The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, July 15, 1923, Page 7, Image 7

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    SECOND 'SECTION
Ados, Society, Clubs, Gezzrd IVrrj A
end ClosxUisd
MCE? I TO 8
SEVENTY.T11IRD YEAR j ' " SALEM, OREGON, SUNDAY MORNING, JULY 15 1923 a ; PRICE; FIVE CENTS
1 1- - - -. ... , . . .. ...... ..... .. ....... . . . .... . - . - .-. . , ., ,. .:. . .. 1 !
AUT
omobi:
TRUCKS AND
RACTORS
ACCESSORIES I : ' V I
BICYCLES
LES,
1
MOTORCYCLES
ir-
Wlerb Alilea Per Car"
vac vamarcr's
r Hi::
W r It
M
TO
IE
lLPORTANT POINT IX COX
- SECTION WITH TIRKS '
On account of bad and poorly
marked roads, lack of touring In
formation etc.. 10 miles per day
was considered a Jatr daily sche
dule over a Ions tour 20 years
ago. " ;'
About 17 years ago It was my
pleasure to participate in a Re
liability Contest, staged by 'a
manufacturer of high priced cats
which amounted to 100 miles per
day fori 100 consecutive days. This
to the experienced men was npt
so much of allays run, but since
thel 0,000 miles were, to- be made
without mechanical trouble, this
j average was sufficiently strenuous
i for cars of that vintage. .How
ever, contrast this with some of day on which the Chansellor and
. ' . . .
,r ct.c , !
u Tha Car . f-
'. .., r' V" -I I f y
7 A 1 ssi al ssssssl amsTi -
.1 t'f. - ft,;-!' :m
III". , - . . .
i j- j jio Salem ir
I V ; I fTnitnf-kiTnn 1
f! WI
i i ; , ,: ' f
J ' - ' -- - v
my more recent contributions to
wards my million touring miles
mark. Tent years later with a
car costing Jess than one fifth as
much I turned an even 10,000
miles in one month of touring
over California's wonderful roads,
which included a race against the
"Lark" the fastest train between
Los Angeles ' and San Francisco
for eight consecutiTe nights, beat?
lng the train seven out of eight,
which "amounted to approximate
ly 450 miles a night.
The 10,000 miles also included
a world's record, at that time, for
one days touring with four passen
gers, approximately 750 miles.
Loa Angeles to San Liego over the
Shore Route, returning the inland
route was the first lap of the big
OKLAHOMA'S NEW POET LAUREATE.
it
ST- i i-.f..:'
4 X
jay ? ;l .. . .. j
"1
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: ;;: ;
3ave Road Shocks
HEAVY re inflation passes
the road shocks back on the
car causing too much upkeep ex
pense and rapid depredation.
C-T-C Cords are more powerfully
hand-bttili of better materials to
safety carry- 30 less inflation
than so long insisted upon for
ordinary cord tires. '
That is why the beautiful custom
built appearing C-T-C Cords will
give yon extra long-distance mile
age at far lower cost. " '
Colnaibia , Tlra Corp, Ta dory Branch, Carl E.
HBttutaq, Snnca K(t , 477 Court St., Smith
a Watktna, Federal Tir Serrica Vick Bros. Ira
forgensou Other Dealers throngaont Country.
Columbia Tire Corporation
Portland, Oregon.
Violet McDougal, the newly appointed poet laureate of Okla
homa. Her yew is known to magazine and newspaper readers
all over the country.'' Sh is 24 years old and has' had verses
E tinted every year sines sha was 16. Her poetry is not wild, and
icks the raw and rugged style Easterners would expect from her
State. ' Miss' McDougal if in New York on her first visit. Her
horns is. in Sapulpa f ... T . .
L
Lyon's trop'ay was F:on by one
minute.. The second lap was to
Bakersfield t and return over j the
famous Ridge Road, then Santa
Barbara and back, eiapsed time
23 hours and some odd minutes.
The above ; tours are ' merely
mentioned for comparative ' pur
poses; 10,000 miles in 100 days
without trouble was food perfor
mance 16 years ago. considering
the standards of mechanical ex
cellence, design, goodness .of tires,
roads, etc., for a car! costing up
wards of $3200. .v Yet, I. found it
less nerVe strain, physical effort
and cost to turn 10,000 miles in
a month 10 years later with, a
popular priced car for the follow
ing reasons:
The tires available for use in
the early days were about one
hair as good and reliable as the
present day ' cords. ; ' Clincher
tires without demountable rims
meant long road-side delays to
change tubes and a lot of phy
sical effort to pump the tire up.
