The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, October 07, 1925, Page 1, Image 1

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    IliER Ml
SPEED FEATURES TRIAL
SPECIAL ELECTION VETO
STAGE IS ALL SET FOR
SERIES OPENING TODAY
PORTLAND BUSINESSMAN
OF LLOYD AT DALLAS
FOUND CONSTITUTIONAL
KILLED JJI AUTO WRECK
v ; .... .. f
WIFE ' OF RETIRED SEA CAP.
, TAIN IN HOSPITAL
BECLflRED PAID
BIGOTBY IS FLAYED
HIMYK
TESTIMONY OF WITNESSES IS
GOVERNOR ACT El) WITHIN
CLASSIC FIGHT TO BE WAGED
ON PITTSBURGH FD3LD
TAKEN BY STATE "
RIGHTS SAYS OPINION
MI
t am
TIMBER FIRMS ASK
FOB HUB BOffl
II FJ
FOB
Alan, Bynon, U. S. Attorney
in Poland, Charged by
. - Kelso Officials
$5000 SAID DEMANDED
Cowllta , County Officials Declare
Lawyer IIeld Them Up" Be
Avit? iuiuuif( vfcx uia -.
'-' . Evidence '
PORTLAND, Or., Oct. . the
fitatement 'of i the Cowlitz county
commissioners that they rwere
r held up" for Information which
resulted in 'the present advance
ment of the murder case at Kelso
was "preposterous", Alan Bynon,
assistant United States .attorney
declared today in answer to the
icport from Kelso made by the
commissioners. ;
, "C. H. Hili U a friend of mine
and has also been one of my cli
ents. The federal government
d()(g not nrnhihii man tanrlnir
district attorneys h or assistants
from maintaining private connect
lions and V have- had a private
office for some time.". , -
KELSO . XVaaV fW. K t Ptr
Associated Press.) -Charges that
Allan . Bynon, assistant United
States attorney for Oregon at
tempted -to force Cowlitz county
officials to pay $5000 for the In
formation that led to the solution
of the Dovery murder case were
made here today by Washington
state and county officials,
.the ; county ' commissioners . of
Cowlitz county signed an agree
ment, In Mr. Bynon's office in the
federal building at Portland to pay
C. G. Hill,- Portland automobile
aalesman and client of Bynon, the
sum of 5000 for the murder evi
dence. Declaring that they were
"hejd up" and practically forced
to sign the agreement, the commis
sioners . today publicly repudiated
vtA A ffT Ant -
Bynon, according to advices
from Portland admitted the tran
saction and claimed that he was
pot acting as a federal official, but
eg private attorney for Hill. ,-
: Full details of the transaction
with Bynon ' were made public at
a meeting of,-the county commis
sioner." At the request of news
papermen, Assistant Attorney Gen-
' cnl CKarnA anf ' Ctioriff . florVo
UfcUUWCt&VC , WVUUICU llil C k. LUC UP-
. . i . w . m . .
. tails of their bargaining with By
non and produced copies of the
agreement and of letters written
by the federal official. ; !
The contract, according to Mr.
. Sharpe, Is not worth' the paper it
is written on in that it was signed
by the three commissioners, aa
public ortlclal and Washington
law does not allow boards of conn
ty commissioners. to transact bus
iness away from the county seat.
mucn jees out of the state. - - '
Frank Hart said Jto be another
itinerant prize fight promoter was
named a& the other suspect In the
Dovery case today and a warrant
was issued for his. arrest. Hart's
Whereabouts is unknown but a circular-
bearing his description 'Is
now being prepared.
The, dismissal of the murder
charge which A. Ruric Todd,' de
posed mayor of Kelso had filed
against City Engineer George Mor
ris was temporarily held up today
by Mr. Todd. The state's attor
ney had promised yesterday that
he would drop the Morris charge-.
but after a consultation with Todd
todav temnorarUv wlthhtM ortinn
BUYS peppermint! OIL
SMALL FORTUNE PAID FOR
LABLSH FARM CROP
- H. M. Todd of Eugene, coast
j presentatlve of the H. M. Todd
ccmpany of Kalamazoo, ; Mich
who was in Salem Monday for the
purpose of buying oil. -believes
. that the peak has been reached in
-the peppermint oil market'. And
although be does not believe thai
the price will be any. higher," he
does not believe there ' win be a
decline in the near future.'
