The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, June 15, 1927, Page 1, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    Grand Army and Af f iliaf erJ Organizations Will Fill Salem the Better Par of Next Week, Begirtfling WJondoj;
frTVtt&ir Sumrrtef School Will Begin Its Work Next Wlondoy
WKATIIKH FORECAST: Fair anil warm
er Wednesday; gentle winds, mostly north
erly. Maximum temperature yesterday.
fT7: miamium. iH ; river. 3.2: atmosphere,
Hear: yflpd northwest.
0m
During 1828 Its Chicago, :MUwankee &
. St. Paul railroad reports;, 153 automobiles
crashed into the com pony ,-trains. ' it is
believed thatapproxlmately 99 per cent or
these contests . were won by the trains.-
Detroit Free Press.v
SEVENTY-SEyENTH YEAH
3ALEM, OREGON, WEDNESDAY MORNING, JUNE 15, 1927
PRICE FIVE CENTS
ftDf ELUDES
NEWSPAPERMEN
10 SEEK HI
k
-
ifjinripct Flier Soends Hectic
Day Playing Hide and
Seek With Retinue
DINES WITH RUSSELL
Hi Alt for Nn ' "M'M
Off :i iarl"ii City Meal
1,11.1 'lull Willi OiHiv
I (i, Vice President
NKWf VOKK, June 1L AP)
.Alter suhmiti ing lo neinn u-u
r.lsout from function to inicrwi.
i k in function lor more
j Ivan three weeks. Colonel Charles
Lindbergh suddenly began to
iil'av 'hide and -seek with his re
imiie loday ami proved an adept
,! the gumo.
Reporters drifted up to the
I'ark avenue house when- Limt-
i......h inI his mother are guests
at.oui s n'HiK'k this morning,
thinking J li hour early enough to
;itch any man who had lieen Hp
until the small hours oil the morn
ing. They were informed at the
floor i hilt' the aviator was still
sleeping and they settled down
I'm- a wait.
Depart m e Announced
Th' ii it was announced that
Lindbergh had left the apartment
:ti o'clock and ROtifi for an. auto
mobile ride. The game was on.
The nest word of him .came
from Mitchel field, where it
.seemed he had driven with Casey
Jones. Curtiss tent pilot, and had
inquired about conditions for fly
ing to Washington so that he
might pilot back his trans-Atlantic
'Spirit of St. Iouis."
Conditions were bad. a heavy
rain was falling and the charts
showed no hope of brightening
weather. So Lindbergh left the
fjeM. headed for New York, be-
fieM. headert tor ie
fi my of his sea
i-bt np with him.
ifirtt the Park avenu
searchers had
On return-
avenue apartment
lie accorded the bewildered report
ers a brief interview, then disap
peared again.
I,ii nch Plans Changed .
Hut reporters knew that he and
lus mother had arreted invitations
to a luncheon at the Newspaper
Huh so there they lay in wait tor
-him Hut Lindbergh didn't go
to tl luncheon.
Harry Hruno. host at the lunch
eon and associate of Richard
lilythe, Lindbergh's personal rep
reontuiive. wan informed of the
change in tliflier' plans but he
kept his counse.1. Mrs. Lindbergh
PRESIDENT DUE
AT LODGE TODAY
STOPS AT HAMMOND TO DKDI
CATK WICK Kit PARK
lljppy Crowd Ciather AlonR
Itoute to Applaud NatioH'M
KviTMtive
P II K S I 1) K N T COOLIDC.E'S
SPKCTAL TRAIN KN ROITTK TO
soi TH DAKOTA, June, 14 (AP)
Turning from the east toward
the corn and wheat fields of the
middle west. President Coolidge
journeyed westward from Chicago
tonight toward South Dakota to
his summer residence in the
Ulack Hills.
At the end of the trip tomorrow
veiling, far removed from the
hills of his native Vermont, a new
mountain country awaited him
where, among cool streams and
air filled with the odor of balsam,
ri ami recreation were in store
to replace the heat and complexi
ties, ot the national capital.
