The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, February 19, 1927, Page 2, Image 2

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    I
I
KEWS'OF. THE STAGE AND SCREEN
Elsinore Theater ".--" "
Marie PreTOst's new Metropoli
tan' comedy production "Almost a
Lajdy,! -which comes to the Elsi
Tiore theater .tor . one day, Satur
day, February 19, proyldes Miss
IreTost; the star, with a splendid
opportunity for pathos and the
colorful roles in which she is at
her best. Her supporting cast in
cludes Harrison Ford, George K.
Arthur. Barney Gllmore, Trlxie
Friganza and John Miljan.
x "Almost a Lady" Is based upon
Frank Adams story, "Skin Deep"
and has as Its central themes the
tribulations of a poor ' modiste's
model and the social Inclinations
of a newly-rich Irish couple Marie
Preyost, as the model.' is asked "by
the. Irish climber to impersonate
a celebrated authoress who failed
to appear at her first ' reception.
Harrison Ford is mistaken -for a
duke. Complications, full of hu
mor, and drama, mark the de
nouncement. The comic situations are In the
clever hands of Trlxie Friganza
as the; newly-wealthy matron and
her beer-drinking, life-loring. sim
ple husband, Barney Gllmore. The
story was adapted for the screen
by;F. McGrew Willis, E. Mason
Howard directed.
"In the Shade of the Old Ap
ple Tree."
,'BlacJt Bottom."
' "East Side-West Side."
"Alabama Stomp."
"What kind of a programJl
this, anyway?" asks the orchestra
leader.
The Follies Girl of 1900 says:
"Please Sir: 'This a contrast 5pf
imislc of different times."
The Follies Girl of 1927 says,
"Say! ; Sousa! It's a wow! It's a
scream! You can write home
abont it!"
;And so you can.
Fanchon and Marco's "Idea,"
Follies of 1900, , a West Coast
Theaters presentation at the Elsi-
nore theatre, on . Sunday, Febru
ary 20, tikes a leap from the prim
"nineties" to the racy "twenty
seven? offering a startling, amus
ing and clever contrast of two dif
ferent generation's ' idea - of how
the tired business man should be
amused.
Oregon Theater .
With all the thrills and all the
fascination of circus day. "Bigger
than Barnaul's," F. B. O.'s great
Gold Bond special, will be seen
for the last time here today at
the "Oregon theater. - No picture
ever filmed possesses In such a
great degree the charm and glam
ourof circus, jte. Uttie dangers
andtdifflculties.that confront the
j-Hperformers, and when to this is
added the superb emotional acting
of such a cast as Ralph . Lewis.
Viola Dana, George O'Hara and
Ralph Ince, the result is bound to
be' a masterpiece.
Thrilling "inside" angles of an
acrobat's life, the ever-present
rist of death on the tight-wire,
the -.love and intrigue that goes
on behind the scenes, and a mag
nificent display of bravery: by
which : the disowned son redeems
himjetf at a crucial moment, are
theig highlights of he picture,
Including the most gripping fire
sequence ever portrayed on the
screen.
"Beau Geste," coming to the
Oregon theatre, February ,20, has
the distinction of being the first
three-act motion picture! Those
who have seen the . unusual pre
sentation carry away with them
the . impression, .that .two breaks
in the picture are even more ef
fective than one! . '
There Is really no reason, ex
cept; tradition. 'why there should
be ' ftn intermission " about half
wa through a ten reel picture.
However, most reserved seat thea
tres, respect this tradition.
In "Beau Geste" the mystery
story-is told in the first twenty
minutes of the picture and the
first Intermission comes imme
diately after the mystery to give
the audience an opportunity to
think over the developments and
formulate an explanation. Dur
ing (his Interval of sixty seeonds,
Hugo Rfesenfeld arranged to have
the ' orchestra make a gradual
change from the intense excite
ment of the mystery to the sim
ple little children's story of the
English country-side. The house
lights remain dark as the curtains
are .drawn on the screen.
