The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, November 06, 1926, Page 1, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    .!
WEATHER FORECAST: , . Fair-" east." and t
unsettled in-west portion: probably rate in :
, tbr northeast portion; . moderate- tempera-
tare, southerly wlnds Maxlmma yesterdar.
58; mlnimnm, 44; riTr. -lt3i ralnrall, .03; -atmosphere,
cloudy; wind,: south; . .
Russia is eeeklnr.more visitors from th
United States, ,an )s Almost on .the -verge ,
of raaranteelng sate conduct. Detroit '
Free Press. .
SALEM OREGON, SATURDAY MORNING NOVEMBER 6 1926
PRICE ITVU' CENTS
ITEHSY5T1
iWEiici
GflflO PROPERTY
Appraised Valuer of; $792,
000; Would Be Worth
$1,130,000
ON. 19 INCOMB BASIS
Chanco tor Extension Costing
936812, Without Consider
" ing JXlne Ier . Cen t, An- .
nnal Increase
At the meeting, of the commit
tee of business men appointed by
the mayor, at the Salem Chember
of Commerce last evening, there
was submitted a letter, written
by Ernest CX Willard, Portland,
consulting engineer of the .water
company, and directed to Chas.
A. vPark, president of the Salem
water. Light and Power company,
which letter In full is printed be
low, the basis of valuation being
that arrived at by the board of ap
praisal, which was $792,000:
October-2. 1126.
MfChis. A. Park, President
Salem Water! Light & Power
Co.. Sajem, Oregon.
Dear Mr. Park:
Referring, to your, request for
data Tor the. arguments In favor of
the purchase of the' property of
your i company by the, city of Sa
lem, i It t would . seem that the
strongest and most logical argu
ment can be .based upon the earn
ings of the property.
During the year 1925 the gross
operating revenue "as ' shown by
your reports to the public service
commission was 2135.934, and I
have prepared the following con
- dsased income 'statement, using
Rjua, operating expenses as a basis
ij id making certain adjustments
i?r operation by the JPiJy ofSa-.
icih. iris conaensea income. state
ment, which will be more fully
explained. is at follows i -h .
Operating re renue. ..CIlS 5,934
Operating expehse C not in
cluding depredation).. 53.050
s ' i i ) $ 82,884
Deductions-' s
Uncollertlble bills....! 982
Taxes, City of Salem 4.421
Taxes School District
No. .24 J 3.83C
Factory. Inspection
Fee.? 5
'A . 9.247
' k;r A-, '273.637-
It wilr.be ; noted In the above
statement thst ' the. Item of oper
ating expense does not include the
annual allowance which was made
by .the company for depreciation,
which amounted to $12,020.
It has been assumed, in this cal
culation that if such an allowance
was made -by the city, it would
be used for the purpose of retiring
the bonds when they become due,
as it would be nnfatr taM.be 'pres
ent generation, to require .them to
CotiM4 ( 4.1
r" r ii i -
ASTR1I) LEAVES!
NATIVE COUNTRY
GREAT. CROWD .WATCHES THE
PRI.N'CESS .DEPART ON SHIP
Cikius Give Royal Salnte as Cruiser
Reaches Outer Harbor
at'llalmoe .
MALM OK, Sweden, Nov. 5.
(AP). Almost alone on the deck
of the Swedish cruiser Fylgla.
Princess -Astrid vainly tried to
hide the tears that came asUbe
warship steamed out of ;thevhar
ber here today to tak her to pel
glum where she will join her
husband, Crown Prince. Leopold.
The tears werebrougbt on seem-.
Ingly by realization that hewas
leaving her native land-for-an
adopted one, but later there also
were tears of joy over the warmth
of the farewells ot a great crowd
that had gathered to see her de
part. Looking very chic in a gray
tailor made suit and holding her:
wedding bouuuet. Astrid waved
,iVdbye. aa she tried to hide the'
4vF The band played the Bel
gium national -anthem "La Bra
banconne."" A ferry steamed out
of the harbor, bearing Astrid's
Danish royal relatives, for; final
goodbyes. King Christian, of .Den-
; mark stand fng on the deck, earn
estly waving his hand. ,
. Wheu-,fhe.Fylgla was welt, out
side the harbor, there was a roar
of guns in salute.
