The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, March 31, 1923, Page 34, Image 34

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THE OREGON STATESMAN; "SALEM." OREGON
GREATER SALEM, DISTRICT NUMBER, MARCH 1923
Co-operative Method of Selling Pots Greater Salem District's Fancy Fruits into Markets of Far-off Lands Wideness
of Distribution Held Justification of . System Eastern United States and European Countries Furnish Ready Demand
J. M. NEWHOUSB
Assistant General Manager Ore
gon Growers Co-operative
Association '
i -Few people realize the tremend
ous distribution already secured
by Oregon's sole, statewide, grow-
er owned and grower controlled
. association. ;Far and " wide the
fame 'of Oregon's fruit 3 under the
splendid trade name of "Mistland"
is becoming established. The state
of California .may have' a good
start, but the Oregon Growers
Co-operative association, having
overcome the last three years of
adversity, is. now -making itself
felt, , j f;:
The distribution of the "dried
Italian prune for 1922, will long
stand as a great tribute to the. ef
fectiveness of this organization.
The following markets, were sup
plied 'with, large quantities of this
fruit direct from the association's
nine large packing plants: I
Los Angeles,' California
Sari Francisco, California
Fresnrf, California
m Boston, Mass.
: Baltimore, Maryland v
Detroit Michigan
New Albany, Indiana
Louisville, Kentucky
, Owens,boro,s; Kentucky .
. ,Kew; York: City, N. Y.
i . Omaha, Nebraska
. Philadelphia, Pa.
Pittsburgh. Pa. -;
Charlerol,- Pa.
New Orleans, La.
- . Shreveport, La. '
.Alexandria, La. ,: . h
St.-Paul, Minn. '"; .
; StV Louis, Me.
'. St. Joseph, Mo.
Kansas City. Mo. -
' , Trenton, Mo.
Carrollton. Mo.
EM DISTRICT NEEDS BEES
Thousands of Openings Here for Men Who Understand Beekeeping and Those Who
Desire to Learn -Such Folk Can Do Big Service to Fellowmen Here in. Salem District
There are excellent openings in
the Salem; district: for beekeepers
; . who . thoroughly understand, their
business, or for Intelligent, hard
: working 'and ambitions men who
; will master the business
, Here are : the reasons :
rAH np-to-date fruit growers
save come to realize the absolute
necessity of .honey, bees. In order
; to insure . the pollination, of their
- fruit- blossoms -.- -...y.: i
. So there must be . literally, bil
lions more bees kfpt here in the
widening orchard districts
The "Tlrgin danghters of toil.'
. the worker bees, are the original
"workinr 'fool8,.the Uterallv
i work . themselves to death in . six
weeks daring the honey season-
And a good queen bee will lay
i Croza 2000 to 3000 eggs a day
So that In each hive a .working
.".fool Is born every minute and
: ' then some. C - ;
And a good hive of bees will at
the height of the season contain
. 30,000 to 60.000, and event 100,-
000 -bees f 'y -..-rr-'- 1
So that, though there, may; be
- torrential rains all through the
fruit blossoming season here, with
, only an occasional breaking of
sunsmne tnrougn the weepy
clouds, during those few hours of
sunshine-' the bees win carry the
pollen and make- the x blossoms
fruitful : 1 r:-:-.-:-V
For the bees work and literally
"improve each shining . hour."
They have the urge of their an
cestors back through the ages for
work; that is the life of the honey
bee. and that is her death. ,
Slight Subsidize Beekeepers
It would pay the fruit growers
of the Salem district to subsidise
the, beekeepers, with a money
subsidy. .
But they do not have to.
Here Is a better. way:
They can raise more white, al
sike and sweet clover, and scat
ter more Scotch broom, and in
other ways provide more late bee
pasture'. . .w.,: v. -r.
And encourage more beekeep
ing; get better bees. and. see that
bee diseases are stamped out
. And In that way. the orchard
men will subsidize themselves;
they will Improve the fertility of
their soil, and they will get three
crops for one the ; clover,' the
honey, and the fruit
And they will make sure the
fruit.
