The Oregon daily journal. (Portland, Or.) 1902-1972, January 19, 1910, Page 10, Image 10

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    10
THE OREGON DAILY. JOURNAL, PORTLAND, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 10,-1910.-
WOULD DEPUTE .
m , - t - ' . . ' ' 4-.-- 1 '
GENERAL FUND
by unrMB us
. This Would Be Effect Under
j Bonding Act City Has Two
'V Distinct Laws, Due to Com
mission's Neglect.
of Interest should nave to bapald and
very property owner, took edvantuta of
the bonding- act. the general fund might
be ao heavily drawn upon aa to leava
it, without enough to meet the general
expenaea. of the city, ,
City Auditor Barbur says Wiat the
peopl at large did not una their oppor
tunity to beat the bonding act ovfii be
fore it was amended. Insofar aa xtrvet
and aewera are concerned, but that the
amendment waa ' deemed advlsablo for
the reason that the old law made It
possible for the general fund to he
looted.
Deputy Auditor Jones says thnt many
I property Owners did taKe advantaKe ft
the old law, however, and that the my
has bn paying interest on hundred ,
of thousands of dollars that have never
been applied to street lmprovemnt
bonds though, In some Instances, those
have already run for eight yenra. He
attrlbutea this to th fait that prj-i
motera have platted
bondml them with t
HOW THE HUMAN MOLE WORKED.
r
ivrzn? curses JL iSAvfr
J
1
' v. St any ennsldt rable number of water
mains shnuld be laid under the present
... bonding act for the payment of asfloss
.; tnen.ta on surh mains It is possible that
1. the general fund mny be depleted In
. order to pay the Interest on the bondf.
fteoauae the rhurter commission of
"'. seven neglected to amend the Bancroft
bonding act as It applies, to the laying
of water mains, and at the same time
".: submitted to the people at the last
" election an amendment of the act rov
' rrlng street Improvement and sewer
.bonds, the city now tiaa two distinct
bonding laws.
i . By section 288a of the charter, aa it
waa adopted at the last election, the
city may enforce the payment of yearly'
,i Installments on bonds ror atraei ana
-. newer lmprovementa. But section 227
of the rharter. which waa also amend-,-,
ed. doea not provide a similar clause
, for water mains. "
... Applies la Both Amendments.
In both amendment a the Bancroft
- bonding act applies, but in aectlon 383a
' It la stipulated that in caae a property
owner falls to pay any ona of the 10
1 1 yearly . Installments on the bond for
.: wbioh ha has algned that the olty may
. eell the property and Indemnify Itsell
for the entire amount or tne pona...
, Tnder aectlon 277. however, property
i owners are not required to pay any por
tlon of the assessment levied againat
, them for tna laying of a water main
until the' entire life of the bond, 10
rears, has run Ita course. In framing
the amendmeht the committee failed to
y state that in case section 183a should
iHsa. the bonding provisions of that sec
tion should , also apply to aectlon 237.
As a consequence, the Bancroft act
waa amended In one Instance and , re
tained unchanged In the other.
The Bancroft act makee the provl
alon that a property owner who bonds
hla property for the payment of the
' cost of laying a water main may agree
l to make 10 auinual payments with sim
ple Interest on one tenth of the face
of the bond at each payment , But it
doea not provide any adequate method
for enforcing these payments, say Dep
uty Auditor W. D. Smith and E. W.
, Jones, who have charge of the depart
ment which has to do witn the bonding
of property. - . v ; '
'Tney say the ity attorney has ruled
that the property on which a bond 1
placed cannot be sold for Just one In
stallment due on It. under the present
provisions of the law. Thla, In effect,
permits the property owner to wait iO
years, if he so desires; before paying a
cent on the bond. "' '
r City Must ?ay Inters.
. But whether the; property owner paya
his money In annual Installments or
not. the city, which has guaranteed the
' bond, bust pay. Interest on It semi
annually. ' The money for thla .Interest
must be taken-: from the general fund
If property owners do not choose to
.. nat, -iinHI lh AVffitratlnn ttt thm -In Vae
'Term of the bond.- It la. therefore, read-i selIln Property before the explra-
ilv seen that if any eonslderibla amount I Hon of 10 years.
