The Oregon daily journal. (Portland, Or.) 1902-1972, March 10, 1919, Page 12, Image 12

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    12
THE OREGON DAILY - JOURNAL, PORTLAND, MONDAY, MARCH. 10. 1919.
EHD OF SEATTLE
:! STRIKE PLEASES
: GRAIN OFFICIALS
;Earfy Completion of Vessels
. "Needed for ; Grain Shipments
'; SaM to Be Assured by Action.
referendum vote is taken
Ykl.-"'-- '-LL. - :
Portland Unions Casting Ballots
1 Today on Question of Continu
,1 -oils Work After April 1.
:
' t Announcement that the 1 striking
Metal Trades unions of Seattle district
will return to -work is received with
satisfaction by federal grain admin! at ra-
tion officials In Portland. The reaump
' tion of work means fhat no time will
: now be lost in completing the ships
.:, which are on the ways. Vessels - are
,5 badly needed to move the grain that
Is In 'storage.
f That the settlement of the Seattle
strike has only an Incidental bearing
- upon the determination of the union men
' of the Pacific coast to take a referendum
. vote on. the question of continuing at
work after the Macy wage scale ceases
to exist after April 1. next, was the
statement today of O. R. Feyerabend,
' e representative of H. W. Shaw, secretary
' at the Metal Trades, who Is now in
.;, Washington In conference with govern-
ment officials regarding the Pacific coast
- wage controversy. The Seattle strikers
; ' simply agreed to resume operations in
.the yards in accordance with the pre
viously announced request of Director
' General Pies, who declared that lie
would not treat with the strikers until
: they had returned to their jobs. . In the
' meantime the conference in the East is
expected to develop some kind of a
; wage agreement whereby the shipbuild-
Ing program on 'the Pacific Coast can
.; go ahead.
. f Voting on the question -of continuing
work unlea the Macy scale after April
" I was commenced in Portland this morn
ing by the Metal Trades council and all
unions affiliated with the council, in-
' eluding the Maritime District council.
; The polls will remain open until 8 o'clock
this evening, and it is not expected rat
the result of the balloting will be defi
nitely known until about 11 o'clock to-
night. .
! It is reported by Metal Trades un'on
leaders that, the return to work by the
, : Seattle strikers was necessary in ordr
that all the unions concerned could put
uip a united front in their wage negotla.
tions with the government.
PREPARE TO RECEIVE SOLON'S
Preparations to receive the house
naval affairs committee, which Is due
In Portland soon, as being made by the
. Portland Chamber of Commerce. The
committee is on a tour of inspection of
, the port facilities of the Columbia river.
with special reference to the naval posSl
; WUtles of this section, and the estab
lishment of a submarine base near the
mouth of the Columbia river.
I, While the recommendation has. al
ready . been made that two big naval
bases are to be established on the Pa
cific coast, neither of -which includes
Portland, the local civic leaders will
: make the plea to the committee that
the depth of the Columbia channel is
now sufficient to warrant a safe refuge
for battleships of a large character.
Representative McArthur will not Join
the committee until it has reached Port
. land. The committee includes Repre
sentatives Pagett, chairman; Oliver,
, Riorden. Kelly. Hicks, Zinson, Browning
, and McArthur. A number of women
' relatives of the representatives are also
Included in the party.
The original program calling for a
three-day visit to the Portland district
will be followed, it is announced.
. -
Toledo Channel Being Deepened
1 Toledo. March 10. Brigadier General
: Bisque and United States Engineer Pol
hem us from Portland spent several
days looking after - government work
- here. . The dredge Oregon is busy deep
" enlng the channel from Toledo to the
lower' bay, and haw the work more than
half completed. The large government
spruce mill is about 70 per cent com-
pleted. and the completion of the dredg
ing will allow boats carrying a million
"feet to load at its docks.
.-Willapa Work to Start Soon
" -Raymond, Wash., March . 10. Jity
Engineer Henry Is in receipt of a let
r ter from Colonel Sturtevant of the
, United States engineers' department at
; Seattle, which states the probability of
L calling for bids within 30 days for the
: fill and dredging project for which ap
f propflatlon was made by congress Just
before war was declared. . The WlUapa
I- harbor requires no dredging over the
bar but. the Willapa river Is to be
dredged and the channel, now 19 feet at
BUSS"
ATI VE
E R B
TABLETS
A RUN' DOWN SYSTEM is like a ran down
clock.. Unless tuned up it Is of little me. If
ou are run down from orer work, don't neg
lect yovr condition. Get a box of Bliss Na
tiri Herb Tablets, take en or two at bed
time, and yxm wifit an immediate faa
prorement. For over thirty years they hare
----- . w wuiacn ana
, children in maintaininc health and rigor
uwibv uraiusuii, xraeruie, 1 ena.. writes
"1 U ran down in health, and it seemed
Bothinc would help me. f was induced
to try Blue. NstWe- Herb Tableta. I am
thankful for this wonderful remedy, because
I am enjoying good health." Don't delay tak
ing Bnsa Native Herb Tablets. , There is
nothing to equal them for remoring the cansa
of constipation. Brer and kidney trouble, sick
headache, rheumatism or disordered stomach.
They stimulate the lirer. purify the blood and
ton up the system; also Improve the aooa-
tite (let tha ennSa 1 Ir .K-
trad mark and money back guaren--v
tee on every doz. raca gl.UU par box
. Sold by leading druggists sad. local agents
everywhere. ,
STEEL
THUCTOHat. tHAPIt '
: M.ATCS
' ' - " BAR
RIVtTt BOLT
- UPSET BOOS
'ABBIOATKD material
- . . . .far . ; -
BlbO BUILDIB0
-. . TABUS TOWIRt
-' . -V - IHIrl .
Northwest . Bridge &
Iron Co.
. - PORTLAND, OR. - 1 -P.O.
Bom SSC Phana Mai 113
extreme low water. Is to be made 24
feet The dirt Is to be used to fill in the
tide lands utxm which Raymond is built.
The government; appropriated $419,000
for the dredging, and the city or Kay
mond put up $115,000 for taking care
of the dirt.-which has to he pumpea
more than 1500 feet-
ALL ALONG THE WATERFRONT
The Norwegian steamer Baja. with
B. Lindvigr U Co. of San Francisco as
charterers, is on fcer way to ne Colum
bia river to load lumber. The vessel has
usually been in ' the - Antof ogasta-San
Francisco and Puget Sound trade. The
craft is not new In this port." She has
loaded out of here In former years.
Completlon-of the loading of a part of
a -cargo or box snooKs oy me steei
steamer Glendola. is expected today.