rrincess Astrid, niece of King
Gustav of Sweden, and Crown
Prince Leopold., were united:1 in
marriage by, cltil .- ceremony; at
Stockholm yesterday. They now
"are on their way to Belgium 6y
Separate routes and at Brussels
. lext Wednesday the refgkv cere
Wanr-sUl fc ViitimsK ,.'M '
BUS AND TRUCK
RULES IN FORCE
COM3USSION SENDS OUT QUES
TIQNAIRCB TO OPERATORS
State ITnles Extend Onjy to Those
Doing ; Transportation
for Pay
What tracks and buBes operat
ing in the state of Oregon are
subject to the provisions ot House
B1U No. 413, which was affirmed
by, the voters at the general elec
tion last Tuesday, is to be deter
mined through a series of ques
tionaires sent out o truck and
bus operators by the public ser
vice commission here, yesterday
"The supreme court," - read a
letter accompanying the question
alre," In passing on a similar act
has held that state regulation ex
tends .only to corporations t and
persons engaged in the. business
of transporting persons and pro
perty by motor vehicles for com
pensation over the highways of
the state as common carriers.
"As to whether or not the oper
ations, ot any particular corpora
tion or person are common carrier
operations is a matter of fact that
can only be determined by the
commission after investigation."
' Operators were requested in be
questionaire to supply the com
mission with the following infor
mation: Name and place of business.
Kind of service, number, kind,
character and capacity of vehicles.
Where books are kept.
Territory served.
Financial statement. '
Kind and character of insurance
field.
Statement Showing operating
revenues and operating expenses
for the portion of the year 1926
last past.
No permit will be issued by the
commission to an operator unless
a j full i and complete answer has
been filed in this office to 'the
above questionaire.
House Bill No. 413 became a
law immediately upon the closing
of the polls and counting of the
votes Tuesday -.night.
CHOSfeN FOR AD CLUB
PATTERSON TimXSi OUT FOR
VARSITY BASKETBALL
OREGON AGRICULTURAL
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. Cor
vallis, ov. 5. Ezra Webb of Sa
lem has been chosen for member
ship to the O. A. C, Advertising
club, by Alpha Delta Slgma4 na
tional professional - advertising
fraternity, Webb is one of eight
men chosen as new members of
the club this year.
Frank Patterson, also of Salem,
has turned out for varsity basket
ball this year. He is trying for
the position of forward, and Is
making a strong bid for the first
squad..
Members of the varsity squad
are working overtime in an effort
to get perfection in defense and
offense. Fundamentals of each
style are being stressed by R. H.
"Bob" Hagar, varsity basketball
coach. The men are working to
be in condition for, the annual
barnstorming trip to California
during the Christmas holidays.
HEALTH ADDRESS GIVEN
.
EDUCATIONAL FILM ON DEN
TISTRY SHOWN BY DR. BRUNK
Dr. Vernon A. Douglas,, deputy
county (health officer, and Dr. Es
till lr. Brun-k. director of dental
service of the Marion county
health demonstration, spoke, at a
community group meeting at
Scotts Mills Thursday night at
which about 75 were present.
; Dr. Brunk sh&wed a film enti
tled Tommy -Tacker'e Tooth, and
spoke of educational aspects of
public health dentistry. Mr.
Douglas told the Scotts Mills peo
ple of the' diptheria- campaign- the
health. unU1 is now waging
throughout 'the county, and In
which this was one of a series of
meetings.
Dr. Brunk gave his same talk
at a sililar meeting In Gerrais
Wednesday night.
ASSESSMENTS- LEVIED
MONEY FROM LEVY t'SKp TO
PAY LOSSES BY FIRE
The state -board of control yes
terday levied, assessments against
several state. , Institutions aggre
gating. $ 2 5.0 S wh Ich will gojnto
what Is known as the state re
st oration- jfond; Thfan assessment
istaade annually, and ' the money
derived, front IhOi levy Is iusedito
pay fire losses at the Institutions.
? Fire.; losses at ; thet Cottago
Farm, which" Is operated- In. con
nection wita the Oregon state
hospital,. t.f aud gifla indwatrial
school, will 4e: paid out of the
aesmeat levied here - yesterday.