8 i ii i i i i ii in i ;i mi 1. 1 ii , 'v; .Under the Bancroft act aa It applies
bond unimproved property for the cost
of Installing' water mains, says Mr,
Jones, and, without expending any
money for water improvements, exploit
their land and aell It Buyers of such
property would, of course, assume the
Hen held by tha city, but they would
not ba obliged to take this Hen up un
til the end of tha period for which the
property was bonded. And then they
would only have to pay the principal and
simple interest at 8 per cent.
, 'yytyi "'J:
addition, and then t . t J j M lUTl fNI J , Vi" (?.
he expectation on V : ,r n 1 Afl Li, . U f. 4
W H-t''Jaat Ct I if) IV . hi II ir-ii:J-lTl ViOSWJ
' " Cxri .... ax iri&'j'&x.r ?x&K&A
if , t JKW jrAArzsjrz-jx & . ! am 'TTJ-'
''It ,V r?c . iii'"' Ir
Tbe wife and children of Isaac Finkelsteln, together with the diagramic scene of where he attempted
to tunnel under Ludlow street,. New York, In order that he might come up under the aafe of a Jeweler on
the opposite side and commit burglary. 'Finkelsteln had burrowed. 30 feet, under sidewalk and pavement,
when there was a cave-in and he was suffocated The case is remarkable In that the man kept his tunnel
ing a secret from his family, who thought "he was working nights. It Is impossible to estimate how long
he hadbeen working it. He started the tunnel In the cellar of a vacant house a few doors from bis home.
It took him weeks , to laboriously remove sacks of dirt from the hole. Me had to back put,, as the tunnel
was not big enough for him to tarn round. When his body was found It was noted that he had so mis
calculated the direction he was digging that instead of heading for his much coveted diamonds across the
street he had turned due south and was proceeding along the middle of the street.
The American Excess
01 Good Living
The rrlnriital Cause of the Great
r rrevalenre of Indigestion ' and f
' Dyspepsia.
A Trial Package of Staart's Dyspepsia
.Tablets Beat Tree.
Man Inliablta- every; part of the globe
4' here external influences can - be auc
J wesfully restated. Food Is an Important
element In effecting thla, and nature has
.1 provided for It accordingly. Tha colder
the climate tbe more animal food and
,oily, substances are required; the warm
er a preponderance of- vegetablea and
i fruits la necessary In one's, diet
i. The whale-blubber of the fur-clad
-J Ksklmo, and the rice of the nude Afrl-
1 aaVaurs Teh f 'iJn; buUder
4 aa matters of choice. The same lndi-1 R t AHvn- 1800
K. A. Hartman, repair one and one
BUILDING PERMITS
- TAKE A BIG JUMP
The following permit were Issued by
the building department:
T. Mayda, erect one story frame shod,
Russell street between Albina and Mla
slsalppl; builder, same; $50.
F. S. Allyn, erect one story frame
dwellinar. De aware avenue Detween
; cations exist In dvlliaation. Thus, the
diet in America and England is essen
5 tially different from that in Italy, Spain
i and Egypt. . .
V; The effects of universal communlca-
Hon ar nowhere more obvious than
i; on the luxurious table. To furnieh tne
A refined cuisine, all climates,,, both sea
a, and land, are laid under contribution,
and the stomach is expected to digest,
,1 without assistance everything that la
put into it. Combining together such
varied products, and the neglect of the
9 relation between climate and foods, are
" very active causes of dyspepsia.
V; The heavy substantial dishes of this
. j- climate accord badly with the ther-
n nirimefee nl n1nlv 1 1 r. y r. . . . o ohH nn I.
ilexlbility In regulating the kind and
quantity of ! food is a cause of a large
' JT proportion of the ill health and stomach
troubles among the English and Amerl
cans. 0 Thousands of people who have suf
, fered from stomach troublew, and a gen-
eral Ill-health resulting therefrom, be-
1 cause of a badly regulated diet, arid
, the Ingesting of an excessive amount
i of food at the table, have obtained
nreedy and permanent relief by means
v of a simple expedient that of using
aorw or two of STUART'S lrsPKPSIA Fortieth and Forty-first; builder. B. F.
4 1 ABL.KTS after each meal, or when- Doty; 11800..
ever any of the well-known symptoms! A. H. Birrell. erect one story frame
' L of indigestion are present . , dwelling. East. Grant street between
' i ThVe -powerful digestive tablets con-! !;tl.et.h, Bnnd Forty-first; builder. B. F.
