The Oregon statesman. (Salem, Or.) 1916-1980, June 02, 1921, Page 1, Image 1

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    DIP YOU KNOW That the Salem District Is Ideal for All Branches of the Poultry Industry on a Large Scale?
a
FIRST SECTION
Pages I to 6
mm
TWO SECTIONS
10 Pates
SEVENTY-FIRST YEAR
SALEM, OREGON, THURSDAY MORNING, JUNE 2, 1921
PRICE: FIVE CENTS
uvi lasu
IMS)
THIRTY BOOZE
ACTIONS OROP
FROM COURTS
Oregon Cases Affected By
Decision of United States
Supreme Court in Nullify
ing Old Statutes.
VOLSTEAD ACT IS
CONTROLLING FACTOR
Opinion Handed Down At
Washington in Yugino
vich Litigation
POjlTAND. Ore., June 1.
Thirty casea pending in too fed
eral courts hero against alleged
yiolators of the prohibition laws
will b dropped, aa a result of the
decision of the supreme court to
day In an Oregon case holding
that the Volstead act supersedes
proTiaioni of the old revenue acta
not ta harmony with it. This was
the statement tonight of the
United States district attorney's
office here.
Bote Yuginovich and cousin.
Hose Yuginovich. the defendants
freed -by the supreme court, had
pleaded guilty to charges of oper
ating a still and paid- fines of
1200 each. The federal grand
Jnry subsequently indicted them
ander the old federal revenue
laws on charges of operating , as
distillers without paying revenue
taxes and they Fere convicted.
Their attorney appealed on the
ground that the act under which
tbt eonvictloos were obtained was
obsolete under the Volstead act.
Old La wr Nullified
5 WASHINGTON. June 1. Vari
ous Internal revenue laws enacted
prior; to-adoption of the 18th
amendment and designed to cover
illicit distilling have been super
seded and annulled by the amend
sent and the Volstead act, the
snpreme court held today.
The court sustained the United
States dlstrlctcourt In Oregon In
quashing an indictment under the
old statutes, against Boze Yugi
novich and his cousin Mose Yugi
novich, on the ground that no of
fensive bad been charged under
the Volstead act.
Mrs. Annette Adams, assistant
attorney -general who appeared for
the government, said that the ef
fect of the decision would be to
abate. prosecution in a number of
cases in which indictments were
similarly based, and posribly
causa remittance of fines imposed
la cases already decided contrary
to today's ruling.
feeler Hem Bright Klo.
On the other hand, Wayne B.
ttbceler, counsel for the Anti
Saloon league, tonight held that
U decision would serve as tur
ner support for the dry forces.
Tin court agreed with the lower
trlianal In holding' that "congress
manifested an intention to tax
Hquor illegally as well as legally
produced."
Boze and eonsin Mose were In
dicted for violations of sections of
ths revised statutes. The first
wnnta charged? "unlawfully en
Kg!ag In carrying on the business
t distillers," the second with
"flag failed to keep "conspicu
Wsll" oyer their place of business
ign reading "registered distil
ry the third with having failed
J ie. the required bond and the
Jourta with- having "unlawfully i
fermented a certain mash."
i Error Main Question
The only . question before the
Brt, the government conceded.
u whether the lower court had
in deciding that the laws on
7" tne indictments were based
been repealed by the advent j
w.siUonal prohibition.
V T"11' Volstead act." the opin
io laid, "repeals all prior acts
tie extent of their Inconsls- j
JfI"'I with the national prohibi
tion act.
. "J construing penal statutes It
" tuB ml that litar on .rtmi.nl
JPfal the former ones covering
the
ame acts but fixing a smaller
rnaty. Havlnr In view then
lociplea, we do not believe that
jj 5nral language used evlden
r" the intention of congress to
f D 'or uch an offense the
"foment provided by section
fins Uh the rMult'nc forfeiture.