President Coolidge took stock
of the nation's delinquencies while
r tiding its ideals and material ad-v.iti'-enents
in an address at Ham
inond. Ind.. today dedicating the
Wicker Memorial park to the
world war veterans of that region.
Stopping off for two hours en
route to his summer residence in
the Rlark Hills of South Dakota
the president left his special train
n Kast Chicago, motoring ;six
miles to the park and back
through the outskirts of Whiting
Hammond where .he again
ltarded the special. '
The 12 mile course to and from
the park was crowded moat of the
WV- by happy crowds wjiich ap
,Kded in response to the wares
Mrs. Coolidge and the smiles
the president.
A a harp wind from nearby Lake
Michigan prompted Mr. And Mrs.
roolidge to wear overcoats but
the boulevards were lined by tin
covered citizens and throngs of
bareheaded school children. A
wedding party stood at one point
in the procession and the bride,
wearing a wedding veil, won a
happy smile from both Mr. and
Mrs. Coolidge.
Tomorrow the president will be
welcomed officially Into South Da-
ICoBtiooeJ Pf 5.)
AUSTRALIA BAND
DELIGHTS SALEM
VFRKATILK MI'SHIANS AP
PF.AL TO A I.I. CLASKF.S
One of Finest Performances of Its
Kind Provided by Tour
in jr Artists
By It-I MeSliorry
That premier musical group,
the Australian National hand, vis
ited Salem yesterday and delight
ed th people with two unexcelled
concerts in the Capitol theater. A
few years ago Australia and
America met on the battlefields
with war as the inspiration. Last
night i he meeting was in perfect
unity with music serving as the
inspiration.
Coming away from the concerts
of yesterday the feelings of the
listener concerning the hand are
indeed hard to describe. The
quality of music rendered ap
pe;'"d both to the highest of the
musical highbrows, to the boy on
the street who plays the month
organ, to the followers of Gounod
and to the jazziest of the jazz
fiends. Throughout the concert
the vast audience listened with the
greatest f attention to the lyrical
variety and loveliness of the work
of the visitors from the Antipodes.
One of the most noticeable fea
tures of the Australian National
band is its versatility. Reveling
in -"So Is Your Obi Lady" much
to the delight of all you are great
ly pleased with the sudden change
to grand opera and church music.
Nothing could he finer than the
reverential manner in which the
grand old tune. "Nearer My Clod
to Thee" was played last night.
it h one's eyes closed there came
the perfect illusion of being in
church and hearing the majestic
organ tones. With grand opera
they were no less proficient and
performed as one great orchestra.
Throughout the entire concert
their playing was a revelation
with exhilarating rythm and un
animity as the chief characteris
tics of the performance. The
(Continued on Page 4.)
FOUR PERSONS DROWNED
Swirlittg Waters ( unc DaHiage
Wfieii Power Dam Uovs Out
BI'TTK, Mont.7 Juue" 1 L
(AP) The dam of the Montana
Power company on the Wise river
went out this morning under
pressure of unprecedented high
waters. Four persons whose
homes were close to the river were
swept to their death in the swirl
ing waters.
The dead: Mr. and Mrs. Tracy
Trueman and son.
Charles Ferguson.
The postoffice at Wise Rivet
was washed away.
Many ranch homes were dam
aged. Telephone lines in that sec
tion were torn down by the wild
ly racing flood. Some bridges
were destroyed. An Oregon Short
Line train which left here this
morning was stalled between
Divide and Maiden Rock, where
nearly a mile of track had been
washed out.
GUARD TROOPS GATHER
Troops Kn Route to Summer Kn
campnient fiat her in Portland
PORTLAND. June 14 (AIM
The assembly of Oregon uafional
guard troops from all sections of
the stateen route to the summer
encampment at Camp Clatsop and
Fort Stevens, at the mouth of the
Columbia river, began here to
night; A doze units from cities
in western Oregon arrived early
and others were to reach here dur
ing the night and in the morning.
