The Dalles daily chronicle. (The Dalles, Or.) 1890-1948, May 05, 1921, Image 1

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THE WEATHER
THE FORECAST
Maximum 6
Fair, Frost In Morning
Minimum 4
VOLUME LXI.
THE DALLES, OREGON, THUR8DA Y EVENING, MAY 5, 1921.
No. 106.
fc-j m IP I . n
'OREGON'S TAX
- INCREASES ONE
FIRM IN YEAR
.FIRE PATROL ASSESSMENT ADDS
$66,883.11 TO HIQH
TOTAL.
WASCO JUMP. LARGE
TAX RECORDS SHOW $511,312.96 AS
AGAINST $686,416.15 IN ,
1921.
Chronicle's Salem Bureau.
SALEM, May 6. (Special) Oregon's
total tax for this year is an increase'
of more than 20 percent over last
year. Records of the state tax com
mission show that the total tax for the 1
year, which 13 the assessment on the
rolls of, 1920, is $41,117,367.71, while
the total for last year, the. levy on the
rolls of 1919, was $32,596,696.03. The
Increase is $8,520,672.68.
In addition to the regular total is an
addition to $66,583.61 for' fire patrol
in many counties.
An assessment for this service is '
levied on those timbor land owners '
who do not provide patrols for their
lands. The assessment is made by the
county court on the basis of data fur- j
nished by the state department of for
estry, j
Ten counties now have assessments
of more than $1,000,000. Of this num-'
ber, three counties, Jackson, Linn
and Washington, have jumped from
below the million mark to afcove $1,-'
000,000 this year.
The total tax lew hv cnuitttaa.
cshownJ:lll
,yoae 01 comparison, is as shown be-
low: I
1920 . 11921 I
Baker $ 588,990.98 $ 775,928.42
Bfnton 373,527.52 470,994 44
Clackamas . 1,196,344.92 1,510,399.15
Clatsop 1,618,782.66 1,964,352.19
Columbia .. 691,320.39 795,619.55
Coos 1,004,200.14 1,268,79.48
Crook 197,109.88 295,165.34
Curry 109,720.20 130,847.01
Deschutes . . 390,783.87 496,907.74 I
Douglas ... 762,215.68 988,421.37!
Gilliam 206,257.02 298.948.1U
Grant 205,974.09 242,505.17
Harney .... 264,408.20 394,412.09
Hood River. 367,001.63 486,690.97
Jackson ... 965,638.38 1,218,314.71
Jefferson 184,279.00 241,662.04 '
Josephine .. 347,908.72 411,424.53!
Klamath ... 760,548.70 979,540.61
Lake . , 251,214.97 324,777.40
Lane 1,160,558.82 1,471,457.95
Lincoln 289,482.40 348,840.08
n (Continued on Page 8.)
SUPERVISE PEOPLE'S
AMUSEMENT, URGED
REFORMER CRAFTS EXCORIATES
' PICTURES AND DANCING,
TIPPLING AND DIVORCE.
By United Pres
PORTLAND, May 5 Reformation
of the American public's amuse
ments and practices has not yet been
fairly launched, Dr. Wilbur F. Crafts
of the internal reform bureau .de
clared here today.
The motion picture situation must
be cleared up.. Dancing, one of the
gteaiest evils of the day, "must be
taken in hand immediately. A cam
paign to bolster the Volstead law in
orofr to make the new beer regu
lation ineffective is needed. Strict
uniform divorce laws will aid mar
ital happiness. The Bible, or at least
the ten commandments, should be
taunht in the public schools.
Tnese are among the phases of
Ameiiran life in which the burrau
Intends to take an immediate band
Dr. Crafts said.
"We believe that 'the amusements
of the public could bo well handled
by u board of recreational director"
eald Dr. Crafts. 'This board could
upeivlse the recreational activities
o. tl.e people, such as looking after
darning, theaters and other amuse-jronu."
DOLLAR STANDARD
THREATENS LIFE
OF UNITED STATES
"GET 80METHIMG OUT OF LIFE"
URGES THE REVEREND
HOLMES.
"Get something out of life while you
go along," was the advice given the
men's club of the Congregational
church at Its regular monthly dinner
last night by The Rev. Otis H.
I (Holmes, pastor of the Congregational
I church of Walla Walla. The Rev.
(Holmes lamented the obcession of
money which is gripping this country
and. declared dramatically that all civ
ilizations have fallen because of the
domination of a single idea. He drew
the inference that unless the United
States abolishes the money standard,
it will follow the civilizations of past
ages into oblivion.
The Walla Walla minister said.
"Greece was dominated by the idea of
art. Although she builded vast tem
ples which are superior to those con
structed in this modern age, her civ
ilization perished from the earth.
