The Oregon daily journal. (Portland, Or.) 1902-1972, November 10, 1920, Page 16, Image 16

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    THE OREGON DAILY JOURNAL
13
WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 10, 1920
PORTLAND, OREGON.
MUSICIAN
WORK 6 HOUR DAY
fN JENSEN HOUSES
Hereafter union musicians will
work six hours dally through a six
day week, in Jensen & Von Ilerberg
- theatres Inj the Northwest,'- according
to terms of settlement In" the strike
that has been waged against the
theatrical Company throughout the
last several mo.iths. .
Terms of .pettlement were made
known In rortland Tuesday evening on
the return from Seattle of Ct S. Jensen,
senior member, of the. firm against
which the : unions have been' leveling
their activities. ' -
The concession on the part of the
company, which carries the same wage
wale as under the old plan, Is countered
by the union in calling off their boycott
of Jensen & Von Herberg -theatres and
In releasing the company from union
demands t6r orchestras 'of - minimum
1e Union members will be restored to
rhoif umrif ' nt -the comnany'a theatres
in rortland". Seattle, Tacoma, Yakima
and Bremerton.
On behalf of the Jensen & Von Her-
Seattle meeting Jensen and 11. T.-Moore
. m Tv. .nnn ... a.A vonrAaoni oH
Ul lacvrnih una uiiiviin " 1 1 . i-'
by K. li Pettlngill, Portland attorney,
and W. J. Douglas, secretary of the Se
attle union of musicians: Frank Brad-
' ley, " president 4 of the Seattle union ;
Charles Doyle, president of the Seattle
5 Central Labor council, and H. C. Hol
linger of Los Angeles, an International
Motion ricture Operators' union officer.
Blooded Stock Are
Rapidly Filling Tip ;
Exposition's Yards
."" With only three days more to com
plete preparations for the coming show,
the Pacific ; International Livestock Ex
position's great pavilion at North Port
land is rapidly filling -with blue ribbon
cattle, horses, sheep, goats, and swine
from all over the, We&tern states and
from Canada. .
Carloads of prize-winning animals are
arriving daily. The pavilion and the ad
ditions built to care for the overflow,
now cover exactly eight acres. By Sat
urday morning, when the show will In
formally open, it will be filled to capac-
. ity. ; .
A new tent restaurant to augment the
Fatted Calfe" and "Ye Crumpled Horn"
cafes, was added Tuesday so that pa
trons will be supplied with plenty of
hot meata. day and night, 1 throughout
stock show Week. The new eating place
will be christened "The Tenderfoot
Tavern." The Oregon Agricultural col
lege delegation, comprising students
i who will compete In the judging con
tests, and animal husbandry representa
tives, will provide a nucleus of steady
boarders. !.
Ton nnroa of rmrlrln? anaea between
the front of the pavilion and the Co
lumbia slough have been ; prepared by
Superintendent George H. Buckler for
automobiles; Special street car service,
running through from downtown points,
will be provided by the P. (R., L. A P.
company, beginning earlyx.Saturday
morning. Parents and teachers are
asked to send the school chndrenout
-In the forenoon so that eongeBnotT in
the afternoon may be avoided. All chil
dren will be admitted free Saturday,
with half price for adults. Sunday's
. feature will be a band, concert, with half
price admission for all. On Monday
morning the Judging pf exhibits will be
gin, and the program of the show proper
will start, with night horse shows every
evening and a special matinee Saturday,
November 20. theloaing day.
Merchants Tailors
File j Second Suit'
Against Barkhurst
A." A. Benson and 35 other 'merchant
tailors of Portland filed suit Tuesday
aiiiet, iMT - uai aiiui oil WAing tvi e
temporary Injunction restraining him
from violating his contract with them
by dealing with union labor, and seeking
Judgment against him for $2300 for
failure to perform contract .
This I the second suit of this char
' acter which! the merchant tailors have
filed, the ( J first one having named
Barkhurst ' j and Herbert - Greenland
Jointly In -their first suit on similar
grounds. Circuit Judge McCourt up
held the vattdity of the contract be
tween the merchant tailors but held
that they could not bring the Joint ac
tion, but would have to sue individually
If they desired to further press their
claims.. '
SEPE'S WIDOW IS AWARDED
2500 DAMAGES FOR DEATH
An award of $2500 was made by a
jury in Circuit Judge McCourt's depart
ment of the Multnomah county circuit
court Tuesday In the suit of Mrs. Brl
glda Sepe, administratrix of the estate
of her husband, Clro Sepe, against L. K.
