The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, October 19, 1924, Page 20, Image 20

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TE7JP " THE OREGON STATESMAN, SALEM, OREGON
SUNDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 19, 1924
OBiJ STATE
HI BHWflYj COM
Weekly Report on Condition
- of Oregon State
' Highways j
?. Pacific Highway j
- Portland-Oregon City-Salem-Al-
bany-HarrIsburg-Junction City
Eugene-Cottage Grove-Iloseburg-
Grants Pas s-Medford-California
State Line: Pared entire distance
except between Harrlsburg and
Junction City which is good maca
dam. Free county ferry 'across
Willamette River at Harrlsburg. !
Albany-Crtrv&llls Highway
Albany-Corvallis: Take west
side route crossing Willamette
rirer at Albany. New concrete
pavement opened October 17.
" West Side Highway
Portland-Newberg-McMlnnville-
el
Idnitzon.
Onmflllonsof motorcar
all over the world, Delco .
lrecosnized bymotor car '
owners a the world's fin-'.
est ignition. The winning
cars at the Indianapolis
500-mile Race, for the
last five years, have bcn '
' Ddco cqafped. .
Now your Ford can Lava
Delco I guidon. The new
Delco Lyrtem for Fords
will ur better per-
formance get more
power and more miles s
from your gasoline '
make your engine
smoother and peppier at
either high, or low speeds.
- Delco delivers a hot,
froperlytimed spark.
?sik advance automati
cally with your ipeed.
, Timing ad justmeat ex
darive with Delco. Long
liTed lasts for years!
E. H. BURRELL
Battery and Electrical Serrlce
238 Horta Higa Phons 203
t
n
installed la
f rUee ef tbaer.
; it
Delco Ford
Co. SS.SO w
trs. Prico ia-
W. K. TVT A T
I'l
1
x-.
Ok
I i X
545 North Church Street. 1
Mel
Is Your Car Equipped JVitK
McClairen !
Cords
IT SHOULD BE
Guaranteed to cost less per j
mile. A perfect non sldd
,,JIM" Smith & Watkins
SNAPPY SERVICE
Amlty-RIckreall-Monmouth - Cor-vallis-Junctlon
City-Eugene: Par
ed entire distance.;
Old Oregon Trail-West of the Pal
les Columbia River Highway
I ; Section
; The Dalles-Hood River-Portland-Ralnler-Astorla-Seaside:
, ; Paved:
entire distance. i f
Roosevelt Coast HIghway-Clatsop
And Tillamook Connties r
Astoria-Seaside: j Paved. ,
Seaside-Cannon Beach Junction:
Under construction. ; Rough but
passable. " t - ' .
Cannon' Beach Junction-Miami:
Graveled road. ;
Miaml-Tillamook-Hebo: Part
paved; balance macadam.
Hebo-Devils Lake: Macadam. '-
Neskowin-Devils j Lake:, Maca
dam. ! j ' j .' :" ' '
Roosevelt Coast Highway - Coos
Hauser-North Bend: Macadam.
North Bend-Marshfield: Paved.
,Coquille-BandonTPort Orford
ArlzOna Inn: Macadam.
Arizona Inn-Gold Beach-Brook-ings:
Mountain road in fair con
dition. ; ! : ;," :', J-. i :
Brookings-Californla State Line
Crescent City: Graveled road.
Coos Bay-Roseburg Highway
Pacific Highway-Camas Valley
Myrtle Polnt-Coqnllle: Macadam
ized. i
Willammette Valley-Florence
j ? Highway
Junction City-Cheshire-Goldson
Blachly: , Macadam.
Blachly-Rainrock: Under con
struction. Macadam.
Corvallls-Xewport Highway 1
Corvallis-Philomath- Wren-E d -
dyville-Toledo-Newport: Macadam
ized entire distance. Fair condi
tion to Wren; balance good con
dition; j ,
McMinnTille-Tillammok Highway
McMinnville-Sheridan: Paved.
Sheridan-Willamina-Grand Ron-
de-Hebo-Tillamook: ; Part paved;
balance good macadam,
j Tualatin Valley, Highway
Portland-Hillsboro-Forest Grove-Carlton-McMlnnville:
Paved. !
Mt. Hood Loop Highway In Hood
River County -Macadam
.road in good condi
tion from city of j Hood River to
a point 33 miles south. This en
tire section is open to traffic.
Closed beyond Horse Thief Mea
dows on account of construction.
Mt. Hood Loop Highway in Clac
bunas County -
Portland-Government Camp (via
Powell Valley Road) : Paved .to
Gresham. Balance good maca
dam. Closed-beyond Government
Camp on account of construction.