Sam 11 "m prison men t and at the
tlrm to authorize prosecu-
tloa i-4 D,,niHhment under sec
flc V "a'ting lesser and speci
al k?'"" r"r faiUnK to py
the ,n,PO"'"g a tax In double
fmoflnt Imtinui.H hi i,
- - j an.
r'i.-.ur0n8llnicr AtubUil
Jo7htrw with tlis- court le
el as ? . ni,e con:rP rnanlfest
lKal. lenl,on to la liquor llle
't did vL6."." '""ally produced.
W 1 Benm,nte.nd to rce"e l"
'Pwffi n ddlt,n to th
hat l?T,,,0.,, fpr Tnnlshmcnt
fUt the Volstead act.
THIS LITTLE GIRL IS
TRULY HAPPY AND SHE
TELLS THE REASON WHY
The tumult and the shouting
dies,
; The captains and the kings de
part: SHU stands thine ancient sacri
i flee
An humble and a contrite
I heart."
i
I The humble Heart wins over
the kings and the captains and
the billionaires, 'and the giants,
wherever human history goes
from tle musty, dusty days when
there was neither written nor
spoken 1 language, clear through
the ultraVrefined civilization of
today. What wouldn't it be
worth to have a truly thankful
heart, glad of the things that are
good around one. hopeful for
what the future may bring, and
pleased that there's always
enough to live on. and to love.
and to rejoice over?
There are such thankful hearts,
and it takes neither a palace nor
a. scepter nor a diploma to make
them fairly radiate joy. In these
troubled days, when it's so hard
to believe in one's fellow man:
to believe in one's Job; to believe
in one's religion even, a truly
thankful heart is like a precious
Jewel in a wedding gift of pure
gold.
There is one little girl near
Salem who has this precious gift.
She is to be envied; for she -has
what the whole world wants
more than almost anything else
jthc spirit of contentment and
lh Joy of living- She has writ
ten The Statesman a letter to ex
plain her view of life in general.
Certain contemptuous cynics
might say. "What does a littlo
girl know about the big things
off life?" She would reply,
humbly: !'I am only a little girl,
and I do not know even what
life Is or what it means." But she
does she has its very essence at
her fingers' tips, and in her
heart, and in her words. Ser
vice, content, hope, loire -what
Is there left? What Socratean
philosophy can even approach
then guiding lights of the human
soul? Even the little girl who
hat these has a creed to confound
th selfish wisdom of all the ages.
Here is her letter, ft isn't a
work of art; it does not sparkle
with the finish of a poet, or the
studied wisdom of a Solomon, or
thfli knowledge of an Edison, for
ARRIVE Wi'
Two Marion County Boys
Numbered Among Bodies
: Due in Portland
PORTLAND. June 1.- Bodies
of seven Oregon service men who
died overseas are due here to
morrow. They are:
Private Albert S. Turner. Com
pany C. 603rd engineers. Scio.
Private George W. Zimmeric,
Company E. 127th infantry.
Woodburn.
Private First Class Fred Kees.
Troop First army casualty head
quarters, Pendleton.
Corporal Alfred E. Babcdck,
226th military police company.
Albany.
Private Nick Troudt. Company
C. 313th infantry. Hubbard.
Private Frank Mitchell. Com
pany. O, 361st infantry. Bay City.
Private Elmdr JMIIls. "Battery
B, 147th field artillery. Newberg.
Halibut Catches Break
Records of Whole Year
c A VTT.PT Wash Jlin 1. -
. - - . -. .
Vfovr 'hallhnt rstches off Vancou-
ver island, off Cape Flattery. In
Hecate Strait ana on souiu
caitefn A'aska banks, broke aH
records for the year. It was an
nounced today by officials of the
fishing vesiel owners' aoiatloit
y-r.r Dnrti ' the month 123
ratches were brought into Seattle.
1 largest -itch was inndo bv
the schooner I a Paloma. o,oo
pounds, secured off Goose inland
in Hecate Strait. The fish sold at
5 to 0 7-8 cents a pouna nere.
