The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, March 25, 1926, Page 1, Image 1

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: SEjVEOTYrFITXH YEAR . ,
SALE&I, 0fiEGON -THURSDAY .IQRNING-MARCH 25, 19261 1, ;
. PRICE FIVE CETS
. )i iff m . eu
ltoriy ! i
lllIflfllllTS
city rail!
' 6eblares Municipal Owner-
- ship is r.oi uure top, in
auds cfttfjSSrs work
ttrlbntes Rapl4 Growth of QUes
to Actlrftlcs of Orgaiilierf- '
Business Interests i ' , " . j
a Will Eugene outgrow Salem
oecause she now has a municipal
ly owned power plant? Statistics
read to members of the Rotary
dub at their luncheoa Wednesday
noon by W. M. Hamilton, .mem
oer of the dub and head, of. the
Sal en ; branch ot .the ,4 Portland
Electric Power 4 company would
show that Eugene is paying more
rather thatl i less - for her power
tnairSalehf ffcvt'T.f-r'--'-!ilany.people
belfeTe and some
people pretend ' to - beliere, said
Mr. HamUton, 'that cheap power
is a very, If not the most, im
portant and - essential resource
and facility to all Industries."
But from a surrey ' of t 8 5 .9 8 4
establishments made by the U. S.
department of the Interior it Is
seen that o'iilyM.B per cent of the
cost of production is the ; power
used. Mr. .Hamilton showed that
eren should a reduction of 1 5 per
cent In the .cost of power be . made,
the difference in ost of. produc
tion wouldl pot be jtteater than
one half of one per oeiit. , t.. .. -.
Thus, . Mr.i Hamilton : brought
home the fact, that cost of power
does not materially Influence the
establishment and .maintenance of
industries as s extensively as some
people would believe.. :
Quoting ..ftorn Claude Rorer,
president of the Oregon Bankers
association, Mr. Hamilton assert
ed that the flre factors necessary
to - production ; are r an "adequate
supply of raw material, a reason
ably certain market, a eatis?actory
supply "of labor; satisfactory living
conditions for labor and adequate
tr2sportat o$ lacilttiesv'.'
' rearing that the costof . raw
mat'.s is 57 per cent of the
total "rilues, of r the finished", prod
uct, Mr.? Hamilton continued:
"Supporting this , statement is
the fact that: the Oregon Pulp &
Paper Co.,! ; the Western . .Paper
Converting Co. the various can
ning companies, in Salem and the
linen companies, chose Salem as a
location for these plants primarily
because of the availability of the
raw materials needed in their
plants, and, .secondly i. because of
the favorable labor conditions in
Salem. ; j, . .,-,, , , .
"Persons . .liavincr no , income
from investments and the. dema
gogue politicians disclaim long
and loud against the. prof it made
In the power business: as though
it were a sinful thing to do., and
say that the government, owned
plants would; eliminate these aw
ful profits and sell the power at
wnat tney call 'cost. 5 1
"Our socialistic friends state
mai , government owned f power
plants will attract industries to a
community by selling power at so-
caued 5'eot'.'V-ii - -
"It this i5 true, 'then consider
the following: v; . i- ? 1 -
"Why, not also have '.the. gov
ernment acquire the other natural
resources, the - mineral timber.
(Continued on pg 5)
MILLER JS CANDIDATE
FILES FOB S NATIONAL DE3IO-
CKATIO COMMTTTEE3IAN
The Hon. Milton A. Miller filed
for national Democratic commit
teeman. Hi platform! expressed
In this filing follows:
; "I believe in a united democracy
that the principles upon which this
government was founded may be
put into practice: that the United
States may have a merchant mar
ine second to none to carry the
surplus of our fields and factories
to the markets of the world- -
I am in favor of the United
States taking her place at the
peace- conference. It f is much
easier to prevent wars ..and Jnuch
cneaper than It i3 to flrht a war.