A Coming Bee' Paradise ,
' There is no-section in the world
that has a b tter honey flow than
the Salem district - In the late
spring and early summer; Ex
tend this," by providing proper bee
pasture, throughout all the sun
shiny days of late, summer, and
fail. and. this . will a Teritable
land flowing with milk and honey
and money. . The "honey; ' crop
will be a money crop- an essen
tial story of three, four or five
nd sljf story agrlcuUnre i -.Y
' ' Hence' the Opening ' - '
-The. ahovj etatement, ' oC facts,
?rVtr Ccoveriif an J conclu
;w prunes"' smm
Marysville, Mo. . .
Birmingham, Alabama
Chicago, 111.. -. ;
Cincinnati, Ohio -
Cleveland, Ohio
1 Portlands Oregon ;
El Paso, "Texas- '
Buffalo, N.iY.
; Oklahoma City, Okla.
Clinton, Okla. i .
Cushings. Okla.
Er Reno. Texas
Altris, Okla.
Norman. Okla. - ....
Shawnee,, Okla.
Little Rock, Ark.
Helena, Ark.
Marianna, Ark.
Wichita, Kans. ,
Memphis Tenn.
Dyersburg," ITenn.
Jackson, Tenn.
Humboldt, Tenn.
Seattle. Wash. . "5
Bellingham,' Wash.
Everett, Wash.
Spokane, Wash.
V
Tacoma, Wash. .
Yakima, Wash. .
' Wenatchee,i Wash.
Wallace, Idaho
Pipestone, Minn.
Detroit. Mich. '
Lawrence, Kansas.
Des Moines, Iowa
Baton Rouge, La;
Norfolk Va.
Salem, Oregon "
.'Marshall, Texas
Houston, Texas
San Antonio, Texas
Vancouver, B. C.
Montreal, Quebec
Shcrbrook Quebec;
' Quebec City, Quebec
Winnipeg. Man
Toronto. Ontario T
Saskatoon, Saak.
Calgary, Alberta
Medicine Hat, Alta.
dons of science and of all up-to-
date fruit growers will explain and
give force to v the invitation that
is extended In the first paragraph
of this article. ,
The thoroughly posted beekeep
er, or the intelligent and industri
ous . man looking . for. a profitable
opening, and willing to learn, will
find a welcome here. He win be
received with open arms.'
- He will find customers for his
surplus J bees, and ; he will find
everyone willing and. anxious to
help him, in' aiding in providing
late bee pasture for his bees. This
latter is", the outstanding requisite
tor 'making this a . great bee dis
trict. The. early honey flow Is al
ready her in the billions, upon
billions of blooms on and
bnsh ; fruit, trees and on forest
trees and. flowers." The growing
of the white and sweet and al-
sike clovers and other crops and
the spreading of bloom bearing
bushes and trees and other
growths for the late bee pasture
Is only a matter of education;' of
constant propaganda that would
cost nothing, by men who-would
from intelligent self interest
work along these lines.
s From the College
("Beekeeping for the Oregon
Farmer" is the title of Extension
Bulletin 282 : of the . Oregon Agri
cultural college extension service.
It is by A. L. Lovett, professor of
entomology, and it is dated No
vember, 1919. Following are a
few brief . exeerpts: ) " : '
"NO FARMER SHOULD BE
WITHOUT. A FEW STANDS OF
BEES: for with proper care and
manipulation, enough honey for
home consumption can be secured
'i om one or j two colnies.
A. fruit grower can secure a
DOUBLE PROFIT from his bees
in the "' honey and wax obtained
and In the added value gievn his
fruit .through cross-pollination.
The pollination of fruit trees Is an
important consideration in the
west; it has many times been
shown that Insects furnish the
most Important means of distrib
uting pollen I to' selt-sterlle plants,
and- that of these the honey, bee
is probably the most" important
Though it ia probably the excep
tional season when honey bees are
of much service in pollinizing red
clover, many, other field crops are
benefited. As the acreage of al-
sike clover increases there will be
a real field tor the bees, both for
pollination and for the collection
of- fair excess of) excellent, honey.
