The Oregon daily journal. (Portland, Or.) 1902-1972, March 15, 1919, Page 12, Image 12

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    12
THE OREGON' DAILY JOURNAL, PORTLAND. SATURDAY, MARCH 15, ItlO.
Mai
stng
Rules That Govern for Best Re
. suits From Egg laying Simple?
if Followed Knowingly.
The rules that Roverti selection are as
simple as A B C, says T. E, Quisen-
berry, president of the American Poultry
V- fl cl.. V).., t .awn.. tAnHmr Tv,aa
; . W vurns,., III lUC rclMUIlu WUIU J a.aa -
tial. For instance, a hen that is slow
to feather is lacking In vitality. She is
rjy nature a weaaiing. . nnw uo noi y
' eggs because they want to ; they lay Be
4 cause they are strong and vigorous and
egg laying Is a natural result which they
- cannot avoid.
Before jntlng your birds for another
season, take one more look at them,
and keep the following - rules in mind
when making your selection:- i
' Market those which have been slow
to- feather or seem to lack vitality.
Keep the pullets which matured quick
ly and started laying first. Those which
'tart laying when less than 200 days
old will be the best layers If they have
'the right care.
.Keep the late molters;
Keep the birds with, rather large,
plump combs and wattles.
, Hens with pale vents, pale beaks and
1 pale legs have been good- layers.
. " The skin of the best layers should be
! rather loose and flabby on the abdomen
'between the vent and breast bone. -
. The pelvic bones must be thin,
.straight, flexible and wide apart. .-
Market .the hens which are baggy be
, hind and which have a heavy, fat thick
abdomen which hangs down below the
!Sint of the breast bone.
' Keep the hustler and heavy eaters
f that go to bed late and' with full crops.
i!!i;i!Hi:i'ii!1i:hM!i't!iii ..
7!
YOUR
STOCKYARDS'
CHECK
; Is safeguarded when -left
' with us . for deposit ' to
yotfr home bank account.
LIVESTOCK
STATE BANK
Located at Union Stork Yardi
Worth Portland, Oregov
"Served by five transcontinen
tal railways ' and deep
water to the sea." -
1 ' -
.- memmm 1 11 JW . . m
I " ssrii3rrf& a a III
m .ejaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaHaaaaaaaaa i
jinuauuiiiiMte
ii sn -1
II -i : ijag???-B lac ..
'.t6a msmMMM
DIAMOND CHICK TO
Saves little chicks
and helps them to ,
grow quickly into
big. sturdy fowls.
N Other Fm4 Nenttery
km
Our POULTRY SUPPLY CATALOG and the "Buckeye!! and Lm
. Booklets, on request. Ask for Catalog No, 500
Day Old
Chicks
rkfh DRAIN ,
sending
Rye ' .
s J I
Here Are Some o Our Products:
. . - . WiUon's "Old Fashion" Breakfast Rye.
' .Wilson's "ScotU.h O.t MeV fine or coarse. r
WiUon'a "Breakfast Wheat" or Whole Wheat Granules.
.Wlon s "Old Fashion Corn Meal" (ground from the whole
kernel), j' , . - -
WUson'a "Old Fashion Whole Wheat Flour." i N i-T
-v We utilise the -; whole kernel of the srain, extracting ao
part. . ; t .' "' ' s-n.;' -f- '-' ' -, j,-:1 V -t , i... . ' ? jj;;-r'e. '. .
If yon live in Portland, phone and we will deliver u. fa
package from 9 to 50 pounds of the above cereals or send by
mail, posUge paid, in first and second aones. ,
Send 40 cento for four-pound trial package by mail, and ask
for prices on larger quantities. ; We pay postage in first and
second Bones. i. . - .
TheOH FasWon MillingCo.,
" " Oiniers te Private Famttles) ' . "
Ul HeUaoay Ave, Portlasd, Or. . j nMt inif c-lltt
' ' , "- . , v. - ' r - " - !. !4 : - '
Poultry
Birds that , have long toe nails that
how no signs of being workers are usu
ally unprofitable., i. " V .
If ' a" bird meets the above require
ments. It should have a - broad back,
long body, be stoutly built and in good
flesh. , i
f If a bia-d la not molting and still has
a small drled-up oomb covered 1 with .a
sort of whitish substance, or If a bird
has thick or crooked pelvic bones, which
will be found on each side of the vent
and above the point of the breast bone,
these are always money losers. - ';,, V:
. No man or woman can afford to feed
a flock of drones at the present prices
of feed, but the good layers will make
more profit than in any previous year.
NOTES - -JtsiO
Early : J chicks develop rapidly into
provident" 'pullets that replace the in
dustrious 'bens' as flock breadwinners
when the molting season arrives. These
early pullets produce j in plenty during
the periid when eggs are scarce and
hence , high In price; . In order that the
late, fail and early, ' winter j stream of
eggs may flow ' to market uninter
ruptedly -it is essential to Jump the tra
ditional i berries and hatch ' early and
hence wisely. V
, There are two - systems in use for the
ffeedlng of fowls. In one of which all the
feed is given dry and in the other of
which one1 or more of the idaily feeds
consists Of a moistened mash. For con
venience they may be termed the ."dry
feed'!, and the "mash" 7 systems, al
though In the dry-feed system a dry
mash is 'often fed. Dry feeding is used
by many whereis is "not convenient to
make -the feed a moistened mash. The
greatest advantage to be derived from
the dry system are the saving of labor
and the lessened danger of bowel trouble
resulting from sloppy or soured mashes.
.
"When one has only a few chickens. It
is lees "trouble to purchase prepared
chick -feeds, but .where a considerable
number ! are - reared it is sometimes
cheaper to buy the finely cracked grains
and mix them together. Some chick
feeds contain a large quantity of grit
and may contain grains of poor quality,
so that they should be carefully exam
ined and guaranty as to quality secured
before purchase. .
P. E. ESBENSH ADE
ISO Eaif Morrison Pertlaad, Or.
Call and Lome Over
Our Big . Stock of
STUDEBAKER VEHICLES
CLEVELAND TRACTORS
Wade Portable I Drag - Saws, - Peoria
Prills, Litchfield Maaare Spreaders.