Fire Burns 30 Acres
Eastern Oregon Timber
PORTLAND. June 1 A small
forest fire, which destroyed
acres of young yellow pine gov
ernment timber on Badger creek,
n short distance from HuTur. Or.,
in tbi Oregon national forest, was
reported today to lh forest ser
vice headquarters hera. The blase
has been extinguished, the reyort
stated. This make the third
fire on federal land to be reported
so far this year.
mm
w
-
she I only'll. But it tells a
story of home contentment that is
like a healing halm for the fever
ish dissatisfaction that is so prev
alent: WITH THU HKM OK MOTIIKIl
(By Wilma Finster. 11 years old )
I have a beloved home, too
good to he left alone.
I am a little girl only in
the sixth grade and 1 shall
tell you of my home. I live
in Keizer district, a lovely
place to he, and live on a 20
acre loeanberry farm moth
er, father, brother, and me.
Arrosii from the Keuer
school house, so small and so
hare, an unpainted house, so
cozy and fair. Father is no
carpenter at all. but with the
help of mother dear we have
a cozy up-and-down board
house
We have a very good school
and my teacher's name is
Mrs. Beardsley. She is help
ful to me.
Home from school I come
to cook supper for mother,
father, twin brothers, and
nie. Soon supper Is on the
stove and everything is cook
ing. I peep from the window.
To . my surprise I see my
mother, father, twin broth
ers, hoeing. As it comes to
my mind, chip, chop, and hoe
the trass so clean.
What I want to tell you
about Is that our place is all
in locans. Father and broth
ers are hoeing them, but
with the help of mother dear
they are soon slick and clean.
Today is Saturday. Fath
er and brother are out hoe
ing loganberries, while one
of my brothers churns and I
do the house work. Soon
the butter is churned, 12
pounds of butter for this
week. I then go with a heavy
load to sell the butter. I do
all of this with great pleas
ure. The baking is then done
for Sunday.
Bed time Is here and we
soon fall asleep. Early in
the3 morning we rise and
make ready for a four-mile
drive to Salem, for church in
a heavy wason.
All these things make me
happy; would it you?
VOLSTEAD BILL
HI BE PASSED
Measure Will Be Reported
Out Favorably by Judic
iary Committee
WASHINGTON, June 1. The
Voltead bill, designed to prevent
use of medical beer, was agreed
on today by the house judiciary
committee, which will report it to
the house, probably tomorrow,
with a request for its immediate
passage. Prohibition leaders, de
clared there were votes enough to
put it through before the bureau
of internal revenue could make
effective proposed regulations by
which beer could be prescribed
tor the ailing under a ruling of
former Attorney General Palmer.
Although the measure would
make the prohibition enforcement
act more drastic, representatives
of the drug and flavoring extract
trades won their fight against a
section requiring the medicating
or denaturing of alcohol prior to
its withdrawl from warehouses
and distilleries for manufacturing
purposes.
Chairman Volstead, by direc
tion of the committee, introduced
a redraft of his bill, slightly mod
ified in some particulars. The
section prohibiting importation
and manufacture of liquor until
stocks now held under govern
ment supervision have been ma
terially reduced or exhausted, was
retained.
Willamette River Said
To Be Full of Salmon
PORTLAND. June 1 Salmon
are ascending both the upper
Willamette and McKenzie rivers
hi large niimWrs. according to
Mauler Fish Warden Carl Ii. 1
Shoemaker. and prospects are
that the egg-take this year will
be very large. Mr. Shoemaker j
Iish jut returned from Eucen".
after investigating conditions on !
the two rivers. The large run of
salmon on these water. Mr. Shoe- ,
maker says, proves without doubt ,
that sufficient fish ascended th j
ladder at Oregon City this sea
son, in spite of depredation by
fish pirates, to Insure a normal if j
not greater egg-take.
SWATHY OF
PRESIDENT IS
I
Harding Walks Into Offices
of Commerce Commission
And Asks What Relief
Measures Are Pending.