Honey Is a product wh'ch occurs
In nature in the! shape of nectar
in the flowers of plants, and Is
made available for , our use only
through the aid of bees. Wax, a
secondary, consideration, is a pro
duct of the bees themselves and
is produced ! from glands within
the body, of ;the worker bee.
"Until a few years ago commer
cial; beekeeping was considered
generally unprofitable in the Wil
lamette valley and coast districts
because of excessive spring rains.
A few men here and ; there were
succeeding.- but many were hard,
ly holding th if own9' '
, Edmonton. Alta.
Weyboirn, Sask.
Regina, Sask. "
Swift Current, Sask.
Moose Jaw, Sask. :
Liverpool. England
Bristol. England
Manchester, England
London, England
Glasgow, Scotland
Amsterdam. Holland
Bordeaux, France
' Havre, France
Hamburg, Germany
Antwerp.' Belgium
. Rotterdam, Holland
Copenhagen, Denmark
Christian ia, Norway
V
Gothenburg, Sweden. :
Although still in its infancy as
far. as its canned goods output ia
concerned, the : following; are
among the districts reached:
London .
New York j ;
Baltimore ,
Jersey. City
Hull , -. '
Liverpool
Los Angeles . .
San Francisco
Philadelphia, .-.!.-
Cleveland " :
Des Moines
Chicago. '
Denver
Kansas City
St. Louis
,
Avonmouth
Although apples In .western Or
egon, for. shipping have never, as
sumed large proportions, the fol
lowing distributing points were
reached by the association:
Cheyenne, Wyoming. J
Chicago. 111. y
Cincinnati, Ohio
Detroit. Mich.
Exported ? " ' ?
Gastonia, N. C. :
"Due principally to tnewl honey
plant3, out partly to Improved
methods In handling the bees, this
condition is rapidly changing and.
particularly in the Willamette -vat-
ley, the average yields, considered
for a period of years, will exceed
those of ANY REGION EXCEPT
SOUTHERN OREGON. Im
proved methods of : handling will
Improve the conditions In the
coast region as well. Honey
plants are plentiful, ' Including
maple. Vetch," fireweed," French
pink, alsike clover and-white clo
ver The development of special
manipulations to : get the bees in
condition ; tot; harvest the maxim
um yields from the numerous nec
tar flowers will transform theee
questionable districts into 'profit
able apiary sections. .
Hontey As Food '-;
Honey: is a; most delicious,
wholesome and nutritious , food.
It should cease to be regarded' as
a delicacy, and, become a staple
article of diet. It is more readily
assimilated than sugar and -can be
substituted, for, sugar in cookery
and on the table. ' Excellent re
cipes for its use may be obtained
by writing to the Oregon Agricul
tural -college, or, sending to the
United States department of Ag
riculture for Farmers ' Bulletin
53." . - , .. ;- t i
Made m Lot of Money ' M
Some of the men" acquainted
with the methods of commercial
beekeeping In the alfalfa districts
hare operated here in the Willam
ette valley, and have made a lot
of money, big clean-ups with not
very large Investments. ' t
Some beekeepers down in the
St. Paul, Marlon county, district
have been making money in the
industry for years." J. W. Beck-
ley, 166 North 21st street, Salem,
has made a success with bees at
five different points around Sal-J
eui. vr. a. miner, tv Marion
a r . . . mil..' . r . i i
street, Salem, is. a successful, bee
keeper, in, connection with his or
chard Interests. R. W. Hogg b.
Sons, Route 2. Box. 172. ; Salem,
who have a fruit farm and are
breeders of Poland China swine.
Registered Angora goats and
White Rock chickens, a couple of
miles above Salem, on the Polk
county Bide of the Willamette ri
ver, are Successful beekeepers of
long standing; ana tney market
their,honey under their own label.
The list might be extended very
materially showing numbers of
successful beekeepers here now.
But the idea the writer hopes to
put over is that there, is room for
a great ' many more beekeepers
here; -- room and a welcome and
opportunities for great profits in
a line that can acarcehr.fae over
done " here, and in' a branch 'of
work on the land that Is one of
the most Interesting of - all. And,
above all other considerations, an
opportunity to be helpful, to their
fellow men; for that It what, we
are here for. That la the only
good reason for existence by any
man or woman In this country, or
any. other country, . '
&FJS&
Houston, Texas,
Indianapolis. Ind.
