The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, October 23, 1921, Page 9, Image 9

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TITE OREGON STATESMAN, SALEM. OREGON
SUNDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 23. 1021
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APP4.
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Commissioner Buchtel Urges
Railroads to Send Aid as
I; Soon as Possible
An -acute car j snortare has
again hit the state and apple
shippers are particularly in dan
ger of suffering heavy losses as
a result. The refrigerator car sit
uation la very tight and appeals
are reaching the public service
commission from shippers In sev
eral quarters of the state.
Fred G. ; Buchtel, member ol
the commission. Las sent a letter
to officials of the Southern Pa
cific, the t OreeonWVashinKton
Railroad & Navigation company.
nnrt th Spokane. Portland &
.Seattle .companyfcicainnsthelr .at-,
tention to the complaints and ask
ing for relief as feoou-as, possible
The apple harvest Is heavy and
the pack of high quality. Should
the proposed railroad strike ma
ture it is feared that some of the
growers will suffer losses from
which It will take years to 'recov
er. -
One of the heaviest producing
sections informs the commission
that "We have not had half the
cars we should have in order pro
perly to handle our crop, and the
car situation is not improving."
From the western part of the
state comes word that "it Is giin
to work a terrible hardship on
some districts where thsre is no
cold storage and where fruit can
not be held."
Another report says "The aver
age rate of shipment from oxir
district at the present time Is
probably about 10 to 12 cars per
day and we should have at least
SO to 40 cars per day."
Will everything be square in
diplomatic "circles" at the di
sarmament conference?
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SALEM ". Zszs&&
TEMPTING INVESTMENTS
ON EVERY-HAND you notice advertise
ments5 of stocks, bonds, business oppor
tunities, etc.; many of them sounding
like profitable investments.
But to its customers the United States
National offers a bit of friendly advice :
consult us before investing any consid
erable' amount.' The viewpoint of the
banker is often different from that of
private individuals. Let us glance at that
, investment you are considering.
LUB HE
GOAD, REPORT
The Well Dressed Woman
John Perrin, of Twelfth Fed
eral District, Makes
Survey Statement
BUSINESS IS IMPROVED
3
By ACSTS ATSES. 1
Star la Paramount FIctares. '
I am taking considerable though
for the morrow and am Inclined t
be pessimistic and side with tin
August Shipments Keep Up
With Timber Cut, Mar
ket is Steady-
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Honest . Advertising In
Dentistry
v, w '-
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Stores, churches and banks advertise,!
doing so in a legitimate way, aiding you
to select your store, church or bank to
your advantage
I advertise to help you select your den
tist I have nothing to offer to you
but dentistry as-practiced by all men
of reputation
"; . , SALEM PEOPLE patronize my office,
as I give the best quality of work and
save them time and expense.
THE DEMAND OF TODAY IS SANITATION
. EXAMINATION AND ESTIMATE OF WORK
, CHEERFULLY GIVEN HERE
Gold Crown $7 .Plates... $15, $25
Bridge Work $7 per tooth Extraction $1
DR. 'ALF SWENNES
Gray Building .
SALEM, OREGON
DENTIST
Over Hartman's
Jewelry Sfore
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 11.
Some actnal Improvement in the
demand for lumber Is reported
from states of the Twelfth Fed
eral Reserve district, John Per
rin declared in a report made pub
lic here today.
Stiffening of prices in the up
per grades of Douglas fir, station
ary or declining prices for Cali
fornia redwood and white and
sugar pine, and decidedly more
hopeful feeling as to future, busi
ness prospects also feature the
lumber Industry at this time, the
report Bald.
Progress in Output
"August production of 356,
233,000 feet of lumber, according
to reports from the four lumber
associations in the district, was
26,890,000 feet greater than the
July cut, an increase of 8.1 per
cent," the report said, "In the
corresponding four weeks of Aug
ust, 1920, the cut was reported to
be 468,491.000 feet.
"About 75 per cent of the lum
ber mill capacity in the Pacific
northwest and 60 per cent in the
Inland Empire Is reported as be
ing in operation, while logging
operations are reported as 40 per
cent of normal.