Tkre Portland Box company is supplying
th shooks. the firm of Daoi efcRuRse.ll
being interested in the shiprrtent. which
is destined for Honolulu. The Glendpla
will take en shooks at Astoria also, and
complete her cargo of shooks at Tacoma.
On her 12-hour sea trial trip the steel
steamer. West Modus left Portland this
morning. The West Harcouver cleared
with flour for the government.
Following a temporary lull in the de
parture of coasters from Portland 4
California way ports, the McCormlck
line will have four sailings out of this
port .jbetween Wednesday and Monday.
The Celilo will depart Wednesday, the
Wapama Thursday, the. Klamath Satur
day .and the Willamette Monday next.
The Celilo has already booked all her
cabin passage space.
San Francisco Marine Notes
San Francisco. March 10. (I. N. &)
Hans Thompson has replaced A. W. Nel
son in command of the steamer Ecuador.
The Greek steamer Antonios, on her
way from Vancouver to Costa Rica, put
Into San Francisco Sunday for water.
The blue and white Greek flag flew at
the vessel's staff. The crew is composed
entirely of Greeks under command of
Captain Mavros. The Antonios came
here In ballast from the British Colum
bian port and win proceed to Costa
Rica to . land a general cargo for the
Mediterranean.
Shipwrecked Crew Rescued
New York. March 10. m. p i rm.
tcued from a lifeboat after drifting at
sea ror two days the captain and eight
men of the schooner Haines of Nova.
Scotia, arrived here today on the steamer
rtenariK iDsen to which they had been
iransierrea ny another steamer.
Arrlvala March lo
WlMni. Amarfan at m Cm
ciaco, passengers and general.
AureHa, American steamer, from San Francis
co. Tia way porta, passenger and general.
Arrivals starb S
ptwiitm, for St. Helens. ' '
Frsncireo, oiL '
W. 8. Torter, American steamer, from Gaviota.
oil.
EI AeffUnfln Am,r)mill at-ama- ffwm Gm
Prancbco, oil.
No. 83, American barge, from Saa Francisco,
oil. in tow of Eu Segundo.
Departure March 10
Francisco, ballast.,
W. 8. Porter. American atcamer, for San
Francisco, ballast.
El Segundo, American steamer, for San Fran
cisco, ballast. '
Nil 8.4 laio lnul.ii. e.
ballast.
Departures March 9
West Modus.. A m.rir.w ifMmr fw
Europe Tia San Francireo,flaur.
MARINE ALMANAC
TWea at Astoria Tuesday
High Water I Low Water
8:40 a. m 7 7 fM I -. . o o t .
10:00 p. m...8.8 feat j 8:82 p." ra." .".." 0.2 foot
DAIIiT RIVER READINGS
News of the Port
i , - -
.TATIOX. IS I! fig 15
c Gal 2I 5"
t'matilla
"-5 2.2 10.1 0.00
10 5.8 -0.5 0.01
20 9.7 -3.4 O.00
20 0.0 -2.8 0.00
1C 8.9 -1.0 0.00
15 7.6 1-0.4 0.00
Eugene ....
Albany ....
Salem . . . . .
Oregon City
Portland . . .
(-) Falling.
RITER FORECAST
Tha Wtllamo' fa v4m - 1tn ) 1 11 ti j
. . . m. uauu WUi IUi UUI
Ing the next two or three day.
Ai- ft JKlttMlf USING PORTS
AafnHa afanh in A : .
" Aii.vcu, t a. in. ,
steamer Aurelia, from San Francisco via Eureka
JV--J-' M-r. n-iTea, ai u a. m.. steamer
Cramp, from trial trip; arrived, at 6, and sailed
at 8:20 a. m. : steamer West Harcuvar. from
trial trip, for Norfolk, for orders; sailed, at 9;80
a m.. steamer Wcr-t Modus, for trial trip; left up
al 11:15 a. m.; steamer Aurelia.
Astoria. March 9. I -eft up at midnight,
steamer Celilo. from San Francineo; left up at
midnight, steamer W. F. Herrin, from San Fran
cisco. Arrived, at 5 and left up at 6 a. m...
steamer El Segundo, from San Francisco; arrived
at 7 a. m.. and left up at 2 p. m.. barge No. 98.
irom did rrancuco, in tow ot Jl Segundo: ar
rived at 9 nA a ...
, - "I- . . v. in . , steamer Ma
nama, frrwn San- KTV n.iru . Mjii j. t . i .
- . - - . much, uucxjjb cue
night, steamer Santiam, for San Pedro via San
(MMww, KiTiTcu uown. L , ana sailed at o 1 o
a. m ateame UVt t
. . - ' ' . . . '-k.- . iwr UU1 trip.
lia down, at 4 p. m.. steamer West Modus;
. a. m., steamer uresap, for trial trip.
Ran tV.ii,tuM A ti i j . . .
"ish. ateamer Klamath, for Portland. Arrived,
" a nicni. steamer uimm, rrom Portland.
San Francisco. March 10. (I. N. S ) Ar
rived, tug Hercules (with barge lsaao Reed in
tow), from Honolulu, at 2:30 a. ra. ; Chehali
from Grays harbor, at 7:15 a. m.; Johan Poul-
sen. from Anttria af A m . will . r
- ' - m uaiuciu;, 1 1 inn
Tw Angeles, at8 a. m.; Sea Foam, from Men
docino, at 9 a. m. ; Multnomah, from Ixr Angeles,
-w a. ra. : ea iving (witn Erskine M. Phelps
in tow), for Port San Luis, at S a. m. ; Argyll,
for San liiego.. at . 11 a. m.; Carlos, for Grays
harbor, at 12 noon.
San Francisco, March 10. (I. N:. S.) Ar
rived, Sunday. Solano, from Loo Angeles, at 2:45
a; mt. ; Phoenix,- from Mendocino, at 5 :05 a. m
C. A. Smith, from Manshfield. at 6:40 a. m. :
Arctic, from Fort Bragg, at 7:80 a. m.; 8po
kan from Los Angeles, at 7:50 a. m.; Horace
X. Baxter, from Eagle Harbor, at 8:55 a m.
rl. rUmrr Antonios. from Vancouver, at
12:50 p. m. : Vanguard, from Eureka, at 3:05
V; m.: Governor, from Seattle, at 7:10 p. m
Yellowstone, from Los Angelea. at 10:10 p m
Sailed. Sunday, barge Fullerton. for Port ' San
Luis (in tow of tug Samson), at 8 a. m.; Oleum,
for Los Angeles, at 8:45 a. m.; Spokane, for Los
Angeles, at 4 :30 p. m. : British steamer Professor
for Puget Sound, at 4:85 p. m. : Vanguard for
Loiv Angeles, at 5:25 p. m. ; barge Simla, for
P SnLuis (m tow of tug Sea. Eagle), at
b!8"1!: ,Much 1 (r X- S Arrived
Steamship lujrman Stewart, from Puget Sound,
at 4 a. ta.j U. S. Iris, from Tacoma. at 9-80
a. a.; steamship Katori Mam. from Tacoma at
a a. m. March 9. arrived Steamship K ' S
Loop, from Saa Francisco, at 11 p. m. ; Morn
hig8tar. from Britich Columbian potts, at
m'; CulDurr. from Tacoma, at 11 n.