Rome with all the civilized world at
her feet grew into a great civilization
and fell-r-fell because the Idea of war
dominated her and eventually strang
led her very life. Spain, withstanding
the drives of Napoleon, great In many
realms, felt because she clutched the
ecclesiastical idea to the exclusion of
all else.
"These nations had their dominat
ing idea and they fell. America, strong,
and virile, shows no signs of falling.
Is she dominated by a single idea?
If she is, we must beware. We must
set up other interests.
"The dollar seems to be America's
Idea the making of money. Foreign
nations so characterize us. A French
mend said to me, 'over here a man
$ioo,000 liVl
cms to live. He has his cltv home.
his country villa, his leisure. But In
'the United States when a man gets
$20,000 or $100,000 he sets out to get
twice that much an'd when he gets
twice that much he'll crawl over hell
(Continued on
Page 8.)
VICIOUS STORM
LASHES ATLANTIC:
E
SHIPPING IMPERILED
AND POLES BLOWN
BY GALE.
- WIRES
DOWN
By United Press
NEW YORK, May 5 Gales and tor
rential rains last night lashed the At
lantic coast, with a 75-mlle wind doing
more than $1,000,000 damage in New
York. '
The fishing schooner Julius was
driven ashore at Bayhead, N. J. The
crew was rescued.
Five men were rescued from a
swamped barge 200 yards off .Staten
Island.
During the night telephone, trolley
and power lines were broken. Scoros
of sign poles were blown down. Ship
ping in the harbor was threatened.
FIRST BORN OF
OLD WEST DIES
CYRUS WALKER SAW LIGHT AT
WHITMAN MISSION
IN 1M.
By United Press
ALBANY, Ore., May 6 Tho first
white child born west of tho Rock
ies is dead.
Cyrus Walker, a picturesque fig
ure among early pioneers, today
died at his home here after a brief
illness.'
He was bora at the historic Whit
man mission 1838, shortly after the
arrival of bis parents, The Rev. and
Mrs. Elkaaau Walker froa the long
overland trip.
MILLION
DM
ALLIES SERVE
ULTIMATUM QN
GERMAN NATION
GERMANY GIVEN UNTIL MAY 12
TO COMPLY WITH DE
MAND3. OCCUPATION PLANNED
REICHSTAG'S FOREIGN COMMIT
TEE CON8IDERS NOTE TEU.
TON CABINET RESIGN3.
By Ed. L. Keen
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
ILONDON, May 5. The allies today
served Germany with an ultimatum,
demanding acceptance of their rep
arations terms by May 12.
The allies will proceed on May 12
to occupy the Ruhr valley and to take
other military and naval steps If Gtr
many does not accept unequivocally,
according to the ultimatum.
Occupation of German territory1 will
continue as long as Germany refuses
to fulfill the conditions laid down by
the allies.
The note, signed by members of the
supreme council and handed to Ger
man Ambassador St. Hamer shortly
before 11 o'clock this morning stated
that the allies will proceed immediate
ly with preliminary measures for oc
cupation of the Ruhr valley.
The detailed financial demand, pre
pared by the reparations commission,
it was stated, "will be handed the Ger
man, mission in Earls by tomorrow.
lit prescribes the time and the meth
ods of discharging the .German debt,
. .'.'V1 ! "JV A..i
wmcn loiai? aooui b,ou,uuu,uwj
pounds.
Within the six days following re
ceipt of the reparations demand, Ger
many is called upon to declare her
determinattion to execute her obliga
tions without reservation or condition.
The same demand was made with
regard to the offering of guarantees
for the debt.
Renewed demands were made lor
disarmament of German soldiers, -trial
of war criminals and for carrying out
other obligations incurred In signing
the Versailles treaty.
By Carl D. Groat
(United Press Staff Correspondent)
BERLIN, May 5 The allied repara
tions ultimatum was received here
today.
Foreign Minister Von 'Simons im
mediately took the note before the
foreign committee of the relchstag
(Continued on Page 8.)
T
BE
FRANCE CAN THEN TAKE EYEG
OFF BORDER SAYS
GEORGE.
By United Press
' LONDON, May 5. Germany must
be compelled to disarm, so that
France can take her eyes off the bor
der, Lloyd George today told the houso
of commons, in announcing the al
lied reparations ultimatum to Berlin.
The premlor declared that the (lis-!
armament demand was one of the
most important sections of the ulti
matum. Reviewing the conference of
the allied supreme council, 'Lloyd
George said that the ultimatum hud
been served "not because Germany
had defaulted the terms of the peace
treaty but because of her general atti
tude." "It is most necessary," he said,
"that Germany be compelled to dis
arm so that France can take her eyes
from the frontier, Tho supremo coun
cil is convinced that the terms de
vised by it and the reparations com
missions are fair to Germany and that
they are workable."