Iron Age Garden Tools, Potato Plant
era, Spray lag Oatflts and Braeader
- Baudot Auto Tires
Write or Can tor Catalog and Prices
WE DEVELOP KODAK, FILMS FREE
and pay return .postage when prints
ar ordered. : ,
Man us your film
with 6 cents In
s t ate p a for each
print desired.
Cash refunded for
unprintable films or
excess.
Established 18(3
"WOOD ARB.
CLARKE
CO.
Portland. Oregoa
NO EXPERIENCE
"-" needed to raise chicks by the
new " Buckeye " method.
' Jutt ketp tit lamp bvminf . '
: ni turn tit tgg
Thm "Buckmy" Domm thm Jtcaf.
JL
v8ce tl? 4' Buckeye Mammoth' (2440 egga)
hatching chicks every day ia our salesroom, -
Pi .
"BUCKEYE!
j BROODER
t STOVii,
Broods
100 to 1000
Chicks
Tsemtiikrei rwlry
Ml :
fgts far HatcMos
A granulated mush containing the
wholo rye kernel. It has a distin
guishable, delicate flavor that
is
'fast winning its way to. the front.
very wholesome. ; i
You can get any of the Wilson products
delivered direct from !e mill by phoning or
your order by mail.
Big : Farm
BARRED ROCK IS
EVER OF INTEREST
-- - ' . ' t . . - :
Breeders Are Constantly Gaining
SS IS - I 1 n i W
more . rxnowieageu 01 ropuiar
v Form Birds.
By H. 4. Hamlet
At this time of the year it Is always
of Interest, especially, tothe Inexperi
enced poultry breeder, . to discuss the
problem of mating his birds for best
results. We hear many theories from
those who have., had a year or two,, ex
perience and feel that they have learned
it all. The Barred Rock Is a bird that
the longer mated ' and bred, the more
you learn. After I had bred them four
years I felt that It was all learned, but
more than double those years are past
and I am still learning.
The . Barred Plymouth Ttock is a bird
whose family, like the Brown Leghorn,
is divided - into two distinct lines of
breeding, known as the . cockerel and
pullet breed, '.or light . and dark breed,
the . cockerel ' being the dark and the
pullet , the light. This way of breeding
was adopted because the male Rocks
have a tendency to come lighter color
than the females. The Standard of Per
fection calls for a certain even bluish
barring, free from green sheen, light
hackles, etc. ! i
Show Recognizes Light Breeds
The females must be the same shade
of color and free from the same' defects.
To get the same shade of color we must
make two ma tings, one to produce show
males and one show pullets as described
in the Standard. However, the shows
are recognizing the light or pullet bred
males and the dark' or , cockerel bred
females and . are giving them a class
in. the show r&om, so a breeder can
raise either the light , or dark Rocks
and show both -males and females. In
both Rocks and Brown Leghorns.
The cockerel bredT or dark Barred
Rocks are the most popular. The rich,
hard, narrow barred males are the
Standard requirement and are most
beautiful. For best results we must
first be sure that the vitality of the in
dividual male and female is suitable. If
not, don't mate them.'
Preferred Markings
The male must be vigorous and strong,
but not necessarily large ; - barring
should be very narrow and straight
across the feather; the light and dark
bars equal in width, clear to 'the skin ;
feather tips should be dark and the
feather shaft - should be dark where
the bar is dark. Wings must be as
evenly and narrow barred as possible, he
should be as evenly and narrow barred
as possible in the body or thigh feath
ers. This is extremely important, the
male should be darker than the Stand
ard show requirement for best results,
but must be positively free from green
sheen. This Is a serious defect in
Rocks. i
The female for cockerel bred or dark
mating should be several shades darker
than the male. The dark bars should
be two to three times wider than the
light bars and as straight as possible
across the feather, each feather should
be heavily tipped with dark, the under
barring should be very dark, so dark
that the bars are only traceable but
Ehould show to the skin, should be es
pecially well barred In the body or
thigh feathers, the wings must be very'
dark only showing traces of barring.
especially towards the tips.
She should be very dark alt over,
but free from any green sheen. Both
the mate and female should be uniform
in surface color. Light hackles should
be avoided by all means. Where , the
male or . female is lacking In : require
ments, the opposite sex must be suffi
ciently strong to overcome the defect.
The female should be well up . In else
and especially where . the male is too
small. If she is small, use only a large
male with her.. Best, results will be had
from small matings. More show birds
come from pens where three of four
females are used.
The Pacific International Livestock
exposition has potentialities fof more
good to the agricultural Industry than
any one other thing that can be con
ceived. .
When answering advertisements men
tion The Journal. It will pay you. It
helps us. , -1 .
& The Original
tea ': r a a - ' ; enw
teea
The lactic add in the pure, rich buttermilk
strengthens and tones up the sensitive digest-
ive organs of the little chick and helps to pre
vent White Diarrhea.
Conkey la different from all other chick
feeds, and coats so little for those critical first
Swaeiu, becaoMof rank obtain. It builds atrooo-.
tardy ebieks that stow lata kaary larara, food
brMdcra, aad roll-bodiad market fawn. Bf or tfa
ehieka coma, eat a bae aad ba raady to start thcaa
tight, follow wtth Coakcr'a Bottanailk Huh, tha
rt Paratope aad Esx rredaoar. Sold by aariaia.
Routledge Seed & Floral
i Company
v use
Golden Rod
Poultry Fob tls
Chick Food
Developing Food
Scratch Food j -Growing
Mash
Egg 'Mash
Poultry Oats
Pigeon , Food :
Fattening Mash
All our poultry foods are mixed
according to. the formulas 'of. an
expert and practical poultry man.
Take no chances insist upon the
GOLDEN ;ROI BRAND. 1
GOLDEN ROD
MILLING CO.
. . . ..
: Manufacturers of Cereals and 1
- Poultry Foods
PORTLAND C OREGON
Asset
, Get Bid et the Bodeats '
The annual losses from rodent
pests In the United, States have been
estimated at fully $500,0QD,000. . .