For 2100 pounds bt oil from
I he' Hartley and Craig crop in the
Lake Labish country, Mr, Todd
paid $25,080. Mr. Todd intro
duced the growing of mint into
the Willamette valley and. pro
diets that it will not be long be
fore the mint oil IndustfyUa the
United States will be removed to
the. Willamette valley. About
5000 acres IIl ; W grown -with
mint In this valley pext year, ac
cording to Mr. Todd. ;
KODAK. MAX VISITS
SEATLE, 6ct. 6. With motion
picture films or Alaskan mountain
coat and bear ."'Georee D. East
man of Rochester.Nc Y.. arrived
here today from a six weeks va
cation trip in the 'mountains of
Several Called to Stand Tuesday;
Accused Man Appears Little
, . Concerned ' "' '
DALLAS, Ore., Oct. 5 Speed
features the trial of W..R. Lloyd,
ex-convict charged Jwith the mur
der of C. I. Baun, Independence
taxi driver the night of September
1, for 24 hours after the case was
brought into court: the - Jury box
was filled and before court ad-
ourned for the day the state was
nearly half-way through the di
rect questioning of witnesses.
Those testifying today included
Irvin Baun, -brother of the- slain
man; Frank Richards, of Albany,
Linn county sheriff -, who found
the murdered man's body; Mrs. J.
E. Lucas, - from whose home the
word of the crime Was telephoned
to Dallas and Independence; Sher
iff Hooker, of Dallas, who with A.
L. Keeney,' county coroner, were
among the first to reach the
scene; C. H. Hoy, who was with
Sheriff Richards when the' body
was .discovered; Nelson Anderson
who lives near Mrs. Lucas. Other
witnesses to be , examined are
Francis Galloway, Wasco district
attorney who took Lloyd's confess.;
sion following is capture at The
Dalles, and Special Agents K.eiiy
and McCloskey, who fmade the ar
rest in the railroad yards.' f
Lloyd appeared unconcerned in
the proceedings but closely follow
ed the examination of the jurors.
His demeanor was little changed
from his first appearance in Dal
las after his arrest in eastern
Oregon.
J. N. Halgerson, district attor
ney, is demanding the death pen
alty."'" ; -v'. - ' ' '7s:';,
OFFICER'S CAR STOLEN
NICHOLS IS OX LOOKOUT 1
. MISSING ROADSTER
O. O. Nichols! state traffic of
ficer, was .wandering around ab-
aolataljfe tol ft lart-mTi I gh ti and beg
ging rides from friends as be con
tinued a fruitless , search for his
missing Bulck roadster, which be
reported to the police yesterday as
stolen from . Winter and Ferry
Monday night. At midnight the
police had not received word that
it had been recovered. The ma
chine bore tha license number
146.
! Officer Nichols admits that he
has been on the lookout for many
a stolen car while on duty but
Bince his own particular vehicle
is listed among the missing ' he
promises that automobile thieves
had better keep clear of his path
in .the future. -
TAX FIGURES ARE GIVEN
DATA ON INCOME TAX RE-
- CEIPTS SUBMITTED
WASHINGTON, Oct. 6. -(By
Associated Press.) Completing
its'etudy of the 1923 income of
American taxpayers, the bureau of
Internal revenue announced p-
nlght' that 7,698,321 individuals
and 398.933 corporations had filed
returns for the'year, the individu
als contributing 1633. 651,505 and
the corporations $937,106,798 to
ward support of the' government.
Preliminary figures on these re
turn nreviouslv had been made
Dublic. but the announcement to
night covered complete income sta
tistics showing that receipts from
these sources for 1923 represented
a decrease of $197,405,803 from
individuals, but an increase of
153.330.530 from corporations
over.the preceding year. The num
ber of individual - taxpayers in
creased from 1922 to 1923 ty
910.840. and the -nu mber of cor
porations filing retarns advanced
6.050. -. . - -, -;. .-.
Taxable income of individuals
wus placed by the bureaa at $24,-
840.137,364, an Increase or za,
503,924.834 over 1922.