The Dalles-California Highway
The Dalles-Dufur: Part paved;
balance good macadam.
' Dufur-KIngsley:! Under con
struction. Take old road to Kings-
ley. I J ' . ;. i ;',,' ' : ;-
Kingsley-(Top .Tygh Grade )
White River: Good macadam.
White River-Cow Canyon: Con
struction . under way; rough In
places. ; ; I
Cow ; Canyon-Gateway-Madras-
Richmond-Bend: Good macadam
except 6 miles dirt road at Trail
Crossing of Crooked River. f
Bend-La pine: 17 miles cinder
surfaced; balance fair earth road.
Lapine-6 : miles ! north of Sand
Creek: ; Unimproved dirt road.
6 miles north of Sand Creek-
Fort Klamath-Klamath Falls-Mer
rill-California State Line: Maca-
".7TM J. P
damlzed and in good condition.
.Oregon-Washington Highway
Pendleton-Washington State
Line: Paved. ,
Pendleton-PIlot Rock-Vlnson -Heppner-Heppner
Junction: Maca
damized eicept between Vinson
and Lena which is unimproved.
Ashland-Klamath Falls Highway
Junction Pacific Highway-Kla-math
Falls: .Macadamized and in
good condition. i ;
Klamath Falls-Lakeview Highway
Klamath Falls-Olene: Macadam
ized.-. -.' .h ' !i: '
Olene-Bpnanza: Turn right over
bridge at - Olene and follow sur
faced county; road. . " ;
Bonanza-Drews Valley: Moun
tain road in fair condition. j
Drews VaUey-Lakeview: Earth
road in fair condition.
Dend-Lakeview Highway
Bend-Silver Lake: ' Best road
via Horde! Ridge and Fort Rock
Cutt-off. Road open to automo
biles only.; Truck must go by way
of Lapine and Fort Rock.
Silver Lake-Paisley: Dirt road
in fair condition. Grading opera
tions : under way along Summer
Lake. :;
Central Oregon Highway
Bend-Burns: First 12 miles
macadam.: Balance fair dirt road
open to travel.
Burns-Crane: Macadamized, i
Burns-Vale (via Crane and
Skull Springs or via Westfall and
Drewsely) : i i Both roads open to
traffic but are unimproved and
very rough. i
Burns-Canyon City: County
road now open. !
Sherman Highway
I Blggs-Waaco-Moro-Grass Valley
Kent-Shaniko-Madras - Redmond
Bend: Good macadam except 6
miles dirt' road at Trail Crossing
of Crooked River which is pass
able. ; ! I
John! Day Highway
Arlington-Base Line Good ma
cadam. -. :! ;i . , j ?
Base Line-Gwendolen: Under
construction.; Detour at Shutler
Station via Rock Creek. Mikalo
and Clem, j
Gwendolen-Condon-Fossil-Spray-
Dayville-Mt. j Vernon-John Day
Pralrie City-Summit: Macadam
ized and In good condition.
Summit-Austin-Unity: Moun
tain road in fair condition:
Unity-Irpnslde-Cow Valley: Fair
county earth road.
. Cow : Valley-Brogan-Jamieson-Vale-Ontarlo:
Macadam. J
Ochoco Highway
Redmond -j Prlnevllle - Mitchell:
Macadamized! and in good condi
tion. ? : . r ,;
. Mitchell- Antone-Dayville: Dirt
road. Impassable after rains.
Medford -Crater Lake Highway
Medford-6 miles east of Union
Creek: 60 miles macadam.
6 milesj east of Union Creek
Anna Springs-Crater Lake Lodge:
Dirt road. Crater Lake . Lodge
closed for the season. Some snow
on summit. ! ( ...
Klamath-Crater Lake Highway
Klamath Falls-Lamm's Mill-
Fort Klamath-Park Boundary:
Macadamized and in fair condi
tion. I J -. v.'''.,; J : j
. Park Boundary-Anna Springs
Crater Lake Lodge: dirt road in
fair condition.:
La Grande-Walowa Lake Highway
Road to Wallowa Lake
" La Grande-Island City: Paved.
Island Clty-Elgin-Minam-W a I-lowa-Lostine
- ; Enterprlse-Joseph-
Walowa Lake: Macadamized and
in good condition.
Bakcr-Cornncopla Highway
Baker-Halfway: 19 miles maca
dam; 21 ! miles graded roadbed.
Balance fair county road.
Redwood Highway
Grants Pass-Kerby-Waldo: Fair
graveled road. . !
Waldo-Crescent City: Fair moun
tain road. Rough but passable
over Oregon Mountain.
