The Oregon daily journal. (Portland, Or.) 1902-1972, February 27, 1919, Page 7, Image 7

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    THE OREGON DAILY JOURNAL,: PORT LAND, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY , CT, 1919.
PACIFIC COMPANY
WILL TAKE OVER
HOWIE PHONE PLANT
City Council Reaches Agreement
With Representatives of Both
Concerns? U. S. Approves.
$15,00a PAID CITY YEARLY
Bondholders Arrange for Sale at
$2,000,000, Which Allows
Holders 70 Cents on Dollar.
The property of the Home Telephone
Company will pass into the hands of the
Pacific Telephone & Telegraph company
on Saturday for a consideration of ap
proximately J2.O00.O0O. The last obstacle
to the sale will be removed this after
noon when the city council passes an
ordinance withdrawing objections rtled
against; the merger on February 17. An
agreement with the council and the rep
resentatives of both companies was
reached at a conference1 at the city hall
this morning and the city attorney has
been instructed to draw up the ordi
nance for passage this afternoon. The
consent of the federal government to
the transfer has already been obtained.
Under the agreement the Pacific sys
tem; is to pay the City $15,000 a year be
ginning March 1 in place of the one
per cent on gross earnings paid by the
ilome company : Is to supply the city
with free telephones ; and to maintain
the present fir and police exchange
system.
' Bale Application Stands
.The city held out for a payment of
one per cent of the gross earnings of
the consolidated company to be paid
the city annually, which request was re
fused by Vice President. H. D. Pillsbury
of the Pacific company, who made a
counter offer of $10,000 a year. A flat
rate of $15,000 was agreed upon, which
in considerably above the $3800 previous
ly received from both companies under
the franchises.
The city further asked that the Pacific
people withdraw their application for in
creased rates before the public service
commission. This was refused on the
representation that the company has not
earned a cent in Portland or in Oregon,
and that the public service commission
will settle the hearing on a fair basis.
"There has been no return on our com
mon stock on the coast.'. declared Mr.
Pillsbury. "We have paid but 6 per cent
on $32,000,000 of preferred stock, and 5
per cent on $42,000,000 bonds."
Interchange of Service
Absorption by the Pacific system of
the properties of the Home company will
afford telephone patrons a choice of
phones and virtual interchange of serv
ice, according to Pacific officials. The
inz Improvements, cannot take place De-
fore a year, however, it was stated, and
It will be that length of time before the
interchange will become effective. In
Jxms Angeles the company was allowed
&$nonths to make the change, but It la i
Jbeheved thatft can- b completed in
Portland within a- year. .
4 The equipment of the insolvent com
pany will be used by the pu,rchasers,
adding equipment for approximately
14,000 phones, 7000 of which are already
installed.
The bondholders of the defunct com
pany will realize 70 cents on each dol
lar's investment as a result of the pur
chase of the properties, according to
Oswald West, receiver of the Home com
pany. City looses Bonds
A. L. Mills, on behalf of the bond
holders, purchased the Home property
for $500,000 at the foreclosure sale held
February 17, and this sale comes before
the circuit court Friday for confirma
tion. The telepnone transaction has brought
to light a probable , loss of $25,000 In
bonds to the city, according to Mr. West.
When the franchise to operate was
granted to the original Home Telephone
company. $25,000 In bonds were p.aced
on deposit with the city to safeguard
the city's rights. At the transfer of the
Home company from Charles ' Surrinef"
to purchasers, the bonding company was
not notified by city officials, which
breach, lawyers state, releases the bond
ing company from any liability.
Forest Banner Visitor ,
Dee Wright, forest ranger at Cascade
Locks,- stopped in Portland' today on his
way to Eugene. Mr. Wright has been
in charge of the Herman Creek ranger
statioy during the winter, where he has
been doing grading and construction
work. Dee Wright is strongly In favor
of declaring an "open season" on all
persons who destroy forest service sign
boards. .
U'imiiii
The Quick 0 Way to
Stop a Cough
Tbls home made syrup doei the
work In a harry. Easily pre
pared, and saves about IS.