WHALE IMPERILS CRAFT
SMALL BOAT TOWED 70 MILES
TIIUOl'GII ROCKY REEFS
.CORDOVA. Alaska, Oct. 6. (By
Associated Press.) Being towed
70 miles through.rock-strewn. trat
ers at night by a harpooned whale
was the experience related by Cap
tain Louis Lane of the whaler
Gunnar, who arrived here today on
his way south. "t
"'The' mammal was harpooned in
Prince William Sound, north of
here, and towed the Qannar which
is' operated' by thre men and is
said to be the smallest indepena
tnt unit whaler in the world, 20 H
hours before tiring out. The whale
brokoTaway three times during the
pureuit, but was harpooned again.
Then the Gunnar towed the
whale oack to Green Island in
Prince William Sound, where it
a W-M c2??if ned a; food or foxes.
President Coolidge, in Legion
Address, Makes Plea tor
Lasting Peace
LARGE PARADE REVIEWED
Hundreds of Members of American
Legion Greeted by Executive;
Racial Strife Is At
tacked OMAHA, Neb., Oct 6. -(By As
sociated Press.) -Appealing to
America to take the lead ia pre
vention of war, PrefidenrCooIidge
declared hez today! that there can
be no assurance of lasting peace
until racial hatreds are supplanted
by international good will and tol
erance. His plea wag made before
the American legion convenUon
where he was cheered repeatedly
as he read a carefully prepared
speech.
AUT' ovation was; accorded the
president during a crowded 10-
hour stay here which was climaxed
by a review of thousands of world
war veterass. Foar two hours he
watched the parade, protected
Eomewhat in a covered stand from
a chilly wind and the marchers
were still filing byjwhen he made
a hurried departure to board a
train for Washington.
Daring his convention address
which was heard by more than 7,-
000 men and women, crowded into
the municipal aiiditorlum, the
president sought to emphasize his
remarks, particularly so when he
deplored the wave of religious in
tolerance which he said had ewept
the country and when ho declared
that : in preparing the nation for
emergencies, military power must
be subordinated'-to civil author
it i' " '5
t , "Divine providence has not be-
wB4J01rrrae9a monopoly
of patriotism and character," as
serted Mr. Coolidge, recalling that
duriiig the jwar ?p4 man's patriot
ism whs impugned or service ques
tioned because of hki racial origin,
hia political opinion or his relig
?ous cinvictons." !
"Thanks to our comparatve iso
lation,' continued'' the president,
we have known less of internation
al friction and rivalries than some
(Continued on page 2)
EMBEZZLER
IS FIXED
MEDFORD. Or., Oct. 6. (By
Associated Pre3S.)rt When tho an
nual term of the United States
district court for southern Oregon
convened here this afternoon, with
Judge Charles E. iWolverton-presiding,
Charles E. Erzner, charged
with the embezzling of postal funds
from- the postoffice at Lakeview,
Ore., changed his plea of not guil
ty to guilty and was fined $500.
L. Swan, linn County Repre
sentative, Loses His Man- t
1 damns Proceedings
When , Governor Walter .M.
Pierce vetoed an act: of the last
legislature providing for a special
election and an appropriation to
cover the necessary . expenses of
the same he acted within his con
stitutional right3, according to a
decision handed down in the su
preme court . Tuesday, written by
Justice Brown. ' ? s--, y
The ease was brought by, L. L.
Swan, of Albany, Linn county repf
resentative to - the - legislature,
against Secretary of State Kozer,
seeking to compel him to 1 carry
put the provisions of the act not
withstanding the veto. ; It was an
original proceeding in mandamu
and . the- decision 1 sustains a de-t
murrer to the alternative writ. !
"An examinatioh of the' Mil iU
self," the opinion, reads, ."shows
that it was a proposed law. It
was treated by this legislative aw
sembly as a proposed law. T Like
wise, the governor deemed it toy
be a blU for an act and he buty
exercised bis constitutional pre-H
rogative when he etoed it. ; It has.
all the component parts of a pro-.
posed statute. Every section con
tuined therein w4s contemplated
by the legislative I assembly to be
a section or a proposed statute.
By disapproving that measure the
hief executive exercised a power
vested in him by the constitution."