Sales Effort Xewled
"Shipments and orders kept
pace with the increased cut and
were greater than in July. Orders
are reported to require much
sales effort, but' increased from
263,416,000 feet in July to 331,-
310,000 feet in August of
per cent. Shipments made dur
ing the month totaled 336,941,-
000 feet compared with 286.727,
000 feet in July, an increase of
17.5 per cent. Shipments of lum
ber by w.ter t- the Atlantic sea
board have increased 5.868 per
cent dnrlng the first six months
of 1921 compared with the same
L period in 1920. Notwithstanding
th tremndous increase in water
movement, the total volume of
business of the Pacific northwest
mills in Atlantic coast markets Is
stated to be less than it was a
year ago, indicating a , heavy de
cline in rail shipments. The re
port of the Pacific Lumber In
spection bureau reveals gam3 in
water-borne shipments to all des
tinations at- nine cargo markets
and losses in a like number with
a net loss of 13 per cent. Ship
ments to uropcan markets show
-a decline of approximately f2 per
cent, to the west coast of South
America of 41 per cent, to Aus
tralia of 58 per cent, and to Cht-
na of 12 per cent. Shipments to
Japan, which is rebuilding six of
her largest cities, showed an in
crease of 31 per cent. All com-
X
ISM FBEFI1
FOB fii'.IL STRIKE
Customers -TUesa aoeks I r-
eelved by parcel post from this
store are vile. I -would be seen lo
the street -with them on!
Dealer Yes. We advertised
that yon would neTer wear them
out. didn't e?
"I ee they're havins trouble
gUto -ajary ,. la - that landlord-.
and tenant cas?. : i '
Ye,.ne. side VoiVtak linf
manvwho own house. . ;
"And Uie other Bidet" v
"Wont accept any man ho
refits one." LduhvUle Confler
Journal. ! ' 1
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ernor Olcbtt
weather prophets In the matter a j f Emergency COipeS it Will ,
coal shortage that strike when wi ! Be Met, DeClarCS bOV-
we longing most fervency for blui
akiea and sunny climes. And I aa
tot alone in the matte.-, either
the tailors are with tr.e and, 'a
course, the furriers.
So yesterday I went out anc
bought :ne the fascinating frocl
you see in the sketch. With I
there is a short coat of cloth zai
embroidery Jtist Tight tot cold, an
tumn weather and heary enough
for winter. But what pleased vat
most was the dress. It is cut oa
the all comfortable and becoming
chemise lines, which seema to be ai
good as ever. The waist line la a
little lower and very sketchUy Indi
cated, quite after the prediction!
from Paris. The sleeves are cosily
long and solli, comlns down to th
knuckles In a point. The neck ti
not very low and has a pleasantly
startling suggestion of winter in
the Inserted line of white ermin
between the point and the tiny
cloth vest
Matching the ermine are the
rather large opaque white beads
used in conjunction with the em
broidery. The round patches of embroidery
are done in heavy black floss, and
the white beads are ostentatiously
sewn on with the same, making
them look like tha "black eyed
beans" of the wedding supper.
We have not followed Paris too
closely in the matter of the length
of the skirt. As you can see. It is
comfortably short. We shall un
doubtedly wear the longer and
more formal skirts for afternoon
and for evening, but for street
wear and walking we are still, with
great sense and "discretion, cling
ing to the freedom of short ones(
My new velvet hat, that I wear
with this suit, has for its only trim
ming a knot of ostrich, perched
perilously oc the edge of the brim.
Beyond intimating j that prepa
rations are quietly b4inS made in
Oregon to meat any j emergencies
that may be caused (by the pro
posed railroad strike. Governor
Oicott refuses to mafce any state-;
ment concerning what organiza-j
tion the state may perfect to take j
care of transportation and pro
tect property.
