ing his brave fight against the
arthritis which attacked him while
he was playing an engagement in
Portland.
SHORT SKIRTS DISPLEASE
African Woman Ask School Teach
ers to "Wea'p 'Em Longer"
CAPETOWN, June 28. (AP)
School marms wear their skirts
altogether too short in this coun
try to suit the South African Wo
men's federation.
It has taken steps to lengthen
the hems at least five inches. The
teachers themselves backed by
the government, are opposed to the
proposed reform.
- .. . . r
5 si 2? is- It
la 3 .' fa I.
-g. 5 $f 5 , . Si
?1 ?t f Tl 73
i e . s
s t ,9. , a
l k
YES NO YES NO
YES
221
158
ii6
109j
96
46j
99j
127 1
259
105
145
122
921
10f
228
NO
88
80
, 80
58
67
34
j 1351
j 122
t 104
" 79
) 82
j 40
I .75
I '88
176
114
84
158
131
114
85
75
39
t 79
105
153
100
" 83
85
75
41
64
80
90
70
41
76
94
511
55
74
37
37
55
68
43
50
63
1 74 j 15 ft;
aio' 122
80! 69
85! 97
,92 86
84f 60
.'1121 66
102 74
t 59 76
76 : 61
i 80 47
Ptj-V 67
' 193j 01
S2U 76
178 112
1 15511490jl704fI2942e99f
BYRD HOPS OFF
OVER ATLANTIC
LONG DELAYED FLIGHT FI
NALLY GETS GOOD START
Flier Takes Off From Roosevelt
Field at 5 O'CIock This
Morning
ROOSEVELT Field, New
York, June 29. (AP) The
three-motored monoplane Amer
ica took off on its flight to
France at 5:24 o'clock eastern
daylight time this morning'.
ROOSEVELT FIELD, N. Y.,
June 29 (AP) The monoplane
America's barograph was officially
sealed at 3:45 a. m., preparatory
to a takeoff for France at dawn.
The America was completely
fuefed with 54 gallons of oil, 18
for each of the three motors, and
1400 gallons of gasoline.
Food supplies were the last of
the stores to be put aboard. The
supplies consisted of four roast
chickens, four chicken sandwiches.
four quarts of hot coffee In ther
mos bottles, four ham and cheese
sandwiches, and five gallons of
drinking water. ,
Lieutenant George Noville, co
pilot and radio engineer of the
America, came to the field with
T. H. Kinkaide, Wright motor ex
pert, for a final check up of the
big monoplane.
At 4 a. m. indications were that
the start might not be before 6
a. m. '
When the -sealed barograph was
installed in the America; only one
of the four men of the crew was
at the field. That was George O.
Noville, the flight engineer. Com-
( Continued on paga f.)
CUPID STARTS TO WORK
With June Month Nearly Gone,
Messenger Works Overtime'
Dan Cupid whispered in the ear
of five couples yesterday that
June, the popular month of matt
rimony, was about gone. The re
sult was the issuance of five mar
riage licenses.
The couples applying were: Ed.
Staniford, ,26, Salem, and Mabel
V. Russell, 16, Salem; Chester W.
Mauldlng. 20, Salem; and Rita H.
Mires, 16, Silverton; Howard A.
Nelson. Woodburn, and Alpha V.
kjiarstad, Woodburn; Robert PedT
eftson, Portland, and Florence. Bry
ant, Portland; John Graef, Salem,
and Edna Ellis, Salem.
Sixty-five licenses havt; been Is
sued this month.
YES
NO
134
99 j
93
:77
68
,30
'159
0
103
59
74
72
77
53
81
105
YES-. NqTyES"
JNO
7V
52
53
44
46
16
!. 32
-41
58
31
31
25
49
29
1-45.
168
128
99
89
' 82
50
.86
151
121
87
83
! 74
34
157
105
97
81
75
43
69
', 89
112
69
V75
49
78
47
55
.93
2151
163
118
105
90
56
102
128
238
98
140
120
77
86
130
224
75
100
93
212
, 68
95
108
-56
87
103
196
223.
85
99
99
55
,11
- 1 - ' - ' N ,
W - -, -
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930 ) 17l5il243jl66frjl304J2090- 869
reporter-, ... ;r -': - .
ARMY AVIATORS
EXPEGTARRIVE
ISLANDS 7 A. 1.
Late Reports Indicate Pacific
Fliers Making Splendid
Progress
SHIPS GIVE BEARINGS
Light Rain Sjualls and Stiff Gale
Kiicountered 730 Miles Out
From San Francisco;
Goal Confident
LOG OF PACIFIC FLIGHT OF
ARMY FOKKER
June 28 (Pacific time):
7 a. m. Lieutenants Lester
J. Maitland and Albert Hegen
berger receive final instructions
from Major General Mason Pat
rick, chief of air corps.