The general movement from
Portland to the scene of the en
campment will start tomorrow
morning at 6 o'clock, the troops
moving over the line of the Spo
kane, Portland & Seattle railway
in eight special trains which will
leave at 15 minute intervals. The
trains are scheduled to make the
trip In three hours. 45 minutes.
PORTLAND WRITER TALKS
Ixwis TflrowiM Addresses Librari
ans; Meeting Knd Today
OEARHEART. Ore., June 14.
(AP)- Lewis lirowrie. Portland
writer, was the principal speaker
at today's sessions of the joint
conventions of the Pacific North
west Librarians' association and
the California Librarians' associa
tion. , Mr. Browne spoke at both
afternoon and evening meetings.
The sessions will end tomorrow.
Discussion today were largely of
a technical nature, involving
branch libraries, college and ref
erence libraries, and childrens' li
braries. STUDENTS DRINK LITTLE
Anti-Saloon Survey Show Fewer
Than 5 Per Cent Imbibe
WESTER VI LLE, Ohio. June 14.
AP) Less than one-half of ono
per cent or this year's graduates
of colleges and high schools of the
country drink to f-xcess and fewer
than five jer cent drink occasion
ally, according tn a siirvey' Just
completed - and announced by the
Anti-Saloon league of American
today.' , . 1 i ;:,
FLAG HONORED
IN IMPRESSIVE
ELKS SERVICE?
Crowds Turn Out to View
Parade and Attend Ritual
istic Ceremony
JUDGE H. H. BELT SPEAKS
Australian National Hand Heads
Parade, Followed ly Scouts, j
I.ode .Mcnilwrs, Rami
and Drum Corps j
Patriotism and respect for the!
flag are not diminishing as the nar!
tion's last martial crisis fades into!
.fudge II. II. licit
the past, it was demonstrated in
Salem Tuesday night when hun
dreds of people turned out to pay
their respect to the flag as Salem
lodge So. :t:!6. BP.OE. held its
annual Flag day paraire. com
memorating the 15uth birthday of
t,he national emblem and the
lodge auditorium was filled to
capacity for the ritualistic cere-
( Continued on Pf 3.)
LAW VIOLATERS RAIDED
Vcrnoiiiii Ciivcn Surprise When
Piohi Agents Swoop Down
PORTLAND. June 14. CAP)
Alleged liquor violators and the
entire town Vernon ia were given
a surprise last night when a group
of fifteen prohibit ion enforcement
officers visited the city, raided j
three places and made eight
arrests.
Federal prohibition agents, led
by A. E. Hurghduff. Alexander
Davidson. Arthur Johnson and
Loren C. Cochrane, deputy I'nited
States marshals. and deputy
sheriffs of Columbia county made
up the raiding party.
1
-cwct:
i
1
L-v.::'.SM ... .'-:.-.": J
" -" i
BRIDGE BUILDING
PLAN SUPPORTED
KIWAXIS t'U II VOTKS IWAXI
MOl'SLV TO GIVK AID
New Concrete !lructiires Jo Cost
Ix'ss Than Maintaining Old,
Claim
Definite support foi the nty ad
ministration's bridge construction
program, calling Tor a bond issue
of $350. (Oi) whith will be voted
on at the spec!;;, election June '!,
was assured by .1. Salem Kivvanis
i lub in a re.i.-iiit ion passe.l at
Tuesday's luncheon by unanua-.Uo
vcte.
This action fallowed talks by
Mayor T. A. 1 ivesley and V I:
McCttllough, slate bridge engin
eer. The mayor declared that
some of tin- bridges are actually
unsafe, and that the city, which
does not at thi.- time have a debt
comparable to tli..-,e of oiiu i t it
les of its size, uin well afford to
secure safety and civic progresa
by providing1 the;c improvements.