On the opening night of the
picture the second,. Intermission
came just as Johnand his brother
Beau were falling asleep from ex
haustion in the fort. Julian John
son, supervising editor of "Beau
Geste," suggested that a change
be made 'to a point about twenty
minuies earlier In the picture and
the Intermission now comes fol
lowing,, the scene where Noah
Beery stands at the gates to the
fort after having lashed the. two
. FOR SALE
V. -f Anto Accessory Shop
Clean Stock Good Location
See KRUEGER, Realtor
147 N. Com'l. St. Phone 217
: ' l 'ITS TDQS TO -, VS.;
THINK OP PAINTING AND I
, i . CLEANING UP 4
We Sell Martin Senonr 100 Per
a Cent Pare Pains .- .
DorGirroN a shkrwin
2S3 N. Com'L Telephone 639
THE OREGON STATESMAN, SALEM, OREGON
deserters to their death' on the
desert sands.
The brief : and effective stage
prelude has enlisted much favor
able comment. The music score
reproduces the marching songs of
the Legion as recorded by Edward
La Roche, who served seven years
In Africa.
TITHING BILL DUE IN
SENATE TODAY; RUMOR
(Cfentinoed from pare 1.)
can be raised under fixed millage
taxes. Under the latter bill these
revenues could not be increased
more than three per cent based
on the millage returns for the pre
ceding year.
Senator Upton attacked the bill
giving, additional powers to the
state tax commission on the
ground that property assessments
should be left to the county asses
sors and county boards of equali
zation. "It is wrong," said Senator Up
ton to allow a state official to go
Into the various counties of the
state and make individual assess
ments. I have been told that this
is what the state tax commissioner
intends to do if this bill is approv
ed. This is not the . governor's
program, but is the1, program of
Earl Fisher, state tax commission
er.
"I under stand that: the public
utilities are lobbying for this bill
for the reason hat It does not af
fect them. If we pass this bill I
predict it will result In a storm of
resentment- and that we will be
asked torepeal Jt two years hence.
To properly enforce the provisions
of this bill would require the em
ployment of 4 00 persons in. the
offices of the state tax commis
sion." The representations of Senator
Upton were branded as unfair by
Senator Miller, chairman of the
committee on assessment and taxa
tion. "This bill attempts to equalize
property valuations in this state,"
said Senator Miller, "and if passed
would increase the assessments in
Oregon more than $200,000,000.
It would eliminate Influence be
ing brought upon the county asses
sors and authorize the state tax
commission to interfere "when as
sessments are not fair. Many in
dustries are now 'assessed as low
as 10 per cent of their true valua
tion, while In other cases indus
tries are assessed as high as 85
per cent of their value. This Is a
condition that should be correc
ted." Senator Hall declared that the
bill would cure many existing evils
in the present tax laws toward
more equitable assessments. "If
we had pased this law years ago."
said Senator Hall, "there would
have been no occasion for enacting
the state Income tax act." .
SenatOT Hall said he had know
ledge of one industry in Coos
county whose property value ex
ceeded the total property assess
ment of the county. It was the
opinion of Senator Banks that the
bill should be approved as a mat
ter of expediency.
"I predict," declared Senator
Banks, "that the adoption of this
bill would do more to fefeat the
state income tax law than any
single agency in Oregon." He
said the approval of this hill would
do away with any necessity for the
income tax law.
. Senator Klepper said the bill
was in the interest of equitable
assessments and was constructive
legislation.
, "This bill it approved," said
Senator Staples, "would remove
political influence now urged up
on county assessors and result In
fairer assessments In this state."
Senator Staples and Bell defend
ed Earl Fisher, state tax commis
sioner, against insinuations level
ed at him by Senator Upton.
"I think we are fortunate in
having Earl Fisher as tax commis
sioner of this state," said Senator
Staples.
The bill having to do with In
creased powers for the state tax
commission is somewhat similar
to an act now in operation In the
state of Washington. It was
SPECIAL!
6 room modern house. Four
blocks from postoffice,
$4500
F. L. WOOD
341 State St.
THE OREGON
mm
IT'S CIRCUS
DAY TODAY
I Brag ton Wfifaauy and aioy XtframaBc ?
j romance staged amid the glox $4 Citato?'
f j, Sfcovr on Earth r i- , .