Other opinions! handed down
Tuesday were:
Lewis Pankey, appellant, vs Na
tional Security Co., appeal from
Klamath county. Suit to recover
money." Opinion by Justice Rand.
Judge A. L. Leavijtt affirmed.
Olive A. Squiros, appellant, vs
Isaic J. Squires, jet al. Appeal
from Yamhill county. Suit for
divorce. Opinion; by the court.
Judge H. H. Belt jaffirmedj
t Thomas Roeser vs " Lulu B.
Roeser, appellant; Appeal from
Columbia county Suit for di
vorce. Opinion by Justice Burnett.
Judge J. A. Eakin affirmed. '
Petitiott for rehearing" denled'ftK
Cale vs Canadian; Bank of Com
merce. Petition for further opin
ion denied in Wallace vs American
Lite Insurance Co.
PLANE REACHES HARBOR
FORCED DOWN FOUR TIMES,
PB-1 13 NOW IN PORT
SEATTLE, Oct. j6. -(By Associ
ated Press.) -After being forced
down four times on her way from
San Francisco toj Seattle, the na
val seaplane PEr-1 arrived this
afternoon at Sand Point.
Forest fire snjoke forced the
plane to land at Port Angeles last
night after flying from Astoria,
where a new engine was installed.
The plane's flight ; today from
Port Angeles to j Sand Point, a
distance of seventy miles, took an
hour because of.j heavy fog.
The plane is to be remodelled
here. !
HAND WHITING ON THF, WALT,
Favor
in
PITTSBURGH Oct
6
-(B?
The Associated Press y -A battle
that promises to add a spectacu
lar chapter to the history of base
ball's championship conflicts
starts tomorrow with the Wash
ington Senators, heroic champions
of 1924, defending ' their laurels
against - the Onslaught of Pitts
burgh's new National league title
holders, a fighting array which
hopes to regain the glory that was
this city's sixteen years ago. )- :
- Unless all signs fail, it will be
as closely waged a: struggle ? as
was the championship series last
fall with Washington's great de-;
tensive club, led by Bucky Harris
and Walter Johnson, pitting Its
experience and steadiness against
the youthfully Inspired and brilli
ant attack of Bill McKechnle's
Pirate crew.
Johnson, dramatic pitching fig
ure of the world's champions, will
pick up for the Senators where
he left off victoriously in the final
game of last season's battle with
the Giants. His opponent in all
probability, will be Lee Meadows,
veteran be-Bpectacled right hahder
and mainstay of the' Pittsburgh
staff. Both have been through
many a league struggle, although
Meadows has had no world's
series experience and both are
ready to put forth their best ef
forts. They will be the central figures
in the opening spectacle tomorrow
at Forbes field, where a capacity
crowd of 45,000 taking every
.available bit of seating space, is
expected to provide an enthusias
tic setting for the first world's
series game here since 1909.
1 It will be a colorful and brilli
ant scene .with notables on band
from every walk of life if the
weather survive the - pessimistic
predictions districted tonight.
The official forecast is for a rainy,
cold day but since some of this
(Continu-sl on pe 2)
DISTRESS CALLS TRACED
SIGNALS SENT BY MAN TINK
ERING WITH RADIO SET
SEATTLE, Oct. 6 (By The As
sociated Press) Distress signals
received here early today from an
unidentified vessel in the Pacific
ocean were sent unintentionally
by some member of the crew of
the lightship Umatilla while he
was tinkering with the ship's ap
paratus in the absence of the oper
ator, it was reported tonight by
the Seattle harbor radio station.
The operator had gone ashore at
Umatilla Reef, about fourteen
miles south of Cape Flattery, at
the head of Puget Sound, with
some member of the crew who
was 111. ' He returned to the ves
sel a few hours later and discov
ered the mistake.
Odds Are Declared to
Washington J Slightly
Opening Game
Largest Lumber'Company in
World 1 1 akes Stand tor
Oregon Trunk Line
LARGE MILLS PROMISED
few Routes Into Klamath District
Would ! Open Vast Lumber
Resources, Tacoma
Operator Says
PORTLAND. Ore.. Opt R in
Associated! Press.) The biggest
lumber interests in the vnrM
backed, the Oregon trunk exten
sion here ifrom Bend to Klamath
Falls today, when George H. Long
of Tacoma. vlce-nreslrtont
manager jot the Weyerhaueser
Timber company, took the witness
stand in behalf of the Northern
lines" application at the interstate
commerce j commission hearing.
