The Oregon daily journal. (Portland, Or.) 1902-1972, October 11, 1914, Page 1, Image 1

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    THg WEAlHEIt
Ceasional rain
in .Jtftis district
tody:;" winds
generally southerly-
VOL. XI. NO. 28.
CITY EDITION
PORTLAND, OREGON, SUNDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 11, 1914.
PRICQ ) FIVE CENTS
CHAMBERLAIN
OREGON SENATOR GETS LEAVE OF ABSENCE) JS f(J
GERMANS TRY
WORRY WORKS DEATH TO ROUMANIAN KING
TO
E
E
S DRIVEN ONTO
BELGIAN ARMY
TO
, it lzzP ' -rg- , cx gr"
OVERTAKE
EHOM
IKE TOUR
DUTCH GROUND
Oregon's Senior Senator IS
Granted Leave by Col
leagues in Upper House to
Visit State Before Election
ATTENDANCE RECORD
HAS BEEN CONSTANT
Absence Is Sought Only Af
ter Business of Session
Practically Concluded.
Sanator Chamberlain's Eastern
Oregon Itinerary.
Oct. 14 Baker, evening.
Oct. V.i Union, afternoon; La
Grande, everting.
Oct. 16 Pendleton, evening;
afternoon to be arranged by lo-
cal rommlttwi at Pendleton.
Oct. 17 The Dallas, evening.
(Jet. 18 and in Portland (no
formal addresses).
A
(Washington ftuieuit of The jMirnfil.t
Washlngton.-Oct. 10. Senator Cham
berlain left today for Oregon. He will
reach Portland next Sunday, October
is, heing scheduled to make several
speeches in eastern Oregon en route.
With the best record for attendance
of any senator, lie finally yielded to
persuasion Dy trlencis to enter per
sonalty into Ms campaign. To The
Journal corespondent this afternoon
lie sain :
Practically nothing remains to be
done by congress, except to pass the
war revenue bill. This measure, has
paused the house, and has been consld
ered 1ft detail by the Democrats of the
senate. As amended, it has bee ni re
ported by the finance committee to the
ftunate, and is now pending- on the cal
endan rt will doubtless pass with
tome changes, and will then come to
conference, wbera it will be. placed ia
agreement, so that congress will doubt
less pasa , it within the next 10 days or
i vwir weens, nave remained at txeer
post here until all of the president's
cherished policies hav been crystal
led Into statute, and would remain
now, except that the war revenue bill
wjll pass without question, and on that
I fam paired with a senator who is op
posed ' to it. I Bhall, therefore, leave
thts evening for Oregon to participate
In the campaign.
18 Months' Continuous Session.
"Congress has been in continuous
session,, since President Wilson's in
auguration and in that time It is safe
to say that more constructive legisla
tion has been passed than at any time
In the history of the United States.
Measures which have been promised
from time to time by partleB in the
past for the relief of the people of
the country but which have not been
rasned heretofore, have been taken up
l'.v the president and congress within
tne past 18 months, considered, dis
cussed and placed upon the statute
hooks. it has been an administra
tion of wonderful achievements. All
partioa during the past 12 years have,
in their platforms, made promises to
revise the tariff and to legislate upon
the subject of the currency so as to
protect the country from such panics
as occurred In 1907. Our Republican
friends, taking advantage of the fact
that their platform of 1908 did not say
whether the, tariff should be revised
upwards or downwards, passed the
i'ayne-Aldrtch bill of 1900. which re
vised the tariff upward in violation of
me aemanas or the American people
The Wilson administration has carried
o.ut the platform pledges of all parties
and has revised the Uiriff downwards.
o that In the ordinary course of
things the people will shortly begin
t realize some advantage from the
removal of protective duties which the
conmimer nas oeen compelled to pay.
.Currency Legislation a Monument
"The legislation of the present con
gress upon the currency, the creation
of the federal reserve board and the
t amendment of the VreeJand currency
bill will practically make a money
pajiic like that of 1907 an impossibil
ity. These two measures in themselves
re a monument to the ability of the
Democratic party to engage in con
etrtictive work, twit this .is not all.