! BIGGER THAN BARNUMS 1
MATINEE : a. "EVENING
Children lOc Children lOe
Adults SSia Adwlta 85c -
recommended by the state tax In
vestigating committee created at
the 1925 legislative session.
The senate laid on the table
pending further Investigation a
resolution Introduced by Senator
Joseph providing that candidates
at the primary election who shall
receive a majority of all the votes
cast for any office shall be declar
ed elected and be relieved of the
necessity of entering the cam
paign at the general election. ,
Senator Joseph said that this
resolution, if approved, would pre
vent Interference by one party of
another party.
Senator Klepper charged Sena
tor Joseph with attempting to rail
road the resolution without giving
other members f the' committee
on elections an opportunity to be
heard. . i
A bill providing thai minors be
tween the ages of 14 and 16 years
of age would be allowed to operate
motor vehicles when accompanied
by their parents or guardians was
indefinitely postponed.
Senator Banks branded the bin
as sound legislation and urged its
passage.
"We are making a mistake If
we do not pass this bill." said
Senator Banks.
Senator Dunne branded the hill
as ridiculous.
Eiqhteen Members Answer
Roll Call at Fine Meeting
The February meeting of the
WFMS of Leslie church was held
at the home of Mrs. Johri Koor
man, with . 18 members answering
to roll, call.,
. Dr. Miller, the evangelist from
Nashville, Tenn., was introduced
and gave an illuminating and in
spiring study in the life of Job.
After the business of the day was
disposed of Mrs. Corner opened
the mystery box. A growing in
terest is shown in these questions
which can only be answered by
reading the Woman's Missionary
Friend.
Mrs. Koorman, assisted by Mrs.
McShane and Mrs. Bauer, served
tea and delicious cake and sand
wiches. Woman Who Crossed Plains
With Oxen Dies at Eugene
BURLIXGAME. Cal.. Feb. 18.
(AP) Mrs. Martha Whiting, 83.
who crossed the plains by ox
train in 1858. died here today at
the home of her daughter. Mrs.
Colvin N. Reed. She will be buried
tomorrow at Quincy.
Other surviving children are
Randolph V. Whiting, attorney
and chairman of the democratic
state central committee: Dr. Fen
ton B. and Richard H. Whiting, of
Eugene. Ore.; Dr. Franklin M. and
Herbert W. Whiting, and Mrs. W.
J. Clinch, of San Francisco.
ELECTRIC LIGHTS PLANNED
SILVERTON. Ore., Feb. 18
(Special) Electric lights will be
extended 'from the city limits west
of Silverton out to the Evergreen
district, according to reports from
men of that district. The move
ment has been under way for some
time. It is headed by Walter Von
Flue, F. D. Kaiser and John Moe.
ROLLER SKATING
Tuesday, Friday, Saturday
From 7:30 to 10:80 P. M.
DREAMLAND RINK
Ladles Admitted Free
Gentlemen lOe
SKATING 25
THE ELSINORE
Sunday, Monday
FANCHON & MARCO'S
Follies of lOOO
4 S&LVZT i
INCOME TAX MIT
BY HOUSE FAILS
Committee Appointed to As
certain Amount of Revenue
Coming to State
r
Speaker Carkin appointed a
committee of R. S. Hamilton,
chairman of the taxation and rev
enue committee; Mr. Gordon,
chairman of the ways and means
committee. and himself, to con
fer with Secretary of State Kbxer
and State Treasurer Kay for the
purpose of ascertaining amount of
revenue' the state can expect dur
ing the next two years, and to
gather data on general financial
conditions. The committee will
report on their findings next week.-
Mr. Carkin thought this plan
necessary as the house is more or
less passing appropriation bills
blindly and the information gath
ered by the committee will give
them something to work from.
When the word was passed that
the governor had vetoed the "Wil
son River toll road bill the ire of
many of the legislators became
aroused. Yesterday a direct hit
was aimed at the administration
program when Representative
Bailey made a motion in the house
for the reconsideration of the vote
in which the house had concurred
with the senate amendments to
the income tax bill. After con
siderable debate, this' motion was
lost and very shortly afterward
Governor Patterson signed the
bill, which had been passed by
both houses with slight amend
ments from his original suggest
ions. Representative Bailey, in ex
plaining his motion, said that the
house had concurred in some haste
and that no doubt many were not
at all familiar with the amend
ments at the time.