The 'mayor ifferred to i.ent
adverse disci:--ioii of the bond is
sues, on the t:'t of the Rii hiao'id
Improvement Iisi, and ass.-ited
that the Rich'. iund.. district only a
few months ago was calling t4r
help and dQiiaiding better drain
age. McCullousii opened by suiting
that he was p'.t in doubt as tc t ii"
Kiwanians' attitude on the 1 -idge
program, ins msuh as their motto
is "We Ttui'ot ' and the club itself
started the agitation for new.
bridges several years ago. In view
of the "ict that a two-thirds ' ote
is required to pass bond issues,
howeve' he urged he members to
take a active part in urging tie
passag of this an.cndment.
He f dlowed w: :t a reitefaiir-n
of figu.-es given at a recent ciiam
ber of commerce luncheon, wnich.
based on the cos's; :Iata in the pos
session of tiie bridge department,
show inat it will . ost the city less
per year to build the new concrete
bridges than to try to get along
will the present wr-den structure-;.
RECORDS EARTH SHOCKS
Seismograph Shows Di.st. iirbance
!(,( Ml Miles From Capitol
WASHINGTON. June 14
(AP) Severe earth shocks which,
lasted more than three hours,
were recorded today on 'the
Georgetown university seismo
graph. They began at 12:3" p. m.
reaching a maximum at 1:49. Di
rector Tondorf estimated the cen
ter of disturbance at 10, SOU miles
from Washington. v
COURT REVERSES RULING
Five Year Probation Granted Cook
Denied! in New Dcision
NEW ORLEANS. June, 14
CAP) The I'nited States court of
appeals today reversed the deci
sion of'the district court of northT
em Texas which granted a five
year probation to Dr. Frederick A.
Cook, former explorer, now serv
ing a fourteen year sentence for
using the mails to defraud.
THE HAND THAT FED HIM
GUARDSMEN OFF
TO ENCAMPMENT
HARD. yOHK HAS NO TKR
RORS; RKCKl'ITS COMiMATE
Seventy-Five .Members f Com
pany B, 102nd O. X.
Kntrain Tim lay
- Prospects of hard work and
strict discipline at Camp Clatsop
present no terrors for young men
of Salem ami vicinity who are in
terested in preparing themselves
for the national defense, it was
evidenced Tuesday evening when,
In the evening of departure for
the IS day training' period, the
officers of Company H. l2nd Ore
gon National Guard, were besieged
by applicants for admission.
As a result, several additional
men were enrolled and the sup
ply sergeant fitted them out. in
time to join the joyous crowd
fiat entrained at 4 ::'. o'clock this
orning for the training camp.
Following is the complete roster
V
Captain Paul Hurt-is
of Company B a; it departed for
Camp (''latsop:
l'aul F. Kurris. captain.
' Willis E.' Vincent, first lieuten
ant. Harold Ci. Maison, second lieu
tenant, t.
. Scifjeants
Alanson Mason, first sergeant:
Harry Plant. Harry Savage,
Lowell Carpenter. Lovell Dow,
'Continued on Pace 5.)
TRIPP DIES AT NEW YORK
Westinglmust Hoard Chairman
Succumbs After Operation
NEW PORK. June 14. (AP)
Brigadier General G. E. -Tripp,
chairman of the board. Westing
house Electric and Manufacturing
company, died tonight at the New
York hospital of complications,
I following atx operation.
Born in Wells, Maine, April 22.
11S65. General Tripp was educated
in South Berwick academy and
spent practically all of his life in
the study of electrical operations.
1 v a;:;1.