Dupree. Clro Sepe, who Was a track
oiler, aged 60, was struck by the auto
mobile of Dupree at Broadway and Wil
liams avenue February 11 last, and re
celved injuries from which he died. The
widow sued for $7500.. .
Liniment
aiops ; the. 7 nuchas
the follow exposure
CUDDEN changes of weather
or exposure to cold and wetj
. rnaka your "bono ache."
; ' Sioan'i Liniment brings
I -warmth, comfort and quick
' relief to lame back, stiff Joints,
sprains, strains, aoreaeas.
. -:r. Ptiutrates without rubbing. All
druggists S5c, 70c, $1.40.
Prompt Payments
And Avoidance of
Speculation Advised
OlympU, Wash.. Nov. 10. All the
banks in the state of Washington are
urged to insist upon prompt payments
and to discourage speculation, by Claude
P. Hay, state bank examiner. The fact
that the state and national banks in
Washington borrowed I2S.718.0O0 largely
to flnan.ee crop movement, he considers
sufficient evidence that the bankers have
done their duty. He cites the heavy re
discounting by the banks ' in Oklahoma
as the basis for demanding that farmers
pay their notes as soon as their crops
are harvested.
Cause of Woman's
Death Investigated
Yakima, Wash., Nov. 10. Believing
that Mrs. Ed Cook, who died Sunday
night, succumbed to the effects of a
beating received from her husband some
days ago, according to neighbors, the
authorities have been summoned to
White Swan to investigate the matter.
Word reached the sheriff and coroner
that in an altercation with Cook sev
eral of Mrs. Cook's ribs were broken
and she received other serious injuries.
Cook about two months ago was in the
county Jail on the charge of bootleg
ging. At that time Mrs. Cook, who had
obtained a divorce, 'wag the chief wit
ness, but before the trial they were re
married. !
8- ,rlV Oreen Stamp for cash. Hol
man Fuel Co.. Main 353, 660-2L Adv.
V
Say
A . I
"Gear-ar-Mf
D. CHIRAaDZLLI CO.
GHI
CITY BUDGET IS
BROUGHT DO WO
YEARLY RECEIPTS
Numerous mnall slashes in the
city's 1912 budget today had brought
the total of that estimate down to
approximately $3,500,000, a sum
equal to estimated receipts for the
same period. j
1 The $500,000 which has been cut from
the original budget presented the city
council November S was slashed first in
"gobs" of $100,000 and $50,000 and,
towards the last few days of considera
tion, pared in what the commissioners
were pleased to term "a more' delicate
manner." f
: Council members originally took $100,
000 from the budget by cutting their sup
ply estimates 10 per cent. They were
"gambling with the market ; the trend
is downward." Then cuts of $50,000 and
$30,000 and $25,000 were made in the de
partment of public works and utilities.
Road improvements,: such as Terwllllget
boulevard, were abandoned ; the park
department' lost the maintenance of
numerous parks ; Mayor Baker made
drastic slashes in his division of the
city government and Commissioner Blge
low "lopped off" $50,000 for perBonal
Service alone. : j : .
! At Tuesday's session the final $70,000
was cut. Street lighting lost $5000, the
fire bureau $6710, $3000 from the po-
TOMORROW
gJrmfettce Bap
The
Meier & Frank
Store WiH ; Be
- ! '
Closed All Day
It's easy enough to talk
about flavor But flavor is
something you don't ana
lyze. Your taste tells you
whether it's there or isn't
there.
GhirardeUPs lets you know
you're drinking chocolate
because the flavor is there
arid you know it ! We think
so much of this flavor that
not only do we watch Ghir
ardelli's in the blending
but we pack it only in cans
to protect and preserve that
flavor until" the last spoon
ful is used.
i
j
lice department and numerous small
cuts which brought the total down. "
Hty : will have an t emergency fund of
Iuiljt : hi
$2W000,
Continued
Blow to
Drouth
Farmers
Of
Lake
Districts
h Dry farmers of j the Fort Rock dis
trict, in Lake county, are suffering be
cause of the last four years of dry
weather, and, unless heavy snows this
winter furnish a big run-off next sum
mer, many of them will be forced to
give up their places, says R. C Briggs.
assistant engineer f the United States
geological survey, who with W. Daw
son, field assistant has Just returned
from a trip througk Klamath and Lake
counties. I'
The rivers and lakes in Central Ore
gon are dryer thani they have been at
any time since 18SS, says Briggs, and
not a good crop has been raised since
1916. Many of the springs are com
pletely dry. Williamson river, the out
let of Klamath marsh,! which drains an
area of 10,000 square miles, was com
pletely dry from June until October 1.