REPORTS OF DISTRESS
REACH WHITE HOUSE
Unusual Method Used by
Executive in Acquiring
Needed Information
WASHINGTON. June 1 -While
railroad executive were pressing
before congress today their plea
for relief from financial embar
rassment. President Harding took
action to satisfy himself that a
revision of freight rates, particu
larly on necessities, will be a" part
of the general railway readjust
ment. Walking into the offices of the
interstate commerce commission,
the pret.ident inquired of the com
missioners what they were, doing
toward relief of shippers who had
found some of the rates unreas
onably burdensome. He was as
sured that the subject was under
investigation, and that the com
mission hoped soon to effect
broad revisions through voluntary
action of the roads.
IHre IMtrrfS Iiortel.
Hauling charces for fruit pro
ducts over western roads were
made a specific example by Mr.
Harding. He told the commis
sioners that he had received many
reports of dire distress among
western fruit growers because of
the high rates, and asked wheth
er changes might be expected
Koon. The commissioners replied
that the fruit schedules were re
ceiving informal consideration.
Although it was indicated that
the iuestion of rates prompted
the presidnt's call, it was assumed
that during the half hour con
ference ih "j-e alw) was some men
tion of the roads' proposal that
the government discbarge at
once its debt to them, growing
out of federal control. This pro
posal was renewed before the sen
ate interstate commerce commit
tee today by Samuel Rea, presi
dent ot the Pennsylvania lines,
who a railed such action would be
no more than keeping the word
ff the government given when the
roads were taken over.
Action Is t'nusual.
The suggestion is known to
Have received careful considera
tion by the president and his ad
visers, and was the subject of a
conference yesterday.
In his visit today. Mr. Harding
technically was dealing with a
part of the covernment outside the
executive branch, and he assured
the commissioners he had come
simply in the interest of co-operation
and general welfare. Since
he had the official ripht to com
municate with congress regard
ing rates, he explained, he felt he
might enjoy the same privilege
ir. regard to the commission set
! up as the ajrent of congress in
' the making of rates,
j Mr. Rea repeated in his state
i ment of yesterday, that the ko.
crnment was In duty bound to re
i turn the roads to their owners in
J as good condition as when they
i were taken over, and declared
that the president had power to
carry out the roads' rehabilita
tion proposal and thus put rail
way finances once more on a
sound foundation.
DARK PICT
Peonage, Politics or Revolu
tion May Be His Only
Alternatives
Kl'GKNK. Or . June I . --peonage
or ui r of liie Middle
Ag's. poini'-al action and th1:
Mate ownership .md operation of
the svstein of distribution, or re
volution are the three possibili
ties open to the Amerieao farni'T
should the eo-operativ e biov Mir ''
fail. r:id C. K. Spence. master f
the Oregon Stale grange which
is here jn 1Mb, annii.il session.
Speifc's report, which paints in
dark colors the condition of th-;
American farmer, attacks the rail
ipads. burdensome taxes, and tho
federal reserve system, has been
referred to committees.
1
MEMBER OF GRAND JURY
GETS TOO MUCH LIQUOR
I OF FAMOUS
Lieutenant Roy Bohler. late of
the l iiitd States expeditionary
forces, later coach of the .South
Iakota Aggi-s and of the Hroad
way hich school in Seattle, has
t'een chosen athletic director lor
Willamette university. President
Carl C. Dony announced last
ninht. ,
It seems to run in the blood
of the Holders to teach athiletics.
On brother. 'Doc" Bohler. is at
I'niversity of Oregon at Eugene.
:ind another is at Washington
Slate college. Pullman, and now
the third comes into the same
college conference at Willamette.
Lieutenant Bohler has special
ized in baseball, football, basket
ball and books. He Is a gradu
ate of Washington State college.
'IT. Il has made a fcreat record
in athletics, both as a performer
and as a teacher. He comes here
with the best of nrommen-"
dations. Much better financial
offers were niade him in the east
than has been possible at Willam-
E
L
A vote of almost 300 to 0 was
registered in favor of the sol
diers' loan as against the cash
bonus, at a mass meeting of ser
vice men at the armory last night,
representing the American legion,
the Veterans of Foreign Wats,
and other soldiers.
Not one of the audience of sol
diers elected to take a cash set
tlement If the soldiers' relief bill
should pass. All who apply at
all. declare their desire to estab
lish themselves in permanent
I.omes and business with the long
time lpan rather than receive a
little cash that is all too cjuickly
spent.
i:-.ult I Predicted.