7
TO REPRESENT
N. III. DISTRICT
Cherry Growers Fix Mini
mum Price for Royal Annes
at Eight Cents
GROUP ELECTS OFFICERS
Shoit Crop Increases Opportunity
for iMK Price on Product ;
Ituyers in Some Sections
I'nsupplied
Aside from the election of of
ficers, two important items of bus'
iness were disposed of at Tuesday
night's annual meeting nf the Sa
lem Cherry Growers' association:
the minimum price of Royal Anne
cherries was fixed at S cents a
pound, and the growers of this
Beet Ion voted, in cooperation with
other groups in the northwest, to
Vend Max Gehlhar. prominent
grower here, to Washington to at
tend the hearing on the cherry
tariff before the tariff commission
June 28.
Present at the meeting was a
representative group of cherry
growers from all sections of the
"Willimette valley, and they agreed
unanimously on the minimum
price, after hearing reports from
other sections. On the basis of
the drop reports alone, an even
higher minimum would have been
justified, but 8 cents was consid
ered fair inasmuch as there is
some holdover from last year.
Much Tonnage Sold
Exhaustive data submitted by
the executive committee of the
local association indicated that a
big share of the tonnage in all
roust cherry sections has been sold
at between S and 9 cents, and in
some sections, some of the buyers
(Continued on pace 8.)
'SALE RUMOR UNFOUNDED
Negotiations, for . Klsiuore .Pur
chase Limited to Inquiry
"Negotiations" for the purchase
of the Elsinore theater and of
leases on other theater building!)
in Salem, reported to have been
entered into between the- West
Coast Theaters corporation and
Geo. B. Guthrie, builder and own
er of the Elsinore. have been con
fined to an inquiry on the part of
an official of the corporation.
Guthrie reported when interviewed
by telephone last night.
This inquiry wag merely as to
whether Guthrie would consider
helling or leasing his property
here, and no details were dis
cussed, the theater owner ex
plained. He has given no indica
tion as to whether he would con
sider either proposition.
In any case, no change will be
consummated at any time in the
near future. Guthrie stated.
FLIGHT EFFORT FAILS
Plane of French Distance Avi-itor
Maker Forced landing
LE BOURGET. France, June
14 (AP) The first effort to
break the long distance uon-stop
flight record of &.905 miles, noW
held Hby Clarence D. Chamberlin,
ended in flames today.
Captain Georges- Pelletier Doisy,
noted French long distance aviat
or, who made a Paris-to-Tokyo
flight in 1924, and M. Gonin, his
navigator, taking off at 4:10 p. m.
for Karachi, India, 4 4 00 miles,
away, were u a able to get higher
than 30 feet in their machine and
made a forced landing after going
about 2 i4 miles when their plane
cott Id no longer- maintain the
necessary speed. .
BARELY ESCAPE DEATH
Flames Trap WoUie-o. and Children
on Motorship iHMina Lane
SEATTLE. June. 14 (AP)-
Trapped by flames, as they stepped
aboard the cannery motorship
Donna Lane.; three children and
two .women narrowly escaped
death today when in explosion set
tbe ship abKze.endangerlng the
lives of the half hundred persona
aboard her and threatening to da
stroy the oil .ship Rhem from
which the Donna Lane was load
ing fuel alongside the Standard
Oil docks at Point Wells. 20 miles
north of Seattle.
SHADOW FALLS ON MOON
- 1 . ".1;-1 . -I-:' , ji ii 1 . '' ; V.
Tot a 1 Eel ipse Occurs From 1 0 : 40
to S o'clock JtXiftht
The earth's shadow; felt on the
moon last night with .the result
that It was obscured entirely for
half of an hour.- -u -' . -
The eclipse started at 10:40 and
continued until 2 o'clock. From
midnight to 12:30, occulation was
complete. -
A clear sky made possible re
markable views of the phenom
enon. '
SCHOOL GROUND
WORK DELAYED
St'RVEY OF It EQVTR EM ENTS
AND COST HOARD'S PLA Y
New Teachers Elect etl for Salem
District; Raj ley to Coach
Debate
Completion of the grading work
on the grounds of the new Leslie
Junior high school grounds' will be
held up until the building com
mittee of the school board xan, de
termine the amount of, work yet
to be done there, aud get a defi
nite estimate of the cost, accord
ing to the action ot the school
board at their regular . meeting
last night. The wort already
none will he paid for Immediately.