Our company has $10,000 non
invested in timber in the Klamath
basin," he said.
"We pay about $20,000 a vnar
taxes there. We want to stoo in
terest and start manufacturine.
We will have our mill of 150,000.-
000 feet annual capacity, built by
the time the Oregon trunk reaches
Klamath ' Lake. Without this
needed outlet to our established
markets in the northern states.
we will not'go ahead with devel
opment." ;
Mr. Long was followed on the
stand by J. P. Hennessy. manasrer
of the Bend plant of the Shevlin-
Hlxon Lumber company at Bend,
who told i a similar story of his
company's plans. It was anxious
he. said, to transfer a biar nine
mill that had cut out its timber
In the. lake states to the Klamath
basin. It ; was not willing to make
definite plans until the Oregon
trunk which reached through its
parent lines and connections, the
Shevlin-HIxon markets for Oreeon
pine, was ready to enter Klamath.
Mr. Long spoke for a company
that holds 330.000 aerea In th
Klamatlj 'Tbasln, wlth'perhaps 2 5,-
000 acres of non-timbered land
in the total. For fifty! miles the
land stretches alone the edee of
the government forest reserve.
The Weyerhaueser company pro
poses, it j was testified, not only
to cut its own timber, but to make
heavy purchases of forest reserve
stumpage! as well. It owns, it
was estimated, 4,500,000,000 feet,
chiefly pine, in-the country trib
utary to Klamath Falls.
Mr. Long, one of the original
incorporators of the Weyerhaueser
Timber company told of his com
pany beitlg interesfea in Klamath
timber, back in 1905. A small
mill on the Klamath river, togeth
er with a; logging road up toward
Klamath Falls was bought. Mr.
Long said he tried to sell the road
to E. E. Calvin, then vice presi
dent and general manager of the
Southern Pacific company.
Mr. Calvin told him then of the
plans of. Mr. Harriman for a road
from Eugene across the Cascades
to Klamath Falls. He told him
also it was confidential informa
tion and he was not to divulge it.
He said, j too, Mr. Harriman, al
though a Wall street .operator,
had a remarkable sense of prac
tical economies of, railroading and
that a route across the state from
Ontario to Odell would be built
byt the Union Pacific to connect
with the projected Southern Pa
cifie roadi at Odell. A
"He told me not to tell this and
now I have gone and i done , it,"
said the witness- "I did not tell
anyone a.t that time, but I went
- t- -i - v
.(Continued on pact 7.)
5 .; ... i '
VASSAR . GIRL SUICIDES
Li-.
NO REASON IS ADVANCED FOR
YOUNG SENIOR'S ACT
POUOHKEEPSIE, "N. Y Oct.
6. (By 'Associated ;Press.) The
body of Miss Anna Frances Bailey,
21 year old senior at Vassar col
lege, was found . suspended by m
scarf from a hpdk 4ar the clothes
press of her room at Main build
ing today. ! She was the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen A. Bailey
of Cleveland,' Ohio.
; College authorities believed
that Miss Bailey hanged herself in
a moment of temporary insanity.
Her parents were expected to ar
rive here toworrow to claim the
body., v.r; ' - -
A letter addressed to J, her
mother and found in ' her room,
gave no hint aa to the reason for
the girl's death.--it ' was said - to
night at'lhe college- liss Bailey
had ' been -prominent at the col
lege on account of here literary
workr particularly 5a pOeiry.t Jf.
Henry Noble MacCracken presi
dent of ithe- college said ' tonight
her poems "showed ability? of no
common order, " . f
, ;No adequate reason has been
suggested for the act," but it Is be
lieved that temporary insanity was
responsible." iDr. MacCracken
- said, :i -" - ': - - : -
Wet Pavement and Speed Said
Cause of BU N. Clark's Death ;;
, Early Tuesday -
R. N. fclark.7 50 retired sea
captain and- district manager for
the Missouri Paint & Varnish com
&pany of Portland, was killed and
his. "wife . slightly in j ured when
their Packard roadster skidded on
the ' wet pavement about ten
miles south of Salem on the Paci
fic highway early Tuesday morn
ing. Mrs. Clark is at the Dea
coness hospital suffering from
shock.