I believe in time of peace to pre
pare tor peace.';;- u;;-:---
Salsm Piib!jGrSchf5s!3
' rsxssamaro ;. 1 .. '
Y Mablo Temnlo
Mabla XJemnle. tAac.hr , . th
xourtn grade at Highland elemen-"!
uuy scnooi. t Fourteen . Tears , in
Salem scttool system. Seventeen
years' teaching experience, Grad
uate ot Oregon Stat Normal
school. Summer school at Albany
college and ;at Monmc ittu . JIas
taught ?also; at Enale ootf, and
Lincoln; schools of Salem. Espe
cially fitted for physical eJucatlsa
.work.- Handles p-rt t---'-
n il
-Mft in The: SitUesmdh
MAY BE PRESIDENT
General Arnulf o Gomez .
GENERAL GOr.JEZ SEEtf A
PRESIDENT OF MEXICO
STAUA'CII SUPPORTER OF CA1.
Ut3 tiiGEii FOR OFFICE
Record Is Good; Obregon Will Not
Be Candidate, Political Lead
ers Say. .
, EL PASO, Tex.,; March 24.
General , Arnulf o )iXJomea, com
mander of the Mexico City garri
son in the late .De Ha Hnerta rer-
olution, probably will be thenext
president of Mexico, if the .well
laid plans i of Mexican political
leaders are carried out.. ' ... V;
,Whilev rumors that General A1
varo Obregon probhbly would.; be'
a candidate tor election were cur
rent throughout the southern re
public recently, . Mexican political
leaders along the northern border.
declare there is no truth to tne
report- r . L , . . ' v , ... '
General Gomez is an ardent ad
mirer and staunch friend of Pres
ident Calles, who is debarred from
succeeding himself, and.; it was
through; Msi, brUlianirprXnring
thV late'De la Huerta revolution
that 'several bloody encounters
were avoided In the capital city ot
the southern, republic. v
" General i Gome 1 supervised all
military operations In -the valley
. (Continued a pas 4)
DRY AGENTS SENTENCED
- "-n ' 1 - - ...
SiirrH BROTHERS AND .CHRIS
TENSEX TO GO TO PRISON f
.V" -.ir i- -.v - i. ' v.
PORTLAND, March 24, (By
Associated, Press).- Three special
state prohibition off leers convict
ed ;, recently in , federal court of
conspiracy, to violate the ' liqrior
laws, . were . sentenced, today by
Judge Wolverton to 1 8 months in
McNeil Island penitentiary, and
fined $250 each. The officers, are
Arthur Christensen, Robert Smith
and A. C Smith. . . Their attorney
Elton Wat kins', Announced that
an appeal would be. taken. ' At the
trial beotieggers, testified the of
ficers had negotiated .to sidetrack
part of liquor seized in ft big still
on an island ln; . the . Willamette
river near St. ' Paul, Ore1.
WOMEN -TRAIN FOR WAfi
TWO BATTALIONS ORGANIZED
IN SYRIAN RANKS
JERUSALEM, March 24. (By
Jewish Telegraph! Agency). Bat
talions of women hare appeared
in the ranks of the insurgent
Syrians fighting against ' v t b. e
French regime, according to ' ad
vices receired here from - Syria.
Two ' battalions of Arab women
now - are undergoing mllltfiry
training and units of these took
ivt In k vamatcw ettla af lift A a
near Damascus. The recruiting of
women is said to be continuing,
DEPTH RECORD IS 'MAljE
UNDERSEA CRAFT COMPLETES
SUCCESSFUL TESTS ,
PORTSMOUTH, N. H., March
2 4 .r( By ; Associated f Press. )
The giant. submarine V-2 returned
to the navy yard here tonight hav
ia jr navigated at' i220 -f eeta rec
ord depth' for vessels of her.class.
Her -commanding officer - reported
that the submersion test conduct
ed off. ProrincetoWn r today J had
been t extremely- successful and
that the submarine : had handled
perfectly. , The only; casualty was
burst pipe,, which collapsed un
der the" heavy pressure. ;. 1 -
gen. white f is Honored
SALKM MAN ; NAMED PRESI-
. deSTOF TRAINING CLASS
LEAVEirWORTH. Kan... March
24..(By, Asaociited Press.)