The premier appeared before tho
house late in the day, after having
personally banded the allied note to
the German ambassador.
GERMANY
MS
SA1
POLISH FORCES
SEIZE BIG AREAS
IN UPPER SILESIA
BRITISH AND ITALIAN SOLDIERS
KILLED IN ORGANIZED
' UPRI8ING.
L IS
ALLIED TR00P8 INSUFFICIENT
FRENCH xREPULSE TWO
ATTACK 8.
By United Press
BERLIN, May S.--Organlzed Polish
forces have seized large areas in up
per Silesia, killed a number of British
and Italian soldiers and forced resig
nation of the British plebiscite com
missioner, according to advices hero
today.
The commissioner, In resigning, de
clared the allied troops were not nu
merous enough to withstand the Polos
and guarantee the safety of German
residents.
'Press dispacches today Indicated
the situation was quieter, with the
Poles in possession of the region they
have seized.
The Polish force was estimated at
from 15,000, to 20,000, well armed and
equipped with light artillery.
The small Italian contingent was
said to have suffered numerous cas
ualties and the British sustained a
few losses.
Germany today awaited a response
to a note of protest sent the allies
in London.
. Parts of upper Silesia, are trailer
martial law, declared by the inter-al-lied
commission. The decree was. In
effective, however, and large bands
of Poles marched through the coun
try, terrorizing the Inhabitants.
Sharp fighting occurred at Tarno
wltz and Kattowltz, where French
troops repulsed the Invaders.
A largo Polish force marched into
Kattowltz in the early morning and
stormed newspaper offices and the
police station. The French launched
an attack with tanks and the invaders
withdrew. The French took 300 rifles.
During the night a band of insur
gents quietly entered Turnowllz. They
fired at random, breaking windows
and doing lesser damage, but causing
ho deaths.
French, sentries roused the smnll
cavalry detachment there and tho
horsemen in a flying charge through
the dark street broke up the Invnd-
(Continued on Page 8.)
LOCAL ELKS TO
STAGE CARNIVAL
WORLD-FAMED ATTRACTIONS BE
ING GATHERED FOR TWO
NIGHT CIRCUS.
An Elks' carnival, with bands, con
cession, features, dunces and all of
tho other to-numerous-to-mentton at
tractions that go into tho making of
a successful gala affair, will bo put
on by The Dalles lodgo No. 303, B.
P. O. E on May 27 and 28, it was an
nounced today. The carnival will bo
held ontirely Inside the Elks', temple.
In order not to conflict with the pa
geant, the afternoon of May 27, the
carnival will not start until 8 o'clock
in the evening.
Tho entertainment committer',
which has charge of working out tho
details for tho big carnival, bus gonn
to enormous expense to seciiro fea
tures from all parts of the world tor
tho entertainment of local Elks and
tholr ladles. For Instance, tho com
mittee today received two roulotto
wheels direct from .Monte Carlo, for
use by those Kportlvely wishing to
court the goddess of chance, In ad
dltlon to tho wheel, the committee hus
also secured the use of $3,000,000 In
currency from the treasury, which
will be Hold ut so much per thoiiHuml
ICIA
OUSTED
(Continued on Page I.)
WHITE COAL" OF
COLUMBIA WOULD
CREATE PROSPERITY
OREGON WITH HYDRO-ELECTRIC
POWER CAN SUPPLANT THE
EAST.
By Judge 8tephen A. Lowell
PENDLETON. Ore.. Mav 5 Tho
hydraulic resources of this state are
stupendous, even conceding to Well
ington equal claim and moral owner
ship in the potential power of the Co
lumbfa wherever that river constitut
es tho line between the states.
The electricity which may be devel
oped from the waterfalls which
abound In some sections of the state,
and which in the case of the middle
Columbia, the Deschutes and the John
Day 1b pregnant with rich promise of
desert transformation, invites the Im
mediate -attention of every thoughtful
citizen. $ .
Th 'Pacific ocean will one day rival,
If it does not surpass tho Atlantic in
commerce between the continents
Hitherto the backward races have
dominated the Orient and trade with
them has been meager as compared
with the exchange of commodities be
tween the Atlantic and Europe.
Thenceforward, however, Japan must
bo reckoned as one of tho progressive
powers of the earth, while lethargic
China is slowly awakening,
Tho white men of "Australia and
New Zealand will in the future look
toward America and Canada and hero
seeking exchange of products. All
ought to becdme manufacturing states,
the., commonwealths of the' Pacific.
W possess all the, raw materials,
save cotton arid Iron, necessary to
meet the demands of the Oriontal peo
ples and of the residents In the Anti
podes. With choap power, Oregon and
Washington can supplant the Atlantic,
states In the markets of 'Asia and the
islands of the southern sen.