About two-fifths of this damage
is Inflicted by house rata and mice,
both introduced from the old world,
and the remainder by 'native spe
cies.' 5 -!:: if 'f.:- AfiiV
This enormous waste of resources
. may be greatly reduced through sys
tematic and organized campaigns
ag-ainst the injurious "species.
The bounty system effects no per.
manent relief and is far more costly
than the use of poisons and traps.
The United States department of
agriculture has developed and per
fected practical methods of ; exter
mination which have been success
fully applied over wide territory.
The bureau of biological survey of
the department cooperates with the
public In organizing and carrying- out
systematic campaigns against animal
pests and Invites correspondence on
the subject.
Protection of their natural enemies
is urged as an important aid in con
trolling rodent pests.
WARMTH IS GREATEST
EMERGENCY BROODER
Brooder Must Be Kept in Read
iness for Use at the Proper
Moment.
By the Halted States Department ef
Agrietaltare.
The first requirement of yountr chicks
is warmth a temperature comfortable
for them. Chicks hatch at a tempera
ture of 102 to 105 degrees. .When brooded
by hens they remain under the mothers
nearly all the time for two or three
days. Chicks shipped In small boxes
are kept warm by the heat of their bodies
so long as the boxes are not exposed to
near-freezing temperatures, but this na
tural heat is not sufficient when they
are given-more liberty.
: Have the Brooder Beady
Buyers of chicks should have a brooder
such as Is required for the number of
chicks bought, ready, warmed and regu
lated when "th-hlcks arrive
If, for any reason, the brooder Is not
ready, take the chicks from the shipping
box. in a warm room ; feed, and return
to the box ; repeat at intervals of three
hours until the brooder is ready.
For the first few days give very close
attention to regulating the brooder for
the comfort of the chicks. This is the
most troublesome state In the operation
of a brooder, and the most critical period
in the life of the chick.
Emergency Brooder
Delay In delivery of a brooder some
times puts a novice in a quandary as to
what to do with chicks. A brooder for
temporary use may be made as follows :
Take a box, without cover, ' about 18
to 24 inches square and 10 inches high.
In one side, next the bottom, cut an
opening 3 inches high by 10 Inches long
for the chicks to pass through. Protect
the opening with a strip of cloth, tacked
at the upper edge, having perpendicular
slits from the lower edge to within half
an Inch of the top to give the chicks pas
sage. This box. covered on top with a piece
of old "blanket or quilt, may be used
without heat when the outside tempera
ture is 70 degrees Fahrenheit or over.
For lower temperature a jug or bottle
of hot water should be placed in the
box and refilled as, often as necessary
to keep the chicks Comfortable.
REPORTS SHOW THAT
WEIGHT OF HOGS IS
STEADILY INCREASING
Receipts at 11 Principal Markets
The Past Year Placed at
32,853,000 Head.
Chicago, March 15. A statement is
sued by R E Helde, secretary and gen
eral superintendent of the International
Livestock Exposition, shows clearly how
hog production has been expanded by
cooperation of farmers, packers and con
sumers with the United States food ad
ministration and the department of agri
culture. Receipts at the 11 principal markets
In the 12 months just closed with Feb
ruary were 32,853.000 hogs, as compared
with 28,041,000 in the same period of
1917-1918 and 25,035.000 in the corre
sponding pre-war period of 1913-1914.
-In addition, the weight of hogs In
creased from 1 to 10 per cent over 1917,
the Increase varying In the different
markets. -.
Hog prices at Chicago during the 12
months just closed averaged monthly
117.77 per hundredweight. The average
monthly price in the same period of
1917-1918 was 116.22, and in the corre
sponding 12 months of 1913-1914 was
18.45.
Thus, the farmer has been getting
more per hundredweight for his hogs,
and has been selling more hogs per hun
dredweight. . Cattle receipts during the . calendar
year 1918. at nine principal markets,
increased : about 17 per cent. But a
slight decrease in the weighf of the cat
tle reduced the, net gain to about 14 per
cent i '
Cattle which are now being sold to
packers at a top . price - around 819.50
were sold a year ago around 814.15 and
around $9.15 In 1915.
It la noted, however, that the ' hogs
now coming to market are maintaining
the increased weight - for swine. ' it is
thought that the minimum price estab
lished by the government has played
a part in keeping up weight.
--v ,. i ; i
Fruit Growers Are
; Of fered Information
John Paver, formerly , assistant sales
manager, of the Sunmald Raisin asso
ciation, il now associated wtth the Hall
& Emory company, ia. the Gasco build
ing, Portland.' Paver la Intimately ac
quainted vrttbr-ailthe- large Jobbers In
Pacific coast fruits all; over the United
States, and part of the service offered
Oregon fruit growers Is information on
markets and possibilities of markets for
Oregon fruit in the Kast.
NECESSITY FOR CHICKS;
MILK CONTESTS
E
Seemingly Hopeless Lack of San
r itation Changes Till Portland
Is Marked for Milk Supply.
' How the milk contest plan -baa ef
fected the rise In quality of market milk
in Portland until the Rose city , stands
at the head of all large cities in the
United States la explained In a new bul
letin, written by E. C, Callaway, chemist
of the city bureau, and P. S. Lucas,
assistant professor of dairying at the
Oregon Agricultural college. The bul
letin was issued by the college experi
ment, station and not only Indicates the
very . great value of the ' milk contest
plan, but serves as an excellent guide
to managers of milk distribution in any
city anywhere.
Three systams of distribution are
enumerated, producer-distributors in'
elude the bona fide dairyman who milks
from one , to five ; cows and peddles the
milk jnostly among his neighbors.- Milk
dealers get their supplies from farmers.
pasteurize it and distribute it.
The back-lot . dairy is said, to be
responsible for the most difficult phase
of the milk problem.
"In most cases," says the report.
"children handle and distribute the
product. They use little or no equip
ment such as the modern dairyman finds
necessary. While it seems to be recog
nized that the city is not the proper
place for a dairy, yet these small milk
men enjoy both the patronage and pro
tection of the suburban population. The
rules and regulations - enforced on ' the
bona fide dairyman in Portland do not
apply -to these men. At the present time
because of these conditions, the plan of
milk Improvement described In this bul
letin does not apply to the. small urban
dairyman. Ten per cent of Portland's
milk supply comes from such small
dairies."