.
There were no witnesses to the
accident and passing motarista
brought word of the accident to
Salem. The Golden ambulance
brought .the Injured woman to
the hospital while the body of
Clark was taken in charge by
Lloyd T. Rlgdon, county coronor.
Officers who. investigated the
accident declared that the ma
chine had been traveling at a
high rate of speed and apparently
skidded on a turn. The machine
crashed into a bank and turned
over. - Mr. Clark was killed al
most - instantly, being pinned be
neath the overturned machine
and crushed try the steering wheel.
Mr. and Mrs, Clark made their
home at the Almira apartments
in Portland for the last three
years. His business address Was
the Porter building. A card found
in his effects indicates that he
was a member of Portland Lodge
No. 142, BPOE.
PALMER IS TAKEN OUT
PRESIDENT SHIPPING BOARD
ORDERED REMOVED
WASHINGTON, Oct. 6, ( By
Associated ress.) The breach be
tween the shipping board and the
White House was greatly widened
today when the board removed
President Leigh C. Palmer of the
fleet corporation, who was elected
to the office in January 1924, at
the insistence; of PresidentTool-
idge. and had been given his con
sistent support. - "
At ' the same time, the board
elected Elmer E. Crowley of Bos
ton, operator manager for the
American Export line in New
York to succeed Mr. Palmer and
effected a number of other chang
e's in the" executive personnel of
the corporation. 'The changes
were made effective as of today
and Mr. .'Crowley is expected here
tomorrow, "prepared to take over
his new. duties. ;
The board elected "Mr. Palmer
a vice ' president in charge of
European 'affairs of the, corpora
tion, a position for which he had
been .selected when Mr. Coolidge
caused his to be made president.
This offer, one commissioner
later explained was only a mark
of "courtesy" to Mr. Palmer and
the " latter declined It. When he
put 'on his ha,t late today he
walked tfut'of his-offices for the
last time as president. The step
taken by the board today was one
further advance along the - line
of exercising full ' and complete
control of fleet corporation affairs
a program it had recently notified
Mr. Coolidge it intended to carry
out by rescinding the broad pow
ers It had Tested in the fleet cor
poration' at his request when Mr.
Palmer took office - and by re
vising the personnel; of the cor
poration. The powers were re
scinded last "'yeek." ; - V::. r ;
DENIES 'DUMB' REMARKS
PAGEANT DIRECTOR NOW EM
, BROILED IN ARGUMENTS
LOS ANGELES, Oct. 6 (By
The . Associated Press) It. was
bat a little while ago that Ar
mand Tv Nichols, director of the
recent Atlanta City pageant, drop
ped a remark in Seattle to the ef
fect that his experience with beau
ty shows had taught him the wit
ticism "beaatifai but dumb," was,
as the saying goes, .a .mouthful.
Today he arrived in Los Angeles
a crushed and chastened man. . -."I
was misquoted." he sighed,
"and .ever since I have had to pay
and p&yand pay. I never said all
beauties were dumb, - r I said i the
gag "beautifal bat damb ran troe
to f act in some ases,: ; But ? all
beauties are not dumi absolutely
not; -and as for America's boaat
ies, they are growing more beauti
ful every dayJ---.;:, ;i- 'ry-:-:
::' Althou gh - Holly wood,; with per
haps more beauties to the square
hlock than, any other city, is but
a stone's throw. from Mr. Nichols
hotel; he plans to remain here un
til Thursday. ''"'- . " t!
JUDGE WEBSTER ASSIGNED.
. -SPOKANE, Oct. 6.--By- Asso
ciated v Press.)- Federal . Judge J,
Stanley Webster of 4he Eastern
Washington district JirV boon 'as
signed by Chief Justice Tail of the
United States supreme court to
preside over federal court, in New
York City this fall.