AMONG LEADERS OF -y
CENTENARY DRIVE
7 fV'-2",
Si
Rev. Christian F. Reisner
NOTED LEADERS OF
METHODISM PRESENT
AT BIG CONFERENCE
Nine Hundred Visitors Expected
at Two-Day Session Starting;
Friday Morning.
More famous Methodist leaders will be
in Portland Friday morning than at any
other time in the history of the state. At
the same time there will gather here del
egates from every Methodist charge in
the Oregon conference, approximately
900 visitors being expected.
The gathering is to start off the $100,
000,000 missionary drive of the Methodist
centenary, and' is known as the world
program conference of the centenary.
More than 12 of the national leaders of
Methodism will be in Portland for a
series of morning, afternoon and evening
sessions. Methodist leaders such as Dr.
Christian F. Reisner, Dr. W. K. Doughty.
Dr. John W. Hancher. Dr. G. F. Ream
and many others will be heard, while E.
O. Excell. who has composed probably
more gospel hymns and led more people
in singing at revival meetings than any
other man In America, will lead massed
singing at every session.
Immediately after the Methodist lead
ers arrive In Portland they will be shown
to their official headquarters at the Port
land hotel". At 9 :30 a. m. there will begin
at the First Methodist Episcopal church
a series of group conferences for dele
gates. At noon there will be a luncheon
for the area council
Several Mass Sterlings Planned
The first mass meeting will be at 2 p.
m.- Three victory dinners will begin
promptly at -6 p. m. They are open" to all
Methodists and others who desire to at
tend. They will also be held at the
church. Another mass meeting, ad
dressed by all the leaders, will begin at
9 :30 a. m. Saturday. There will be lead
ers' luncheons at noon and at 2 p. m. a
mass meeting, with a final massed gath
ering at 7 :30 p. m. Saturday.
The first session Friday morning will
be devoted to sectional training and con
ferences, participated in by. the dele
gates. Dr. John W. Hencher will discuss
the campaign and finance situation with
those who will lead in the financial end
of the $100,000,000 worldwide drive. M.
J. Trenery, the Sunday school expert,
will talk before a group of Sunday school
and area Sunday school leaders. Dr. G.
Franklin Ream will discuss ways and
means with those heading the movement
toward the devotion of Methodists to life
service in the home or foreign field. Dr.
Christian F. Reisner, the famous preacher-publicity
expert, will talk to the Meth
odist minute men : Dr. W. A. Brown will
speak before leaders in the stewardship
campaign and the area stewardship
leaders.
There will be a luncheon at noon for
the area council. At 2 o'clock will be the
first mass meeting on the general theme,
"The Centenary in the New Day."
Program for Friday
Dr. Reisner will make the opening ad
dress ; Dr. E. L. Mills will discuss "Con
ditions in American Life Demanding an
Advance by the Church." and Dr. Wil
liam A. Brown will speak on "The Spir
itual Challenge of the Centenary."
At 6 p. m. will be the three victory din
ners in the First Methodist church
Rev. James T. French, Dr. E. L. . Mills
and Dr. Reisner will speak at the lay
men's banquet open to all men in Meth
odism, whether delegates to the confer
ence or not.
The speakers at the ministerial dinner
will be Dr. Charles A. Bowen, Dr. John
W, Hancher, Dr. G. Franklin Ream and
Dr. W. E. Doughty. The speakers at the
women's dinner will be experts in tha
home and foreign mission field, including
Dr. William A. Brown, Dr. Fred H.
Sheets and Dr. Sumner Vinton.
Tou might be surprised to know that
the best thing you can use for a severe
cough is a remedy which is easily pre
pared at home ;n Just a few moments.
It's cheap, but for prompt result it beats
anything else you ever tried. Usually
tops the ordinary cough or chest cold in
84 hours. Tastes pleasant, too children
like it and it is pure and good.
; Pour 2 ounces of Pinex in a pint
bottle then fili it up with plain granu
lated sugar syrup. Or use clarified mo
lasses, honey, or corn syrup, instead of
'sugar syrup, if Jesired. Thus you make
a full pint a family .supply but cost
ing no more than a small bottle of
ready made cough syrup.