"'The enactment of the trades com
mission bill, with powers and duties
to inquire into and investigate wheth
er or not Individuals and corporations
are engaged in business in violation
of the Sherman anti-trust laws, and
. the anti-trust bill, which has JuBt been
enacted supplementary to the Sher
man antt trust law, are magnificent
acts of constructive legislation.
'The one declaration in the recently
passed anti-trust bill, 'That the labor
of a human being is not a commodity
or article of commerce," takes labor
out of the category of a mere com
modity where plutocracy and greed
t have heretofore placed it, and is worth
; all of the money that has been ex
- pended during the past 18 months
while congress ha been kept in ses
sion, even if nothing else had been
uune.
Significance of Alaskan Bill.
"I might refer to other great pieces
, of constructive work performed by
congress, notably the Alaska road bill,
which will have the effect ot
developing the resources of the
new America in the north
west and save the epletidjd resources
of that territory from Guggenheim
grasp and greed. The future possi
bility of this great territory and Its
effect upon Oregon and the northwest
it is impossible to foresee. The S35.000.-
000 appropriated for the construction
of this government owned road will
be money well expended to develop a
virgin territory still owned and con
trolled by the people themselves. This
legislation, supplemented by tha ad-
Concluded on Pu Nine, Colon;. Two.)
W
Senator George E. Chamberlain, from photograph taken recently in
Washington, who is en route to Oregon to make speaking tour.
Innes Reiterates
Plea of Innocence
Ponner Portlander, Indicted With His
Wife in Ban Antonio, Texas, on Har
der Chargre, Insists He Is Wot Guilty.
San Antonio, T.exas, Oct. 10. Faced
with grand Jury Indictment ' cnatf '
the murder of Mrs. Eloise; Jelms Den
nis and her sister, Beatrice Nelms, Vic
tor B. Innes of Portland this evening
reiterated his" expressions -of innocence.
"I had nothing to do wItK the dis
appearance of the two girls," said,
"other than that I do not care to dis
cuss the matter. The facts In the case
will probably come out at the habeas
corpus hearing set for next Tuesday."
When Innes heard the grand jury
had indicted him he asked anxiously:
"Did they indict my wife, tooV j
"When informed that she had been
indicted he said nothing. Mrs. Innes
appeared visibly agitated at the news
but would make no statement.
Judge R.' H. Ward, counsel for
Innes, ,saia that he would press the
habeas corpus hearing next Thursday.
He manifested little surprise that
Innes had been Indicted.
Innes" and his wife ' are indicted
Jointly on a charge of murder and on
an additional charge of conspiracy to
murder the two girls. It is charged
that the Nelms sisters were murdered
In Bexar county, Texas, on or about
June 20.
The bodies, it h? alleged, Were dis
posed of with a meat grinder and with
corrosive acids.
The conspiracy indictment sets up
that Mr. and Mrs. Innes did conspire
in the states off Georgia, Alabama and
Texas to kill the two girls. Innes and
his wife were arrested on a farm near
Eugene, Or., late in August, whence
they had removed from Portland.
GENERAL VIEW
. , $ ' ' ' Photograph copghted J91t by . th International News Bureau
I
2
Wllllllll
Mountain Climber
Passes Suddenly
T. Brooke "White, Who Scaled Bit.
Rainier, Dies of Heart Failure After
. Short Bus to Car.
Although on August 10, with the
Masttttrajlhe ' reached the summit of
Mt .Rainier lMOfeet high, following
an exhausting climb, Just two months
ago, T. Brooke White, aged 59 years,
died Of heart failure after" a short run
for a Willamette Heights car about 6
o'clock last night- .
With Rodney L. Glisan he was out
for a walk, along the Linnton road
Returning, they ran for a car. Mr.
Glisan climbed on first. Mr. White
followed. On the r car platform he
dropped unconscious, and was placed
on a seat while the car dashed for
Good Samaritan hospital. He died be
fore a physician and nurse, summoned
by Mr. Glisan, reached the car.
Mr. White, who was a charter mem
ber of the Mazamas, was born at God
aiming, England, December 3, 1854, and
was educated at Oxford and Heidel
berg, Germany. H came to the United
States in the early 70s. After being
in the engineering department of the
Northern Pacific at Tacoma for a num
ber of years he came to Portland In
1S81. He was admitted to the Oregon
bar in 1894. later entering the govern
ment reclamation service. He followed
this work through the western states.