.: Queen, from Tacoma. at 8:30 p. m.: Karla
Maru. from navy yard, at 8:20 a. m.
er-".V b 10 V- S' s" for
craiae, at 8:S0 a. ra.
t.iiedi1" Steamship Eastholm, for
British Columbian porta, at 2:80 p m. He
dondo for Southeastern Ala&ka. at 10 a. m."
New CaaUe. March 4. (I. N 8.) Arrive
Steamship Tankalilla. from Vancouver
Shanghai, March 4 (I. N. S.) Arrived
Steamship Victoria, from Seattle. ,
a Astoria. March 9. L N. S.) Arrived
Steamship W. S. Porter, from Gaviota
aiicwuw, March 10.(L N. 8.) Arrived
Steamship Cyclops, from Seattle. -March 9
arrived Steamship Maricopa, from Port San
Luis. -
Ocean Falls. B. C.: March . (I. N S.)
Arrived J. A. Moffett, from Saa Pedro!
Comox, B. C, March 9. (L Ji. S.) Ar
rived Eurypytus, from Seattle.
Port Townsend. March . 10. (I N S )
Paased in: ,i Steamship Kongosan Maru." for Se
attle, at 8:20 a, m, March . passed oo
Steamship Hakushika Mara, at,2V-; ChT
fuku Maru, at 5 p. m." '
Bellingham. March 10. (I. N s ) Arrived
Steamahip H. B. Xovejoy.' from Seattle.
m Everett. March 10. (L N. a ) -Sailed
Steamship Admirri Kodnma, for BoSeaiSru
sJm?rirel, r-K Arrived
Steamship Octarara, from Seattle.
, ; Bine Sky Law Passed
. Plympia, Wash.. March 10- U p v
or-Tha,,1 8ky w. Patterned
after the Calirornia statute to curb fly-by-night
wildcat stock promoters, passed
the house by a vote of 82 to 9 this mom
Ing. The bill now goes to the senate. -
Seafarer's Rendezvous Open
" -t wt" - it ' n , e ' 'i j n' m t n t te
"Windjammer " Days Revived
Seafaring visitors In Portland are to
have a place where they can talk "shop."
blow smoke, and recall the many thril
ling experiences they have had on- the
rolling- main, from the days of the wind
jammer to the modern enemy . subma
rine dodger, according to plans which
have been formulated by Ensign Wil
liam E. Gibbons, United States navy,
who has thrown his offices In the custom
house open to the mariners. , "i - J
Resumption of normal shipping func
tions following the doldrums incident to
war will release hundreds of ships to
ordinary channels of trade. The need
of a common meeting place where mas
ters and deck officers and engineers
can assemble has become apparent, in
Portland. ' 5i ;
In the good - old days of Portland's
maritime activity, some 18 to 20 years
ago, tha need of such a meeting plade
was not so keen as It is today.; When
the city was "wide open" the seafaring
fraternity was able to find many a con
genial . rendezvous where the fires . In
the . welcome heaters never went ' out.
where lights always beamed brightly
and where the congenial Mine Host
swapped yarns ' withr his patrons j "be
tween times." I
Times, Verily, Have Changed
Not that the clinking of glasses played
any important part in the life - of the
average shipmaster, but seaport made
up largely of all nationalities, could be
depended upon to supply the particular
kindred spirits desired. '
Things are different now. The hotel
lobbies are about all that are left, and
these places are not possessed of the
marine atmosphere which is to the lik
ing of the masters.
To meet the social demands of ma
riners, and to make them welcome En
sign Gibbons has conceived the idea of
putting the hydrographlc office, room
OF
FOR S. S. WORKERS IN
CITIES OF THE VALLEY
; '..'!"
Courses Outlined for Early Pre
sentation at Central Valley
Points.
Sunday school workers in the Willam
ette valley cities arc to have the benefit
of a school of methods within the next
few weeks. Albany, Eugene and Rose-
burg are to have tbelr schools during the
coming week. The Albany Bchool will be
in session March 9 to 11, the Eugene
school March 12 to 14 and the Roseburg
school March 15 to 17. Other schools are
to be held later In the season. Each pro
gram is under the direction of Harold F.
Humbert, .state Sunday school secretary.
He has secured as the special instruc
tors Dr. J.Vr Springston, Northwest di
rector of Baptist religious work; Dr.
Frank E. 4 Brown, vice president of the
Oregon Sunday School association ; Mrs.
Clara G. Esson, Bible school superintend
ent for the Christian churches or Ore
gon ; Rev. John H. Matthews, superin
tendent of Presbyterian missions for Or
egon, Washington and Idaho. ,
The sessions start at 3 p. m. eacn aay
and conclude with the 8 :15 session. Nine
courses of study are offered each day
during this time. vThe instruction is free
and for the benefit or sunaay scnooi
workers.-
A school of principles and methods cer
tificate, signed by the entire faculty and
the president, general secretary and edu
cational superintendent of the Oregon
Sunday School association, will be grant
ed to those' who meet the following re
quirements : (1) attend at least two
school periods dally : (2) keep note books
and hand them In for examination ; (3)
do the work which each instructor may
require.
- a
Ashland-Siskiyou
Paving Bids to Be
Received in April
Ashland. March 10. District Engineer
J. E. McLeod of the highway commis
sion, was in Ashland last week looking
over the survey of jthe Pacific highway
from the city to Siskiyou, ijias ror pav
ing will be received in April. Work on
the road from Ashland to Klamath Falls
at Green Springs mountain will start as
soon as weather is settled. This road
will give an outlet for the fruit and
products of the valley to Klamath and
Indian reservation section.
Policeman's Funeral Held :
Ashland, March 10. The funeral j of
Policeman George M. Lowe, who was
killed in the railroad yards March 2,
was held Sunday from Dodge's under
taking parlors with Interment in Stearns
cemetery near Talent. County Coroner
J. A. Perl held thct death was acci
dental, j
Business Men's Bureau Elects
Ashland, March 10. The Business
Men's bureau of the Commercial club has
elected the following officers: President,
J. H. McGee ; vice presidents. W. H. Mc
Nalr. A. C. Nininger ; secretary, F.j,J.