When city milk inspection was' begun
In 1909 a deplorable state of milk con
ditions was unravelled in the chemical
laboratory. About 75 per cent of the
mux was either watered - or skimmea,
or both, .and contaminated with' filth
which was covered .up by coloring mat
ter. Detecting milk adulteration and
eradicating tuberculosis from the herds
were leading activities for two or three
years. Then came the dairy Inspection
and an educational campaign in produc
tion and handling of sanitary milk.
Finally official scoring of milk and pub
lishing of scores was authorized, which
Immediately eliminated several hopeless
ly unsanitary plants.
But scoring of dairy plants alone was
Inadequate to guard the milk quality.
and a plan -was adopted whereby these
ratings would be only half of the final
scores, the other part being made up
on the scores of the milk collected In dif
ferent ways at unexpected times. These
scores were published in the'dally press
and in the health bureau bulletin. Then
began the upward march that has put
Portland In the lime light as the city
of sanitary milk and low death rate.
IS
NSTALLING MODERN
COLD STORAGE PLANT
New Equipment Will Afford All
Possible Protection to Fresh
Meats and. Poultry.
It is costing, the Savinar company,
Inc., Front and Stark streets, upwards
of $5000 to Install Its modern cold stor
age plant, which will be in readiness to
receive country killed meats and dressed
poultry about March 15. J. W. Savinar,
manager of the company, gave orders to
the builders to spare no Vains to make
the olant as Derfect as oosslble. and
Khese Instructions are being faithfully
observed. The interior of the apart
ment' is 15 by 40 feet, and its walls are
composed of six plies of - clear dressed
matched fir lumber, with heavy building
paper between each. - It will be supplied
with all up-to-date appliances, and when
completed will afford all possible safety
to fresh meats and poultry received dur
ing the warm days of summer.
"We are incurring this expense." says
Mr. Savinar, "largely for the protection
of our country shippers, but also : to
benefit not only ourselves but those1 to
whom we sell our products. We are
dally In receipt of fresh meats and
dressed poultry from railway stations as
far : south as Roseburg and north, ; to
Tacoma. territory In that direction and
Pendleton to the east. ' These are ex
press shipments and In hot weather.
there being no refrigerator cars running
into Portland, there is great danger of
taint, unless the carcasses are disposed
of immediately on their receipt here.
Having our own truck we will this
season meet air express trains, receive
shipments direct ' from the , cars and
hurry them to our own cold storage
room, thus insuring pure, sweet meats
and poultry to our customers. This will
stop all controversy with shippers as to
the condition of meats and poultry when
placed on board trains, as there will be
no time for such to spoil prior to reach
ing us, and besides our patrons will be
pleased with the service 'we . render, as
that which they buy from us is sure to
be fresh as If just from the hands of
the butcher."
"Where to Get U"
PHONE BROADWAY IS TOB
eEculNE,1PAQQCK,, Boot. gPKurog
' (BS S A I
Standard Brick & Tile Co.
88 rUTH STREET
W Bar Co te 8 nit Ever KmO. '
ALSO FIB COBDWOOn, J r
KEMMERER and
ROCK SPRINGS COAL
TBS CLEANEST AND BEST BtT&MUfO
COALS. PRICES REASONABLE. ,
it m sj
Eaat 144 B-1 X44
NATIONAL FUEL- CO. Order your
COHDWOOD S7.fi O pa end. dalirarwL pboaa
Tfrboc S869.
RAS
QUALITY
SAVINAR
COMPANY
Farm Bureau Favors
, f Patronizing Home
t The county agent has -advocated -cooperative
buying. And-selling and has
given assistance along these lines In
many cases. He has, however, - always
advised buying locally, especially if
fair treatment and ' prices were given.
The agent: himself cannot act as the
purchasing or selling agent, however.
In order to clear up any misunderstand
ing In this respect . the farm bureau
passed the following resolution at the
annual meeting at Albany, February JS:
Resolved, that the county agent shall
not: serve as. a business agent In co
operative buying and selling farm prod
ucts. Wherever cooperative buying Is
desired In large quantities ft Is the ex
pressed, desire of this bureau that local
business men shall be given the first
opportunity to submit bids. Wherever
local organisations such as the Orange
or Farmers union exist it is recommend
ed that this work be handled by them.
The county jagent will, however, be ex
pected to secure and have available In
formation relative to sources and prices.
The chickens are getting ready for the
Easter rush. ;rf-.
WW TODAY
Synopsis of tha. Annual Statamant of the
NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL" LIFE INSURANCE
COMPANY '
Of Boston, la the State of MMchueUJ, on the
Slst day of December. 1918, mad to tha In
surance Commissioner of the Stats of Oracoa,
pursuant to law:
,. INCOME
Total premium income ...... .1 11,720.893.84
Interest, diTidend and rents
reeeiTed during the year.... J.888.T35.80
Income from other sources re-
ceived during- tn year..... . 53.880.59
Total income .. . . .S". . 17
DISBURSEMENTS
Paid for lones, endowments, an
nuities and surrender yahiesS 7
Dividends paid to policy holders
. dutins the year .......... 2
Commissions and ; salaries paid
during the year .......... 1
Taxes licenses , and teas psid
dnrlne the rear ..........
,650.988.53
379440
493.788.72
778.869.12
278,971.97
75S.814.83
Amount of , all other expendi
tures
t
Total expenditures ...... .. 12.589.179.4S
ASSETS
Value 'of real estate , owned
(market alue) $ LUMIW
Talua of stocks and bonds
owned (amortized ralue).. . 53.698.842.00
Loam on mortgages and eollat- - m
araUetc 16,415,385.61
Premium notes and , policy
loans 14,548.722.56
Cash in banks and on hand. ... 619,841.09
Set uncollected and deferred ...
premiums . . . 829,081.04
Interest due and accrued...... 1,155.829.36
Total assets .