The result of the vote is prac
tically what had been predicted
by various speakers in the cam
paign now being waged tor the
relief bill in the coming special
election, but there had not here
tofore been an opportunity to put
it to a vote. With so strong an
endorsement of the permanent in
vestment feature 'of the hill, it is
believed by the service men that
there can be small doubt of the
measure passing.
A brief program was put on
e
Officers Drag Lake Union
in Search of Body of
Mis, Mahoney
SKATTLK. Wash. June I.--James
K. Manonev. whose prelim
inary hearinu on a cn.irge of Mrs,
degree forgery was today set for
June 14. while search is being
carried on tor his aged bride, Mrs.
Kate Mahoney, missing sine
April HI. was associated with a
gang or WYerett. Wash., booib'
gers and the "myrtery trunk" for
which the dice are dragging
Lak- Union in the belief that it
may contain the body of Mrs. M;'--hon-y.
tnav have been filled with
contraband ii"nr. it was declared
toUy by Mrs. Dolly Johnson, Mi
honey's sister.
Mrs. Jo hi! ;on also said she be
tieved Mrs. Mahoney may be at
Havana or at soni" other r-mo"
point and has heard nothing l
her since the arr rt of hT h
hand. She said Mrs Mahoney hoi
inleniled going to Cuba when she
left Seattle.
Mrs, Johnson disputed tti" Po
lice tlkeorv that Mrs Mahoney dis
appeared Saturday. April !"-. !''
daring Mahoney and his vi'e ' ;
Seattle on Monday. April IV '
St Paul and that she talked wi"i,
Mrs Mahoney on the teb phon j
the day before their depart'trrv
The police today rontm I
their search for the trunk which !
they sa wa; ' thrown into Lak'
t i) ion on April K-.
THK WHAT I! Kit.
Thursday, fair: moderate west
erly winds.
WILL HUGH AT WILLAMETTE
L ON H
1
INSTEAD
mm
i
BQHLERBOYS
jette; but he believes in the Salem
I university, and he wanted to come
i west so he has accepted the of
i fer and will become a meniber
i of tiie Willamette faculty,
j Rohler has made college ath
j letics a serious study, considering
j i important enough for a life
, work. Hesides his years of college
playing experience, he attended
the treat Chicago Y. M. C: A.
j training school, and he plans to
spend this summer at the Uni
versity of Illinois summer ath
letic school before reporting to
Willamette.
The new coach is 31 years old.
i a member or the United Brethren
j church, and is said to be a whirl
! wind in gaining the attention and
; interest of his men.
j The coincidence of three broth
iers coaching rival conference
i teams, which will meet in a full
schedule of all the college sports.
! i unusual. The Willamette
I board was willing to take a
chance on a wonderful family
nam".
OF
S
to liven up the meeting by "The
Hobo Entertainers," two service
men. Most of the eyenlng. how
ever, was devoted to serious bus
iness. FamouM Pictures Coming.
The Veterans of Foreign Wars
announce that they have secured
the privilege of exhibiting the
famous "Powder River pictures,"
the wonderful series of films
taken by the signal corps during
the war, and showing the war
or. the front line as it has never
before been presented. This ex
hibit is to be arranged for dis
play within the next few weeks.
Delegates Named.
The American legion elected
c'elegates to the state convention
at Kucene July 4. as follows:
C.eorge A. White, P. F. Pound.
Allan Itynon. Carle Abrania; Mil
ler McOilchrist. principals; Robin
Day. Joe Minton, Max Pago Allen
Kafoury, Paul Hendricks, alter
nates. A remarkablo vote was given
for Colonel White, his name ap
pearing first on every one of the
ballots but one. Commander
Pound was a close second in the
altogether friendly race.
New Provisional Government
Plans to Make Sweeping
Changes in Office
TOKIO. June 1 (My The As
sociated Press Dispatches from
Vladivostok captured recently by
anti-HoIshcvik troops, are that
the new provisional government
set up there will make sweeping
changes of officials, preliminary
to taking over control of the
maritime province.