Mr. White was a charter member and
president and secretary of the." Oregon
Rowing club, and was also president
several terms of the North Pacific
Rowing association. He was unmar
ried, and is survived by a sister and
brother in Victoria. B. C. He lived at
573 Main street. The body is at the
Dunning & McEhtee undertaking es
tablishment and funeral arrangements
.will be made after relatives are heard
i from. .
OF ANTWERP WHICH
Turn TUni ic o nrl Rfllrin op Put
I vvu i iiuuoanu uiaiiiivo vui
Off From Antwerp Relief
Brigades by Germans, the
British War Office Admits.
WILL BE INTERNED IN
HOLLAND DURING WAR
Statement Says Retreat Out
of Antwerp Was Suc
cessfully Made.
iL'Dited Presn Wirp.
London, Oct. 11. (Sunday) Two
thousand British marines and sailors
a part of a force of 8000 which par
ticipated in the defense of Antwerp
have crossed into Dutch territory in
the neighborhood of Hulst and laid
down their arms. They will remaii
interned in Holland during the war.
This fact was made known in an
official press bureau statement issued
early today, which also frankly stated
that the danger to the Belgian army
was that of being cut off by a strong
force of Germans. The statement fol
lows: "In response to an appeal from the
Belgians, three brigades of British
(Concluded on Page Kive. Column One)
NEWS INDEX
SECTION OXE 12 PAGES
Page.
1 Chamberlain En Boute to Oregon.
British Driven Into Holl&nd.
King Carlos of Roumania Dies.
Germans Pursue Belgian Soldiers.
2. Residents of Antwerp Panic Stricken
Antwerp ass .Been .Besieged Bet ore.
3. Russians Inspired By Patriotism,
4. Peace Week Is Ended.
Methodist Factional Fight Smoulders.
Army Reserve of Veterans Planned.
Consolidation Plan Recommended.
5. London Open to Attack.
Germans m Pursuit of Allies.
6. The Dalles Women for Smith for
Governor.
Democratic Rally at Central Library.
Columbus Day to Ee Celebrated.
7. State Land Board will Receive Bids.
Germans Building' Powerful Gun.
8. Abolition of State Senate Urged.
Ike Joamai'a Circulation-Trad Con
test T
9. Paris is Sombre These Days.
Grand Lodge, . of P., to Meet Thi
Week.
Prohibition Issue in Four States.
10. California's Tidelands Revenue.
Vocational Training to Be Discussed.
Suburban News.
11. Oregon Civic League Luncheon.
Dahlia Show Is Success,
Recall Candidate Issues Statement.
12. Missourians to Try Referendum.
SECTION TWO TEN PAGES
(Editorial, Real Estate, Markets,
Special Features.)
SECTION THREE 12 PAGES
Part 1 Sports News.
Part 2 Marine News; Want Ads.
SECTION FOUR EIGHT PAGES
Page.
1. Tribute Paid S. Benson.
2. In Stageland.
3. Motion Picture News.
4-6-6-7. Automobile News.
a. Prison Reform in Oregon.
SECTION" FIVE 12 PAGES
Page.
1-2-3-4.
The Week in Society.
In Woman's Field.
Women's Clubs.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Your Horoscope.
Parent-Teacher News.
Health and the Human Machine.
In the Realm of Music.
Social Service Nnws.
University and College News.
Popular Science,
The Journal's Circulation and Trade
Contest.
Good Roads.
SECTION SIX EIGHT PAGES
(Magazine and Pictorial)
SECTION SEVEN FOUR PAGES
(Comic)
WAS SURRENDERED TO
Photograph copyrighted 1911 hy the International News Service
King Carlos of Koumania (holding paper) in conference with his ad
visers. This is one of the last photographs of the late monarch.
ROUMANIA S KING DIES
FROM EXCITEMENT OF
THE EUROPEAN CRISIS
Carlos, Aged 75 Years, Suc
cumbs; Recent Quarrel
Causes Breakdown,
(PriSted Press Teased Wire.)
London, Oct. 1. The Ticmmania le
gation tonight officially announced
the death at Bucharest at 5:30 this
mornjng of King Carlos of Roumania.