Shinn ; treasurer, H. O. Enders ; direc
tors, H. P. Holmes, L. S. Brown, W.j C.
Mitchell, W. M. Dodge, C. E. Sams.
Jersey Breeders Organize '
Ashland, March 10. Dairymen of the
Jackson county farm bureau have or
ganized a Jersey Breeders' association.
electing the following ; officers : Presi
dent. R. D. Sanford; vice president, Wil
liam J. Fern; secretary-treasurer, F.; C
Hollibaugh ; directors,. J.B, McCracken.
Robert Purvis, William J. Fern, B. D.
Sanford, Isaac' Hemman, T. C. Holli
baugh.. . i -
Sinn Feiners to
Become Actively
Hostile, Report
London. March 10. (L N. S.) A mem
ber of the secret .Sinn Fein "cabinet"
in South Ireland states that the Sinn
Fetners Intend to give up their passive
attitude and become actively hostile, ac
cording to a special dispatch, from Cork
today. '-v ... : - -. .-;
A meeting ef a republican parliament
has been planned in South Ireland to
which schemes for - establishing a gov
ernment will be submitted for approval.
As the result of the arrest of some of
the Sinn Fein members ' of parliament
only about a score are at liberty and will
be able to attend.
SCHOOL
METHODS
407, custom house, at the disposal of the
guests. ,
"You are cordially Invited to make use
of the facilities of this office, during
your atay In port," announces Gib
bons. "We have on file for reference
charts and sailing directions of all the
world. . These are up to date and form
a library of the greatest use to ma
riners, and others interested In shipping.
"Time signals are received dally at
noon by telegraph, from the naval
observatory, and our chronometer is
regulated daily . by these signals.- Cor
rect standard time may be obt-ined at
any time between 9 a. m. and 4 :30 p. m.
Appreciate Cooperation
"We will be pleased to furnish correct
time by- telephone to any who ' call us
up. The time ball is located on the roof
of the custom house, and It Is dropped
by ' telegraphic signal from the naval
observatory. Mare Island, Cal., at the
Instant of noon.
"We have for distribution to cooperat
ing observers pilot charts, hydrographlc
bulletins, notices to mariners, and re
prints of articles on nautical subjects.
These furnish the latest information as
to the location of wrecks, derelicts, ice,
and changes in aids to navigation and
currents.
"This office is maintained for the
benefit of mariners in general, and we
would greatly appreciate your coopera
tion in observing and reporting wrecks,
derelicts, ice, errors in charts and Bail
ing directions, rocks and shoals, mis
placed buoys, irregularity of lights, cur
rents, floating obstructions of any kind,
bar soundings, routes, port facilities,
magnetic variation, and anything, of In
terest to navigation" and mariners."
The office also annouiceg that
chronometers will be rated free of
charge. Office telephone numner is
Broadway 1363.
GLOOM DISPELLED BY
PROMISE OF TONNAGE
FOR LUMBER TRADE
Plants Will Open With Increased
Forces in Response to
Revival of Demand.
With promise of tonnage to take care
of off Bhore shipments of lumber prod
ucts , the gloom which has settled over
the logging and milling industry in this
section is fast disappearing. The plant
of the Northern Pacific Lumber com
pany at the foot of Sherlock street will
open Tuesday with one shift, giving
employment to 250 men.
Officials of the St. John Lumber com
pany announce that their mill at the
foot of Burlington avenue will begin
operation soon with a shift of 200 men
and several other mills In this vicinity
which have been closed down altogether
or working at less than normal capacity
now propose to put on more men to
take care of an increasing trade.
Lumbermen attribute the revival of
business in their line to the acceptance
of the price schedule as permanent. For
a time there was doubt as to the status
of the market and prospective builders
hesitated in expectation of a general
decline in prices of material and labor.
It Is now generally believed by both
lumber manufacturers and construction
contractors that present .prices will rule
the market for an lndefinate period, with
prospects of a raise rather than a de
cline from present levels.
As soon as sufficient shipping shall
have been released to handle foreign
orders the mills will all be operating
to capacity, according- to lumbermen
familiar with the situation. Domestic
orders are steadily increasing In volume
as the reconstruction program gathers
headway and present indications are
that the slack in the labor market will
be taken up during the next few weeks.
Reports of the federal employment
bureau show a total of about 9000 men
out of work in the state today, a re
duction of more than -1000 during the
past week. Of the men now out of
work the majority will be immediately
affected by the resumption of construe'
tion work.
Over 2000 of them are classified as
loggers and lumbermen ; about 1500 are
carpenters and there are several hun
drer other skilled men of the building
trades.
Seamen's Union Will
Enter Paris Protest
London, March 10. (I. N. S.) An
drew Furaireth and Edward Flynn of
San Francisco, and W. L. Cartledge of
New York, representatives of the Inter
national Seamen's union, have left for
Paris, where they will protest against
the adoption by the peace conference
of any program of shipbuilding or man
ning of ships that is not in accord with
the American laws. They said they
would "stand pat" on the American
regulations as the fairest and most
complete for sailors in the world.
1
Accused of Stealing Auto
Warrants with bail set at $2000 each
were Issued Saturday by Judge Rossman
for the arrest of Les Batton and John
Doe Batton, who are charged by Dr.
Calvin S. White with the larceny of an
automobile. " k
HAVE COLOR IN CHEEKS
Be Better Looldng Oake
Olive Tablets
- If your skin is yellow complexion
pallia tongue coated appetite pooir
yoU have a bad taste in your mouth
a lazy, no-good feeling you should
take Olive Tablets.
' Dr. Edwards Olive Tablets a sub
stitute for calomel were prepared by
Dr. Edwards after 17 years of study
with his patients. , f
: D&Edwards'OtiveTabletsarea purely
vegetablecompound mixed with oliveoiL
You will know them by their olive color.
To have a clear, pink skin, bright eyes,
no pimples, a feeling of buoyancy like
childhood days you must get atthe cause.
Dr. Edwards' Olive Tablets act on the
liver and bowels like calomel yet have
no dangerous after effects. :
i' They start the bile and overcome con
6tipation. That's why millions of boxes
are sold annually at 10c and 25c per box.
All druggists. Take one or two nightly
nd note the pleasing results, ah.
-. r
E
TO END TUESDAY
42 Out of 47 Unions on Puget
Sound Vote to Return
to Work.
, Seattle, March 10. (U. P.) Thirty
thousand shipyard workers in Seattle,
together with the metal : tradesmen of
Tacoma and Aberdeen, will march back
to the shipyards at, 7:30 o'clock tomor
row morning, and while picking up tbelr
tools at the point where they left off
January 21, will conclude one of the
greatest labor dramas ever witnessed
In America.'