Bids on the equipment neces
sary for the new building will be
received by the supply committee,
after specifications have been
drawn up. it was decidnd. Su
perintendent Hug was also, author
ized to accept the lowest bid made
on equipment for the high school
science department for-the com
ing year, amounting to $991. 31.
Ralph Bailey, former Salem
high school debater, and more re.-'
cently star debater and .orator at
jhe University of Oregon, wa
elected to the position of history
teacher and debate coach in tho
high school. Mr. Bailey has been
at the, University of. Oregon, with
a. .teaching fellowship, during the
last year. "
.1. V. Thompson, who has been
a -post graduate student at Wil
latiette jiniversity during the last
yea;r, and is a graduate of Pacific,
university, was elected to teach
book-keeping and accounting in
tbe high school. ,
Other teachers elected hr the
board last night were, Junior
high. Vivian Carr, -Monmouth
graduate, English teacher: Ruhy
Delk, Willamette university grad
uate, home economics teacher, and
Madeline Ilanna, science - and
mathematics; grades. Margaret A.
Johnston, Iowa State .Teachers'
college; -Dorothy TCeber. Mon
mouth graduate; Audrey McCune.
Monmouth graduate, and Anna
(Contimiod on puRe .)
NURSES ELECT OFFICERS
Miss Airs of Montana CIiokoti n
President at Convention '
PORTLAND, June 14. (API-
Miss E. Augusta Ariss, president
of the nurses' examining board of
Montana, was elected president of
the northwest section of the Am
erican Nurses' association at the
annual convention here today.
Other officers elected were Miss
Emily Post, superintendent of St.
Luke's hospital, .Boise, Idaho, vice
president; Miss, Floss Kerlee, su
pervisor of the. receiving depart
ment of the state hospital at Warm
Springs. Mont., secretary; Misa
Celia Satterwhite, Seattle; treaa
urer.
SCIENCE HALL DAMAGED
Building at OAC Ctchs Fire
Second Time In 19 Months
CORVALLIS, June 14. (AP)
-For the second time In nineteen
months, fire broke out today in
the old science hall of Oregon Ag-
ricultural college. The extent of
the damage was estimated at $10,
000. The building was used as a
chemistry building. To labora
tories and a class room were dam
aged.
The Story4 t
of Grizzly at the
State Fair Grounds :
Among the Indians, who
back In the sixties camped at
times along the Rlckreall
river at Dallas, was an old
fellow whdnr ; the whites
called Grizily. He was one
of the Rogue River tribe that
had been located in 1S55 on
the Grand Ronde; Indian res
ervation. He had had an
awful fight, in southern Ore
gon, with a grizzly bear and
had been left badly crippled
by the encounter.
The boys who In those
days attended the old Dallas
Academy would get Grizzly
to tell of the fight. The In
dian was great on pantocaine,
V and as the jargoa poured
forth the story, hands, feet
and swaying body dramati
cally pictured the furious en
counter that ended with the
Indian killing the grizzly
with a knife. . ,
Among the. boys who lis
tened to and watched Grizzly
perform, in those far away
. days, was Ev. Shelton,
. Ljroungest son of SoL Shelton,
on whose ; donation ':" land
; claim most of Dallas Is now
located. Br. learned tbe tale,'
. words, action and all, and oa
certain occasions recites it. V
: - After, much persuasion,, by
one of his Old school mates,
rt'Er. has consented to give the
story at the Old Timers' pic
nic at the state fair grounds
. next Sundayv - '
If you want a thrill, boys
and girls , of the old day,
, don't miss Kv's classic.
THREE TESTIFY.