Brlgadien General Geo. A. .White,
Salem, Or., national guard officer,
has been elected president ot the
6P"c'ial' ,cla J at the.,cJl-am,ndnt.
general staff school, Fort Leaven
worth; it ':a announced today..
. rce f rciil c? it f""'"''"! rf
I'M ia'i
m m
w- ..." m
m .if-
UfillTEO STATES
IS GR1TIGIZED
AmeHca Shoiild . Have Can
celled. AH; Var.Debts,. .
British Now Agree .
SCATHING SPEECH:- MADE
England, Seeking Methods of Col
lecting From Her Debtors
Launches Verbal ! At
tack on America ! ,
LONDON, March . 2 4.- (By As
sociated. Press. The problem of
the world war's heritage, of inter
allied debts was given a periodical
airing in the house of commons
today,., .and Winston : Churchill,
chancellor, of the exchequer; and
Philip Snowden, laborite and for
mer, chancellor who are poles apart
politically, Joined hands ,ln. the
house, agreeing .that the burden ot
responsibility, for the war. debt dlfc
lerences rests on the United States
for refusing; to adopt a policy, of
all-around cancellation. ,
' Mr. Snowden precipitated the
debate in the hope " of helping to
bring Great Britain's recalcitrant
continental creditors to time, and
he spared neither , the United
States, - France ; nor. : Italy In the
scathing criticism for which he lias
a reputation. ; -1 'i - V '
- . With ministerial . responsibility
associated with, his utterances,- Mr.
Churchill restrained his statement
somewhat, and on the ' whole was
hopeful of obtaining fron Great
Britain's debtors 'the necessary
33, 000,000 . sterling which this
countryt now is paying, to " the
United States annually. 5 --The
chancellor of the exchequer
believes the , British government
will . be enabled to ' carry out the
principle .of t the Balfour. -.note,
- ' (Continued on pip S) '
ROTARY, . FAVORS' RAISE
INCREASRIV Tr CTTTIRSSAL
Members of,- the Salem Rotary
club, voted unanimously at ' their
luncheon .Wednesday noon to in
dorse the special i election to be
held - next, Monday -for a 'general
rise in the pay of ' Salem school
teachers. j AAi -vj.U-,-'-'-'A: A'i
v George .Hug, superintendent:, of
schools, pointed" out, that the rise
is - given to . the teachers staying
with i the city's school system,
thereby ' encouraging' ,the . best
teachers toxemain here.-;
That the school .board is finan
cially lean was disclosed - in - Mr.
Hug's statement that not one book
has been 'purchased ths year for
the high school library.
'Salem ,1s growing" so rapidly
that within six per fcgnt limitation
it is Impossible vtb finance our
school, system, adequately in the
regular way,'decJarediHug- i 4If
we cannot have any more money,
the only way I can see" Ifi to hayd
less children." '
feS
.- HKSSHaBMHSSSBBSaSBHaBBBaaflBSBBHBaBMHHHHM '
II y-W AAA A: -A
THREE MORE DAYS LEFT :
. -?IN feld VOTING OFFER
,, s , . .',..
$3000 IN PRICES HANG ON RE
MAINING EFFORtS -
Those Who Work Now Can Pile
.V . ...;.: - .......
Up Lead During Next Few. --
Days Drive
HONOR ROLL TODAY
1 Miss Clere Powell, Falls City;
Oregon. z .li l .. -
3 Miss : Alta - .Wtnn, Gervjds,
Oregn.- . .- .- : . . - : C:
3 Mrs. Clynier, TurneTi Oregon.
(By Auto Contest Editor) ,
With ! but three more days in
which tdjunf In subscriptions aild
secure the greatest ' number vot
votes f or eacn subscription; Inter
est In ttie competition and en
thusiasm ti'n the progresaV jbf, Jhe
cohtestaits x In. tthe . Statesman's
mammoth 33000 gift distribution
is growing by leaps and bounds.' .'
; Each ; contestant In the f race
realizes that tHe, grkiid prtte?repr
resenting. oyer 33QOO, are practi
cally within their reach, to , be
claimed. for. their very own or for
feited to . more agressiTe oppon
ents in the last few days, depend
ing almost entirely on the final
supreme efforts put forth while
the big rotes aie allowed.