Also cars were undertired( tires
not large enough.) , It required
about three sets of tires on the
10,000 miles, in 100 days, and
many weary hours along the
road to change them. While
on the 10,000 miles in one
month, with Cord tires, I never
''JonMnued on pare 5) t
ouDimra
ECONOMY KIL'E
Remarkable Economy" I s
Shown in Recent Trials'
of Stock Model Cars .
Gbupe-edon--
LLYS
No jTricfc Seats
The new Willys-Knight Coupe-Sedan has no folding seats to climb over
or squeeze between, Instead, it has foofS both fiord and rear, offering easy
entrance and exit to all five passengers. This superb creation combines
engineering excellence with complete, luxurious dosed car' appointments at
a modest priceT 'We "know of no Willys-Knight engine'that has worn out.
VICK BROTHERS
HIGH ST. AT TRADE
On the Pacific coast the Oak
land motor car has been termed
hy the newspapers "Economy
King."
This title has' been acquired by
twice in succession winning the
contest from Los Angeles to Camp
Curry' Economy Run over every
type of mountain and valley road
way. Both in 1922 and 1923 the Oak
land car not only won the prize
cup for its class but also the
sweepstakes cup. This last year
it practically walked away from
the other ,car9, setting up three
new records for this event which
officals believe will not be broken
for years 36.92 miles per gallon
of gas6Une, 65.05 ton miles per
gallon In Jthe p weeps tafltes ajad
65.17 ton miles in its class.
in explaining the reasons for
the economy of the Oakland ear
in the'icontests and in general use.
Benjamin Jerome, chief engineer,
declares that proper design and
careful workmanship are the bas
is of the remarkable records made
by this car. j
4 "The car is a Light Six which
means small cylinder displacement
and consequent economy of fuel,"
he states. "It has a specially
built carburetor and manifold
which gets the most out of the
gasoline. ; .,' x
"Just push the car on the show
room floor or on the street and
you will note that it rolls easy.
This tree rolling Indicates that
all the parts are finely co-ordinated,
that the hearings are proper
ly designed and fitted and that the
brakes do not drag. ?
''The stock car that the pilot
drove in the Los Angeles-Camp
Curry run could be pulled by a
string around the radiator ; cap.
But the biggest feature that
makes for economy is proper de
sign and most careful manufactur
ing methods and unless the lat
ter Is watched carefully all the de
signing ih the world could not
produce a truly economical tcar."
: .-
BRAZIL'S FUEL IMPORT
RIO DE JANEIRO, July 14.;
Although the greater part of Bra
zil lies within The tropics, one of
the greatest problems involved in
the country's economic expansion
is that of fuel supply. In 1922,
according to official figures pub
lished here,' Brazil spent approx
imately $27,000,000 on Importei
fuels. . f p'
The principal difficulty in ' the
way of developing known sources
of fuel in Brazil at present Is the
lack -of transportation facilities.
Coal mined in Brazil now costs
more on this market than that
Imported ' from England - or the
United States. '
CHEVROLET SALES
GRH
0
New, Agency Shows Splendid
Results During First
' Sales Period i
Among the new automobile con
cerns oerating in Salem, Is
N'ewton-Chevrolet agency ,
tnan six weeks " old,, with
room and supply stock at
High St.
G. L. Newton
manager.
the
less
salea
227
and
sold,
icus-
ma-rec-
formerly of Spokane, Washington,
is an enthusiastic boosters of "Sa
lem, and Incidentally the Chevro
let vcar. He states that the jfirst
month's business carried a record
of 47 sales, and that a car short
ge prevented that record from
going up to 75 deliveries. j
The Chevrolet is steadily gain
ing in popularity, as the sales
chart from, different parts of the
country show, and this year is ex
pected to establish new figures in
factory output and field sales. ,
The hew - model machine 13
meeting with increased demand.
ana wnerever a new car is
it automatically brings in
tomera for another car. Few
chines having this remarkable
ord, but the Chevrolet seems to
be just what car owners want who
are In the market for a medium
priced car, that will deliver, high
priced car service together with
the beauty and quality of higher
priced ; makes. . .Tourist park reg
istrations show that this year tho
number of Chevrolets that are be
ing used by tourists out number
by far that of any past year, and
the tourist season actually has nc
reached its "peak" from the view
point 'of numbers of cars enroute,
but using the present figures as
a base it is reasonable to calcu
late that when the height of the
touring season is on, there will be
more than .twice as many Chevro
lts carrying tourists this year than
ever before. This is a big boost
for Chevrolet, as the needs of the
tourist are such that not all jcars
by any consideration will meet
the requirments of the ."gasoline
gypsle." j
Mr. Newton has on display -in
the sales room at present most
of all the various styles of the lat
est model Chevrolet. -
stated, "there is no let-up in
sales. j
. "Florida dealers particularly
are enjoying a truly remarkabli
closed car business. At no point
did I find any accumulation ot
used cars in the hands of our deal
ers. v '. ' ,
"I gained two very definite im
pressions during my trip.