"If there is an ! emergency,'
said the governor. 'we expect to
j be prepared to meet! it. Further
; than that I do not care to put out
j any statement ."bout what is &o
I insx to be done j
j Should the necessity arise the
j governor would havtj the national
Kuard at his disposal. In addi
tion there ar in the state hund
reds of automobiles! and motor
trucks, owiied by the state, the
counties, cities and I school dis
tricts that douHlesi! could be
commandeered to take car? of
passenger and freight transporta
tion, f
parisons are of the first six
months of 1921 with the first six
months of 1920.
Market Holds Finn
"Little change appears in the
log market. Stocks are being re
duced gradually and the tendency
Is to log as little as possible and
to uae up all available material.
It is reported that mills owning
srumpage are virtually the only
one& cutting, commercial loggers
preferring not t trade except on
is causing some difficulty in ar
ranging for shipments, but as the
crop is so near to being cleaned
up it is not expected that the con
dition will caue serious diffi
culty with the apple crop.
TIIL LAST WORD.
a -camp run" basis (all logs f rom j nw said its last word; that is
a Riven operation), while the j say, the 40 years toil of Sir Jam
mills desire to purchase on stump-
age, or graded basis, asserting
that the lumber market win not
warrant buying in on any other
manner at this time.
APPLE PACKING
HI E!
E. S. Biehn Reports That
Harvest Has. Been Much
Aided by Weather
G. L DAVENPORT
GBOWXB AK9
BHTPPER
Applet, Potatoes, Onions, 8ed Pots-
toes, true varuies. xss
best that's grown.'
All kteds Drodaea solicited.
147 Front St. Portland, Ore.
Apple picking ana packing in
the Willamette valley will be
completed within the next ten
days, according to E. S. Biehn,
who has been superintending, as
sembling and packing of apples
throughout the valley this season.
Mr. Biehn says that apple harvest
is already finished in .the terri
tory about Brownsville, Sheridan
and Alpine. Corvallis and Forest
Grove still have considerable
quantities of Newtowns, Ortleys
and some Baldwins to be packed.
The fall weather has been es
pecially favorable for harvesting
this year and the work has pro
gressed very rapidly on thi3 ac
count. The present car shortage
Zyxt is the last word in the
English language, according to
the Oxford dictionary, which has
that is to
63
Murray and his coadjutors has
come to its end with the last
word that can be found to go into
it.
The Oxford has gone all the
other recent dictionaries, which
end with the word "zyxomma,"
one better by discovering "zyxt."
And what does it mean? It seems
that the word is 14th century
Kentish dialect for "seest"
"thou zyxt."
. It was. indeed, only in recent
times that the dictionaries had
discovered "zyxomma," which is
some kind of fly known to the
zoologists.
The real eld dictionaries used
to end with "zymologist" mean
ing one who follows the scienca
of zymology, which is something
or other, the writer is not quite
sure what. Boston Transcript.
IENTOY IMM
B n
TREAT FOR IAOCEXCE
"Do you evs erink to xce3S?'
asked the girl's father.
"I never touch liquor of anj
kind, sir."
"How about tobacco?"
"I do not smoke. I have nev
er had a cigar or cigarette in my
mouth."
"Evr gamble?"
"Never. I do not know ono
card from another."
"I suppose you swear some
times?" "No sir. An oath has never
passed my lips."
"I'm. All righ. Come out and
have a stick of candy with me."
Exchange.
kNB of the greatest Joya
this Hie comes to a
man through Mi ability to
read. When it becomes ne
cessary to strain your eyes -to
take in what Is on the
printed page it becomes Just
as necessary that you con--suit
an authority on op
tometry. Have us build for
you a pair of glasses that
will give your vision the
proper accommodation.
"appeal? Xcr &ruie&
Freeing the Victim
9f
Nervous Headaches
StTKDAT HEALTH TALK KO. 12
By O. U Scott, O.O.
The victim of nervous headaches is usu
ally the victim of a poor stomach or an
inactive liver. If the liver Is inactive it
disorders the stomach. If the stomach Is
the center of weakness, the headaches will
only be overcome when the weakness of
the stomach is corrected.