Washington, D. C.
Jamestown. N. Dak.
Lo3 Angeles, Cai.,
Memphis, Tenn.
Milwaukee, Wis.
New York City
Norfolk, Virginia
San Anton'o, Texas.
San Francisco,-Cat.
Oregon pears marked as coming
from Oregon, were shipped to the
luiiowing mam points:
New York
. Chicago 4
Washington. D.JC.
Detroit, Mich; f :
j Baltimore, Md. 1
Birmingham, Ala. , '
Los Angeles 1 ' - 1
. San Franeisco
j Tulsa, Oklahoma
Bichmond. Va. -
. Havana, Cuba 1 i
: Dmaha, Nebraska -
Toronto, Canada
Memphis', Tenn.
Export s !
Cherries, peaches and berries
reached Los Angeles,- San Fran
cisco, New York, Portland, Omaha,
Butte, Pocatello and Everett.
In vegetables and broccoli our
products were shipped as far east
as Chicago and New York, and as
far south as Los Angeles.
Every true, Oregonian should
dedicate himself or herself to the
task of making our quality fruits
and vegetables known the world
over.' Only, in this way . can we
reap the full benefit of ' our cli
mate and soil conditions In more
and satisfied settlers.
PLANS FOR BIG SEASON
Oregon Packing Co. Gets
Ready for 1923 Business
"Every fruit cannery in Salem is
preparing to put' in additional
equipment .to remodel its plant
wherever little short-cuts to larg
er production and efficiency can
be. made, and generally, to make
the most of what now promises to
he: a banner fruit year for the
whole Willamette valley. Practic
ally everything, from the tallest
cherry tree top down to the lowli
est strawberry ' nestling cheek
down to the ground looks like a
record-breaking crop. Salem may
have to borrow cannery worker
and fruit pickers and truckmen to
haul the stuff from the farms to
the, factories and away from the
factories after it Is canned;, it
looks as if the demand for help is
going to be like that for money
and for, love .there's never
enough of it anywhere in the world
to quite go 'round, j , ' : :
Last year' the company practic
ally rebuilt, or rather remodeled
the entire working arrangement
of their whole plant. By adding
a system of conveyors and rear
ranging their cannery department
they were able to double their
fruit preparation room space, and
to Put In more canning machines.
They now have a complete five
line cannery equipment, with a
capacity of 180 cans of fruit per
minute. Some of these are the bit
'uns. the No. 10 's; though these
do not fill and handle as fast as
the smaller Cans; but the whole
series averages 36 cans per minute
for each machine. j
. It is. a real problem to find and
to keep profitably busy as large
a force as a big establishment, like
the Oregon Packing ; company em-'
ploys. Last year they had up to
400 employes at a I time, during
the strawberry!, and pear seasons,
ana. tnelr payroll has run up to
sii.uoo a week,; for labor alone.
Their total, labor payment last
year was 3148,00;jit has meant
FRU1TLAND
NURSERY
Highest Quality
( -r- -
Fruit Tree
Berry
Shrubbery
j Large stocks of home- ,
grown trees, 'all wanted :
varieties ;
A. J. MATHIS, Prop.
a living for hundreds of families,
and comforts and . luxuries for
many part-time employes ' who
wanted a little extra money.
This season 'the factory expects
to; be able to show a . good - in
crease , in production ' over, last
year ; and last ,- year was t between
25 and SO per cent ' better than
any , previous year, because of the
better factory arrangements and
the added 'machinery :
. The Oregon,' Packing company
plant was built 10 years ago, and
has grown steadily until it' now
stands as one of the most impor
&?t:::m&Mh. HAS: -HfStQ&Y:
First Church in Oregon Erected There in 1846 by Catholic Missionaries SetMement
Dates Back to 18384s ; Flourishing Community Backed by Rich Agricultural . Section
Numerous . ; noteworthy . histori
cal events cluster about St. Paul,
an. old and- thriving, little city,
located in the northern part of
Marion county in the well known
"French Prairie" district, a verjM
productive and prosperous farm
ing' and dairying"; section of the
valley.