Mr. Henderson said he had
asked a few members if they knew
just what effect the amendment
would have on the bill and all
said that they did not. In his
speech against the concurrence
with the senate amendments he
stated that no one seemed to care
much what the amendments con
tained. Mr. Henderson's main objection
to the amendments were that they
Casey's Guaranteed
RHEUMATISM REMEDY
Money refunded if it doea not
cure your case
NELSON & HUNT
Druggist
Cor. Court and Libert y Tel. 7
MASSAGE
at your home
Telephone 2214
S. H. Logan
THE OREGON
i: today : :
; SATURDAY
; jL ChSl&ren 10c
i Jtf Mr Matinee 25c
; Evening: 35c
OREGON THEATRE
sunday FEBRUARY 20
2:30 Matinee Night 8:10
C" CfVLBghtfot France
lllllll JL A XX
obey you implicitly
but if you touch my
brother's body I'll run
this bayonet through
your foul carcass ! "
One of the many breath
taking incidents that make
TOTT? A ITT
i "tbt year's greatest melodrama"
20-pieca
Not for One Year at Less Than Present Prices
PRICES . Blatlaoey SOc
Nights, SOc -
BEATS OX
carried a provision the effect of
which wouid relieve all corpora
tions or concerns who had entered
into contracts prior to January 1,
1927, but on which they would
still be receiving yearly payments
after the income tax law was ef
fective, from paying any tax on
such an income. "If we must have
an income lax." he said, "let us
Have as fair a one as possible."
He considered "that the amend
ments would- practically absolve
many business firms from an in
come tax for about three years," or
until such contracts would have
expired.
Mr. Macpherson opposed; the
amendments, saving they were
purely a piece of class legislation.
He objected te the waythe pro
vision for consolidated returns was
amended. This was a further pro
vision inserted' which allowed con
cerns affiliated with other con
cerns outside of the state, and who
had income in this -state which
would be affected by this measure
to deduct any loss that the con
cern outside of the state with
which it was affiliated might have
had.
Mr. Gordon said that personally
he would rather let the bill go to
the people just as it was, because,
being opposed to an income tax,
he thought that it would come
nearer being rejected by them as
it was amended, than if it was at
tempted to be made fairer.
INJURED YOUTH DIES
EUGENE, Feb. IS. (AP
Carrol Parker, 23, who was in
jured when a Southern Pacific
train struck his automobile at a
crossing in Springfield, Saturday,
died here today. He was the son
of Mr. and Mrs. John C. Parker
of Springfield.
THE ELSINORE
TODAY ONLY
MATINEE 25c
Children 10c
EVENING
Children lOe - Balcony 35c
Floor 50c
- 7So - ft JO '
75c - S1.10 . 81X5
8AUS NOW
I
i
SATURDAY MORNING,!
LEGISLATION ENDS
Senate Sends Measure
President Without Takin
to
Vote of Record
WASHINGTON. Feb. 18 (Af )
The last step in the enactment
or radio control legislation w
as
trken today by the senate
after
weeks of delay without even
a
a
record vote and with less tbanj
third of the membership preseh
The long pending measure,
as
rewritten by house "and senate cpn
ferees, now goes to rresment
Coolidge. who is expected to sljgn
It next week and send to the ptfn
ate before- adjournment of con
gress two weeks from today the
names of the five men who are
to make up the radio commission
created by the measure. j
Demands that the legislation be
sent back to conference for am
endment in important particulars
were made in closing debate by
Senators Pittman, Nevada, ajnd
Eleasp. South Carolina, democrats,
atd Howell, republican, Nebraska.
The senate previously had twice
refused to take this course. The
Chief points raised by Opponents
were that the bill failed to assert
the .right of the federal govern
ment to control the air for the
benefit of all of the people; to
provide for a waiver of rights i to
wave lengths, and the use of the
T
o
ON RIO CONTROL
C
SHOE STOCK
We will soon move to our new location
135 North Liberty Street
, (Gahlsdorf's)
where we will open the most modern shoe
store in the Pacific northwest.