The victim of nervous headaches en
joys days of relief, but as time runs on,
the headaches come back more and more
often. The cause is a mechanical mis
alignment of spinal joints which causes
pressure on spinal nerves, either to the
stomach or liver, and in many cases to j
both. The chiropractor restores the me-1
chanical alignment, and with the pressure
on the nerves released, fiature. acts nor
mally, which is to say healthfully.
xrscix try 1
SAtS
411 a. , WOMM
he's yennc and
toaatitul. ah
will forrHre T
for ratbag. hr
tftravafaat n4
silly." j .
HEALTH FOLLOWS
CHIROPRACTIC CORRECTS
PRESSURE ON SPINAL
NERVES IN DISEASES OF
THE FOLLOWING ORGANS"-
HEAD
EYES
m ana
IrNOSE
-inKUAI
ARMS
tT" HEART
Vl1fNAC
STOMACH
MV PANCREAS 1
SPLEEN
KIDNEYS
BOWELS
APPENDIX
BLADDER
OWIOWUUHW
THE LOWER -NERVE
UNDER THE MAGNIFY
ING GLASS IS PINCHED
BY A MISALIGNED JOINT.
- PINCHED NERVES CANNOT
TRANSMIT HEALTHFUL
IMPULSES. CHIROPRAC
TIC ADJUSTING RE;
MOVES THE PRESSURE.
THE UPPER NERVE IS
. r REE AS NATUttE INTENDS.
Spinal
Chronic Sufferer
Finds Cause
Removed
"l m writing this. In the hope
that some one may profit by my
experience. Being troubled vlth
nervous headaches which pre
scriptions tailed to : rellere, . t
was advised to ee chlroprac
tor. I was better in two weeks.
I have been back at "work now
some months, thanks to chl
Topractic." A. W. Carter. Chi
Toprictic ReseateV 'Bureau
Statement No; 123. f
XVTTEN HEALTH BEGINS
Depends on . when, you . tele
phone 8t tor aa-appointment.
Consultation 1s without chars.
Miss Koon assists women pa
tients. ; . ;
Dr Oj L. Scott
Chiropractor
414-19 U. S. Bank Bldg.
Phone 87
5TART ON LONG JAUNT FROM NEW YORK TO OHIC
Trade in your silent piano
on a player piano
No dull evenings when you have a player piano in
your home, but be sure you get the good kind
the kind you can play with expression.
' An expert demonstrator teaches you how to skill
fully operate a player when you purchase here.
We will take your silent piano in exchange at its
full valuation pay the balance in little monthly
payments. ..
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REGAi eSk
oes
CL You can pay more for your shoes if you want to;
biit you can't buy more value.
CIn Regal Shoes you get More Wear, Better Styles,
and All-RoundSatisfaction. They are reat shoe
values!
...&..
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iiiacK Kia comDina
tion last $9.25
. Brown kid combina-
3il tion last .- $9.60
All styles and leath
ers, now range from
$7.50
to
Another mighty popular Regal
style conservatively English in
design and in just the right weight
In Brown Calf
$7.50
$9.50
The Pom Is built oa a "rcqgny1:
last with a broad, rounded toe
well liked by men for its easy
fitting qualities, j r
Hikers? "WctL I racsa they are! Kot the crt that walk three miles
and ride thirty with sodm kindly aatotet whose car has a convcnlanUy
empty back seat. Bat bonest-to-Koodness hikers, who walk for the sheer
Joy of stomping1 the roads. With their knapsacks slang Jauntily over
their khaki clad ahotUders, Miss Isabella Henderson and Miss Etteabeth
Fleckenateln started on September IT on the first lap of tb TS4 mQea
that stretch between the, West Side Y. W. a New York city, and ths
assodatioa buHding in' Dayton, Oblo. Averaging from eighteen to twenty .
miles a day, they expect to do the trtn In a mouth's Ume. :.
Brown Calf
Tan ! Scotch" Grain .
$8.25
$8.75
-and wrve scores of others
styles to show you
"YOU"
c "-" V . LITTLER it UPMEYEE,
'At The Electric Sign "SHOES"
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