The founding of St. Paul and
settlement of that, section of
Marion county date back to
1858 and to this little city, be?
longs thei distinction of having
the first large; and beautiful
brick ; church . edifice to be built
In I Oregon, If not- in the north
west, the cornerstone? for which
was laid on May 24th, : 1846, and
thla church was dedicated No
vember . 1st. of - the. same . year. In
those days lime' and building. ma
terials', were, scarce, and- therefore
clay mortar ; was - substituted for
the, usual lime, and, sand mor
tar in lwhlch to . lay the brick in
the walls ; of. this church andf to
this day this . Urge briek struc
ture Is as solid and . substantial
as the dajrit was completed, and Is
in! a perfect, state of preservation.
Many noted Catholic mission
aries and pioneer' priests who
figured, prominently In connec
tion with Oregon's early history
served- this parish, in those.. early
days and it. would require sever
al volumes to relate the . interest
ing narratives of - incidents en-
I Historic pioneer Cathelie church at St.
Patu, Orecoa. First brick church buut
ia the raciTie Verthweav -
acted in, and around this his
toric little city since the early
settlement of that community.
St. Paul has now grown into a
thriving nd prosperous commun
ity and Rev. Father Chabot, at
present officiates in the St. Paul
catholic church and academy.
Space forbids delving . deeper
Into the most interesting histor
ical events ana pioneer activi
ties - centering in and about t't.
Paul, at this time, but we wish,
to say that while this little town
has been ' deprived of the advan
tages of railroads and modern
highway facilities, the Oregon
T. A. LIVESLEY & CO. . '
-.; hops
II Salem Bank of Commerce Buildine i
1 1 eh j , m " . .1 : i
T - : j '
- I I ill V- r- .. - . ... ,v .: H
tant , of Its kind, in Salem or in
deed In all Oregon. It puts up a J
full, line of fruits, beginning with
the earliest gooseberries and run
ning on to the close of the stored
pear season It has ideal track
age, facilities.; so. that' it can get
its stuff in, for treatment or out
for delivery after canning. Dur
ing the past season it used the old
Southern Pacific wool warehouse,
east of the S. P. depot, for stor
age in addition to its own factory
capacity. The company made', an
especially heavy run of loganber
ries and of pears, its equipment
Electric, Southern.; Pacific and,
Pacific highway., having missed
the town by about ten or twelve
miles, this little city, has kept
pace with the times' and can
boast . of - a . bank, jgood schools
and modern mercantile estab
lishments, together with a large
number of other similar business
institutions.
An enterprise which is worth
much' to the community, is the
large and modern cooperative
creamery located at St. Paul, . of
which 1 cooperative organization
C. ! S. Mullen is president, and
D. L. Vandelweile, is secretary
treasurer." The excellent product
of this creamery is known far
and ' near and only ! recently
some valuable prizes were won
on ; an exhibit of : the butter pro
duct of this creamery in general
competition with the products of
some of the country's larger and
beat" creameries.'
The community, as a result, is
rapidly developing into one of
the large ' and prosperous dairy
ST. PAUL HARNESS AND SHOE REPAIR SHOP
Ovid V. Blanchette, Prop.
St. Paul, Oregon
All kinds of repair work. Including auto tops and side curtains
Prompt Work and Satisfaction Guaranteed
tMUMII MIMIII
IB
CT A iTCJ
iJ Mr I Mm
ST. PAUL
J. E. SMITH, President
LIABILITIES
X Capital Stock
a". j - tt i:..:
Surplus and ; Undivided
Deposits
Total
Resources
Loans, Discounts and Bonds..
Cash . and. Due from Banks,
Other Resources..... ... . ..
Correspondence solicited concerning the advantages,
business opportunities and real; estate and other in
vestments afforded in this community.