We are sparing no expense in furnishings and equipment
looking to the comfort and convenience of our customers.
We will open this store with a complete new stock. Every
pair in the store will be made especially to our order and
will come direct to the new location from one of the larger
eastern factories, so we will, close out every pair in our
present stock, i
Thousands
HLF
$8.00 PUMPS AND OXFORDS
$9.00 PUMPS AND OXFORDS
BOTH
25c
Dr. M. D.Ainyard
FOOT SPECIALIST
Foot ills affects the Ner
vous System. Any con
dition ;. that r interferes
with ; the ndrmal' func
tioning of nerves affects
the general health. Por
health makesyou defici
ent in your occupation 6v
profession. Why not haye
mese diseases and abnor
mal conditions corrected
y one wnQ Jcnowsi '
FEBRUARY 19, 1027
ether by licenses and to make it
certain that -each state will have
the right to ' at least one of the
effective wave lengths. :-
" Under.' the terms of the measure
the . commission of five will have
complete -control of radio for one
year from' the date of its organi
zation and thereafter will have the
power to ' pass final judgment on
all controverted questions and all
those which might be voluntarily
referred to it by tlie secretary of
commerce. , .
Anton? the other, provisions are
tl ose designed to prevent monop
olies; "to control wave lengths, the
number and power of. stations,
chain broadcasting, the 'length of
time stations may broadcast, and
to prevent discrimination and ex
cassive charges for radio trans
mission.
UNIVERSITY GRADES OUT
Fraternity Students Make Higher
Average Than Others
EUGENE. Feb. 18 ( AP)
Students at the University of Ore
gon living in organizations made a
higher average number of points
during, the fall term than did non
organization students, it was an
nounced today.. Fraternity men
garnered 35.45 points against
Aathori DtftrHHvt nr
CORONA
The Pemnnal Writing MarhfaM
Typewriter Exchange
THOS. ROEN I
Pboi
AM 191 Com ftaton
Our Entire
XOSE
of Pairs to
! - , . .....
Close Out
IP
$4
00
$12.00 Grades $6.00
$4;50
,
$13.00 Grades $6.50
MEN'S AND WOMEN'S
AND DRESS SHOES
Rubber Heels put on your shoes each Wednes
day at Half Price. Bring them any day
and leave them f or Wednesday
TIE-PRICE
PRICED
SHOE
CQ
JtaUl&MS
CixBaOtl
VkkDi&Mtr
226 Sle&-Kc28U&&& '
.- . -
3S.3S for the non-fraternltv
and sorority women made an aver-
ago oi points as opposed to
40.96 for the non-sorority women.
General undergraduate average
for the university was 38.46, with
35.41 for the men and 42 for the
women.
GItAXT EXTENSION PROPOSE 1 1
WASHINGTON. Feb. 18. AP
The life of the. joint congres
sional committee on northern Pa
cific land grants would be contin
ued through next congress under
resolution introduced today hv
Senator Stanfield. republican. Or.
gen. ' - -
nnnclk
way to end
The $1,000,000 Way
Colds can be ended in 24 hurs. Or
checked before they develop if this
method is used promptly.
The way is HILL'S, prescription
perfected by one of the world's larg
est laboratories. It is quick.' efficient
and complete. It is so well-proved
that we paid $1,000,000 for it.
HILL'S does aH things at once. It
checks the cold, stops the fever, opens
the bowels and tones the entire system.
Millions have come to employ it. Go
get it and learn what it does.
BeSart li'.gLft Matte
GASGARA Jl QillMHE
GetReJBai i&pttrait
Tarn
OUT
At
STREET
Repair Department
Our shop is equipped
with all new machinery
, We use nothing but the
very best grade of leath
er that money will buy.
Mr. Jacobson, in charge
of this department, is an
expert in his line has
spent years in factories
and repair shops and will
do v- nothing , but high
grade worlc . r x
1
25c
'1