McKcnzio Highway
Eugene-Belknap Springs: Maca
damized and in good condition.
Belknap Springs-McKenzie Pass-SIsters-CHne
Falls-Redmond: Ma
cadamized and In good condition
except for a 12 mile section at
summit. I May be closed by snow
BILL'
PHONE '44
'V. 1 -
WALTER P. CHRYSLER'S !
! REBUILDING THE CITY j T
Detroit Is a good example of a city where there are more motor cars than
listed telephones, where traffic Is a real problem' but where the city has
settled down to find, practical ways of improving traffic conditions. Streets
are being widened by making sidewalks narrower and by removing parking
areas between the sidewalks and the street. " I
The motor car is simply a means of transportation and the modern city
must be rebuilt: an4 replahned to meet the changed order. The city which
sits back and complains about traffic conditions but does nothing about it
simply ln't progressive. Most American cities are very progressive. Proof
of this is shown by the tact that most cities ' have attacked their traffic
problems intelligently. '
: ; SOME GOOD ADVICE .' '
I In driving a motp car jdon't coast on a wet or sliffpery downgrade with
your c!utch out and rely on foot brakes to govern the speed. - i
j In crossing bridges tak extra care.
Don't cross a railroad ttack until you are absolutely safe. i
i If you have a horn that emits a faint squeak get it fixed or buy a new one.
I It you have aloud one be reasonable in Its use. Horns are for protection,
not to frighten people. ;
Give heed to sighs. Read them as you motor along and then observe
them. It pays. . . . .
Respect "dummy?? policeman. j
Know the law in your Community and state and observe it. 1
GOOD LIGHTING IMPORTANT i
i Many a city has learned that good
street lighting h a practical method
of preventing motor :car, accidents.
Poor illumination has been the cause
of many automobile accidents.
i Loose gravel Ihntrmay be found in
many spots of nearly every highway,
is a source of danger ta motorists.
Where a heavy car pr truck may roll
forward on a straight line in light or
medium stretches t of gravel, the
lighter weight car which Is not built
to hug the road, is almost certain to
skid. ?
j The Minnesota legislature is de
bating the advisability of making a
law which requires all ivehicles to
carry lights after dark. :At present
horse-drawfl vehicles are exempt
from such a law. -;t:
FUMDIISTHY
IS DISCUS
Interesting Meeting at Dallas
Addressed By B, u. Miles
and Others
; Picturing the fiber flax indus
try in Oregon as one capable of
development to a point where! it
may equal the lumber Industry of
the state1 and expressing confi
dence in the industry to the ex
tent that he wag willing to invest
$50,000 were the features of an
address made by B.. C Miles of
Salem, at a flax meeting held in
the county court house: here last
Thursday afternoon, says the Polk
County Observer. i, A
The pnrpose of the meeting as
outlined by E. R. Morris, of the
Portland Chamber of Commerce,
who presided, was to inform far
mers and citizens in general of
the possibilities of developing the
flax fiber industry as a new in
dustry for Oregon. The meeting
was not for the i purpose of en-
any time. Make inquiries as to
snow conditions at Sugene and
Bend. . il . . " :
i McKenzle-Bend Highway
Junction of The Dalles-Califor
nia Highway-Deschutea ; River-Tu-
malo-Slsters: Good macadam.
J Alsea Highway
Corvallis-Philomath-Alsea: Road
open and passable. ; - i
i Alsea-Tidewaterwaldport: Con
struction operations urider way.
Through traffic must detour south
at Alsea and go via Five Rivers
and Lobster Creek. Detour is un
improved mountain road passable
except after rains.
The Young Salesmen Are
Off With a Bang ,
J Cut J Prices Start Todajr i
's "'; Ton Used Cars I- i i' :V '
Packard Single SI: Touring .. . . . : . $2250.00 '
Packard S Passenger Sedan .............. 3000.00
1022 Dodge Sedan ...................... 1000.00
1021 Dodge Sedan ............. ... ...... 800.00
1921 Olds Sedan OOO.OO
, . 1021 Essex Sedan ........... . . . ........ OOO.OO
1922 Hop Touring .... 1 ....... . ... ...... OOO.OO
' 1921 Hup Touring 750.00
1924 For4 Coupe : 600.00
Jordan 7 Passenger Touring ............ . 500.0O
Liberty 4 Passenger Roadster ............ 300.00
1922 Ford Touring ..................... 250.00
. 1921 Ford Touring .............. . .. . 200.00
Baby Grand Chevrolet 175.00
i - 'i 'I : ' .; ', i t,:-- . ;
The above ears are lully equipped, many of them with'
extra tires, and extra equipment and are in excellent mechani
cal condition, i I ' ;
! ' 1 : " ! I - fl
We guarantee our used cars the same as our i new ones.