7:09 a. mr Maitland and
Hegenberger start "forvHonolUlu
in army Fokker monoplane j
from Oakland municipal air- t
port. j
7:20 a. m. Army airplane
passed through Golden Gate,
San Francisco.
10:25 a. m. Army plane
sighted 300 miles off California
coast by unidentified ship.
2:44 p. m. Army plane
sighted passing over steamer i
Sonoma,, approximately 740
miles from' California coast,
flying 200 feet above water, ,
starboard of ship, which was
headed eastward.
7:35 p. m. President Pierce,
600 miles out, reported heard
army Fokker asking President
Cleveland, 1100 miles off Cali
fornia coast, for radio bearing.
HONOLULU, June 28. (AP)
The army monoplane flying
f torn' the Golden Gate to Hawaii,
was reported by the army radio
station here, to be 900 miles from
Honolulu at S:30 p. m., Honolulu
time, (10 p. m. Pacific time.)
OAKLAND, Cat.. June 28.
(AP) With more than half of the
2400 miles of its flight from the
mainland to Hawaii behind it, the
six-ton army Fokker plane to
night was .still winging its way
westward.
At intervals from 7:35 ' p. m.
(Pacific coast time) until 9:30,
messages from the President
Pierce, 600 miles off shore, de-
( Continued on page 4.)
BOND ISSUES DEFEATED
Multnomah County Votes Solidly
Against Issues
PORTLAND, June 28. (AP)
Multnomah county voted solidly
against approximately 110,000,000
in bond issues, it was indicated
from election "returns tonight.
A proposal to vote 13,000,000
for a bond issue for widening
Uurnside street was - running ;be-
bind more than 2 to 1. Complete
returns from 396 precincts out
of 486 in the city of Portland,
gave for the Burnside widening
project: Yes, 10,787; no, 24,531
An overwhelming majority was
being piled up against the $4,000,
000 bond issue for a new bridge
across the Willamette river here.
From 228 complete precincts out
of 532 in Multnomah county, the
vote was: Yes, 4893; no, 14,283.
PAPER FOUNDS SCHOOL
!- " - - - 5. -5- ' -
Pamphlet Accidentally Dropped
Brings School to Kentucky
BLACKEY. Ky.. June . 28 A
pamphlet accidentally left on a
train has resulted in the founding
of the Stuart Robison school here
attended : by 500 '.mountain boys
and girl&. v;..;;-.:;- j
Dr. . E. O. .Goerrant dropped an
article on " the nd' for such : a
school, -while traveling. f -Mrs. C.
SJHaney of Ftp rid a fonnd the pa
per, and as a result donated 2800
to a land to build the school.-
. Ther school, is under the super
vision of the Southern Presbyter
ian : Church. - Many of its pupils
walk from two to ten miles a day
to attend.-'- .
PROPOSAL
BY 19,123
Figures Reprint Nearly All of MultnomaK,
All but TWd Counties Report ; Negative
Vote Expected to Pile Higher; Tax Limi
tation Amendment Also Disapproved; De-a
feat Looms for Multnomah Measures
. PORTLAND, Or., June 29. (AP) A proposed state in
come tax faced an adverse majority on; returns tabulated,
early today, from yesterday's special state election. Figures 1
from 1007 precincts out of 1847 in the state, with MultnomahT
county nearly complete, and with figures from all but two
remote counties included were: For income tax, 28,687 rJ
against tax, 47,798, maponty
Further returns from rural districts were expected to
reduce the majority against the income tax measure, as many
of the counties showed majorities in favor of the tax here,
reported only part of their precincts.
Other measures voted on showed the following totals :
To repeal obsolete section of state constitution denying
suffrage to negroes: Yes, 45,167; no, 29,031. :
To authorize increase Portland school faxes, yes, 30,938;
no, 39,377.
Amendment to criminal pleading law, yes, 39,856: no,
26,240.
To increase legislators' pay from 3 to ?10, yes, 18,382;
no, 54,188.,
To amend registration law, yes, 37,708; no, 32,242.
To prohibit salary increases during- term of office, yes,'
30,638; no, 41,696.
Portland city county consolidation, yes, 30,543; no, 37,016.
To authorize financing veterans' memorial, yes, 16,115;
no, 45,083.