Silver lake, normally covering 10,000
acres, has been . completely dry for
three cummers. j
Briggs said that most of the ranges
in Southern Oregon iare owned by Cali
fornia cattle companies, which herd
their stock in Oregon and ship them to
Bakersrield. All the Southern Oregon
trade goes either to California or to
Nevada. Residents of Lake county sub
scribe almost entirely to Nevada news
papers, while those pf Klamath nty
take the California dailies. . which they
can receive about 1 24 hours quicker
than those from Foreland.
PORT OF ASTORIA
FACES DEFICIT IN
! Astoria, Or.. Nov. 10. The earn
ings of piers number 1 and number
2 of the port of Astoria terminals
for the last 10 months are sufficient
to pay the operating expenses, the
Interest on the bonds issued to con
struct these piers, and leave a net
balance of $21,000, ' according to a
financial statement taade by Man
ager R. R. Bartlett of the port com
mission. The grain handling and
wharfage revenues for November
and December are yet to be added
to the balance of $21,000. j
i The receipts segregated foliow: Grain
handling, $115,000; earnings, piers 1 and
2, wharfage, $96,000; leases and rentats,
$12,500; storage. $77,000. Total, S300,.
S00. The operating expenses were $184,-
693.97. leaving a balance in net earnings
Of $115,806.03. The interest on the
$1,890,150.46 in bonds Issued to construct
piers 1 and 2 was $94,507.52. and, deduct
ing that amount from the net earnings,,
leaves a balance of $21,298.51.
Regarding the non-producing depart
ment of the terminals, the report esti
MX
s
JJJj
i
2
5
DOCKS OPERATION
TO BE
Union Pacific System
Sunday,
As a Through Solid Train, Between Portland
and Chicago, Without Change, in 72 Hours
EQUIPMENT
TRAINS
17 AND 18
(5
3
CONTINENTAL
EQUIPMENT r
i , .
I
I
j service. .Chair Cars.
NEW TRAINS 23 and 24
EQUIPMENT Between Portland and Salt Lake City
Train service between Portland and Spokane remains unchanged, except that
Spokane 9:15 P. M. instead of 9 P. M. Arrive Portland 8:15 A.
EAST BOUND
NO. 24
NO. 4
11:00 P.
12:5S A.
1:40 A.
7:iS A.
10:55 A.
1.11 P.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
5:00
7:20
I
8:10 P.
12:20
3:35.
5:54
7:00
9:30
8:rt A. M.
6:20
5 :00
Call on our representitives for any detail information desired. They will make your reservations and deliver your tickets.
. C. W. STINGER, Agent, 3
L. " E. OMER, City Passenger , Agent. CONSOLIDATED' TICKET OFFICE, J. L. MILLER, Agent Union Station.
t
mates the expenses for the year at $388,
015.96. This sum Includes, among other
amounts, $160,000 for dredging, opera
tions, $28, $78. 81 on .construction of pier
3. $83,878 on unfinished contracts and
$96,742.48 interest on the $1,785,850 in
bonds issued to construct pier 3. To
offset this expense, receipts are given
as follows: -
Cash on hand, $107.459.41 ; uncollected
taxes, $58,103.64, and returns from piers
1 and 2. $21,298.51. Total, $186,861.56.
This leaves a deficit of $201,154.40,
which, the report recommends, be raised
by taxation, making the tax levy for
the port slightly less than it was last
year. .
Legion in Astoria
To Take JIo; Action
On Political Issue
Astoria, Nov. 10. Following the most
bitter fight ever waged In the Ameri
can Legion post here, that organiza
tion decided to take no action in regard
to members of" the post using the Amer
ican Legion to further their political
interests. The trouble resulted because
James W. Mott, candidate for city at
tbraey, used .his work as director for
a play which the legion recently staged
as a feature in advertising his cam
paign. - .
Members opposed to taking the legion
into politics wiQ appeal to the state ex
ecutive committee for a ruling on Mott'a
action, asserting that if he is upheld it
will mean that any candidate who is a
member of the legion can use the ex
service men's organization as a stepping
stone to political power.
v j J jy j 1 lll '
November
Composite Observation Cars, Standard Drawing-Room Sleeping Cars Tourist Sleep
ing Cars, Reclining CJhair Cars and Dining Car Service between -Portland and
Chicago. i i '. . " i V i . i'
; Standard Drawing Room Sleeping Cars between Portland and
Portland and bait Lake City.
Barber and valet service en route.
Other Changes
LIMITED Trains 4 and 19
Between Portland and Omaha
Standard Sleeping ' Cars and Tourist Sleeping Cars between Portland and Chicago,
between Portland and Kansas City, also between Portland and Denver. Dining Caf-
Standard Sleeping Cars between
.and Pendleton, between Portland and La Grande. Chair cars
CONDENSED
NO. 18
M.