If the contestants halt now for
a moment if they slack up or let
their enthusiasm ywane i they
? ?
?
;
? ? ?
SPEND $4000 OX DOG THAT
WEIGHED FOUR POUNDS ?
S
NEW .YORK, March 24.
(By Associated, Press.) Fran
cle, a four-pound black and tan
exponent of ' whai. the well
dressed dog will .wear, arrived -.
today from France with his
master- and mistress, Mr. and
Mrs. , Sidney p M. ... Williams of
New. York who .said, that Fran-,
cie costs tnem ituoo a year.
Tirr trfpTffrs,' wrinajr said,.
iras made to replenish Francie's
wardrobe, at a fancy .tailor's
shop in Paris. It included, she
explained, spring styles in sport
clothes with pockets for gloves
and I handkerchiefs, evening
clothes, morning costumes, pa
jamas and other "necessities."
, ; Francle , his mistress said,
seldom drinks, but , appreciates
good liquor ina mild highball
.at tea time., American bootleg,
however,-Is" offensive to Fran
cie's 'taste.,? ,
; .. She said that she and Mr.
Williams .have four .other dogs
whose annual expense is 23,
r000,a year.; 0..4, ?M
t Mrs. Williams explained that
.In figuring the. annu'al expenses
of her dogs she. always Included
the. moneyj she spent on them
for travel, .htjte t-iiccommoda-tlbns,
food and wardrobes. j
fctiEAKirfC? Tilfe CAMEL'S BACK
J"V
OL'BDlIZERBi'J
Prohibition Debate Reaches
Heated Proporlfohs; Com
pliments" PasseS
MELEE AROUSES: ANGER
Cries of MLiar Fill Air as SUte-
ments Fly Across Chamber;
Modification BUI
1 Is Drafted
WASHINGTON, ? March 24.
(By, Associated Press) . Prohibi
tion debate reached, the point toi
day in the house wherethe old
fashioned word,. "liar" - came Into
play, with - members edging, for
ward in their seats like a crowd
watching the end of a tense race
The prohibition enforcement
unit and the , department , ot jns
t ice . became entangled In the
melee and finally an unusual situ
ation was created, where the ser
geant at arms was forced to issue
a formal statement on the subject
at issue whether in wet days his
chief duty was to drag drunks off
the house floor.
Representative La Gnardla, pro-
rresstva ' nnHflllst- Mow Vnrlr
Btarted , the battle, of words by
Charging that Franklin L. Dodge,
formerly a Justice department in
vestigator, bad attempted to dis
pose of 200,000 worth of liquor
permits obtained from the wife of
George , Remus, convicted Cincin
nati bootlegger,, and it did not end
until Representative O'Connor,
democrat, New York, had called
Dr. Clarence True Wilson, of the
Methodist board, of morals, a liar,
Mr. Wilson was quoted by Mr.
O'Connor : as having asserted that
congressmen in pre-Volstead days
gave the. sergeant at arms a hard
task, to perform, and with having
said 4his - information came from
the sergeant at arms. . Then Ser
geant afx arms Rogers extricated
not, know Dr. tWilson,
and j had - come . to " work ' in the
house since prohibition became
effective ': r .
lawmaking his charges, Repre
sentative L Gard la asserted that
a general dry law. .enforcement In
vestigation should 5 be made and
that, the. prohibition unit and the
justice department would be good
places' to start it.. ; : - -
A1 special 'effort was made, he
( Cob tinned on paf ' .)
DENIES LIQUOR CHARGE
FORMER. DRY AGENT , ENTERS
? PLEA OF-NOT GUILTY
PORTLAND, Or., March 24.
(By Associated Press.) CJ. Mc
Knight, former federal prohibition
agent stationed at Astoria, plead
ed not guilty. In federal court to
day to a charge ot operating a still.
Judge Wolyerton set bis trial for
June 9. .-'.:.
i.
I i.-f-f" .4 .
rtftTTr r rnnmrn
H I Lb n l bu
Huntington to (titiniie
as CdacH at Salem High
A a Tt- -: ' i ' ' -f - - x i -
Definite Announcement Made;. Bob Drager la Elected Captain
of Next ' Season's f Hoop, qnad ; Team Is Feted at -.
