The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, March 16, 1924, Page 15, Image 15

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if Part Three
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Pages 1 to 6
J-M 1
SEVENTY-THIRD YEAR
SALEM, OREGON, SUNDAY MORNING, MARCH 16, 1924
SECTION THREE
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SETS 4 RECORDS
Studebaker Encircles Union
of South Africa in Less
. Than Hundred Hours
JOHANNESBURG, MarClj 1C
Old-timers of the Boer trek -wagon
trails thronged around a - mud
daubed automobile, when .it drew
up at the curb on a main thorough
fare in Johannesburg today.
' The , machine, ' a Studebaker
Light-Six louring car, naa just
written a new page in the colorful
history of the Union of South Af
rica. Without a pause in the mo
tor'! steady throb, it bad set four
records in retrayeling the old set
tler routes, completely circling Ihe
Union, In less than 100 hours a
perilous trip that once took weeks
for the bullock carts.
Made Three Other Record
Not only did the Studebaker es
tablish a new round-trip record
around the Union, but it also shat
tered three other records between
points along the course. Notable
among these was the new running
time of 35 hours and 57 minutes
between this city and Cape Town.
This was a distance of 998 miles.
A standard stock model was dri
ven out t Johannesburg by H. F.
Payne, Fred Scantlebury, L. O.
Bright and W.; B. du Preess. They
drove over mountainous roads
thick with mud to Cape Town, then
through Port Elizabeth, East ton
Ion, Kokstad, Durban and return.
The car made a 2637 mile circle.!
- Running- time from . the start
here and return was 99 hours; 46
minutes.) Gasoltne consumption
averaged 21.5 miles per Imperial
gallon. The gasoline mileage was
unusually high, motorists agreed j
todays considering that an average
speed of 26.75 miles an hour was
maintained along roads broken by
frequent streams, which compelled
fording.
Numerous washouts, due to
heavy rains, forced the car to tra
vel along long stretches of hilly,
slippery roadway, subjecting the
Studebaker and its drivers to se
vere lests. For this reason the
trip proved one of the most sensa
tional ever staged in South Africa."
Lost in Diamond Diggings
The maze of roads running
around hundreds of diamond dig
gings, near Kimberley, brought
eontusion to the record-breakers.
The running time suffered serious
disadvantage through time lost in
opening and closing cattle gates.
Metropolitan motorists may be sur
prised to know that actually 309
gates barred the Studebaker's
path.
'., Returning to Johannesbury, the
Light-Six was examined by several
hundred motor car owners. The
engine was still running smoothly.
The body was uninjured al
though it was thickly coated with
mud, from axles to top. Then a
careful examination of the chassis
showed that the car had gone
through the gruelling strain with
out the slightest breakdown.
Mastered the Mountains
"We knew the Studebaker
would go through with it," declar
ed B. Penney, Johannesburg motor
dealer. "We hoped for a record.
But, honestly, we did not expect
the four records that the car made.
"We felt it could cover the dis
tance according to the express
schedule we had mapped out, and
it accomplished what no other car
has done. We proved that it is
master of muddy mountain roads
as well as crowded city trafic."
But the olden-day bullock driv
ers, grizzled veterans of once toil
some trails over which the motor
car flew, still shake their heads
and talk of the change an automo
bile from South Bend, Indiana, has
wrought in the story of South Africa.
(armored ford cars used by
POLICE AS BANDIT CATCHERS
acceleration and power developed
for hill climbing, a mile was cov
ered in one minute and 31 seconds
from a standing start. On a coun
try road the car attained a speed
of more than CO miles an hour and
In a city street test covered 2828
feet at a speed of approximately
70 miles an hour.
Ford cars have been in use by
police departments all over the
country for years and recently
there has been a rapidly increasing
tendency in the larger cities to nse
j them in place of motorcycles since
they are less conspicious. and af
ford greater protection and com
fort. Portland, Ore., is one of the
latest cities to adopt the Ford cars
to replace motorcycles and now
has 23 of them in operation.
Cleveland Heights, O., and Cincin
nati are other cities which have
recently joined the Ford ranks, the
armored Ford as used in Philadel
phia, however, is General Butler's
idea.
One of the armored Ford Cars used as bandit
chasers by the Philadelphia Police Department
and (inset) Gen. Smedley D. Butler, Commissioner
of Public Safety.y j
'Armored Ford cars as bandit
chasers are the latest innovation.
Gen. Smedley D. Butler, Phila
delphia's dynamic commissioner of
public safety, is the man who in
troduced them.
Before he took office a few
weeks back, the Philadelphia city
council voted General Butler $5000
with which to purchase an auto
mobile for his personal use.
Biit when salesmen for high-priced
cars appeared and tried to in
terest him, be made it plain that
he intended to spend the money in
purchasing small, light cars for
use as bandit chasers by the police
department.