"One Is the solid mass of faith,
loyalty and confidence In the new
Maxwell-Chalmers manufacturing
and sales organizations as well as
a keen appreciation of the earning
power of our franchise.
""The other impression is that
the Maxwell Flat Rate Guaranteed
Service plan has been as eagerly
and as readily accepted by the
Email dealer as by the large one.
This' occasions no surprises be
cause the system "W laid out in
Ruch a . simple ami thoroughly
workable manner as to immedi
ately ef feet shop economics," pro
duce legitimate profits'- and direct
ly increase new car sales."
MAXWELL MOTORS
HAS PROSPERITY
Director of Service Visits
South and Finds Interest
ing Conditions There!
A. T. Stanton. Director of Ser
vice, Maxwell Motor Corporation
and Chalmers Motor Car company.
recently returned from an extend
ed trip in the south, reports a
HvaIt hnninefta bv Maxwell and
Chalmers dealers vlsltedj
"Notwithstanding apprehension
as .to the cotton crop in Georgia
and South Carolina." Mr. Stanton
Yoii want ft painting job
that will not fade that will
withstand the effects of the ele
mentsthat will stand up long
est to washing. " Better have
US then paint your car. WE
don't skimp on number; of
coats, quality of paints and
varnishes or in skilled work
manship. : 1 j
Close estimates. i
RELIANCE AUTO
PAINTING A0MPANY
PHONE 637 !
- 810 State Corner Front
Wood Alcohol Has Victims
; Where Bootlegging Is Not
BERLIN, July 1. Wood alco
hol has ' claimed the lives of at
least 18 German drinkers within
the past few months, although
neither prohibition . nor bootlegg
ing prevail here.' Thl9 type of
spirits is used widely .in industry
and science, and the victims have
been laborers. who believed they
were getting cheap drinks by con
suming small quantities of the
liquid that remained in tank-cars
after unloading. " "
At Hamburg some time ago a
large number of harbor truckers
became seriously ill from drinking
wood alcohol and 10 of them died.
A few days ago five more victims
were reported from Prussian Si
lesia, and three from Berlin
Grunewald. Repeated warnings have 'been
issued by employers and author
ities against the- deadly and
blinding effects of the chemical
as a drink.
.Better see.if dad "won't get you a bike right
now so you can be with the gang when they go
fishing or swimming.
I Heaps of 'Fun and Gee, But They're Cheap
LLOYD E. RAMSDEN
387 Court St. 7
BE SAFE
RELINE YOUR
BRAKES
. ' ' ' - , ' ' : ' ;
' We have just secured a new brake- lin
ing machine with which' brakes can be re
lined without removing them from the car.
Let our expert mechanics reiine your brakes
and insure yourself the - greatest possible
safety at the least possible cost. .
Five mechanics of over eight years' ex
perience. .'
Marion Automobile Go.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
Phone 362. 235 S. Commercial
1922 Maxwell Has the Greatest Resale Value
NATIONAL USElDGR
Published by
CHICAGO AUTOMOBILE TRADE ASSOCIATION
'i i . Chicago, I1L -
Thirty-Sixth Edition :i .
Present , . -' Average
Pacific Make or Rli$i
Coast vfT.r-,--Tiafi:
Prices V . J Pacific Coast . ,
K $1050.00 MAXWELL . $590.00
$1225.60 :EBi:::M...imM:-y
$1190.00 Studebakcr (light six).... $650.00
$1075.00 Buick (4). . $620.00
$1065.00 Dodge $620.00 5.
$1065.00 Durant 4)..... $600.00
$1210.00 Gardner. $600.00
$1215.00 Oakland (6) $483.00
NOTE The lowest priced car in its class has the highest resale value.
There must be a reason. The MAXWELL does and always will offer
the public the greatest value for their money. v ,
The above statement is taken from the famous BLUE BOOK (zone No.
12) publication of the Chicago Automobile Association based upon actual
figures furnished by automobile dealers of the Pacific Coast, who hf.ve
submitted to this association actual prices received for these cars during
the past six months. v- f.
' , . . - c ' - . ' '
Any dealer in automobiles will show you f these figures on application
OSCAR B. GINGRICH MOTOR CO.
371 Court Street -
SALEM. OREGON
SUBSCRIBED AND SWORN, TO BEFORE ME THIS 14TH DAY OP JUNE. 1923.
(Signed) MARK POULSEN, I
- v City Recorder, Salem, Ore.
I have personally examined the records of the Chicago Automobile Trade As
sociation and have found the above statement to be correct.
. ' (Signed) MARK POULSEN ;
1 City Recorder, Salem, Ore.
Original on fije at Oscar B. Gingrich Motor fc Tire Co. ,
1-!
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