Total Mill
. .$ 89.166,637.66
in
admitted
Oregon ..... . . ........ S
89.166.6S7.6S
LIABILITIES
Net MatrvMV .,.,...$ J2.82.
Total policy claims unpaid..... ; 844.518.JS
DiTidendT:. 8.041,744.22
AU other liabilities ......... 1.870,783.27
Total liabilities. fnrfudinir
surplus of $3.607.412.36.. 89.166.637.66
Total insurance in force Decern- - r;".
ber 31, 1918 . . $403,609,868.00
BUSINESS IN OREGON FOB THE YEAR
Total insurance written' dunng
the year . ...... -$
Gross premiums received daring
the year ................
Premiums returned during the
year
Losses paid ' during tha year. . .
Looses incurred during year....
Total amount of insurance out
. standing in Oregon I Decern-;
ber SI. 1918
920,394.00
106,771.52
9,813.84
17.000.00
17.000.00
2.988.998.00
NEW ENGLAND MUTUAL LIFE EiSUBANCE
COMPAN x
ALFRED I. rUSTEE, President.
J. A. BARBEY, Secretary. -
Statutory resident attorney for service: ;
HORACE MECKLEM.
Srnopsis of tha Annual Statement of
THE INSURANCE COMPANY OF THE STATE
OF PENNSYLVANIA
of Philadelphia, in the state of Pennsylvania, on
the Slst day of December. 1918. msde to the
insurance commissioner of tha state of Oregon,
pursuant to law: ;
CAPITAL
Amount of capital stock paid up. $1,000,000.00
INCOMB
v luMmfaiiM received durins! tha '
year $2,796,858.74
VMt.Mafr AlvirtOTift and rents re
ceived during the year. ...... 197,338.75
Tivmma from other sources . re
ceived during the year ...... 442.205.gJ
' Total income . .$3,486,698.38
, DISBURSEMENTS
K .., naM rinHn 'ill tMf.
lnerodina- adiustment expenses. $1,591,931.41
ipiilli aits pair! on capital stock
Nona
Commissions and salaries paid dur
ing the year
Taxes, licenses and fees paid dur
88T.S8t.92
ing the year . It 1,551 20
Amount of all other expenditures, 627,638.04
Total expenditures ......$3,088,552.57
ASSETS ' ' , '
Vslnj. f reel estate owned ( mar
ket value) $ 371.008.83
v slue ef stocks and bonds owned
(market value) 8.578,642.60
Loans on mortgages and collateral. .
ate. Nona
Cash in banks and oa hand. . . 277,734.15
Premiums in course of collection
written since Sept. 80, 1918, S23.S60.17
Interest and rents due ana accrued
and other items 45.840.83
Total assets $4,790,085.48
Less special deposits in any state. 62,052.72
1 Total assets admitted in Ore
gon ... . $4,737,632.76
LIABILITIES
Gross claims for losses unpaid.. S 464,631.00
Amount of unearned premiums on
all outstanding risks . ... 2.721.839 76
Due for commission and brokerage Nothing
au -otaer ueoiuttes 240.644.13
. Total liabilities, exclusive of
mptta stock of $1,000.-
000 i. ........ ... $3,426,614.90
BUSINESS IN OREGON FOR THE TEAR
Gross premiums received during
the year . . . ............$ 67.001.40
Premiums returned during tha
year . . . . ... . ' 8.580.68
Losses paid during tha "year.... 18.873.17
Losses incurred during the year.. . 14.858.22
THE INSURANCE COMPANY OF THE STATE
OF PENNSYLVANIA
OusUtus Remak Jr.. president; John J, P.
Rodger, secretary.
. Statutory resident attorney for service, John
H. Burgsrd. Portland, Or.
Send U Your Old Carpets
Old Bagt aad Woelea Clotalag. i
We Make Bersrslble. Haad Woven
Fluff Rugs
They Wear Like Ire a.
v Rag Bags Worsa All Slses.
Man Orders Bead for Booklet.
Carpet Cleaning .
9x12 Rugs. Steam Cloanee $1.50
'.. WESTtBir rxtrrr nvo co. f
tTsloa Ave.' H. .:..i'-:
Zait 6tl6 Pkeaes B147
NORTHWEST RUG
COMPANY r
ORMER AODRBSb 1U UNION AVBL
New Ron made from ail kinds of old
trp9tM. Carpsit tJeaujinar. Jrleflttlngj. Ke
isinaT. Rag Hues woven ail aUaes. .
. -.MaU Orters Soltetted.
BAST tlW )g . Blu , B-1336
The Famous
Castle Gate Goal
ECONOMY FUEL CO.
vnrz AOEST8
X. tl4B.SS4$ ' SI GRASD
KEW TODAY -
MFFTITfO TOTICE 41
EUREKA COUNCIL NO. 204.
KNIGHTS AND LADIES
1 . Oh SECURITY,
win give a grand masquerade
baU next Monday evening,
March 17, at the East Side
W. O. W. hail. East 6th and
Alder its. Grand prises will
be . given . for tha best dress
and characters. Admission 504 and 35s.
THIS 18 THE COUNCIL THAT DOES THINGS
BIGGEST AND LARGEST IN THB-
STATE OF-OREGON
- - Large committee will Insure everyone a good
time. Come and see. You are cordially In
vited. STATED oommunicatioa Esst
' Gsta lodge No. 165. A. F. AND
A. M., Monday evening, - March
17. 1919. 7 p. mv Work ia the
Entered Apprentice degree. There
-will be a special feature in tha
conferring of this degree that wiil ba worthy
of attention. Members requested to ba present.
Visiting brothers cordially invited.
CHAS, 1. NELSON. See.
E. P. MERTZ. W. M. .
B. P. O. ELKS No. 142. Spe
cial meeting this - (Saturday)
evening. Elks' Temple, 8 o'clock.
Initiation of candidates. Visit
ing brothers welcome.
sf. U. BrAUi.IJiU,
GRAND mssquerade ball, givsn
by Moosehesrt legion of
the World, St. Patricks day,
March 17, Moose iiall, 4th
and, Taylor sto. S ptuos. -
EMBLEM jewelry a specialty, bottom, pin.
ebarsss. Jaeger Bros.. 131-183 6th eu
HJODGg roosa tor rent. East 8030 evsnlBgs. ,
TijtaJ Statistics j
' MARRIAGE I.ICEXSK
Amer Willis Lathrop, 2 1 , Turner, Or., and
Kina Lorene Huffman. 18, 179 79tl st.