Forty-two out of the 47 shipyard
unions of Seattle, Tacoma and Aber
deen voted to end the shipyard strike,
according to the findings of a special
meeting of strike leaders from the three
cities held at strike headquarters here
throughout Saturday night and Sunday.
The four opposing unions are all local
organizations. One Tacoma union re
fused to vote, but declared Itself willing
to abide by the majority vote. A con
ference was then held between the metal
trade chiefs, Henry McBride. labor ad
justment chief of the shipping board,
and yard owners, following which a
statement was Issued announcing the
opening of the yards tomorrow morning.
Wages paid will be the same as when
the workers struck.
San Francisco Unions Stay Out
San Francisco, March 10. (U. P.)
Determination to remain out until the
Saturday half holiday is granted them
and belief that all shipyards will be
practically tied up within a fortnight,
are expressed today by leaders of the
unions connected with shipbuilding. A
mass meeting of workers here decided to
continue their demands and stay out.
Notice of Special
Election June 3 Is
Sent to Counties
Salem, Marclr 10. Copies ef act call
ing for a Bpeci election June 3 to pass
on measures referred to the people by
the last legislature are being mailed to
all county clerks by Secretary of State
Olcott today. The act itself provides
for the mailing of these Copies and that
such mailing shall constitute notice of
election in lieu of all other provisions
of law to that effect. Under the act,
only measures specifically referred to in
it, and no others, can go upon the bal
lot at the special election. These meas
ures include reconstruction bills, the
lieutenant governor amendment, pro
vision for a reconstruction hospital ja.t
Portland, state aid for education of sol
diers, the Roosevelt highway bonding
bill, thet state guarantee bill for Irriga
tion districts, the one-mill market road
tax measure and an amendment increas
ing the limitation of taxes for roads.
Girl's Charge Held
As Cause of Murder
Chicago, March 10. (I. N. S.)-j-Police"
are searching today for Harry Rochette
and Private John A. Chance, member of
the recruiting office at Fort Worth,
Texas,' in connection with the murder
late Sunday night of James Cavanagh,
19, shot three times and instantly killed
as he was leaving his home. Rochette
Is the brother and Chance the brother-in-law
of Virginia Rochette, who, the
police say, made a serious accusation
against Cavanagh.
Naval Committee
On Way to Coast
' Chicago. March 10. (U. P.) Chair
man Padgett and other members of the
house naval affairs committee were en
route todar to San Diego, Cal., where
they will inspect sites on the Paciifc
coast for a naval training station. The
congressmen left here last night after
Inspecting the site for a proposed
$6,000,000 Chicago postoffice. "Only
four naval training stations will be
maintained," said Padgett. "Great
Lakes, Newport, R. I.. Hampton, Roads,
Va., and one on the Pacific coast."
Secretary Baker
Inspecting Gamps
Detroit. March 10. (I. N. S.) On a
tour of inspection of army camps and
cantonments. Secretary of War" Baxer
and Chief of Staff Peyton C. March
stopped in Detroit Monday morning on
their way to Camp Custer. The secre
tary expressed the opinion that Camp
Custer would be ' one of the permanent
training camps for United States troops
which will be selected on this Inspection
trip. - . .
Early Settlement
Of Strike Predicted
New York, March 10. I. N. s:
Early settlement of the strike of 7000
marine workers employed by private
boat owners was predicted today when
Thomas Delahunty. president of the
marine workers' affiliation, went into
conference with James I. Hughes, fed
eral conciliator, who negotiated a set-
Ltlement between the strikers and the
railroad administration.
Belgians Want to
1
Attfogate 1839 Pact
Parsl, March 10. (U. " PO The Bel
gian delegation has decided that be
treaty of 1839, which established the
neutrality of Belgium, is useless and
costly and should be abrogated. It was
announced Saturday. Belgians contend
they should be given full standing among
the nations of the world and have filed
a report to that effect with the peace
conference. ;
513 Are Accused of
Violating Dry Law
Indianapolis. March 10. fo. P.) Fire
hundred and thirteen persons accused of
violating the federal law prohibiting tha
transportation of . intoxicating liquor
from wet territory of Illinois,: Ohio and
Kentucky Into dry' Indiana, were ar-
i . a . ! . - . - j i . . i m.
nugnca in umiea outiew lusutci court, I
starting today. I
SHIPYARD
SIR
Man Who Put Up
Scenic Kailway oh.
Council Crest Dies
L. A. Thompson, president ot the com
pany, which constructed the scenic rail
way on Council Crest, died Saturday
after an Illness of four months in his
home at Glen Cove. Ii. L, a few miles
from the home , of former President
Roosevelt at Oyster - Bay. Mr.; Thomp
son died on his sixty -eighth birthday anniversary."-
1 - -- -
Mr. . Thompson was well known
throughout the United States as head
of the la, A. Thompson Scenic Railway
company. He leaves many friends in
the Pacific Northwest, where he was
interested in building many roads such
as the one in Council Crest park. A
niece, Mrs. C A. Finley. lives at 980
Hillsdale avenue, - Portland.
Swedes and Finns f
Find Site for, Ways
Marshfield, March 10. The Scanda
Shipbuilding company, recently organ
ised by local Swedish and Finnish ship
builders, has tak.n on option on prop
erty on the lower CoquVne river near
Bandon. The option provides for a 10
year lease -on property 800 feet deep
with a frontage of 1000 feet on the river.
It is proposed to start a shipbuilding
plant The site will allow the establish
ment of five ways. -
35 Injured in Train
Crash Near Toledo
Toledo, Ohio, March 10. (U. P.)
Thirty-five persons were injured, none
fatally, it is believed, when a Toledo,
Bowling Green & Southern traction car,
southbound, collided with a Clover Leaf
train near here today.
In ths roll of honor made public today are
the names of the following men from the Pa
cific Northwest:
DIED OF ACCIDENT OR OTHKR CAUSES
Washington
PRIVATE WILMET O. MOREHOUSE,
emergency address, Carls B. Morehouse, Seattle,
DIED FROM WOUNDS
Idahe
PRIVATE BURT1E F. ATKINS, emergency
address Marlon Atkina, Bonners, Ferry.
DIED OF DISEASE
PRIVATE ROGER 8. SHAV, emergency ad
dress, Mrs. De.Ua L Shsy. Portland.
Idaho
PRIVATE ROBERT HINTS-emergency ad
dress Mrs. Jane Hints, Pocatello.
PRIVATE PAUL D. VOUNOSLOOD, emerg
ency address, Mr. Klra Touncblood. Boise.
KILLED IN ACTION, PREVIOUSLY RE
PORTED MISSING
Washington
PRIVATE HENRY J. HENDRICKS, emerg
ency address Peter Skripka. Spokane.
cflRSflgiL EARL a. BLACK DEN. V. 8.