And, as a cough medicine, there Is
really nothing better to be had at any
price. It goes right to the spot and gives
quick, lasting relief. ; It promptly heals
the inflamed - membranes that line the
throat and air passages, stops the an
noying throaty tickle, loosens the phlegm
and soon your cough stops entirely.
Splendid for bronchitis, croup, whoop
ing cough and bronchial asthma.
, Pinex is a highly concentrated com
pound of Norway pins extract, famous
for its healing effect on the jnem bran es.
- To avoid disappointment ask your
druggist for "2 ounces of Pinex" with
directions and- don't accept anything
else. Guaranteed to give absolute satis
faction or, money promptly - refunded.
ThePipe Co-. FV Wayne, Ind. Adv.
Oregon Member
Offers Remarks
Praising Wilson
Washington, Feb. 27. (WASHING
TON BUREAU OF THE JOURNAL.)
The Democratic national committee
meeting Wednesday was featured by the
adoption of a resolution indorsing
woman suffrage and the administra
tion. A later resolution, offered by
Committeeman Hornibrook of Oregon
and unanimously adopted, congratulates
President Wilson upon "great achieve
ments in behalf of a just and enduring
peace,'' and says :
"We call upon all good citizens. Ir
respective, of political affiliation, to sup
port efforts he is making here and
abroad in behalf of world peace, sup
ported by all civilized governments.
"We deprecate attempts in various!
quarters to minimize me giory right
fully belonging to America and to tar
nish the honor of the army and navy
by unwarranted attacks upon the ad
ministration and agencies of the na
tion by means of which these great re
sults have been achieved."
Meat Condemnation Sustained
The action of City Meat Inspector
Chase in condemning a carcass at the
market of Frank L. Smith A Co. was
sustained by the city council Wednes
day and the meat was ordered destroyed,
bacteriologists representing the city and
the meat company made an expert examination.
AM
JHI
CC
iilo
TIME
AG
OLD
RESIDEN
PORTLAND
T OF
, IS DEAD
Stroke of Paralysis Fatal to Well
Known-Mason and Member
of the Elks' Lodge.
James E. Page, who lived in Portland
for nearly 20 years and was a member
of the Scottish Rite and the Elks lodge,
died at Willitts. Cal.. February 21 of a
paralytic stroke.
Mr. Page was bom 64 years ago In
Ashland. Wis. He came to the coast
in 1889 and had been associated in the
Umber and lumber business until his
death.
He was a high Mason, Joining the
Shriners in St. Paul before coming west.
He removed to San Francisco eight
years ago. The body was taken to
Tulsa, Okla., where Mr. Page has two
brothers, for burial.
Mrs. Elliott of Portland is a daugh
ter of Mr. Page. He also leaves a
widow, E. Alice Page of San Francisco,
a son, Claude E. Page of San Fran
cisco, and a daughter, Maude Page of
Seattle.
Mistah Williams'
Haid Wasn't;Hurt
But Cop's Fist Was
Luther Williams, who alighted from a
Southern Pacific train Wednesday
carrying two suitcases containing liquor,
is in jail facing-state and federal boot
leg charges.
Williams attempted to escape when
arrested and Officer Hopkins of the war
emergency squad struck him a terrific
full arm blow. It struck the dusky pris
oner on the side of the head. He was
uninjured but Hopkins is nursing a sore
hand and a badly sprained wrist.
Williams'had 13 quarts of whiskey.
Dr. Hamilton Gets
Major's Commission
Dr. Riden. R. Hamilton, Portland phy
sician, who served seven months in the
army and was commissioned as a major,
has just received his commission in the
medical officers' . reserve corps as a
major after having been discharged from
Fort Riley. He entere'd the service
April 6, 1918. going to the training
school for medical officers at Fort
Riley. He was then sent to Fort Ogle
thorpe as an instructor in the medical
officers' school there, later being sent
to Fort Riley when the two schools were
consolidated. He has accepted the com
mission. He was discharged in December.