To raise state basic tax levy to $3,500,000, yes, 12,551;
no, 56,340. - ,v ? ,
To give state tax commission supervision over county .
assessments, yes, 20,495; no, 48,252.
To close Nestucca bay to commercial fishhigrTes, 37,890 ;
no, 30,781. -
PORTLAND, Ore., June 28. (AP) Returns at midnight
from 732 precincts out of 1847 irrthe state, gave for the pro
posed state income tax : Yes, 20,280 ; no, 32,895.
The figures on other measures were:
Negro suffrage, yes, 25,361; no, 14,174. ' j
School tax, yes, 16,670; no, 19,156. . ? ,
Criminal amendment yes, 23,104; jk, 13,195.
Legislators pay, yes, 10,487; no, 27,963.
Registration, yes, 20,295 ; no, 16,997. .
Salary measure, yes, 17,088 ; no, 19,558. V'
Veterans' memorial, yes, 9499; no, 27,696. ' ,
Tax limitation, yes, 8819; no-,. 37,616. " "
Assessment (blue blank) bill, yes, 11,559 ; no, 24,712.
Nestucca closing, yes, 19,964; no, 16,610.
'--'"" . 1 '". . O PORTLAND, June 28 (AP)
INCOME-TAX HIT
BY MARION VOTE
NESTCCCA CLOSING CARRIES
IN COUNTY, 2638-1780
Only Four Measures Meet Approv
al of Taxpayers in This
Section
Complete returns from 33 pre
cincts In Marlon county at 2
o'clock this morning indicated
that the income tax measure which
was enacted at the last session of
the legislature and referred to the
people, failed to meet the approv
al of the citizens of this commun
ity, as well as those in other parts
of the' state. .
This measure would levy annu
ally a progressive state Income tax
npon net incomes of persons and
corporations resident and non
resident in the state f from every
source, It would exempt a single
person with a net income of $1,
000; married persons with a net
Income of 32,000, and for each
child or dependent under certain
condition! 1400; corporations, $2,
000 each. The measure provided
for a graduated scale of tax. The
vote in this county' was 1457 in
favor of the tax and 3371 against
it.' r . - -5 .. : ;:-:v-vv ;; .
The state tax limitation amend
ment, which ."would authorize the
state' to levy upon property' in De
cember, 1928 an amount of tax
not exceeding $3,500,000, .plus 6
per "centum thereof, .less the esti
mated" collections of taxes on in
comes in 1929, and "any year
thereafter not to - 'exceed, said
amount with any authorized, in
crease- thereof I previously Vlevledrr
plus per centum thereof; less es
timated collections of income tax
es during the ensuing yearjl the
constitution limitations applying
both to general property and in
come taxes, hut not to millage 'lev-
les authorized by the people, feor to
taxes levied for payment of bonded
Indebtedness, . or interest thereon.
(Cynliauca on yye 4.)
DEFEATED
MAJORITY
against 19,123.
ISi'AfiK--
indicated the, state income tax
rnnning far .behind in the cities,
while rural districts were giving
the measure" substantial 'majori
ties. With 301 precincts reported, ,
including 68 in Portland,' the fig
ures on the income tax were:
Yes, 7393; no, 11,034. "
Another state finance measure,
which would fix the state tax base
at 23,500,000, was . running .be
hind. With 301 precincts report
ed, the vote .stood: Yes, 3541;
no, 11,879. ' v . i-.
' A. measure giving "the statnax
commission supervision dyer coun
ty assessors, stood: Yes, 5030;,
no, 10,930. ; . i
A bill authorizing a veterans
memorial hospital in Portland ap-
(CoDtinuad on Fas 3.)
THOUSANDS HEAR
CHERRIAN RAND
THRONGS GATHER AT WILL-.'
. SON PARK FOR CONCERT
First Open-air Program In 8erk"3
of 18 Draws Music Lov
ers of City
" Three thousand or more people
assembled . In Willson park last
night to hear the first, open air
concert of the season given by-
the' Cherrlan band. " The band
stand was surrounded on all sidf
by hundreds of closely pacfe
eager listeners, although a r
4t
in
the" hundreds of cars whirTne(f
both sides of - State - an urt
streets for-several blofV', ,
A large number carr3. eary
as seven o'clock to KJ'
es. whieh were enlrnequats
for ; the accommo" , "f"
than a amart. r. CeQt- r lhe
tri.'d " '-onsldting of 10
.- The progrf.- nrnm nt,Z , .
numbers, b',.stpa- ..-,.'
i . f i i ;.! r i
UtIUtli Wit'-. . .
Forever
bera w
overture, Joliy Rub-
; (Coptipuf4 ? pip 9.)