M. "., emergency address Perry Black den, 400
Washington street. Portland.
PRIVATE THOMAS BENNETT, IT. - 8. M.
C. emergency address Basis Miller, B. F. D. 1,
Dallas.
WOUNDED. DEGREE UNDETERMINED,
PREVIOUSLY REPORTED MISSING
Washington
Private Harold F. Goody, emergency address
Charles E. Goody, Spokane.
PRESENT FOR DUTY. PREVIOUSLY RE
v ; PORTED MISSING
Washington
PrlvaU Ernest H. Barrstt. V. 8. M C..
emergency address Clara &. Barrett. 1815 Thir
teenth .avenue. Seattle.
Private Samuel L. Crawford, U. 8. M. C.
emergency address Alice Crawford. Sunnyside.
Washington, if rrh 1 0 .The ttst of Casual
ties made public today contains the names of
105 men, exclusive of corrections, of which 80
are names ot members ot (be marine -corps.
The casualties are divided;
MARINE CORPS
Killed in action V 14
Died of wounds received in action .........
IMed of diseare 2
Wounded in action severely .. 'Jt
Wounded in action slightly .... 2
Missing in action 1
Totat .........
Killed in action . . .
Died from wounds . .
Died of disease
..80
..
. . 8
..61
..78
ARMY
Total
ARM CASUALTIES
KILLED IN ACTION
Privates
THOMAS CAYELJ.O, Strottenville. ?f. T.
OMEK J. COFFMAX. Thornton. Ind.
WILX.IAM Jf. COOPER, Knoxville, Ten II.
MILES ti. GOLEMAN. Creennup, 111.
SAM l" EL. HIRSCH. Columbus Jet.. Iowa.
JOSEPH I. MOORE. Williamsport, Md.
DIED FROM.WOUNDS
Sergeant
ALVEi BOSS KITCHELL. Ada, Ok Is.
Privates
BURTK F. ATKINS, Bonners Ferry, Idaho.
CLARENCE R. COOK. Steelton, Onx.
JOSEPH MAKARCZTK. Perth Am boy, X. J.
JACOB SAITFER. Oeorge, Iowa.
GEORGE E. PORTHAN, Ely. Minn.
MICHAEL STCHL, Watertown, N. T.
JAMES VALENTINE. Rome. N. T.
DIED OF DISEASE
Lieutenant
HERMAN SILYER8TEIN. Albany N. T. ,
ELMER R. BOLINDEH. Swamp Scott, Mass.
Mechanic
JAMES F. OH ALA RAN. New Tork.
Wagonert
WILLIAM P. LKOMIARDT, WansQue. N. J.
GEORGE W. OTIS, Chicago, 111.
MY RLE A. WILCOX. Hornell, S. T.
Nun
CATHERINE V. GOLDEN, Somerrtlle, Mass.
FleM Oterfca
GEORGE T. GD3BS, Washington. D. C.
CORNELIUS A. MURPHY, Boston, Mass.
HARRT DETLEFBEN. Dannebrog. Iowa.
PHILOMENA DDCON, Stockton, CaL
ALFRED DUST. Berlin, N. II.
PHILIP J. EKKHOLM, Elgin, I1L
WILLIAM T. EMOE. Missouri Valley. Iowa.
KDWIN FEHLANDT. Jordan, Minn.
AZEL B. FLOXD. Alexandria, Tenn.
CLARENCE E. FOCHT, Huntington, Pa.
WILLIASI FORESTER. Bogota. Teias.
EUGENE I FRANTZMAN, Fort Plain, '. T,
ALVA GRE8SMIRE. Vedernburg, Ind.
JOHN E. GUSTAFSON. Teofte, Minn.
WILBCRN HUNTER, Bloomingtoa, Ind.
ELL. JOHNSON, Blue River. Ky.
SAMUEL 8. KIEFER, Pine Grove, Pa.
n - -ar-TT I W PHhlinrtf Pa
j V'Xl- x . aiULu.., .vw . -
STANISLAUS KRAWSOKSKL Pittsburg, Po.
FRANK C. LARoON, Bacrea aresrt, aiinu.
HENRY LA CTER. Cabot. Pa.
OWEN A. LEKVIN. Chippewa Falls. Wis. .
ARTHUR O. MeCONNELL, Ettland, Pa.
LUTHER McGC IRE, Henderson, Ky.
, LEE MARSHALL. Jacksonville, N. C.
- MICHAEL J. MEYER. Saginaw. Mteh.
DAVID W. CARTER. Norwood, Ohio.
ROBERT P. CLABO, Pigeon Forge. Tenn.
ROGER DILLEY, Binghamnton, N. Y.
LEROY R. FOSTER, Ripon. CL
WILLIAM HALLE RN, Lima, Ohio.
JOSEPH HAMILTON. New Orleans, IA.
ANDREW O. HEIMDAL,' Ashmoor, Mont
WILLI A M ALBERT HEYER, Milwaukee. Wis.
BENNET WILEY HILL, Willow ton. W. Vs.
ROBERT HINTS, Poeateno. Idaho.
LOUIS FRITZ HOLLMAN. Brenham, Texas.
WALTER S. HOOPER. Kansas City. Mo.
JAMES W. INGLE, Adam'ville, Tenn.
JENS C. JENSON, Foley. Minn.
MOSES S. MURRAY. MarUnee. Ca.
EUGENE CLARENCE PAYNE. Anooch, Pa.
ADRIAN BOHN PUBCELL, Scrantoa. Pa
OSCAR T. 8CHEEL, MaoeonUh, I1L
CLARENCE E. SLEEPER. Ft Dickeson. X.Y.
EMERSON 8PADY, Cap Charles Va.
JOSEPH H. 8 TONER, Waynesboro, Pa.
STEPHEN T, SULLIVAN. E. WeekhawcaJ.
HARRY TABSON, Loe Angeles, CeL
JOHN P. TAYLOR. Jamesvule, N. Y.
HAMPTON THA BP, Jeffersonvttle, Ga.
HARRY VINCENT, St. Louis, Mo. r
ELVIS WEBB, Port Republic Jf. T.
PAUL D. VOUNOBLOOO. Boise. Idaho,
KILLED IN ACTION. PREVIOUSLY RE-
girrtD wvwievBH nimbi
THEdDOBK YRED ECKHOFT, Ion, Mo.
KILLED IM AOTION, PREVIOUSLY REPORT-
'gi0 ' wvvnwsw ffbivn isv mv r
. . V r?T.T.rvN TSahnre Pa.
KILLED IN AOTION. PWEVIOUSLV REPORT-
ROLL OF HONOR
gl HWVSHSV ! mm '
CLARK la, MoCANN. Austin, ra
Private -
LEWIS GOXXSPIK. Frasien Bottom. W. Va.