LOCAL Y. M. C. A. TO ,
HAVE SONG LEADER
' ' ' J, "
; s .
v
:-.:;'. :
. Walter Jenkins.
The Portland Y. M. C. A. is to have a
song leader. "And he is the best song
leader on the Pacific coast," averred A.
M. Grilley, executive secretary of the
local association, but, during the war,
general secretary of the Red Triangle
work at Camp Lewis.
Walter Jenkins, formerly district song
leader of the Pacific Northwest for the
T. M. C. A., will take up his duties here
on March 1. "For some time," explained
Mr. Grrlley, "we have felt the need Of
leadership in song. We want more sing
ing in Portland ; we want more singing
at our meetings, and Jenkins has a per
sonality so magnetic and an influence
so persuasive that he will inject the
spirit of song into the sorriest grouch
of any audience."
Pitcher Oldham Is
Coming to Beavers
Manager Walter McCredie of the
Portland baseball club announced this
afternoon that Pitcher Red Oldham,
former San Francisco southpaw, had
been turned over to Portland by the
Detroit American league club. Oldham,
who has been in the army, ia now re
siding in Los Angeles. Oldham was one
of the best left-handed pitchers in the
league two years ago and his hitting
aided San Francisco to win a pennant.
Airplane Line Planned
San Francisco. Feb. 27. (U. P.) D.
M. Linnard plans to establish a line of
large passenger aeroplanes for the con
venience of guests of his chain of Cali
fornia hotels, it became known today.
oo h trail
DOE WEDNESDAY
Reception to Returned Troops
Will Follow Plan of Former
Success.
t Five hundred men and officers of the
Sixty-fifth coast artillery will arrive in
Fortland March 5, according to Infor
mation received Wednesday from Sen
ator McNary. The troops are due to
leave Camp Eustis. Va, today. Railroad
authorities in Portland say 480 men m
two two troop specials are routed through
Chicago and Omaha over the "
cific into Portland and on to Camp
It'ia probable tiat the trains will not
arrive Writer than Wednesday morning.
Efforts will be made to have them spend
the day liere.
O. B. Overbeck of the general recep
tion committee announced today that
the reception would be handled in much
the same way as before, since that
proved successful. There will not be so
many men to take care of this time. A
desk will be placed in the Liberty temple
for the use of the Sixty-ninth artillery,
so that it can give out the tickets for
admission of relatives into tie station
when the trains arrive.
Information as to the movements of
the 162d remains meager. Colonel May
telegraphed his wife that he leaves Camp
Dix today for Camp Lewis, via St. Paul,
which indicates that he will not come
through Portland. He did not say
whether cr not there were troops with
him, but it is thought that the machine
guri company which came across the At
lantic with him is on the same train.
The local reception committee has wired
Senator McNary to get information as
to whether or not there are troops with
him, and, if so, why they cannot be
routed through Portland. It Js known
that the regiment will not come back as
a whole, and it is possible that some of
them will pass through Portland and
some will not. to equalize the pressure'
on the railroads.
No new arrangements are being made
to receive the Sixty-fifth men when
they corrc back from Camp Lewis Fri
day, after receiving their discharges.
The general committee has decided to
leave this matter to the auxiliary. The
boys who iave no homes here will be
taken care of just as other discharged
soldiers have been.
Woman's Eest Boom
Opened at the Depot
A new rest room for women was
opened up at the Union station this
afternoon by the Oregon-Washington
Railway & Navigation company, the
Southern Pacific and the Northern Pa
cific Terminal company. Exercises con
sisting of several musical numbers and
a few talks by railroad officials were
held at 2 o'clock in connection with the
formal opening of the room.
S. & H. Stamps Bring Added Profits
20 EXTRA STAMPS FRIDAY and SATURDAY ,
WITH THE COUPON 20 '
Bring This Coupon
ATSD GET
20 Extra 20
"S. H." Trading
Stamps on your
first 1 cash pur
chase and double
on ths b a 1 a n o a Wt'.T.-.uf
Good on First Floor and in
Basement Friday and Satur
day, Feb. 28 and March ' 1..