Ask the man who has bought one from us. : j
There is no better place to buy a used car than from
Mac Donald Auto Co. Anyone will ell you that,
' v i Service is our middle name. "
The terms lire lower than any other place in Oregon. j,
-;' ' :fF ;. . I-- '-..'i 't " I.' : '.' - ' ' . U' I
MacDonald Auto Co.
FERRY AT COTTAGE, ; PHONE 523
Hare you a boy friend in the Salesman's Race?
If so, help him along. i
It's not to late to enter the contestSee Mr. MacDonald Today.,
BE REASONABLE
,
'
' Let the driver use his hands for
signals. ':'-!:'..'. I .
When everyone In the ca. does it
it looks like a traveling men's con
vention. ' I "; 1 .
Know the signals In your city or
state and follow them carefully.
. couraging farmers to plant acre
ages of flax just .now but to co
operate in determining the soil
types On which fiber flax can be
successfully and properly grown,
Mr. Morris indicated, j
i
After spending more than three
months - in Europe studying the
linen industry and comparing con-
dltioss in Oregon with conditions
there, Mr. . Miles concluded that
flax growing and linen I spinning
In Oregon offered sufficient merit
to give it a thorough trial. He
found that Oregon flax fiber was
considered excellent when exami
ned by seven expert Bhinners in
Ireland and Belgium. He found
that Oregon climatic conditions
were as; good Jf not better than
those prevailing at Belfast, Ire
land, the center of the linen in
dustry of .the world. Labor, ac
cording to Mr. Miles is the most
difficult problem to overcome, but
this too, ; he believes can be suc
cessfully handled.
Under the proposed plan as out
lined by Mr. Miles he would ex
pect to erect the smallest pos
sible spinning mill which, would
cost about $150,000 and which
would spin only seining twine for
which there is a million dollar an
nual market in the Pacific North
west. This twine is used by fish
ermen. In the way of this development
however, Mr. ! Miles pointed out,
may be the Oregon, state govern
ment. The state now has control
of all, the flax fiber available and
have asked 'Governor Pierce to
give me an option on this flax at
market price in order that we may
use thi3 fiber in our spinning
plant," Mr. Miles said.
As to the success of fiber flax
as a pronta Die crop xor Oregon
farmers, Proff O. R. Hyslop, re
presenting the extension, service of
the Oregon Agricultural college
spoke. Prof. Hyslop, pointed
out, that it was bis belief that
fiber flax if planted on good, well
drained "soil, which is free from
weeds and if cared for in the right
manner will prove a profitable
crop. All soils will not produce
gbod fiber flax Prof. Hyslop said,
and ft is to determine the soil
types to which the crop Is adapted
and the best cultural practice that
the extension service will arrange
f-6m 10 to 15 small demonstra
tion plots In Polk, county. By pro
ceeding In this way no loss; will
will be incured by farmers and the
extent of fiber flaxl production
will be determined by itsV profit
ableness on the various soil types,
it was pointed out. ; f
Is flax hard on the soil? Is al
most; the universal question asked
by ranchers. Experiments at
Corvailis show that If grown in a
rotation flax is no harder on the
soil than any other crop and dol
lar for dollar flax takes slightly
less )lant food from the soILthan
does wheat.
Pete Thomason, veteran flax
growers of Turner; discussed his
experience as a flax grower' and
said that he liked the crop better
than any he had grown and found
it i more profitable, i Robert Craw
ford, superintendent of the state
flax plant, also explained the pro
cess of extracting the flax fiber
from the straw. .
While the meeting was not lar
gely attended keen interest was
shown and as number of local flax
growers , were present. These
growers indicated that they liked
the crop but had So far not found
it very profitable! f
r
: He who keeps too- many irons
in the fire gets burned.
i
A NEW SILVERTON
-T-
X
-BOOK
i t
A folder Just received at The
Statesman ofice contains the an
nouncement of the publication of
"A History of the Sllverton Coun
try," by .Robert -Horace Downs,
1 M. A.K head of the department of
history in Franklin high school,
Portland, Oregon. We were at
tracted to this by the limited ter
ritory taken in and yet the con
tents indicate that the book will
be intensely Interesting.
If; Oregon i could preserve its
history In this way, It would mean
Incalculable benefit to posterity.