HUGH EMPLOYED
lis i oo n iii o
Office Men of Silverton Firm
State DeAutremont Used
Assumed Name
STARTS WHEN CALLED
Youth on Trial Shows Embarrass
nieiit AY ben Pointed Ont;
Twins Also Cited .? Ilig
riujr Crew 3lemberj
JACKSONVILLE. Ore , June 14
-AP) Three. 'witnesses A. B.
Geriraonte, oj Silverton, Ore., and
Ifbmer C. fiant of Coquille, Ore.,
respectively time keeper and form
er bookkeeper of the Silver Falls
Lumber company at Silverton, and
J'. H.' Richards, a lorgiug camp
foreman iKisitively identified
Hugh' DeAutremont; on trial for'
the murder of Charles O. fCoyle)
Johnson, during the Siskiyou tun
nel holdup, as the man, who from
lane to August, 1923, had worked
in the logging camp of the con
cern" under the name of R. K.
James.
It was the first time during tbe
trial that the name of the defend
ant ' had been mentioned in the
evidence and the youth started
and reddened as he was pointed
out by Geriuiocte. r .
rhecks lued to Twins
Ray and . Roy DeAutremont,,
twins, brothers of Ilngh, held in
Ohto for alleged complicity in the
attempted train robhry. were also
shown as employes of the logging
camp at he saoue time in the rig
ging crew." Checks issued to the
twins and "K. E. James' .were
identified by Gant as the ones he
had. issued to . them. . He also
pointed out' Hugh as the man he
knew as ,"JE, E. James."
4 - The state earlier In f h da bail
shown by the testimony of A. T.'
8tbwe, automobile' salesman of
Portland, that EE." James", tad
applied for au automobile driver's
license. ; . . ,
Says Koy Made Denial
. Jlrs. Stella Walters, who with
her husband and brother conduct
a hardware store la Portland, tes.
tified to the purchase of oooklnj
utensils later found in the rendez
vous of the bandits in the Siskfr
you mountains.
She could not identify the pur
chasers exeept that they '.'were
three young men who told me not
to wrap up the goods because we
(Contlnu4 ia Ps. j.)
TRINITY CHURCH
RESUMES FIELD
GROriv SPLITS FROM IMMAN
VKIi CONGREGATION
Six Months Dissension at SilTer-
ton Knda With verbody
Satisfied
SILVERTON'. Ore., June 14.
(Special.) The old constitution
and the' old, officers of Trinitv
church will be re-lnatated accord
ing to the decision reached at a
meeting held .at Trinity church
Monday evening , .
The meeting was the outcome of
six. months', disagreement in tho
immanuei congregation which
was organized by the union of
Trinity and St. John's congrega
tions, i . .
The dlsagreemeht reached such
a, stage, that at the meeting of
Immanuel congregation A. Or-
tntld. n fnpmtr memhoi'' of ' 5f
John's congref atlon, made the mo
tion that all those dissatisfied
with Imraanutd congregation
should form a new church and the
former Trinity ehurch property
should be deeded to this organi
sation. '
The motion carried br two-
thirds majority, and it w upon
this motion that the new organ--Ltatlon
was formed. About 200
members signed no at the Monday '
night meeting. f , ,
.. L. II. Meyer acted mm chairman
with A- -1. Larson secretary. At
the" opening 'of the meeting llr.
Meyer explained that the meeting
was called, according to Mr. Op
sund's motion for, "those dissatis
fied with Immanuel congregation
and willing to form a new one."
Mr. Meyer .also exDlained that-
the old Trinity congregation would
s tana for a period; of . five years
and that this could be taken no
again. .... ' ' j
, , L. M.. Larson made the rhotlon
to accent the provision of On-
aund's motion and that the deed
,to Trinity property be requested,
according to the agreement.
-.-A motion was, also carried .to
leave- the matter of transferring-
property to -the board of directors
ana tnat this . transaction take
place as quickly as possible.
" The meeting w-a noticeahle for
Its lack -of '.discord. All motions
were carried nnsnlmonsly aci
(Continued on 9.) ,