Clarence Henry Aebly. 22. Tekoa. Wash.. an
Helen GUdys Gifford, legal, 3212 61 at. S. E.
John Swinge, 27, 1 Underwood, '' Wash., gnd
IliWa M. Wenclland. 27. 648 E. 24th st.
Edward H. .Sutton, legal. 1249 E. Taylor St.,
and Mrs. Eva E. Keeley. legal. 142 E. 89th at.
John Dick, ' 82. 344 Skidmora St.. and Dora
Christian. 23, 560 E. Mason st. ; ' ,
' George A. Young, legsl. 186 Russell at, and
Cleo Crawford, legal, 77 4 Mississippi ava.
George C. Humke, 24. 411 Main st., and Ls
nore E. Schwabauer, 28. 6 E. 78eh st N.
,.: - , BIRTHS ' -
JONES To Mr. nd Mrs., E. M.j Jones, 7319
64 th. March 7, a son. 1
a.ARK To Mr and Mrs. J. Clark, 518 Na-
balem ava.. Feb, 25. a son. - .
FLORA To Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Flora. 966
B. 23d. a daughter. i
WEBSTER- To Mr. and Mrs. Geo. L. Webster,
193 W. Park. March 9. a daughter.
YEATCH To Mr. and Mrs. J. Ci Veetch, 946
Dunckley, March 8, a danghter.
RANDALL To Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Ttandall,
466 E. Harrison, -March 12, a daughter. .
LEWIS To Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Lewis, 97 E.
79th, March . 16, a son, - '
HALE To Mr. and Mrs. L. O. Hale. 1966 E.
Washington, March 9, a daughter. -RITCHEY
To . Mr. and Mrs. Hj G. Ritchey.
4 Flanders. March 12, a daughter.
DOSER To Mr. and Mrs. J. Doeer, 4314 E.
'74th. March 4, a son.
; DEATHS AXP TPITEBALg 7
M'GOWAN March" 1 4 , at 80 6 " FaUlng street;
James McGowan, aged 52 year; beloved broth
er of Mrs. John Bonner-of Missouls, Mont :
Margaret and Alice McGowan of this city. Tha
funeral will take place Monday, -March 17, at
8:15 m.. from the above residence, thence to
St , Mary's . church, Williams avenue god Stan
ton" -streets, where msas will ; be I offered at 9
a. m. Friends invited. Interment Mount Cal
vary? cemetery, - - ' .
BAKER At the family residence, 6024 88th
ava. 8. E.. Henry Richmond Baker, aged 49
years, , beloved bitsbsnd of Wis. Id Baker. Fu
neral services will be held tomorrow (Hundsy),
March 16, 1919, at 3:30 p. m., from tha Port
land Crematorium. E. ISth andi Bybee ave.,
under the auspices of Arleta camp No. 805..W.
O. W. Members of Arleta camp please meet at
the hail at 1 :S0 to attend funeral! in body. A.
D. Keoworty A Co., directors, 5802-4 P2d St.
COHON At tha residence. 493 IE. 85th at,
March 15, 1919. Louis Cohon., Friends in
vited to attend the funeral services, which will
ba held at Holstan's funeral - parlors at 12
(noon) tomorrow i Sunday ), March .16, 1919.
Interment Share! Torah cemetery. -j -
ATKINSON In this city, March 114. Hugh N.
- Atkinson. 730 Wygsbt. street, aged SO years.
Tha remains are being forwarded - today ( Sat
urday) to Goldendale. .Wash.. . by Dunning At
ascfe.nteo. -- ' i
FUNERAL services of the UU I Mrs. C.
Bankuead will ba held Sunday, Match 16, at
2:80 p. m. at the Portland Crematorium, E.
14th and Bybee ave. mends rnvitea.
UOODMAN Florence May t;oodman. Good Sa
mxritan hospital. March 18, 24 years, septi-
eemte - . ' I
STRAIN Henrietta Strain. 409 IStark, March
IZ, fn years, uremia puiomns.'J . .
BAILLIE Frank H. Baillia, Portland ssniUr"
ium. March 12. 53 years, hypstatia snlarga-
ment - - , t - '
HAWLEY Harria H. Hawley, 505 E. Broad
way. March 11. 63 years, angina pectoris.
CUMPEST Frederick Onmpest. en route to
hospital. March 11, 43 years,; acute dilata
tion ot Heart'" - "-'
H08FORI) Fred WyllU Hosford. en rouU to
hospital. March 11, 4 years, fracture.
WEIR W. J. Weir, St Vincents hospital,
March' 11. 54 years, enlarged glands.
COVERT George Covort. 560 - Woodward,
March 11, 75 years, srterio sclerosis.
ANDERSON (Godfrey Anderson, Good Samari
tan hospital. March 11. 03 years, tuberculosis.
POWERS Phin H. Powers. 647 Borthwick,
March 12. 64 years, carcinoma.
GOODMAN Dora Goodman. 4 41 6th. March
n. years, cnronie nepnrttta, i
FLOUISTB -
CLARK HROS., florrfsts, , Morrison st, bat, 4th
and 5th. Phones Main or A-1805. Fine flow
ers aad floral designs. No branch stores. '
MARTIN AFORBMCO.rriortots. '38 Wash
ingtorJ. . Main 289. A-1269. Flowers for aU
occasions artistically arrsnged. n- -
EfBERTY MARKET" FLORIST. Srh aeA Tsns-
hill sta. Cut flowers, plants and designs. Sell
wood rreenhouse. 649 Nehalem avm. Sell. 1520.
PEOPLES FLORAL SHOP. T45 Alder, design
- ana aeoorstions. Phone Marshall 6922.
LALANE Floral designs and decaratlonai' Oppo
arte postoffica. Main 6545., M
SWISH rnnnat. rrS'
FLOWERS AND PLANTS.
iBviNGTOJi park! " floral oti., 4ti and
YamhilL Funeral designs; lowest prices.