Tese fires" occurred ' SomftIij&e
LARGE TAX CUT
REFUMEETS
GOOLIDGEOKEH
Basis of Survey Reveals Sur
plus for Year Amounts
to 250 'Billion
INSTALLMENT DUE SOON
Permanent Reduction in Revenue
Not to lie Asked ot Short Ses
sion of Congress In ,
December
WASHINGTON. Nov. 5. (AP)
Immediate reduction in the form
of a refund of 10 to 12 per cent
oh individual corporation . taxes
paid this year on last year's in
comes was approved today by
President Coolidge.
It was said at the White House
that studies made by the President
during the last few days indicated
the surplus for this year would
amount to at least $250,000,000,
and on that basis Mr. Coolidge be
lieved the refund warranted.
While the president will make
a recommendation, to the present
congress at its short session open
ing lit December, he will not ask
for a permanent, cut tax in the
form of a new revenue lawat this
time, f
It is the plan of the executive
that refunds should be given on
this year's taxes, the last install
ment of which is due December
15, but that the present rates
should apply on the next year's
taxes and until congress is able to
determine whether a permanent
reduction is possible.
! The White House pronounce
ment occasioned some surprise at
the. treasury. , whjer$ Jjhasbe.enJ
repeatedly asserted that it was too
early , to .talk tax reduction. It
was stated; -there, however, . that
the program of the president,was
sonhdffrom the treasury, viewpoint
in that it did not call for perman
ent reduction.
It .was made clear that the
president thought the refund
should apply only on the individ
ual and corporation income taxes
and not on' the special miscellan
eous levies, including the taxes on
automobiles and .admissions.
A refund of 10 or 12 per cent
would mean the return of be
tween 2200,000,000 and 2250,000
00 to the tax payers. This will
almost, equal the estimated sur
plus. Possibility., of the tax refund re
sulted, it waf said at the White
House, "from, excessive receipts
during tho current year over those
(Coatiaued on pac 8.)
UNEASY LIES
OLD GRADS BACK
FOR HOMECOMING
V
FESTIVITIES OPENED
LAST
NIGHT WITH: BIG PARADE
r
Stunts ; ami Football ; Game With
, CPS Special Features This
Afternoon
i
: With , many graduates of Wil
lamette, university already on' the
campus and. more, expected today,
the annual Homecoming week, and
celebration . at the university got
under way last night with a pep
rally and pa jama .parade through
the downtown streets. In wtich
hordes of wildly exuberant stud
ents participated.
Other 'events at last night's
opening festivities Included a ban
quet at the Gray Belle restaurant
by the "W" clab, at which ra
ster Small. Justice of the peace
and prominent Salem lattorney,
also a WiHamette graduate, pre
sided, and a fireworks dtspla on
the football field put on by , the
freshman class.
The returning alumni will reg
ister at Eaton hall this morning
and will take part in the ceremon
ies at the Alumni Chapel session
at 11 o'clock, to which the under
graduate students are also invited.
A luncheon and business meeting
for the alumni will be held at
noon.
The big event of the week end
will take place at 2 o'clock when
the Willamette Beareats meet'the
College of Puget Sound team fu a
football game on Sweetland field.
Temporary bleachers have been
erected to hold the large crowd
that is expected, and a barrier has
been built around the north side
(Continue.! oi pr 2.)
MILLS EVIDENCE;
UNDERGOES FIRE
HUNDREDS OF QUESTIONS
ASKED CHURCH SEXTON
Mrs. Hall and Brothers Sit
'Tlglinjrjfpay;,
Composed
SOMERVILLE, N. J., Nov. 5.
(AP) James Mills, husband of
Mrs. Eleanor. R. Mills, the choir
singer, who was slain with the
Rev. Edward W. Hall, four years
ago, testified for three hours to
day, but contributed no informa
tion as to the double killing and
only vague testimony as to events
preceding the tragedy.
Mrs. Frances Stevens Hall, wid
ow of the minister and her broth
ers, Willie and Henry Stevens, all
charged with the murder of Mrs.
Mills, sat through the trying court
day without losing their compos
ure. Only once during Mills testi
mony did Mrs. Hill's lips seem to
quiver and her eyes appear to be
on the verge of tears. This was
(Continued on page 3.)
THE HEAD THAT WEARS
PRUNGROWERSi
DISCUSS MARKET
FEDERATED CLUBS OF , POLK
COUNTY SPONSOR MEET
Producers. anl Packers Should Set
Minimum Price - Says
Neuner
DALLAS, Ore., Nov. 5.--(AP) .