As a matter of fact there is
enough that happens in every
neighborhood to write a history,
but we think because it happens
in our neighborhood that it is
trivial. The world loves to read
history and intimate personal his
tory" is the best that can be found
This narrative is' the result of
more than nine years research by
the ! author, who is a grandson
and great-grandson of Silverton"
COJD U
, :K..L !';.: ' . ' ' :-f
' ACw ifl T V"- f.o.b.Lcmsing. Taxtm&ipare
: J If j 1 l ;SrNrv tir extra. Qencrnl Motors V
lU 1(1 Jl 1 easy payment plan offer term
J Jy JJ1J unequalled in the industry, f
. i: '' ,i .i, ... : : . ... , I ., , ';. "' :. : :
' . - :-...( . " i f ' - '..
' faj r""T" '
' . j, - I
Biei-ookmei j Reiined TKe ;
Coach that Challenges Comparis.Qnr
DUCO SATIN FINISH and ''Body by
Fasher,. New patented one-piece ventilating
. windshield. Velour upholstery and extra
deep cushions. Cowl lights arid automatic
windshield cleaner. Extra wide doors and
unequalled leg room. ' Delco! ignition and
Hairison radiator. Wonderful "Six" engine
and a chassis of proved stamina.
' !' . i ,-. 7 '-'':": ; -. .' "i " '.":'' 'I ' ' ' ".
! Call for Your Demonstration ToDay
pioneers of 1845 ' -land ,1849 re
spectively. The Sllverton country
hag been made to include the
Waldo Hills and some portions of
Howells ' Prairie, . and the region
extending northward and east
ward to Butte Creek, including
the present cities of Silverton,
Mount- Angel, Scotts Mills and
Monitor, a country of which Sil
verton, in pioneer times, was the
center. ' " i (
I The -scope and i unity of the
wbrk may be disclosed by a glance
at the chapter titles which are as
follows: ' - 1- ?
i CHAPTER I
The Sllverton Country in-1842
:'A Description of the Country
! Before the Coming of the White
! ManGeography and Native
Races. !. ',
, CHAPTER II j
Daniel - Waldo The First Settler
; A Unique Figure His Influ-
ence.
CHAPTER III !
Reuben Lewis and Allen Jones
Davie Ancestry A Tradition
Exploded. . v,;.
CHAPTER IV
Settlement of the Silverton Coun-
t v From 1844-1848 The Sto-
fy of Settlement Year by Year,
tWith Some Incidents of the
1 Long- Journey Across the Plains
I -Biographical Notes on the
' Families Securing Donation
J Claims. . . " . -I ' ; j--.:
I CHAPTER V ;
The Battle of the! Abiqua 1848
J A New Version of a Much
I Controverted Event. Written
' From Hitherto Unused Source
Materials. ' j . I
- CHAPTER VI
i- , . r- t
Settlement of the Silverton Coun
try From 1849-1852 The Sto
ory of Settlement Xear
Year, With Some Incidents of
; the Long Journey Across the
Plains Biographical Notes on
I the Families Securing Donation
The Boy Will Be In
LLOYD E. RAMSDEN
4 387 COURT ST.
F. W. Pettyjohn Go.
219 NORTH COMMERCIAL STREET
Claims11 HUH UU. ;
CHAPTER VII
Gold, 1849 and After An Ac
count of the Great Stampede to
California The Sllverton Ar
gonauts. -.
CHAPTER VIII
The Donation Land Laws How
the Settlers Acquired Title to
Land Extinguishment of the
Indian Title.
CHAPTER DC
The Allen Church 1850.
CHAPTER X
The Bethany Christian Church
1851.
CHAPTER XI
Antebellum Politics Know Noth-lngs-
Formation of the Repub
lican Party. .
CHAPTER XII
The Civil-War Knights of the
Golden Circle Union League.
; CHAPTER XIII
Pioneer Life in the Sllverton
Country.
CHAPTER XrV
Military Affairs The Indian and
National Wars.
CHAPTER XV
Education Early Schools.
CHAPTER XVI
Education Higher - Education
Growth of Secondary Schools.
CHAPTER XVII
Economic Development
CHAPTER XVIII
Social ' Progress Churches 1
Newspapers Rural Life Fra
ternal. "A History of the Sllverton
Country" will be off the press
early in the new year, and as only
a limited number will be printed,
it (Is advisable that you send in
your order early. 1
There are descendants of tha
pioneers and others unknown to
the author who will be desirous of
obtaining this history. Render
them a" service by sending In their
names and addresses. They will
appreciate It.
Time For School
if he rides one of our spe
:ial built youth's bicycles.
And think of the joy he'll
feel when he becomes the
proud possessor of the
best bicycle built. We
have an extensive line off
all make wheels at special
prices. We want you to
see them.
Lamps Mud Guards
Tires Repairing
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