Growers and Brokers 1
.HUBBARD C RE A ME RY
Manufacturers of
MOTHER, HUBBARD BUTTER "
This brand always a guarantee of quality
' Distributed In Salem by State Street Market, 12 5ft State Street.
t Highest Price, paid for; eggs. Commercial Feed; Grinding,
. Manufacturers of Mother Hubbard brand of Scratch and Egg
' Laying Mash
, ' Octav Voget, Mgr.
i-
being well adapted to these prod
ucts, and Its contract supply being
easy to get and have delivered.!
districts of Marion county.
General farming, . stock rais
ing, fruit and berry, growing are
among, the. other, important pas
toial industries of the commune
ity.
With good : macadam roads
radiating In every direction from
St. Paul and the comparatively
cheap farm lands of that com
munlty, the growth and develop
ment of the town and district
is sure to be much more rapid
in the next few years than It
has in the past decade, especially
with the coming of the automo
bile stage and truck lines, which
will afford the town and com
munity with transportation ad
vantages and communication
With Portland . and ; Salem almost
as efficient as by rail or water
transportation' facilities. Here
homeseekers will find excellent
opportunities for Investment, and
will establish their homes among
a thrifty,; genial and progressive
people, if they cast their lot in
or about St. Paul.
MMMIIH tllll
ANK O F !
S. J. SMITH, Cashier,
.$15,000.00
. 9,86a38
.136,910.03
Profits...
$161,778.41
..$109440.63
42,084.27
.. 1053.51
..$161,778.41 J
M
E
SQUARE
DEAL
QUALITY
E3
H
E31
R
SEEDS-
.... ... r . . . ( (
Above is the emblem of ,
LEE L. HERSCHBERGE?.
the Hubbard Seed Merchant '
Although Mr. Hubbard deals la
eeeds of all kinds, he is particular-1
ly. interested in.
CLOVER and VETCH SEE D
This is Mr. Hirschberger's lti;
season. The popularity of fcu
warehouse with buyers is the re
sult of square dealing and a tier- -oughly
equipped plant for. re
cleaning seed. Because of the ex
ceptional. quality of .Ms work,
receives a , premium price for 1
recleaned seed, a premium virLJ,
he passes on . to the growers. 4
a. result farmers ' from mi:
around take their seed to him. II
ships several carloads of seed eac .
year." . ' "
Mr. Herschbe?ger, plans on ad.
Ing another cleaning machine t:
his already fine battery, of clear-
rs.
His slogan Is:
,Our Claim Best facilities fo? '
recleaning clover seed.-
"Our Aim A- better stands-
of seeds than your law requlrrv
CREAIBYJELSIII
Hubbard Institution Mal;c
"Motlier Hubbard" Buttcj
, One of the valuable bus!;- j
concerns of Marion county, is t! t
Habbard- Creamery, at Hubari.
This place serves a vital if 1
among the farmers as it furor
es them a ready cash markc',
right at home for their -crean
poultry and eggs and also becau'j
it is equipped to do custom grind
ing at grain and to supply feed.
It. manufactures the famou;
Mother, Hubbard" brand of bit
ter which, commands the top prlc '
on the market. This brand, is a
leader in many of the. towns in tt
state, in Salem It Is retailed ac
jobbed by the State Street Market.
i 125 9 SUte street.
The- creamery' spends lari , -
amounts of money each year t:r
poultry and eggs.
The average price paid last yesr
for' select eggs rw'as 30.67 cekti
per dozen.
, The amount of . money paid czi
each, yf ar Is a'. blgt; factor . In . ti
total income of the. district -The
creamery's feed, grind!;:
equipment-is modern and of vV
ue to the farmers. It also se'.'.j
various kinds of , f eed . and mac
facturea several, excellent kla Is
of poultry; feed such as. scratch,
egg mash, 'etc., all going out un
der its . own - ."Mother. Hubbard
brand, which Is a, guaranty ct
first class quality. ' . ' . '
Octav Vo get Is : manager. IIS
also: owns a farm near town. C.v
the farm, he keeps avaluiblo he: I
of purebred. Guernsey, cattle atl.
White Leghorn chickens , lly
Guernseys carry a heavy nercert-
age of blood of the great VZj
Rose family. White Leghorn bt:by
chicks are among the leadirl'
sources of revenue from the farn.
i
i
M A