M.
M.
9:00 A.
10:55 A.
11:45 A.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
Lr. ....... Portland .,......Ar.
Lv. ...... Hood River
Lv The Dalles........
Lv. Pendleton . i
Lv ..La Grande.
Lv Baker .........
Ar a.. Omaha Lv
Ar. . . Chicago. . -.Lv
A. M.
4:50
750
- 9:35
8:45
11:00
P.
P.
P.
P.
A.
M
M.
A.. M.
P. M.
5 :00 P. M.
10:55 A. M.
9:20 A. M.
Ar Salt Lake City......Lv
Ar Denver .Lv
Ar Kansas City Lv
P. M.
P. M.
701 weus-rargo ouiming. i Third and Washington Streets.
Broadway 4500 : . Main 3530. -
? , Wm. McMurray, General Yvuxnft Ajent PortUnd, Oregon
OVERSEAS VETS'
BODIES DUE TO
ARRIVE THURSDAY
Bodies of Gerald J. "Barrett 4nd
Joej D. Nelson, Portland boys who
died in overseas service, will arrive
in jPortland at 3 p. m. Thursday,
together with bodies of eight other
soldiers from the Northwest who
died abroad, according to announce
ment made by Major Frank P. Ting
ley, depot quartermaster. i ,
Gerald Barrett, son of Mr.. and Mrs.
J. K. Barrett, 266 North Twenty-first
street, was the first Portland bojto die
.In service In France. He was a student
at the Oregon 'Agricultural college at
the time of the mobilization of America's
troops. At the close of the school year
he enlisted and was- sent to Camp Lewis
and went overseas with V company,
Kighteenth engineers, under command of
Captain Kenneth M. llaiser.
ACCIDENT, FATAL '
.He was HfHoner the first 10.000 Amcr
icans to arrive on French soil. He was
stationed near Bordeaux,. where the en
gineers were building docks for the serv
ice of supplies. A. K. F., and was killed
December 31. 1918, in an accident, while
- I
in Train Service
Portland and Salt Iake City,
SCHEDULE
NO. 17
. 7:30
5:15
4:35
12:25
9:00
7:05
11:15
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
9:55
7:55
1:25
9:30 P. M.
1:15 P. M.
. 5 :00 P. M.
10:40 A. M.
on a work train- there. He was buried
In France with military honors and be
cause of this no funeral services will be
held by his family in Portland. ; His :
body will be interred at Rivervlew ceme
tery. ..!:---. -
Joe D. Nelson died at St. Aignon,
France, of pneumonia, in October, 1818.
lis was the son of Mr. and Mrs. B. Nel-"
son, 757 Missouri avenue, and the hus
band of Blanche Harper - Nelson. He
was a cook in Company B, 162d In
fantry. . I : .'-
NILITART FC5EBAI
A military funeral will be held Sat- :
urday afternoon from Krickson's par
lors, m charge of the Portland r"t rrf
American Legion. Six men of old Com
pany B will serve as pallbearers and
eight others will act as a firing squad.
Other bodies scheduled to arrive are;
Sergeant George F. Browning, 826th
aero squadron. Aberdeen. Wash. ; Cor
poral Gilbert C Waterhouse. Company
C, Third supply train. Centralis,' Wash. ;
Private Henry A. Usitalo, Company O,
861st Infantry. Seattle ; TVivate John
McDade, - Company L. 805th Infantry,
Olympla, Wash.; Private James 1L Al
lyn. Fifth company. Second M. M.. Gold-
endale. Wash. ; Sergeant Newman "!.
Dennlns, headquarters company. 162d In-
fantry Dallas, Or. : Private Owen TL
Johnson. Company K, Fourth battalion
Klghtieth engineers. McMinnville. Or.T
Private William A. ' Johnson, pioneer
school class, Riddle, Or.
I Body Is Identified
Yakima. Wanh., Nov. 10. The body
found In the Columbia river near While'
Bluffs 'has been, Identified as that of a
man : named, FalrbniHh, a resident of
Okanogan county, who probably com
mitted suicide. -
Denver, also between
j : ; t
between! Portland
and coaches.
No. 11 will .leave
M. ,
WEST BOUND
NO. 19
! NO. 23
8:30 A. M.
6:10' A. M.
5:30 A. M.
1:28 A. M.
. ! 7;30 A. M.
)4:40 A. M.
3:S0 A. M.
10:30 P. M.
.2 7:30 P. M.
? 5:17 P. M.
M
M.
M.
10:30 A. M.
i:3o"pM.
6:15 P. M.
11:30 P. M.
Broadway 802