A well-balanced state undertakes to
satisfy the needs of Its own people,
tho tastes of Its citizens in occupation,
and to see to It that nil Its Industrial
(Continued on Pago 4.)
CANTO'S HUT
AGAINST OBREGON
FLARES IN MEXICO
LA PUERTA CAPTURED IN8UR.
RECTOS 8URROUND TECATE,
PREPARE TO ATTACK.
By United Press
SAN DIEGO, Cal May 5. May 5,
Mexican Independence day, j;av; tin
Esitolmn Cantu revolution well under
way. Cantu iiiHiirrectoH are In pouhop
slon or La Puorta, 45 miles south of
Sun Diof.o. Thoy drove tho federal
garrison from La Puerta af'or a guer
Ilia fight.
SAN DIEGO, May 5. Rebel forces
have surrounded Tecate In Lower Cal
ifornia, 45 mllos southeast of horo,
and uro preparing to attack tho town,
according to a party of Americans
who passed through tho town ut 3
o'clock this morning. The snmu rebels
late yesterday afternoon bested the
federals south or Tocate In a short en
gagement. T
MYSTERY CASE
RIVAL FOR HAND OF GIRL MAY
HAVE DIRECTED
BULLETS.
By United Press
CHICAGO, May 5 James McDon
ough, sole support of kIx brothors
md sisters, was shot through the
heart early today.
McDonough, an employo of a dairy
lompany, was delivering milk on u
iouth side route.
Neighbors heard two shots and
li
MAN
IN
S
(Continued oa Pace I.)
PORTLAND FIRM
TO DRAW PLANS
HOUGHTALING AND DOUG AN
AWARDED CONTRACT BY
MUNICIPAL COMMITTEE.
CONCRETE IS MATERIAL
DORIC STYLE SELECTED MAIN
THEATRE TO ACCOMMODATE
1500 PER80N&
Plans for the new municipal audi
torium, bonds for the construction of
which were voted May 12, 1920, will
be drawn by Houghtaling and Dou-
gan, Portland architects, it was de
cided yesterday afternoon by the
auditorium plans committee appoint
ed by Mayor P. J. Stadelma'n, after
spending several days in carefully
going over tentative plans submitted
by local, Hood Rivor and Portland
architects. After checking dveV all
of the main features of the numer
ous mts of tnetativo plans submitted,
the tninmittee was unanimous in se
lctlnc these prepared by Houghtal
ing and Dougan, as the most suit
able for the type of building to be
constructed.
Out of tho $125,000 bond ' Issue
voted, $114,000 will be expended in
the construction of the building, the
other $11,000 having boen used for
tho purchaso of a site at Third and
Federal streets.
Tho now building will be construct
ed of concrete, with a brick facing
nnd either stone or terra cotta trim
mings, It will be designed in the
Tuscan Roman y Doric stxlo of, ar
chitecture, with simplicity' predom
inating, both interior and exterior.
Tho main theater of tho auditor
Aim will have n seating capacity of
1500 persons, with a fully equipped
stage capable of easily accommodat
ing tho largest of road shows. The
gallery will hmtse n complete fire
proof projection room, for use in
showing motion pictures. Dressing
rooms will be under the stage.
A community auditorium and gym
nasium will occupy another section
of tho building. Shower baths and
lockers will' bo Installed,
Tho second floor will bo occupied
in part by one of the finest bull
rooms In tho Pacific northwest,
moasuring 68 by 70 feet, which Is
half again as largo as any other hall
(Continued on Vagn 8.)
PEACE RESOLUTION
ENCOUNTERS DELAY
MATTER OF TOO HIGH IMPOR
TANCE TO BE RU8HED
THROUGH.
By Herbert W. Walker
(United Press Stuff Correspondent)
WASHINGTON, May 5 The Knox
peace resolution has encountered de
lay In tho limine.
Today Chairman Porter and other
members of the foreign affairs com
U'ltteo said It wus uncertain whon
tho penco resolution will bo consid
ered. Republican Leader Mondell al
so paid It was uncertain.
Asked about tho delay In the
houso, Porter said:
"This matter is so Important and
H closely connected with the situ
ation in Europe that wo In tho house
do not proposo to rush tho resolution
through Tho senate considered It
three wooks anil I fall to see why
the house should pass such an lm
pot taut measure In a few days."
PLANE TAKES NOSE DIVE;
AIR MAIL PILOT KILLED
Dy Unltua Tien
OMAHA, May 5 Air Mall Pilot
Walter Duntlng was today Instantly
killed ut Rock Springs, Wyo., whon
his machluo went into a noso dlvo
shortly after leaving tho ulr mall
field. liuntlng'B body was crushed
md later burned, when tho plane
:ook fire. The machine was- totally
lostioyed.
FOR MORION