Severity-five years of age and of late
In poor health, his death Is du to
excitement engendered by the recent
break with his ministry over Rou
mania's position in the European
war. A week ago there were re
ports' that the monarch contemplated
abdication.
King Carlos was a Hohenzollern
and thoroughly German In his views
and ; sympathies. His people wer:
essentially Slavic. Both Austria and
France sought to draw the little
country Into the war. It was than
that the king made known his pro
German sentiments. The populace In
Bucharest at that time was clamor
ing for war. The Roumanian minis
try was a unit in declaring that Rou
mania should stand with Englani,
Russia and France.
The death of the king at this time,
it is believed here means that Ron
mania wil throw her fortunes with
the allies..
If so her troops, admittedly the
best drilled of the southern European
principalities, will be of great as
sistance to Servia against Austria.
NOISELESS AIRSHIPS
Paris. Oct.
correspondent
10. The Copenhagen
of the Paris Temps
wires:
"According to private information
from Berlin, Germany is building a
fleet of new Zeppelins with silent
motors.
"It is reported that these giant and
noiseless airships will be used in the
raids over England and in shelling the
British fleet." ,
THE GERMANS AFTER A
BOSTON BRAVES TAKE
GAME FROM
IE
Stallings' Wonder Workers
Score Another Victory
James Holds Athletics.
Official Attendance and U-
ceipts for riXBt Two Games
World' Series.
. Attendance. 41,124.
" Tre"ceTpIsTf9TT78.
Players' share, $53,810.
National commission's share,
$9,927.80.
Each club's share, J17.S70.10.
The attendance and receipts
for the two days were the
same, attendance on each day
being 20,562, and the receipts
639.
By Hugh S. Fullerton.
(Written for the United Press.)
Philadelphia, Oct. 10. (By the cal
ender, August 9 by the heat) This
miracle team from Boston fought the
Athletics to a standstill today, stopped
their supposed irresistible attacks by
superb pitching and brilliant fielding,
and after they had broken the spirit
and the hopes of Philadelphia they
made one run, and won the game,
1 to 0.
There is no discounting the fact
that spirit and fire and sheer con
fidence triumpned over the superior
strength and ability of the world's
champions. It is evident too, that the
Athletics, for the first time in their
victorious career, finding themselves
forced and pressed at every turn, have
wilted.
Seal BTo Joks.
Today, when in the ninth inning.
Deal, the batting joke of the series,
the man who seven times In succes
sion In two games had failed miser-
(Concluded on Page Seven, Column One)
BITTER SIEGE
SECOND
CONN
MACKS
MEN
A Large Force
Albert and His Men Who
Escaped From Ajitwerp Be
fore the City Was Taken.
r
BELGIAN KING, WITH
HIS ARMY, IN DANGER
(By the International
London, Oct. 10. King Albert, at
army of Belgium, which he led out
bottled up when it was seen that the
nevitable, is reported to be in a critical situation. He is being pursued
by a large detached force of the German division of the besieging army
under General von Veseler, which is attempgng to cut him off along
the Dutch border and force him either to facojbattle in the field agianst
overwhelming odds or seek refuge in Holland, fehere to be interned during
the remainder of the war.
Queen Elizabeth of Belgium arrived in S'ngland today, landing at
Folkestone from Dunkirk.
Her movements were guarded with the fjrictest secrecy. The pur
suit of the king and the gallant defenders Antwerp developed when
a body of Germans in great strength essayedja crossing of the Scheldt
river near Termonde. They threw temporarvspontoons across the river.
and despite the raking fire from the Belgian trenches succeeded in es
tablishing themselves on the other side, whire they were hastily re
formed and took up the march in a northeasterly direction towards Sart
Nicholas, 26 miles southwest of Antwerp an but five miles from the
Dutch frontier. jj ;
AIM TO PREVENT BELGIANS JOINING ALLIES.
The Germans evidently were bent on tAning the rear of the re
treating Belgian column and eitfcr forcing a Eattle or driving them into
Holland, and in any event presenting the elgians from effecting a
juncture with the allies in France, who are Jihing steadily toward the
Belgian border. Should the Belgians appear ehind the German line in
France, they would be able to seriouslbiMswjGiBcjal von Kluck's '
forces. I i . ' .