"Runabout" Wardrobe Trunk
Just the right size 40 inches high, 22 inches wide,
13 inches deep. Round-edge construction. Hard
vulcanized fiber binding on all edges and fiber
covered body. Built for hard service and equipped
with self-locking Excelsior lock and most improved
clasps. Carries six suits or gowns.
Special $24.50
FRAMES
PRINTS-o5?';?0
Oval, gilt and black, with iq
glass JLSC
SPECIAL at c
Bring in Your Soiled Gloves
to Be Cleaned
Short 15c Long 20c
Nikk-Marr Toilet Requisites
Demonstrated
Your Last Summer's
Hat Is Still Good
Just freshen it up with
."DY-IT"
All Colors Easy to Apply
Bottle 25c
7 A c :i
I ists on
t SHERWIN-
WILLIAMS
PRODUCTS
AT'TO TOP DRESSING
Pliable, waterproof coat for
top and curtains. pints,
pints, quarts.
AUTO ESAMELS Eight pleasing colors. pints,
pints, quarts.
FLATTOJTE The best of washable wall coverings.
15 colors. Quarts 81.15. gallons ..S3.80
FLOOR PAINTS 10 colors. Qts. SI. BaIs- 93.SO
a f ADA QTIMC ln a11 shades of the rain
fiUIJJ 1 lillli bow. Covers all sur
faces paper, cloth, concrete, fibre board or wood.
Sanitary, durable easy to apply. White 70i
16 Colors,, per package 75
fesi
Plant Your Sweet Peas Now!
Packages 10c to $2.50
ELECTRODES
ZISC AND COPPEE INSOLES GUARANTEED
$1.00
REDUCED PRICES
4-oz. GLYCERINE 25
3- o. CAMPHORATED OIL. 25
2 -ox. OIL, EUCALYPTUS
8-oz. WITCH HAZEL, double distilled ..25
2-oz. SPIRITS CAMPHOR Z5c
WATERGLASS Pint 20. quart 35S -gal-
lon 50S gallon
HOSPITAL COTTON, pound , 50c
1 oa. GUM CAMPHOR 25
1 pt. ALBANOL (Paraffin OH) 50
100 SACCHARINE TABS., 25 500 for... Sl.OO
6-yd. GAUZE , T5
4- oz. KOCH ELLE SALTS 25
POMPEIAN MASSAGE CREAM 4T
ZONA POMADE all shades 45
DAGGETT & RAMSDELL COLD CREAM. ... .47?
WOOD-LARK FRECKLE CREAM 85
MIOLENA FRECKLE CREAM
HIND'S HONEY ALMOND CREAM 49
RQBERTINE . . .V.4T
ESPEYS CREAM 23-45
BRONNLBV BATH SALTS.. ...790
Use a Harvey Exposure Meter
Many films are badly underexposed, some over
exposed. . If you want the best results ALWAYS,
use a meter. It saves f lima
BARGAINS IN SECOND-HAND CAMERAS
SPECIALS
4.5 to tl7.1S
LADIES' ALL
SILK COLORED
UMBRELLAS
with baccalite
trimmintrs. A full
line of colors
At 20
Discount
r SS.7S to 17.60
MEN'S AND
WOMEN'S BLACK
UMBRELLAS
in .American Taffe
ta, Gloria Silk and
Pure Silk. Nice
assortment of han
dles in both lots
At 20
Discqunt
ALL VELVET BAGS HALF PRICE
MEN'S BELTS 49
SHOPPING BAGS 25
WALLETS K1.19
GENUINE COWHIDE BAGS, black S6.00
WHITING'S DUALINE STATIONERY A large
sheet in French blue. buff, lavender, light blue.