A new assembly is to be con
voked in July, according to the
reports legislation to be consid
ered will include revival of the in
dustries, rehabilitation of the cur
rency, improvement of communi
cations, protection n' the right of
farttvrs to work the land in ac
cordance with the land apportion
ment system which prevailed be
fore iie revolution, profction of
anii llobhcv.l- farmers. division
of the state adminiM rat ion tn'o
prefortural and village assemblies,
and on interference by the mili
tary in politics.
House Still Uncertain
On Longworth Measure
WASHINGTON. June I House
(republicans .'fter a heated discus
-ion in conference, tonight ad
join umI without reaching an
agreement o:i the course to be fol
lowed en th Longworth resolu
tion which would make effective
upon their introduction in the
house all rates carried in the gen
eral tariff bill. No date was set
for further discussion.
RE UfflOUS FOR
C
1
BOLSHEVIKS TO
BE 110 OUT
Calling alternately upon the
Almighty and the police for help,
a member of the Marion couo(y
grand jury huddled in a corner; of
th postofflce late yesterday af
ternoon, was taken into custody
by Chief of Police Moffit upon (re
quest by postoffice officials. Th
condition of the man was said to
have been caused from drinking
intoxicating liquor. He was in
high nervoub state and suffered
from a temporary lapse of mem
ory. i-'
Evidently the special Instruc
tion of Judge G. G. Bingham to
the grand jury yesteraay morhr
ing, when he instructed them to
deive ueeply Into the liqaor ques
tion, was taken literally by the
juror. He was taken to the police
station. Later a taxicab was
called and he was sent to his
home accompanied by a neigh
bor. ' 'i
Jarisdlctton n Question f
Just wnat authority the police
would have over one serving in
the capacity of a grand Juror was
a matter of uncertainty last night.
However, legal advices on tle
question were to the effect that
the man's position as such would
not in anyway hinder a complaint
being issued. Chief MotMtt. arter
receiving the opinions said that he
probably would awear out a com
plaint or hie arrest this morning,
Meantime the juror's name is not
considered available as public in
formation. 1 I
The duties and privileges of the
juror and the responsibilities rest
ing upon them, were strongly
emphasized by Judge Bingham IA
his instructions to the grand Jury
yesterday.
Bingham Charge Jury I
"All good, patriotic American!
believe in upholding and enforce
ing the law. Ours is a govern
ment of the majority. It Is tne
duty of the minority to obey tho
law whether they approve of it or
not.
"All persons before the law are
equal. The rights of tne num
blest citizen rhould be upheld and
protected the same as that of tho
most influential member of socie
ty. The law should be enforced
every day in the year and not on
special occasions, or against any
selected Individuals.
Cioddcws Him Common Sense
"Although the goddess Of Jus
tice is supposed to b- blindfolded,
she is supposed to have ears snd
to use common ordinary horse
cense."
Several sections of the law re
carding duties of Jurors were read
by the Judge, after which ne eon
tinued:
"The court makes it your spe
cial dutv to Inquire particularly
Into all violations of the prohibi
tion act and so far as it Is tn your
power you are to see that the act
is properly enforced.
Officer No Kewpecter
"No officer has the right to
sav whom he will arrest or whom
he will allow to go free when
(Continued on page 4)
t-
I SCORES IN COAST BASEBALL
PORTLAND
AP. R.
(ienln, cf . .
Wolfer. If.
Hale, 3b..
..2
. .3
. .4
. .3
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
Cox, rf.
Poole, lb .3
Krug. 2b -3
Haker, c 3
Young, ss .3
Sam Hoss, p. . . 3
Hutler .1
Totals 28 3 0 1 7 6 2 0 24 12 2
OAKLAM)
AD. R.
Cooper, cf 3 1
Wilie, rf , 4 1
Gulsto, lb 4 1
Miller. If .4 1
Knight. 2b 2 1
Brubaker, ss 4 0
Pinelll, 3b 4 0
Koehler, c .2 "
Alten. p 3
Totals 30 5
Score by Innings
Portland 3
Oakland ....0
Hatted for Koss In ninth.