MAX: ML SMITH, florist ""Wh 6th 'at' "
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
Holman Undertaking Cp.
Funeral Directors
Established 187T i
Third and Salmon Streets
Mala S07. A-1511 .
'. Lady Assistant, t "
Progressive F uneral Directors
9 Montgomery at tb A-1699.
WILSON c. ROSS
4 KAST 7TH AND MULTNOMAH '
Funeral Directors
AST 84 C-S168.
F, S, DUNNING77NC.
. m w asiuw sv aeaar s tea, stt
416 Bast Alder st - r Phone East 62. B-6228.
T Ha Aakleassm IVswl YTssAw.b am
DUNWNGMcENTEE""'
Bro4w "I Ankeny sts. Lady assisUat,
. . proaqway A-S005.
A. D, KENWORTHY & CO.
Phoea Tabor 5367. - - Hocae Pboao D-61.
SVliZ" P I I CRPU 4 Mia, Leroh
TTi'J.-. . '!.- s i it i i i Assistant
UNDERTAKERS. M. 11th and Hawthorne.
x. -s .CHAMBERS COMPAITY""
248 aad 260 Eilltnasworth -ave., near Williams
sea. W nnrt aana. mm
klLLEB A" TRABT.lArar 1 rul
Waehtogtoa at Elia. T wlf "'Ifi
SkPWPi ?'Vil?TAV MaTrT4162!
QISCVYCa A-2621. Comer Third and Clay.
Wiison & Wilson 2&aXa
HAM If TON ' t orTiirFu:
IlnlVIILI Ull nerai aervieea. ) Tabor 4818.
PRIPQOM Undertaking Parlors. 44(MoF
CniUOUIX naoa at Broadway 2684. '
Ul I 1. - KM, UltWUIl
B-2S46.
B. T. BYRNES, new residsmae establishment.
wi wiuja,ms ava. rvooa-tswu xu. 0194s.
A. R. Zeiler Co, 12 WZrivf;
(2)
Jf O?? ITMENTR
DUESIMQ GRAMITe CoJ
POJ?TLAND MARBLE" WORKSr"264-26 4th
t.1"" 'lT "s ii. aisin saoa. jruiiip
- LOST AJfV TOVSY tl
.T.61?, from mT t'sce at Luther station,
J'C . last Wednesday afterooon. one big
7rtT.Jr.,'ft JeT cow with big horns and bit
10 r',wrd to anyone that brings tr
Vr ir..P !? Bd,iiformation wiU be apprecisteO.
St. it.r.on, Milwsukie, Rt, 2.
8TOLEN Bojr-s white rsavas shoes, blsckmb
tanlr ThlS1"1' '"" Couch school swimming
U k 7 Punishment if boy who
strueuJT ' m " 0nn ia-
WwrTiITBWB l4T " Aurora, Or..
ttvT. .nH "?"ining work elotaes,
6?! j'omsY0" t tod? aotiiyjL-
PCH . bttU terrter' '' ""
niiT ??t L?r urn or information. A F.
Rriwi;soa24ti rh- M'tn 8nai f
LOST Fox terrier, JJcense No. 1B52. Jim
Brown on collar; $3 reward. Call A. T. Pool
Grocery, la Sellwood.
LOST Between 144 E. 15th and 642 IUw
thorn, ave a fob,, monogram A. M. JC. Kt
ward. East B579. IB4 R. 15th st
LOST An Eastern Star pin. please return tn
Mm. Gustafson at. Uoneyman Hdw. Co. and
receive reward.- - ' .. ..
LOST Garnet brooch on Washington at. - bs
,. tween 3d and 10th st Resrsrd. East 1SH7.
LOST Part of cuff button, eoral, good reward .
if returned. 103-107 12th st ;
COST A grey i'ersian cat tfomMinnesota its.,
near Failing st Reward. . Wdln. 623. i -LOST,
purse, , between MadlsobridisT and J7
fmon street depot Leave at Ssrgcnt hotel,
rOST Llcensa'Uta. No. 892177" CaU 'wiod
lawn 247.
HELP.-WASTED MAT.K - ' 1
WA NTED Krperirnced stock clerk for whole
' sale grocery: prefer young msn with offire
experience; must writs good plain hand; splen
did opportunity for advancement; stats age and
esporience. J-23 1, Journal.
WANTED -Experienced billing mschlne oper
ator for shipping department, wgosessle gro
cery! prefer young man with railrosd office ex
perience: good opportunity for advancement;
state ate and "Perience.-;2.jCTirnat
MARRIED man to work aroaitd cemetery; one
who understands - something of Isndscsping
preferred; steady work. . CaU East 67th and
Fremont
EXPERIENCED grafters in peachseedli
fine stock, psy $4 per lfJOO. Lafsy
ayett
EXPERIENCED men for field grafting irT"nur"
aery. VlUsr Nurseries. PhnTsbor 8 "SO.
FIRST class lady cost "rnsker. Sciimeitasf" as
Eagin,82 Washtngton st . ( J .
WANTED Experienced msn for ' graft ing
UPn tre sorsery. PhonsjTabor 4185.
WANTED A man to give me uuUuctioti on
E!?"J'2dJnL-i:liiurn1'.
WANTEO'Beliable boy over" 16 years" oidTfir
lisa-lrssv 4. a lint i
"win,- Tl's,VO, eftrurnSII. '
CORDWOOD choppers, wsnled CaU at
Williams ave. ' .
WA NTED A baker, good wages. Write te C.
F. Egglmann. Springfield, Or. ' . - ' i
LEIGHTON LUNCH, SSTlrVashington. Waited".
experienced storemta.
"s'u wis.- 'vo, eftnimai.
HELP WASTED MISC.
1
49
WANTED 100 men at once tu Team auto nj
gaa tractos operating and repairing. All tu
denu paying a deposit on tuition fee before
April 1 will save $26. Apply t
HEMPHILL'S TRADfc SCHOOLS. !