Envelopes tissue-lined. . Regularly J1.50, now 1
A FINE BOX OF PAPER, long narrow En- .
velope. Regularly 35c, now 18
AERO RUBBER CUSHION HAIR BRUSH. ..98
FLORENCE MILITARY BRUSHES, leather
tourist case S2.SO
FLORENTINE SHELL PTRALIN ITORY OFP
92.00 2-qt. Molded Fountain Syringe. One-
year guarantee $1.09
$2.75 2-qt. Combination Water Bottle and
Fountain Syringe, 1-year guarantee... 81.98
$2.50 Metal Hot Water Bottle... 91.98
Wpodard, . Clarke & Co,
Inter-Church World
Conference Will Be
Held Here Sunday
V
Fred B. Smith and J.. Campbell White
of New York, both noted speakers to
men, will deliver the chief addresses at
a meeting in the interests of the inter
church world movement - in Portland
Sunday and Monday. Mr. Smith will
address a mass -meeting for men Sunday
at 1.50 p. m. at the First Congregational
a,nVWiii 'o occupy the pulpit at the
White Temple. Sunday evening at 7:30
o clock. Mr. White will speak at the
Sunday evening service of Trinity Epis
copal church.
There will be a conference of leading
men and pastors at the Y. W. C. A. next
Monday morning at 10 VclocK-when Mr.
T o ,f "Mr- White will both speak,
w.. o clock Monaay afternoon Mr.
White will address a mass meeting for
women at the First Congregational
church, and at:30 p. m. Monday Mr.
Smith and Mr. White will be guests of
0n.J" , a dinnr which wiU be given
H?el Port,an- Prominent lay-
twaidicler8ry wni bo ln attendance.
ine inter-church world movement has
aLai.objectiv banging about a co
ordination and correlation of various
boards and missionary societies of all
denominations to avoid duplication, ov
erlapping and unnecessary expense.
Police Record Claimed
Los Angeles. Feb. 27. (U. p.) De
tectives here believe Mike Rixzo, Los
Angeles fruit merchant, who Was kUled
by alleged blackhanders Tuesday, was
the man who has a police record in
Seattle under the name of Mike Marina
The police theory is that Rizso was a
blackhand leader and he was killed by
alleged victims.
GRAND DUKE RAPS
LEAGUE OF NATIONS
AND
ORES
SON
Gompers Holds His Own in Argu
ment at Luncheon in the Rttz
Hotel, in Paris, v
By Lowell Mellett
Paris. Feb 27.-(U. P.) How Russian
nobility and American labor discussed
"cabbages and kings" at a luncheon In
the Hotel Kits- became known today, al
though the affair was not exactly public.
The American labor mission, headed by ,
Samuel Gompers. were the guests (
Wednesday of Grand Duke Alexander.
The luncheon was arranged by Charles
Mayer. New York munitions broker. The
chief topic of conversation was Bolshev
ism, although the League of Nations and
President Wilson came in for more or
less debate.
The tali . aristocrat, gray-Van Dyked
grand duke and the sturdy little tabor
leader presented a strange physical con
trast, but they are said to have reached
a striking degree of unanimity of opin
ion. The grand duke was unspaMng in
his criticisms of Wilson. Gompers point
ing out his own independence, said he
supported or opposed the president as
the occasion demanded.
The grand duke expressed scorn of the
League of Nations, calling it a "dough
boy-tommy scheme." and saying that,
while the rest of the world might accept
the "Anglo-American plan" , temporarily,
it would eventually have a league of its
own. -i
The construction of the league, he con
cluded, mads him think of the way th
French play poker with the deuces and
joker wild. Now, he declared, ; Wilson
has gone home with the deuces and the
Joker in his pocket. .
i No return luncheon has been arranged.
Spring Vacation at
TT. of O. March 22-30
University of Oregon.. Eugene, Feb. 27.
Spring vacation for University of Ore
gon students will begin on March 22 and
continue until March 30. according to
announcement made by A. R. Tif.'any,
registrar. Term examinations will be
held on March 19, 20 and 21. It is prob
able that a pre-reglstratl-n day will be
set before the present term ends so that
the students will be given an opportun
ity to register for the third term before
leaving for home.
cf tor a felicrn
been playinQ
Vt
i ii
THE STORE THAT UNDERSELLS BECAUSE IT SELLS FOR CASH"
Another Under priced List of Timely Offerings for Our
th Bargain Friday
A sale that thrifty women never fail to attend A sale that' brings to you
trustworthy merchandise at less than prevailing retail prices.