In their rear the flying columns of Belgians and pursuing Prussians
left a once beautiful city, the pride of Belgiutfi two-thirds in ruins. The
evacuation of Antwerp came only after it ws seen that further resist
ance would meanthe utter destruction of thcNcity by the ruinous fire of
the giant howitzers which had been pouringbcir deadly rain of shells
into it without surcease for three days, the climax of a ten days' siege.
Fires still rage unchecked in many partspf the city. The loss of
life has been appalling. Scores of beautiful buildings, monuments for cen
turies, have been razed or scarred. The Hotef ide Ville, a wonderful ex
ample of Renaissance type, dating from 156j,i suffered severely. Some
reports say that the Notre Dame cathedral, dating from 1352, a magnifi
cent structure, has been seriously damaged. ilOthers say it escaped un
scathed. Fugitives report the plight of thcpr.efugees desperate. Aged
and infirm lie by the roadside, worn out anp ;helples, where they col
lapsed. Women and children are forced to lk to a refuge in Holland.
BELGIANS' SURRENDER UNCONDITIONAL.
The Germans are in complete occupation of the city. The actual
surrender took place at 2:30 Friday afternoon. At 9 o'clock the flag
of capitulation was raised where the war flg had been flaunted from
the tower of the cathedral. $
Burgomaster de Vos, accompanied by Ajlerman Louis J'ranck, met
General von Veseler, commanding the besie'Jers, at the Berschem gate
and the city was surrendered unconditionally. At 2:30 the German
marched in through the suburb of Berschentj- :
Military critics today discussed the posatility of the retaking of
Antwerp by the allies. It is an accomplish!: fact that permanent for
tifications in an exposed position are easy prf for modern artillery.
This was the reason for Antwerp's fall, ffi
GREAT CATHEDRALpS
DAMAGED bY GERMANS
Rosendaal (Via The Hague and London Oct. 10. German control
of Antwerp is absolute. Tonight it is reported here that the invaders
now hold not only the city, but everything tEat their great 42-centimetre
truns did not demolish. They have restored 5-ofder in the city and made
every attempt to limit the fires burning in tjrious sections of Antwerp
caused by their shell fire. H is stated thatphe great Gothic Cathedral
of Notre Dame has been damaged, but rwt beyond repair, by Ger
man shells. I,;
Two streets Rues Darciles and
aged, the houses linirTg them for their entirei34ngth having been reduced
(Concluded on Page Five,
MISSOURI MULES
In today's Journal Want Ads
you will find offers of everything
from mules to phonographs. The
following are samples. The
name of the classification in
which it appears today follows
each iterm
"We have 2 clients who want
5 or 7-room house not to exceed
$4000." Wanted Real Estate, t
"Five-room uoper flat, paneled
dining-room, pbone and water,
$12.50." Flats to Rent.
"Mules! Mules! We have for
sale 2 carloads of good Missouri
mules, weight from 1200 to 1500
rounds.? Horses and Vehicles.
$20 takes my $75 White
ine." For Sale Miscel
ma-
chine
cellane-
ous.
"Wanted To buy a milk or
buttermilk route; will pay $100
cash down; give amount of milk
sold and number, of customers,'
Business Chances,
Pursuing King
Newsservice.)
the heSd of the vanquished field
of Antwijjrp to save it from being
fall of flic temporary capital was
k
Van BrH have been greatly dam
ColumnTwo and Three.)
AND h- PHONOGRAPH
"Tyjgwriter I will trade dia
mona. iruh or furniture for visi
ble, sink Ie keyboard." Swap Col-
umn.
-n n -J2 ; ;
. 'lSpuys Edi son phonography
including 40 4-minute records."
Musica Instruments.
"$10 to loan on improved city
real eate." Money to Loan
Real iSstate.
"Tw jarge nigs in good con
dition mt $20." Household Goods
for Safeij
"Gofjdj library of books to trade
for -23ElViflc r anything I can
use." jvap Column.. .
"Singe1 sewing machine and
other fdrnititre for tyewriter.
camer;gipr diamond; would sell
cheap. j ! Swap Column,
"Yotig married couple want 2
or 3 dnrentlv furnished rooms or
k s. i i l .:,!. :
pri chj lur nisiieu nuusc wiiu pri
vate family; no apartments; west
side pffeferred." Wanted to Rent
-h : 7
I.
-IT"