-Banquet Prepared by Girls'
j Bbb;brageh,giiiid on;the Oregon higK school all-siate
team,; was elected unanimously; to serve as captain on next
season's basketball ;teain at the, banquet, given . in . honor, of
Salems state championship basketball team by the student
body Wednesday nfeht. 1
t Coach' HolHs Hnutinon declared definitely that, he; is
willing, to coach again next year. , This is a mattertfver, whicl
the high school has had some concern. : There were one dr.twb
members of -the faculty who, it is said, questioned the advis
ability or the "- T'- ry-
ing part ot the. coach's salary,
Some chance 'for conflict was
seen on - this score, but when
George Hug, city; superintendent
of schools, explained at the ban
quet that the school -board is fi
nancially too hard pressed to pay
alby itself for a' coach, and that
without the students' aid a coach
the caliber -of Huntington could
not be obtained, any hinted dis
section was scattered completely
and a unanimous vote , ot confi
dence taken in the coach.
There will be a meeting of the
student council this morning to
go through the formal process of
electing Huntington coach for the
following year. .... . ,.;
.It was, brought out, that, the
banquet marked the close of the
20 th season of basketball for Sa
lem high school. This Is the 12th
season a banquet, has been giren
the team by the student body. Out
of , the sefen . years the state bas
ketball tournament has been held
Salem has won four of the cham
pionships. Besides the members - of the
team. Superintendent Hug; J. C.
Nelson, principal , of the higfi
school; , Coach Huntington; ,, Dr.
Walter Brown, who has taken ac
tive interest in the team; Bob
Kitchen, athletic, manager; ' Mer
ritt Davis, graduate treasurer;
Cecil . Edwards, president of the
student body; , and Spot Simpson,
yell leader, were present at the
banquet. Edwards served as
toastmaster. ,
Mildred Pugh, rice president of
the. student body, was in charge
ot, the serving , ot - the bariq-uet,
which was arrangedcompletery 1y
girls of the school, albiet mighty
delicious, what ,with-cocktalls of
a harmless pleasantness: and
baked, chicken. - Pearl Kaphan
assisted.
BECOME U. S. CITIZENS
htHIRTEEN UNDERGO NATtTRi
ALIZATION IN, COURT HERE I
Thirteen persons were admitted
to naturalization in the United
States here Wednesday when ex
aminations were held in the cir
cuit court rooms under the direc
tion of L. I. Welsh of Portland,
deputy district director of natural
ization. Seven of those admitted
yesterday are residents of Salem.
The list of those naturalized
Wednesday follows, with the
birthplace of each: v;,;, , ,
Morten Frederick . Mortensen,
Salem, route . 5, from , Norway.
Gersh Malzels, 23S Center. Street,
from Poland ; Relnhold , Frearick
William Aherns, 310 Water street,
front Germany; Fran RbuclirGer-
vals, from . .Hungary ;v Glacomo
Fontknlni, 1925' North", Commer
cial, from Italy.Axel Theodore
Bjork:fcl 1529 South.. liberty from
Sweden; Eliie Cordero ,McKey,
362 North Jweltth street, from
Spain; Andrew Martin. Schmidt,
Sliver ton, from .Hungary; , Jbseph
Sdhmidt, vpervais, - from : Austria ;
Abton Stenger, i ir.4 Woodburn,
from Hungary; Myron, DaUas Che
dester, SUverton. t naturalized in
Canada; Thomas iS.jKacenile,
2590 Cheery ATenue, front Can
ada; 'Joseph Schfechter Gervals.
from Hungary. I
NORBECK SHOWS LEAD;
:v SIOUX FALLS, srJX'.jiarch 24.
(By Associated Press)." Re
turns, frbmTuesaayai statewiae
primary showed Senator Peter
Nor beck, apparently, emerged the
stronger:, in - the pre-primary clash
between, the republican faction he
headed . and - that led by Governor
Carl Gunderson. - - .