More than 250 prune growers
from Oregon and Washington as
sembled in this city today to dis
cuss the marketing situation and
attempt to perfect some sort of an
organization that will guarantee
profit to the industry. ,
The meeting was called by the
Federated clubs of Polk county,
which had the cooperation of the
marketing department of the Port
land chamber -of commerce. H. J.
Elliott of Perrydale, president of
the Polk County Federated clubs,
presided. At the forenoon session
representatives of various packing
companies were present, but it is
of little encouragement as to Im
provement ot the situation, which
has been discouraging to the
prune growers for several years.
The afternoon session was for
growers only, "many of whom ad
dressed the gathering, but there
were so many different ideas on
organization that nothing definite
was accomplished other than to
arrange 'that each county -with a
prune acreage in Oregon, together
with Clark county. Wash., should
appoint three representatives to
serve on a general Committee to
study the matter and report at a
later meeting.
George Neuner, United States
district attorney of Portland, and
a prominent prune grower of
Douglas county, was the principal
speaker this afternoon. He is
sponsoring a plan whereby the
growers and packers can get to
gether and establish a minimum
price for the product.
WRIT OF ERROR GRANTED
KEEL.ERS ARREST INVOLVED
SALE .OF SOME BONDS
... . i . . r x . i
A wru oi error was grauieu oy
the state supreme court here yes
terday in the case of Frank W.
Keeler, Portland" bond broker,
who is seeking to enjoin Stanley
Myers, district attorney of Mult
nomah county, from submitting
to the grand Jury there certain
documents found in Keeler's pos
session at the time he was arrest
ed a few months ago charged with
dealing in securities without first
obtaining a permit from the state
corporation commissioner.
The circuit court for Multno
mah county held in favor of Dis
trict Attorney Myers, and this de
cree later was affirmed by the
state supreme court. Attorneys
for Keeler said, the case would be
appealed to the United States su
preme court for final determin
ation.
Keler's arrest Involved the sale
of bonds Issued by the town of
Orenco.
THE CROWN
i
FASCISM FOES
ILIT1T
Penalty of Death ) Approved
for Those Who Attempt
Life of Premier
DRASTIC ORDERS PASSED
Opposition of Press Terminated
by Decrees Suspending Pub
lication of Anti-Fascist
Periodicals
ROME, Nov. 5. (AP) Mili
tant fascism, stung by last. Sun
day's attempt, against the life of,
Premier Mussolini, today struck
at its foes in a series of drastic
repressive measures which were
approved by the cabinet sitting
under the presidency of the duce
himself.
All the measures, after approv
al by the grand fascist council,
will go to the chamber of deputies
at a session Tuesday, especially
convoked by the premier.
The decrees approved by the
cabinet provide the penalty ot
death for every attempt to' injure
or molest the premier, or to strike
against the fascist regime; pro
vide heavy penalties, as much as
30 years imprisonment, for direct
and indirect opposition; create an
elaborate system of political po
lice to watch every movement of
every anti-fascist at home and
abroad, and to put the opposition
press out of existence.
Not since the autumn of 1925,
when fascism had apparently won
a crushing victory over its foes,
have fascist leaders reopened hos
tility against the enemies of their
regime with' so much tlgofT Yes
terday the premier, in a cryptic
sentence, gate promise to a crowd
of black shirts that their demand
for war against the opposition
would be met.
"Tomorrow, said Mussolini.
from the balcony of the Ghlgl pal
ace, - we win nave tne acts you
have been awaiting."
Today that declaration materi
alized in the form of a series of
the most .drastic and comprehen
sive decrees for the purpose of the
expiration of opposition, which
have been approved since the ad
vent of the fascist party to power.
These decrees, whose intention
(Continued oa.pife 2.)
SEEK VALUE REDUCTION
y l-A IdZATION BOARD SEEN
BY LARGE COMPANIES
Represeutaives of the Pullman
Car, company, American Railway
Express company and the Calif or
nia-uregon iumner company ap
peared before members of the
state board of equalization here
yesterday and requested a reduc
tion of their property valuations.
Assessments for the year 1927
will be made on the property val
uations for 1926 approved by the
equalization board.
The . Pullman company asked
that their-property valuations in
Oregon be reduced somewhat from
$1,050,431.50. The reduction was
asked, the attorneys tor the com
pany said, because of business
losses due to motor vehicle, traffic
The original property . valua
tions of the American Railway Ex
press company were fixed at
$530,287.60 and the California
Oregon Lumber : company at
$16,000.