DIED PROM WOUNDS. ' PREVIOUSLY RE
PORTED WOUNDED (Degree Unaeterwtlnea)
' , Private
I8ADOBB J. PAQUIN, Bedlak Falls. Minn.
MISSING IN AOTION. PREVIOUSLY REPORT
. ED WOUNDED (Degree Undetermlnee)
,- .Private
EDWARD IXTl!. Buffalo. Jf. Y.-
KILLED IN ACTION, PREVIOUSLY REPORT.
ID MISSING
L ' - Lieutenant " ' .
, HEXBX B. HUDSON. Avon. Pa
Privates --
GEORGE BACHMAN, Handy Hoc. Conn.
MARSHALL C. CROPPER. Canton, Ohio.
ISAAC M. FA IRCLOTH, Allsbrook. S. G. .
F.I.HOY GREEN. Tyler. Tesss.
HENRY j. HENDRICKS, Spokane. Wash.
THOMAS B. HOPKINS, Milan, Mo.
HANS W. JENSEN. Saratoga. Wyo.X
DONALD McNEIL. Hinesdala. MouL .
DIED 'FROM WOUNDS,. PREVIOUSLY RE
PORTED MISSING
HARMON R. .HUMPHREY. Brilliant. Ohio.
DIED, PREVIOUSLY REPORTED MISSING
Jrvate
WITJJAM BALLODnZZtS. Bcranton, Pa.
ANDREW V. BARTOLOTTI, Austria.
JJIARLES BERT8H. Ansconds. MonU
H;NKY BIXHMER. Portland. Maine.
JOHN H. BI HRK8H. Cedar Rapids. Iowa,
j HJKUEIt , i,Asxrs(j. iMtlt Rock, Ark.
- FRANK MLNDRl'D MILLER, New Waiton.
Connecticut.
; f Al.H OV.IU Hamilton, NT. D. :
LEOFIX. TOPA. Chicago III.
MARINE CORPS CSUALTIES
KILLED IN ACTION
Corporal
PAUL A STANTON. PhiladelphU. Ta.
Privates
THOMAS E ATKINH. Tovekmart, Ga.
JUWRENCE E. ALLEY. Whitman, Neb'
WILLIAM D. ANTHONY. CenterviK. Md."
RAYMOND A. BEHAN, St. Louis. lao.
WALTER L. BENNETT. ImsrTColo.
ALEX T. BERGER, Tucson. Aria,
OTTO R. REIGEL, Robinson. Ul.
jnjAN H. SEIKERT. Philadelnhla Pa
THEODORE R. VANf ASSEL. Wayland. If. T
1 DIED OF WOUNDS
RICHARD CAMPBELL. Wichita. Kan,
CLAUD T. COOK. Hutchinson. Kan.
Privates
MICHAEL. BOBBICK. Cleveland. Ohio.
WILLIAM A. CARSON. Redlands. CaL
JAMES R. CHADWK'K. Swifts, Ohio,'
JOSEPH F. E FINGER, Newark. N. J.
JAMES R. HI I.I.BERT. Leoeaoteii. Ind.
ENOS C. MORGAN. Marathan Clermont. O.
DIED OF DISEASE
'Corporal
THOMAS W. PAYTON. Reed Point. Mont.
Private
WILLIAM A. II. JUST, St. Louis, Mo.
MISSING IN AOTION
Private
RAYMOND M. nASMAN. Rochester, Ps.
KILLED IN ACTION, PREVIOUSLY REPORT
ED MISSING
EARL B. BLACKDEN. Portland. Or.
Privates
THOMAS BENNETT, Dallas. Or.
STERLING L. ALEXANDER. Franklin. Fa,
t HA.Mi H- ZEIN, Lacrosse,- Wis.
. Night List
- Washington! March 9. rTha list of casualties
in the American expeditionary force abroad con
tains the names of 68 ' men, of whom none are
members of tha marina corps. The casualties
are divided: -
Died of accident and other causes ........ 25
Died of disease-.'. 14
Wounded severely .................... 23
Missing An action 0
Total 68
Total . number of casualties to date including
army casualties reported above:
Killed in action (including at sa)
Died of disease ..............
Died of wounds .............
Died of accident and ether causes.
81.T57
20.634
13.265
8.132
Wounded in action (over 85 per cent
returned to duty) I ;i!
Missing in action (not including prison-
. 1190.T2S
loners released and ; returned to duty) 6,083
Total ......
.......265.084
ARMY CASUALTIES
DIED. OF ACCIDENT AND OTHER CAUSES
Lieutenant
JAMES J. BALLENSTEIN. " Minnesota
Minn.
GEORGE H. EDWARDS JR. Kanaaa rut.
Mo. , " '
SERGEANT ASA O. HOWSDV TW-if
Mich. -
CORPORAI. RALPH R . lTT.TYE-n CmA,
WAGONER a L. GLOYD. Macomb, m.
Privates ,
MANCO L. BAKER. Minden. La.
HAROLD It BLA8IZER, Fremont. Ohio.
NICHOLAS E. BLANO, Canton, Ohio.
RAYMOND Ci CARLSON. Gerlow, IU.
JOHN J. CATON, Seville. Texaa.
WILLIAM E. CHAMBERS, OtUwa. W. Va
BARNEY MITTENDORF. Avon. Ohio.
WILMET C. MOREHOUSE, Seattle, Wash.
OfLLISriK BLAIN O'BRIEN, Spring. Texas.
WILLIAM P. 8TEHL1N, BrewnsviUe, Tenn.
8TANDLY APTYKA. Newark. N. J.
CARL J. ALBRECHT, PhiladelphU, Pa.
WAS NERVOUS
BUT FEELS LIKE
HERSELF AGAIN
Regains Weight and Strength
When Blood Is Built Up by
. the Tonic Treatment
Nervous ailments of all kinds, partio
uiany nervous debUity, work a .remark
able transformation in the patifent. The
change is both physical and mental. The
sufferer loses weight and strength and
frequently becomes Irritable and fault
finding. Troubles that were once thrown1
off without any difficulty assume exag
gerated propotrions. Other symptoms of
ttus nervous condition are poor appe
tite, headaches, exhausUon after little
effort, breathlessness, and frequently
distress arter meals.
ne) cause ox in is aeotuty Is gener
ally starved nerves. The blood which
gives the nervous system its food and
power to work efficiently has become
think and. weak and until the blood re
gams lis. tone ana strength, there can
be no Improvement in the condition of
the nerves. ' , , -
Mrs. Arthur Storer of No. 2138 Wabash
avenue, Terre Haute, Ind., was a victim
or nervous aeDUity. u . you have any
or the symptoms she describes you will
rind her experience profitable.