-
' !Wctflay:
.: In WdsKinfjbn
' , The house "indulged in a hectic
prohibition' debate. Hi?' "
. 1
The-house agriculture commit
tee decided to hold night sessions.
.-i ,':, - - -
, .The. Goodingi long and short
haul raUroad rate bill was de
feated by the senate. . .
Supervisors were announced for
the immigration patrols on the
Mexican and Canadian borders.
, Jhcm as.s.Walker Pagei att acted
the flexible provisions of the tariff
L- re a senate inver iting com-
rt'' - rf 1,rrarhraent against
2 .- Juu;? deorge-Vi English
V- T
by-t!
3
Contest M&
-
41 PERISHiWHENlcVESSEL
&URNS AFilR EXPLOSION
LN , RIVER .tKAIER
DESTROYED ON AMAZON
Varied . Reports ; Received; Gaso
line and Powder Contribute
' to Fire
RIO JANEIRO. March 24. (By
Associated Press.) Thlrtyeight
passengers, the captain i.and. the
first and second engineer of the
Brazilian river steamer Paes de
Carvalho perished when . i. the
steamer sank in the Soloimoes
river; one of the npperorks. of
the Amazon near. Manaos accord
ing to dispatches received : here
today. The disaster was caused
by an explosion. . .. - M,- .v;
Seventy-eight , passengers .and
several members of the crew were
rescued. Additional advices, from
Manaos say - that ; fire, broke out
in the steamer Paea de Carvalho
early in the morning of March 21,
as the steamer was nearlng
Coarhy on the Soloimoes ,- river.
The captain, second rot f icer' first
engineer, nine members t of - the
crew ; and - twenty-six passengers,
these advices say, perished.
The fire - originated in a mat
tress in the third class cabin, the
occupant of which was reported to
have . been smoking a , pipe. .; He
attempted to throw the mattress
overboard, but the flames set tire
to keiosenetmd gasellfle In fins
nearby, ' -:u r A-:."A f:-1 --J';
;The' flames i spread rapidly;
reaching a quantity ot V powder,
which exploded, wrecking 'the
steamer. ; ' ; "' . . - !
night Hearings coming
PRESSURE V OF FARM RELIEF
' BRINGS EXTRA WORK ;,
., iorr' r j tSH j!-'::J
WASHINGTON, v March 24.
(By Associated Press.) Pay and
night . sessions ; for . farm v relief
hearings will be held here after
by the house agriculture commit
tee in an, effort to get legislation
into congress before adjournment.
-..' The committee decided ion this
today ; alter, , members had ..urged
that some way, be found to expe
dite the testimony Representa
tive Jones,, democrat; Texas, made
an attempt to have the hearings
closed In order to consider a bill
but the other 'members held that
those wanting to be heard should
be given an opportunity. ; .-,
Meanwhile, the delegations rep
resenting . national . ; and i- middle
western farm organizations, here
urging a measure , to assess- an
equalization fee npon 'certain
crops, to provide a fund, for mar
keting "the - surplus . arranged to
appear before the - senate agrii
culture committee Monday. It is
not expected : that . the delegation
will have completed its case in the
house at that v time, but I several
witnesses can be detached to testi
fy before the senate committee.
PILLING 'TO BE CHIEF
MAN WHO CAPTURED MURRAY
GETS OLTMPIA JOB
OLTMPIAWaslw March 24.
(By j Associated , Press).- p. ? D.
PUlIng, , detective in- the, lecal ,pc
lice .department, and j formerly , a
guard at the Oregon penitentiary,
will r be- - Olympia's next chief of
police,, Mayer-James Johnson an
nounced today. . Official confirma
tion tof Filling's appointment is
expected to . be made 1 by the- city
commissioners next v; Wednesday.
Pilling will succeed Af J.' "Peter
son, who is resigning..
i 'Pilling was one of the men in
strumental in the capture of Tom
Murray, , Oregon desperado , now
under sentence of death, -following,
his , sensational ; escape from
the ; penitentiary on AugustlZ.