It was said that representatives'
of a number of other corporations
Would appear before the board of
equalization later In the. month.
NICARAGUA FEELS QUAKE
NUMBER OF PERSONS KILLED
AND MANY INJURED
MANAGUA, Nicaragua, Nov. 5,
( AP) . Fort nearly a minute
early today Managua and most of
Nicaragua , trembled In the worst
earthquake felt in the country for
28 years.' A number of persons'
were killed and many injured
while the property damage was
estimated atf $4,000,000. ..; ,
The worst damage was done at
Leon, about 50 miles northwest of
ftlanagua: There about 80 .per;
eat of the houses sustained dam-t
age and many, of thein .were total-;
ly destroyed.", . The towers of tho
old cathedraf fell .16'. tho ground
and ' all' tho alW were- 'badly
craekeaw;4..: . '' J-
In Managua, about450-'pcr cent
t the. houses Show damage: - J '
t At the first signs of the quake,
the people rushed- tt the streets,
remaining there for. several hoars
fearing further shocks,
HEEL OF DUCE
Host Glasses Founfci
MRS! JOHN PORTER FINDS
HAWLEY; SPECTACLES ,
; Somewhere s in the Silver
Creek Falls region . Congress
man W, C Hawley lost a pair
of 'gold rimmed glasses that
.were suspended, from .his vest
by 'a gold chain when he, ac
companied by County-. Jndge
Hunt, County ' Commissioner
'John H. Porter and' Deputy
Road master , Frank .Johnson,
made a , visit to the district
Wednesday with a view at de
termining the advisability .of
establishing a national park.
The loss was not discovered
until the party returned to
Salem and Mr. Hawley felt the
loss of the glasses keenly,; for
they were the best . fitting
spectacles he has ever hiad. .
Mrs. John H.. Porter, wife
of the commissioner, heard of.
the. loss and volunteered to lo
cate the , glasses. The party
' had., covered - a great, deal of
ground and had gone through
brush covered trails and woods
and the task seemed impos
sible. The glasses were found,
however, by Mrs. Porter, un
der the north falls of Silver
creek where vine maple and
overhanging rocks makes the
passageway very narrow. - It
is thought the vines tore the
glasses .from ' Mr. Hawley's
vest ai he was making the trip
under the falls.
The glasses are once more
fastened to the congressman's
vesL
QUEEN PROVOKED
BY PARTY'S SPLIT
MARIE MIXES BATTER AND
ATTENDS 'WAFFLE IRON
Sam Hill Passes Out . Cigars -Neighbors
at Blaine Fanny
. Home
to
-ON MARIE'S TRAIN- Vancou
jfver, B. C, Nov. 5. (AP). Queen
Marie reached the turning point
In her' journey today, hoping that
the annoying situation aboard. her,
train resulting from differences
between her self-styled host - and
her special aide would be cleared
up when Seattle is reached to
morrow. ; . i
While Samuel Hill, millionaire
builder, of the Maryhlll museum
ol fine arts dedicated by Marie
two days ago, and Major Stanley
Washburn, the special aide, re
mained . apart today under terms
of a truce, Queen Marie r had a
waffle breakfast at Hill's Blaine,
Wash., farm home, cooking waf-
fles for herself and Prince Nicolas
and Prlnce?s Ileana. '
Although Mr. Hill has said he
was not certain when he . would
leave the royal train, others
aboard ' expected he would" be
dropped at Seattle. They con
tended that his role of host to" her
majesty censed when Marie dedi
cated his museum, and that Col
onel John IL Carroll, who stepped
aside in his behalf at Maryhlll.
should again assume the office
He -holds a document signed by
Marie placing, him In full charge
o the tour, !
Qaeen Marie is undisguisedly
provoked by the split between her
Maryhlll host and Ma J qr Wash
burn and . although . she has . had
frequent conferences with all con
cerned, but no .statement . had
come frojn the royal car,
: Confusion - attended' the .waffle
breakfast in the Hill, home at
Blaine, the host' having expected
only Marie and her. children to ait
at the kitchen table with him.