The Ford runabout was his
choice and it wasn't long before
an enterprising Ford salesman had
a car ready for the general's inspection.
Now the Philadelphia police
have six of these armored Ford
cars and under General Butler's
plan this number will shortly be
augmented until there will be 90
such bandit cars in service.
' The entire shell of the body is
lined with -inch special steel and
the space between the armor plat
ins and the outside of the car is
packed with loose cotton and
coarse hair to retard the velocity
of bullets. Armor plate also cov
ers the cowl and runs up as high
as the lower portion of the wind
shield. The upper portion is in
two sections of bullet proof glass
and wind-wings have been provid
ed on either-side, tbese-also of bul
let proof glass.
The Ford engines are specially
equiped to afford increased speed
and tests made show some inter
esting results. In one test to show
INJUNCTION GRAXTTD
An injunction in favor of the
Willard Storage Battery company,
Cleveland, O., granted by Judge
Charles M. Foell of the Cook coun
ty, 111., Superior Court sets a pre
cedent in the use of any signs ap
proximating the appearance of the
Willard trade mark, or any other
widely known symbol of Willard
sales and service, that may have
a wide effect upon the automotive
industry as a whole.
The court decision, in it's broad
cast application, would restrain
sales and service stations, not au
thorized by specific contracts, from
any display of a company's name
or trade mark in such a way as to
lead the public to believe the sta
tion was the authorized agent of
the company whose name is so displayed.
MtTLTXOMAH SALES DROP
Multnomah county sold 6 1 S
fewer cars during the month of
January this year than in January
last year. The total for January
in that county last year was 1294
against 676 this year.
MM DUE
ISS1IH
Dodge Brothers Four-Passenger
Coupe Is Meet-
With Approval
ing
To meet a distinct need for a
a car of convenient size that would
comfortably seat four people
Dodge Brothers designed and pro?
duced their new four-passenger
coupe, which is now being shown
here by the Bonesteele Motor com
pany. The body of the coupe, which is
of composite construction, is one
of the finest examples of coach
builders' art. The seating arrange
ment is staggered, with a seat of
folding design at the side of the
driver. One feature is found in
the fact that the driver sits dir
ectly behind the steering wheel;
not at an angle. Four passengers
can be seated with the utmost com
fort. Also, the doors are extra
wide, allowing ease of movement
in getting in and out.
The body, which Is painted a
deep blue with a yellow trim
stripe. Is upholstered In genuine
mohair velvet. Mohair velvet has
long been recognized as a material
which for beauty and durability
stands premier. It cleans easily
and its richness is at once appar
ent to all who see It.
Disc wheels are standard equip
ment on the new coupe, as are win
dow regulators, a dome light and
hardware of Dodge Brothers own
design. For those who demand
more .complete equipment Dodge
Brothers set aside a certain num
ber of these coupes to be speciallv
equipped. The special equipment
Includes a nickel radiator shell,
cowl lights, nickeled front and
rear bumpers, special striping on
the louvers of the hood, motome-
ter and lock, automatic windshield
wiper, balloon . tires, etc.
The four-passenger conpe Is
attractive in appearance and con
forms in every . detail to modern
design'. Dodge Brothers chassis
lends Itself admirably to this typ
of car. which is an attractive addi
tion to the types which the com
pany has been producing for some
time.
Bf AfclOJf COUNT! AHEAD
There were 88 more automobiles
sold in Marion county during the
month of January this year than
during the same month of last
year. The total sales for all makes
of cars in the county for January
this year were 179' against 111:
last year.
Statesman Ads par for they are
read in the home by Home People.
It is truly a Home Newspaper.
Guaranteed To Cost Less : Pet Mile
le
o win L AV1 V Tlf"AO
"Jim" .'wiHrHifjjr ; :. "Biff
Smith & mtkins
Use Our Fliwerv
Corner Court and High. .
Phone 44.
Jbr Economical Transportation
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January Sales in Oregon
More Chevrolet cars were sold in Oregon during the month of January
than any other fully equipped automobile.
Chevrolet sales greater than combined ' sales of competitive cars in state.
Fully Equiped
Delivered in Salem A Few Reasons Why Chevrolet Sells
Roadster $625
Coupe $830
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Truck Chassis $675
All Prices
F. OJ B. Salem
Terms if Desired
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Delivery Chassis $515
I l . Tin VXJ7 H
1 . World's Lowest Priced Quality Automobile.
2. Fastest Selling Quality Automobile Made.
3. Lowest Average Cost Per Mile.
4. Highest Proportionate Resale Value.
5. Most Economical for Transportation.
6. More Essential THany Anything Else but a Home.
SEE CHEVROLET FIRST
.M,ewtoi
Sedan $990
227-231 High Street
- Chevrolet
"TRAI L'EM TO SALEM"
Co.
Telephone 1000
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