8c
SEVERAL HUNDRED YARDS OF DAINTY
Laces and Embroideries
Edges, I nsertions, Readings, Skirtings, Etc., A 11 in Desirable
Patterns and Priced for This Sale at, Yard ............ . ..
See Our Morrison Street Window Display
A sensational purchase and sale of several hundred yards of dainty Laces and, Embroideries
an opportune sale coming as it does right at a time when most every woman is in need of
such materials for Spring sewing. Attend this sale and you save a full third to a half on
your purchases.
Embroideries at 8c Yard I The Laces at 8c Yard
Both Imported and Domestic Embroideries in a
full variety of desirable patterns popular widths
in Baby Sets, Edges, Veinings, Readings and Inser
tions; also Skirtings and Beadings all clean, new
embroideries desirable in every way.
Included are fine French and Round Vals- Imita
tion Filet and Clunys in white and ecru, narrow
Venise E4ges, Net Top Edges, Piatt Vals, Pleated
Shadow Edges, etc. They come '-in Yt to S-lnch
widths and in an unlimited variety of patterns.
EXTRA! SPECIAL FOR FRIDA Y!
900 Pairs of Women's Shoes
In Fashionable Button and Lace
Styles, on Sale at, the Pair
$2.37
In our enlarged Shoe Section, in the basement, we have arranged an important underprlced sale of
more than 900 pairs of Women's Fashionable Button and Lace Shoes they comV in patent and In gun
metal leathers in styles for street or evening wean Goodyear welt or McKay flexible soles all sizes from
3 to 6 both fit and durability guaranteed., Priced for Friday at $2.37. .
EXTRA FOR FRIDA Y!
Men's Regulation Work
Shirts at 98c Each'
A fine fitting durable Shirt at a bar
gain price. Comes in regulation ' style
with turn-down collar, faced sleeve and
one pocket all sizes 14J4 to 17 in blue
and taa with assorted stripes.
Women's Outing Flannel Gowns at $19
The Season's Last Price Reduction
A final clean-up of our remaining stock of Women's Outing
Flannel Gowns. They come in various styles, made of best
quality Amoskeag and Teazeldown flannels and 1921 cloth.
Buy . now and buy generously for both present and future
needs, Regular values run up to a dollar more than the price
quoted for Friday's Sale, $1.89. ?
RICH, LUSTROUS 32-INCH
Black Taffeta Silks
Under priced for Friday'
Sale at, Yard .......
'$1.19
These beautiful Silks are always fashionable and in ereat demand they come In a fine, even weave
and are shown in a perfect black with a lustrous Swiss finish hey are 32 inches wide and are consider
ably underpriced at $1.19 yard. ;
White Nottingham and Scrim Curtains at 98c
Pair One-Half Regular Selling Price
A special closing out of a fine lot of White Nottingham and
Scrim Curtains several different styles to select from they
come iVi yards long and in generous widths. Come early and
secure first choice purchase as many as you wish as long as
they last Friday at 98c pair.
EXTRA POR FRIDA Y!
Imperial Longcloth at 6 Yds.
, for $1J00
Not more than 12 yards to any one
purchaser. Comes full 36 inches wide
and with a nice soft finish only a lim
ited quantity to sell at the above spe
cial price.
A Final Clearance of Children's and
Misses' Coats at $5 DO
At this low price you have choice from about
65 Children's and Misses' Coats in Winter styles
all well made garments of worthy materials 'most
all sizes In the lot in navy, brown, black. Burgundy
and mixtures. No exchanges no phone orders.
A Sale of Women's Taffeta Silk Pet
ticoats at $2
At Jthis sale you have choice from a splendid lot
of Women's Taffeta Silk Petticoats in two-tone and
plain colors several different styles in 36, 38 and
40-inch length Petticoats worth a great deal more
than Friday's Price, $2.85.
Store Opens
at 8:30 A. M.
Saturdays .
at 9 A. M.
The Most in Value The Best in Quality
Store Closes
it 5:30 P. II.
Saturdavs
at 6 P. M. I
AT