Members of the official family art
rived at intervals, however, until
nearly 20 persons were grouped
about a table set for four, Marie
tried her hand at handling the
batter, turning out waffles for
Nicholas and Ileana and. herself. ,
Mr. Hill left the table long
enough to appear at' the door, of
the home to wave to - assembled
neighbors and to pass out a box
of cigars to them; .. j
DESCHUTES LED THEM
t - .. ,
POIJS REPORTS FIRST COM
PLEJU ELECTION RETURNS:
. : . , t : :
Deschutes was the .first county
inOregqn to; report, to tho, secfe-;
tary of state partial returns of vthe
recent, general election. t Polk was
the first county in the state to r-i
port it; complete returna.. ; ; ' i
. , . Canvassing of the.Totes cast at
last Tuesday's election is nowwua-.
der war and. probably will be com
pleted within Jhe next two weeks,
PEDDLlm lla;FORTUN E ;
, GREENSBURC.Pa.; Nor. S.-,-
An estate of $30,000. waa.left.to
"relative, by the. will of ,WfilT. Dan
iels who came tri " America, "4 6
years ago from Bus clan , Poland
and began life as a peddler..
GROUP STUDIES
SPECIAL REPOOT
iter mm
Engineers' Report Ptec::
Valuation of Property at .
sr $782,000 . ,:
DEFER ACTION: 30 DAYS
Question Raised Whether ' Com- J
mfeeee Shoeld Favor Pnrchae
in Plant at Price Men
tioned. by Engineers
After much hashing and re-1
hashing of the proposed purchase
of the, water company by the city
of , SalemK the, general committee
of 25 voted -last -night to lay i the
matter over f or 30 -days providing!
for a subcommittee to Investigate
further, during that time, ,F .O.
Deckebach and'Dr. B. U, Steeves,
with sueb. others as. they may-ap-l
point, cqnstitute this . subcommit
tee.
: It .was only by. a narrow mar
gin that the group avoided pass
ing the buck, completely, when a
motion by Isadore Greenbaum to
refer-. the, report of the engineers
hired' to appraise the water prop
erty to the. city council -with-the
recommendation that It e put up
to a vote: of the people, was nar
rowly defeated. Whereupon llr.
Greenbaum ahd two or three sup
porters of his motion decided that
nothing more eould. be done and
left the meeting.
It . was -. then that R. ; J. Hen
dricks, perceiving that the ma
jority, of the committee, did net
feel weir enough 'Informed to go
on record last night either for
or against the purchase, moved
that 30 days more time b given
for ttudy ef the problem and that
a subcommittee coniet with the
water compatty during that time
and report hack to the - general
committee.-
. A Good toveatment c
T One nlghlbjht ' ot last night's
meeting was the report of Engi
neer Ernest Willard, representa
tive of the water company, which
tCBtinaed joa p(S 6.)"
WETS DISRUPTED
thinkswheelehi
CNSTITLrTioNAL ' REFEtlEN D-
- .CM BILLS DOOMED
Dry Sentiment of Nation Revealed !
By General Election of
V- Last Tueeday;' t
WASHINGTON. Nov. 6. (AP )
Wayne. B, Wheeler of the Antl-
Saloon league, Issued a statement
tonight saying the results of Tues
day's election show "that the. party
which takes a wet stand. In 192S
is doomed: ta disruption."
" "Latest and complete returns
from 'practically all districts," he
continued. - "show Increased dry
gains, both In the referendum elec
tion fights and congressional con
tests.' ' Seventy-one per cent of the
democratic' members and 72 per
cent of the republican members ot
the next house with 70 per cent
of the democratic and 76 per cent
of the republican members of the
next senate have dry voting rec
ords or have made dry pronounce
ments.
; "The dry sentiment of the na
tion is revealed in the re-election
Of ' 296 members of the present
congress ,. who have dry records.
Only nine out of the 35 senators
elected' on November 2 are wet. I
Of the 39 new members of .the
house, at least 2 5 hare dry rec
6rd or made dry pronouncements
In the states. '
;"At least ten members of the
house and four or five In the, sen
ate not classed as dry will oppose
any effort to repeal the national
prohibition act or to write ncoa-i
stitutional provisions in It. I
I- "The : referendum elections la
New York and. Illinois to substl-
tute a definition of Intoxicating1
Uquor. which would Include "only j
those, which are intoxicating in'
fact, will have little wcighL Mea-i
THE ;
BLACK
PIRATE
t. i-
Doajjlas Fairbanks
j greatest screen play,
in: technicolor; never
1 before seen here,
f bcsins;today at; "
" The Elsincre7 ' 1 .