Nine Men and Three.Womeri
I Will Decide Fate of Man
Charged With Murder
i i
INSPECT PRISON TODAY
r.t -i-
Extonaating Circumstances Will
! Be Basis of Defense It Is
Indicated 1b Statements
-- by King
The jury that will decide the
fate of Tom "Murray.-convict, on
trial for the murder of John '
Sweeney, guard killed when Mur
ray" and three other prisoners ea-,
caped from the state prison Aug-.
ust 12. was selected at 6 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon and was sworn.
In by Circuit Judge Percy R. Kelly
immediately afterward. Today the
trial will open in earnest with the
taking of testimony. . i
The Jury consists of nine men
and three women. ,The women,
all housewives, are Mrs. Nettle
Sherman, of Jefferson, Mrs. Bertha
M. Kirjg, of Sublimity, and Mrs.,
Maggitt Ramisby, of North Silver-1,
ton. '-, -' - -"
j Of the men on the jury, seven
are farmers, one runs a confection
ery store, and the other is a con--tractorJ
The men are:: Adolph
Bombeck, Salem contractor; Jacob
Bingham, Gervais, confectioner;
Harry B. Carpenter. Livesley,
Homer i P. Cleveland, Liberty,
Theodore Minden, East Stayton,
L. B. Judson, Salem, Adam Burns,
Salem, Edward H. Hamel, Liberty,
and George Garrell, Brooks, all
farmers. - ; . V.
I ! Two days were required to fill,
the Jury box. ,' It was found that
in nearly every instance the proe-.,
pective juror was well acquainted
with the details' of the prison
break, in a numbe of instances'
had formed well defined opinibnr
asto the guilt) or Innocence of the
defendant. Five tentative Jurors
declared they could not abrogate
their opinions In the face of any
evidence that could b nttrrA r
the trial, and were excused on ac
count f their: prejudices against
Marray. Altogether, 47 men an
women were seated In the Jury boj
before the complete jary was ee
lected. ' - .- - - :
: Both the state and the defenst '
exercised all of their preemptorj
challenges in removing v Jurors
whom they believed would be pre
judiced to their cause. In criminal
proceedings, the defense Is allow
ed 12 challenges and the utate six.
H George Farrell, a farmer la the
Brooks district; and one of the last
men to be seated In the Jury box,'
w a oromer of Frank Farrelf, a
guard at the prison who was shot
and killed by Harry Tracy In 1902,
at me time oc the Tracy and Mer
rill break. Farrell was the first
man' killed when Tracy and his
companion shot their way through
I (Coatiauei oa pat )
RUSSIANS STAGE ORGY.
THREE DAY SPREE RESULT OF
RETURN OF ALCOHOL '
MOSCOW, Oct. S. ( By Asso
ciated Press). - For three days
the Russian people ' have been
celebrating with unabated con
viviality .the country's return to
alcohoL After eleven years of
partial prohibition, RnBsIa le.t
down the restrictions "on strong
liquors last Sunday. " :
In Moscow today nearly 100,
000 quarts of the new forty per
cent vodka were sold. From early
morning lines f eager Russians
four deep extending for a whole
city block waited patiently outside
the1 wine shops for their share of
the popular "baverage.
t The demand was so great that
by Over o'clock? In the evening
every store was sold out. -
" juvery pouce station is crowded
with celebrants who drank, to ex
cess, even javeniles. r Recognizing
that the people haven't had such
a; holiday in eleven years, police
dealt leniently with inebriates.!
MYSTERY YET UNSOLVED
x - - -
POLICE UNABLU TO ACCOUNT
FOR DISAPEAIt AN'CK "
SEATTLE, Oct. C i Br Asso
ciated Preee.) -Captain o police
Kent - t- Seattle annownced toar
that tho'.disappcarjitfe of Euprae
3; Richard' 22 yciar old cterk and
student,.:. mi?9i 5 three days, "is
one of the strangest casrs I have
encountered in recent "year.-;.",
Richard disf.appfarcd E-aturdiy
wn-en he'"',nrio,t?i 'hfiscTrtfrEt of
a 'feed tarota ar.?trir'?' l,rll'b
iug rang by aoTrc on In t;i -il!ey.
He If 'ft his hat, anl rcut and
monrj-'he Ji-nl oUtsine-l by cash-'
Log his pay check,
r. "Anything - mlfht i have hap
pened," JZitt f .'.1. 'He hay live
beeen k!"'i rr k!.iaire l."