WOULD CEDE vHQLDlflGS
GERSf AN . .PBOPUB SEEK , TO
CO-MTSCATE OLD LANDS "
pBERLIN. March t24. (By The
Associated Press.) Approximate
ly 12,500000 GerciaS Tofc.
cbrding.'to, an of flcialj preilriiriarj".
estimate, have" signed for confis
cation without .'compensation, cf
the Jprcrcrtlci.f f; Germany's, for-nierlrali-j
farailies. Ttia is 8,
500,000 -.t :ra tlaa neceseary" to
tl t!
a - .....
Vote 0,k-
T MI!!!
ts m
George - Grabenhbrst .Headi
Committee to Prepare
Wapi f 6r Guidanbo
ZONING TO TAKE MONTHS
Applications Now Received In 11
icate Substantial ; Building i
Impetus Is To Be-'
: . 'Expected , '
A. complete sonlng; of Salem at
as early a .date as possible will be
the. objective of the city planning
and zoning commission; it. was
brought oat at the meeting of tL3
commission Wednesday night. The
matter of the fill for the Liberty
street - bridge project was also
touched upon, and petitions for
building permits np before the
commission revealed that a- build
ing boom of large scope is ready
to be launched in Salem.
A committee headed byGeorge
H. Grabenhorst is - new working
on the preparation of maps. Thesa
maps tre usage maps, ' and must
be made available, it is held, be
fore an s Intelligent zoning of the
city can be accomplished, , ;
. . As soon as these maps.arja mada
available, the work of Stoning .will
be started. - Because of the intri
cate work needed to make It com
plete, it is doubtful' that the zon
ing will be finished bef ore a year.
or two. . ; . . . . .
-All -. parties : interested are now
working.. In-harmony for the' effi
cient - development of the gbuti
Liberty street , bridge project
While no word from the city coun
cil Indicates that the bridge will
go through after all the prepara
tions are. made; at least work ca
the fill will be carried atead witi
gusto.
Plans for the .bridge that wiU
connect Liberty street from citv's
end to city end are-being lira 4
bf C. B. McCullQugh, state tril r
engineer- The plans are not ycl
completed,, but , McCullough' as
serts they will be ready sons
time next week.
-As soon ; as' the plans for tv .
bridge" are completed,' a ineeti
(CoBtiBd en par t.y s
OUTLINE? SHIPPING PLAll
Ta lOPEN - BIDS ON SALE O?
FIVE BOATS ON'APRIL 0
-WASHINGTON, Majrch 24.-H
(By - Associated Press.) New
bids for. the sale of the flve Adi
mlral Oriental line ships out of,
Seattle , will ; fee opened by ttq
Shipping Board Aprif 6 it was &n-
nounced today, with; the modified
form of contract recently work ed
out included -in the specUi'catlcr 3,
. Provision will be made oc'ir
the proposal,' for the Admiral Ori
ental boats to-call at Portland
Ore., .for: passengers only.- -
j. Contract modifications'
proved by the j, boatd .cover
changes. Jn. service which wouli
permit the successfal LUTer-tof
take ,one of the five; ships off ti.
run -if, business permitted hir ti
maintain schedules with.t&e "c :
four. - In that v eve -t tl. '? -
taken off could either. t a I. ,
or put on some otherrun: . - '
SNlPERi PLACED IN C U
03IAnA
KILLEH MUST K
CHAIR ON JULY O
I .LINCOLN,; Neb., tTarch il.
( By Associated Press.) Ytzz.Ii
Carter formally sentenced at
Omahi today to die in the electric
Chair althe state prison hero Ju!;
9 for the murder February 17 c !
Dr. A: D. Searles; tonight is la f
celt r house near where "Dor, I t
Rtnger, also under death senteica
to die the same day," 13 tnilU.;'
execution-.... . . . . .
- Carter, the "Sniper Bandit" n:;
brought 'to the prison by auttio
blle.: : . : '.' .
uw.l i IL...
' In gettn dut any et :c
edition ? some'ena 13 i..
invariably left cut:
'-lVe:sre' 'trcr-:r!r.,T 1
raphical skctc..- I
ness . men ar. 1 prof t :
men for ths D.'-r.v::. " J
Ice number cf.tha C.
T J :
..we
4
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