"About two years ago," say Mra
Storer, "I ' suffered . a severe nervous
shock when ; my . husband was badly
Dumeo. r or wree months l was up
night and day caring for, him and the
shock, combined with loss of sleep, prac
tically prostrated me. I couldn't regain
my strength and was tired all the time.
I didn't have any ambition for my house
work, and even after the responsibility
of caring for my husband had passed. I
couldn't sleep through the entire night
The slightest noise upset me. I had
terrible nervous headaches and. lost all
toy color. -
"I saw a newspaper announcement of
Dr. Williams' Pink Pills and procured a
box. I could see' a very decided 1m
provement in my condition after the first
box and I continued the treatment until
I could sleep well and my appetite im
proved. -1 have ; regained my lost
strength and color and can do my work
with . little errort. x no longer nave-t
headaches. I have given Dr. Wllllarprs j
Pink Pius to my daughter and tkey
have helped her greatly."
Dr. Williams' Pink Pills are an Ideal
tonic ' for nervous people - because they
are non-alcoholic .
A useful book. TJiseasee of the N'er-
voua System," will be sent free by, the
Dr. - Williams Medicine Co Schenec
tady, N. T. Tour own druggist sells
Dr. Williams' Pink Pills ' or you
order them direct by mall, postpaid
B0 cepts a box, six boxes for
Adv.
CARL W. ANDERSON, PnrtervilK Csl.
WARRKV mf unv mi, vi. u vi-..ki-
" -. - - V . . .'.
RORERT WALKER BRACKEN. Bristol, Ta.
tAHMEIXJ CllILLEMI. Albany. N. Y.
MIKE COLE. Vertaburge. Pa. ;
"i M LUt?u,N. Cleveland. Ohio.
John biciuuds. oaiiopoiis. ouio.
DIED OF DISEASE
Privates
2Viy.r:KSX1LLKR- Kvllle. Tenn. '
' fwI.Ri'-JK ,J- NKLLHJAN. MUford, Ma.
UAMUi t HCAUULN, Chieopee Falh.
iMTlJ1 A.SrHRAI)KU- Shamokln, Pa
SAWMONS. Dsyton. Ohio.'.
.? w? SJN2 KTOX. Bne. La.
i?J. SH E. Jeddo . Pa. .
iAZSk fK"'INf!8 JR.. Richmond Va
t f kixT' C0BB-
CLYDE YOUNG. IHleUne. Art '
11ARKY O. ZIMMthMA.V, Palmyra. Pa.
MISSING IN AOTION
. Privates
OL.'.N Bt'ROON. .Oeomilta;" Va,
CHRISTOPHER O. HAKKIS. Elisabeth. N 3
ANTONIO NARCCARELLA, New York.
-WILLIAM PABRIS. KnoivUle, Tenn.
- JOK SKltVAL. Amaterdam. N. Y.
HENRY RICHARD 811ACKLETTE. Gusten
Ky.
"I ADVISE EVERY
SICK VVOLlAfJ
ToTry Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound."
"I advise every euiTorinsr woman to
take Lydia E. Pinkham's VegeUbls .
J I much trood. T
had female weak
ness, inflamma
tion, pains in mj '
sides and painful .
eriods. I suf
ered for six
years and tried 1
many remedies 1
without benefit. )
The doctor said t
I must have an :
operation. I read about Lydia E.
r mkham s v egetabla Compound in
the newspapers, and since taking it I
am cured and hare a nice baby four ;.
months old. I feel like a new woman, '
and have recommended, your medicine i
to my friends. I would be glad to r
have everybody know what your med
icine did for me, and if any write to
me I will answer all letters." Mas.
Mart Caligube, 317 South Main St.,
Herkimer, X. Y.
Every woman at some period or
other in her life may suffer from juts
such disturbances as Mrs. Caligure,
and if there is no interested friend to
advise, lei this be a reminder .that
this famous root and herb remedy has
been overcoming these ailments of
women for more than 40 years.
t II tt lt.a -f-
. ' ,wa.a v.nvivatv - W A 3 IV -
Lydia E. Pinkham Medicine Co,,
Lvnn, Mass., for advice. .The retulk
of many years, experience, is at your
service. :
She Took
Adler-i-ka!
: "My wife had what the doctors call
caiarrn : oi . uu stomacn xor 10 . years..
Had to diet carefully and suffered
much. She has now taken one bottla
. . j,.. , , - t ..... , i
OK Auieri-aa aviiu lecii pvr&ecvix vvvii.
(Signed) B. F. Parker, Brock, Texas.
Adler-I-ka expels ALX Eas and sour
ness, stoppinff stomach distress IX-
STANTL,y. Empties BOTH upper and
lower bowel, flushing; ENTIRE, alimen
tary canal. Removes ALL foul matter
which poisons system. Often CUKES
constipation. Prevents, appendicitis. We
have sold Adler-i-ka many years. It
Is a mixture of buckthorn cascara,
glycerine and nine other simple drugs.
Skidniore Drug- Co. and leading; drug
gists. Adv.
dnf-Soldiers Shave Vitli
Cuticura Soap
The Healtby Up-To-Date
Cnticsira Way
No mug, no slimy soap, no germa. rx)
free alkali, no waste, ne irntatioa even
when shaved twice daily. One soap for all
uses shaving, bathing and shampooing.
Doubles razor efficiency, not to apeak of
value in promoting akin purity, skin com
fort and gkin health due te ks delicate,
fragrant Cuticura -medication. Largest
selling skin soap in the world.
aW" Qitictxra Toilet Trio
Consisting ef Soap, Ointment and Talcum
are indispensable adjuncts of the daily tov
let in maintaining akin purity and akin
health. By bringing these delicately meali.
cated emollients in freqnent contact with
your skin as in use for aO toilet purposes,
you keep the skis, scale, bair and haands
clear, sweet and healthy 2Scea. everywhere.
Stop Itching Eczema
Never mind how often yon have tried
nd failed, you can stop burning, itching
eczema quickly by applying Zemo fur
Dished by any druggist for 35c. 1 Extra
large bottle, $1.00. Healing begins the
moment Zemo is applied. In a short
time usually every trace of eczema,
tetter, pimples, rash, blackheads and
Similar skin diseases will be removed.
For clearing the skin and making it
vigorously healthy, always use Zemo,
the penetrating, antiseptic liquid. It
is not greasy and does not stain. When
others fail it is the one dependable
treatment for skin troubles of all kind,
The ILW.RcmCcw Cleveland, O. -
A Bod Couch
If neglected, f tern leads te serious trodlsv
Safeguard your health, relieve your distress
and soothe your Irritated threat by taking
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