SACRAMENTO 7, SEATTLE 8
SACKAMKNT'i, .Inn l.-Thr borne
run Ik!kH t'n' S.'intor 'b-frat Sratll
hpr" lod.iv 7 to Tho pr' maib-
ook. t'i'-k xnA Compton. In Ihn xisin
imiinf fn Imrl'-d lorrfnt of atu
at 'K') MuMlfton, who n i'on
vrr-Kiiig with th- wil" of Manager Pil
Kfr. a ml "Hoxy ' m-mrnl lot atnl
rliiirewl up the erii'UHnrf. lie wi rr
1.1 1--ni'H I'v krv.T.i plaira The fan
ei from the pari, aioiftnt jeera.
K if V
Seattle .. 3 S 0
K' Tiitrietito 7 '. I
Hatri" t'raneia. Daily an4 Tahiti:
Fittery and Took.
OAKLAND 6, PORTLAND 3
SAV KRANf'lHI'O, June 1 -Airtight
pit. Innz l,y Alten in all hut the firal
inning, when Portland urni-ed three rutin,
enabled Oakland lo wir from the lea
em. today to 3. The Oaka tie4 the
aeore in the fourth inning and put scrota
their two winning talliea is the erath.
Cooper, who mad first on Pool 'a fnv
hie errfing on Wilie' doable tad Wilie
EOinK home on Outeto'e two baa traaah
to right. After thj tint inning but
DARK
in
OFTULSftiW
Oklahoma City is Under
Martial Law, and Estim
ated Damage to Property
Placed at $1,500ft000.
NEGRO REFUGEES ARE
HERDED INTO PARKS
Firemen Refuse to Play Hose
On Burning Homes of
Colored Folk
TULSA, Okla., Jne 1. Pos
sibly 100 persons dead, hun
dreds wounded and property
damage estimated at $1,500,
000 were outstanding results
tonight of race disorders
which broke out here last
night following the arrest of a
negro accused of attacking a
white girl and which contin
ued sporadically today. .
This evening Tulsa was qui
et with the city under martial
law and its streets patrolled
by troops of the Oklahoma na
tional guard sent here at the
direction of Governor J. B. A;
Robertson. Officials were
hopeful that the worst of the
trouble had passed and that
the coming of dawn would
find normal conditions re
stored', -o. .
Vigilance Continued.
; However, they did not relax
their vigilance and it was stat
ed that all was prepared for
any situation. Civil officials
were cooperating with Adju
tant General C. F. Barrett,
who came this morning with
additional troops,
i No accurate check of the
dead had been made late to
night and unofficial estimates
ran from the known list of 10
whites and 70 negroes dead to
an opinion of police Inspector
Charles Daley, second in com
mand of the police force, that
the list would reach 175.
The exact total, officers
said, would probably never be
(Continued on page 4)
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03
5
t0' hits were gathered off Alten.
B. H. R
i ottun.1 . . Ill t:
Oakland 5 S O
-Balteriea H. Ko and Baker; AlUa
and Koehlei .
AaTOELS . VEBKOK S
f.OH AKOKLRH. Job 1. T Angeles
defeated Vernon fl to 5. The Angels
took the lead In the aeeond and in tho
aitth elinrhed irtory by making threw
run on lw aingtaa and two triple Tho
Tigera rallied in the eeventh jut rowld
tint overcome the Angela' lead. Meho't
and ktllefer were thrown out of tht
gaaie fer disputing with the umpire.
R H. T.
Vetaoiv 5 t
li Angelea 6 19 2
Batter let Lore, Faeth, Mitebell and
Hannah: Retnhart, I-yeoa sod Baldwin.
STANDINO OF THE CLUBS
W. I,. le.
Katt ' r'raneiaeo ST 19 .SSI
Ha'-ramento . . SS 21 .S2
Vernon 30 S6 ,58
J.o Angelea 2 2 ,51
Seattle - J M .800
Oakland t S .
Halt Lake IS 82 .SSO
Portund is as an
i