707 Hawthorne ave. or ,24 N. 6th, branches at
Winnipeg. Begins, Saskatoon. Edmonton. Ith
bridge. Calgary. Vancouver, H U. Portland.
Or., the largest chain of trade schools in
it. e. or Canada.
LEARN AUTOS AND TRACfoBS
riVE DATS FREE TRIAL
PAY TUITION WHEN SATISFIED . .
TVaa. sAaassvi eMat.s. t
v w svsebssu eiuiu, uaGU'i, " vrnsUl as-livl BTJT IS
electrical work; BIG 100 PAUE CATAI.OO
FREE. Address AdcoX Auto and Tractor school.
Dept. J, Union ave. and -Wasco st, Portisod. :
Or. Phone Esst 7445.
'- HAWTHORNE AUTO SCHOOL
402 HAWTHORNE AVE.
n.iHn1.t. rua i n rl . m mw.it Mn,M '
everything mechanical and electrical; ununited r
practical repair experience it is not theory; it is
practice that makes you a valuable msn I -
" POSITIONS ASS FllED " '
EVERY GRADUATE OF BEHENKE-WALKEB
. Business College, Portland. -,. .
Enron any time. Telegraphy, stenography, bank
ing, bookkeeping, secretarial. Free catalog.
LEARN TETtTnTrHY-
Young msa and women wanted. Call 218
nail way exenange Diag. Dpienaia opportunity.
va leant a well nairf nrnfessinn Ftm hAr.klat
Railway Telegraph Institute.
STENOGRAPHERS (any system) Join our
SPEED CLUB.- Keep ia practice and rain
speed; rates ressonsble; day school, night school.
Lumbermens building, 5th and Stark.
BUR8ELL PTIIVATB BUSINESS 8CHOOU
lAYLOR-FAlTH Business CoUege. Best beeausa
cotnpletest- Bpanish. French and English com
mercial courses. Comptometers end adding- ma
chine. 204 Stevens bldg.. West Park and Wash.
' BURSELL PRIVATE BUSINESS SCHOOL
, Day and Evening Classes
Lumbermens bldg.. 6th end Hurt. Bdwy. 8404.
, MiSS F. BUR8ELL. Principal.
MISS DECKERS
PRIVATE BUSINESfl COLLEGE
SPECIAL COURSE IN COMPTOMETEH8
ALISKY BLDG. 3D AND MORRISON.
WANTED At once. 6 men te learn autninobilss,
trucks and tractors. Csll at 43 UawtUorna
ave.
ROCK , MOt Nf AtN" t EACllKIlS" AGENdf
Frank K. Welles, ex-asst State Supt., mgr.,
N. W. Bank bldg. Teachers placed promptly.
GOING East or South I Household goods' shipped
at reduced ratex moving and packing. I'aotrte
Coast Forwarding Co.. 403 Hoyt st Bdwy. 70S.
Slinn enn i u v ...... . ..', . .. . -
WRITING school, day, evening. (6 month.
269 14th. near Jefferson. Main 3898. '
HELP WAlf TED FEMALE
WANTED Experienced' sewing machine oper
ators. Arjrlv H tends rd factors Xo. !E. Grand
gva. and E. Taylor. ,
LADIES to do needlework at home, spare time;
experience unnecessary. 182 10th st, room
205; hours 9 to 4, evenings 7 to 6. j
WANTED -Lsdy stenograpber aad bookkeeper;
out of town position: good psy. D-.07.
Journal.
WANTED Girl for active work in business
Plsee. not office work of an kind! aLsadv.
Do,not phone. 421 E. Broadway.
WANTED Combination lauadreas endkl(chen
helper, residence : references required. . Ao-
plyBt Helens hall, 18th and Hall.
WANTED Competent girl for general housed
work,. Apply 1137 Tliurmsn st 1'hona
Main 6084. . t -
WANTlady for housekeeper. -779 Minnesota
ave., cor, geech st Call all day.
FIftMT CLASS eoatmaker.
tfchweiuer ek Eagin,
2 H Washington st -
DRESSMAKER wants
a good finisher, also op-
orators. V. Elson,-
Vsstnngton st
WANTED A helper in a children's institution;
soma coosmg. aier. gs. , a-a.94.
HELP rVTANTED MALE AN1I
FKMALE 19
Pars yon while leamine; rlvea t at rr u,h-
positions secured. Write for catalogue. ,234
Bnrnside st, or phone Broadway 1781.
PORTLAND BARBER COlXE0'tsc"hTuTe
. ia S weeks; psy while learning; position guar
anteed. 284 Couch at
MEN, WOMEN, learn barber trade, wage vikile
learning: position guaranteed. Mer. 22 in
experience. Oregon Barber College, 233 Msrluon.
WAXTEP- AOP.NTW
WANTED Live canvassers in Oregon, Wash-
; ",, mr. eiua Tieeeseary '
and legitimate articles to farmers. irrigaUonisU
and municipalities. Good salesmen make .from
lnformstiun. Coast Culrart A Hume Co., Port-
CALL at 826 Itailway ExcUngs. high class
. . .... u, u iuu. ' um
eome first served. Material Chasers Co.
MITtTATTnfgSl Hire ' -
2 2- J"ita work on farm; have' hiui
uanuiini o ana ju Dorses:
S?".Aork, " mn ! must be good wages.
D-209, JournsL .
COJ!IROT.9M J,nd a'lder. repair and " new
. .71? .ti eiT or coontry. M. D. Crowe.
441 E. 6 2d t. Tsbor 7 882. ,
EXPERIENCED truek driver wanU steadyTt:
VI V . betlt nf NfanibM, Vons V t
WANTED Psjntlng, paperCtnglng ana ks":.
.--''" -r esimnicea woraman. . 1 none 1 s
Pos 4966,- -
1NTERIOR finishing, painting, tintiria, )
, www rontrsru leaw wore, f.s.t
.1.
sh'sia untea. g.bO; paiMniui
. A . . 1 . -
Nickels, Broadway 8623.
WANTED, carpenter arid cement oi.
I) u
jo, any sise. Phone Main 26S8.
fA i i.j, iijr)rttr. UiiTHitT
.wziADie. I'Uom W tiln. 33:. 3,