. I-!,7"T r W. O. Van Schuyver. erect three
S " "uu, tijiu in me 'story hrk.k gtor'es and roorps, Washing
. txaet proportion as found therein. They j ton street between Twelfth and Thir
Stake the place of the natural digestive teenth: builder. A. Bross: 140.000.
. sj Juices when the latter are deficient In Mrs. M. Jansck, erect one story frame
? quality or quantity, and do their work "welling. Schuyler street .between
for them, removing the indigestion by 'i Klghty-second and Eighty-third; builder.
wiirHnr fn,.A .'iV H. Brown: S1000.
! .u Pa? Investment company, erect two
" f ; " ""'""" uiges-; story brick warehouse, Belmont street.
. Cv. tract. hotween Water and East First: builder.
, 3 , There is no other digestive remedy Charles II. l.ucas company; $21,000.
, Son the market which haa been found' -Mr- Wallace, repair two story frame
feuual to Stuart's Dyspepsia Tablets' f!,0', Seventh.. street between Couch and
n hi. h ( nui. j Davis; builder. John Tumbull: $300.
DRIVEN TO STREET ;
BY MIDNIGHT FIRE
Scores of Families Have Nar
row Escape in San Francisco
Loss by Lapsed Policy.
half story frame dwelling, 454 East
Thirteenth street between Tillamook
and Thompson; builder, D. W. Middle
ton: 1276.
Portland Railway, Light A Power
company, orect two story reinforced
concrete car barns. East Twenty-fifth
street between Ankeny and Burnside
builder. W. S. Barstow & Co.. 30.ouo.
J. T; Alexander, erect one story frame
t-nrafc. Knott street Detween uanten
bein and Vancouver; builder, O. W.
Lawhorn; $250.
N. Dunlap, erect one and one half
story frame dwelling. Oregon street be
tween Thirtieth and Thirty-first; build
er, same; $2000.
W. B. Donahue, erect one and one half
story frame dwelling, East Twenty-
third street between Alberta and Brain
ard: builder, name; $2000.
W. B. Donahue', erect one and one half
story frame dwelling, .fcst Twenty
third street between Alberta and Braln-
ard; builder, same; $2000.
A. Van , Hoonilssen, erect one story
Market and Mill; builder, same; $2000.
Cook & Buckwslter, erect one story
frame dwelling. East Twentieth street
between Alberta and Bralnard; builder,
same: $1700. - -- - -
. A. H. Birrell, erect one story frame
dwelling, East urant street netween
reeves and cures all of the symptoms
1 of dyspepsia and indigestion In so thor
I'jmgh and pleasant a manner as these
marvelous little tablets, a single grain!
j or which is capable to .digesting sues
Kralns tit any and every kind of food,
i v All persons wbO' are annoyeoy. with
Wilson EstAte. repair two storv' frame
I store. 145 Third street between Alder
fully efficient, . or which removes dis
comfort, banlahes stomach-pain, and re-;anl Morrison; builder. C. H. Beard; $50.
J. I Day.'erect one and one half
story frame dwelling. East 8eventh
street between Tillamook and Fan Ra
fael; builder, same,- $1600. r
. 3. Dltlof, repair ,two story frame
dwelling: Ivy street between Vancouver
and Williams: builder, same; $400.
P. A. Kadell. arert Cne and one half
tITnlted Press LsasH Wlr.)
San Francisco, Jan. 19. Two thirds
of a block of buildings In the vicinity
of Market street and Church street are
smoking ruins today while scores of
families driven from their homes are
being cared . for by neighbors, follow
ing a midnight fire that destroyed $10.0,-
000 worth of property. " Thrilling es
capes from death were frequent and
that no one was injured is regarded 'as
miraculous.
The fire started at 1 o'clock this
morning In the furniture. store o Wlcjc
er & McManus at 2084 Market street
Numbers of sleeping families in apart
ments' overhead or .adjacent were
aroused by the noise Of fire apparatus
as it responded to four alarms.
Police and firemen rushed into the
buildings and dragged forth bewildered
men and hysterical women. Quick work
cheated the flames of their prey and all
occupanta ' were rescued before the
structures were consumed. s
Wicker A McManus will recover 118 -
000 Insurance but had .let a policy for
$10,000 lapse two days ago.
and once In the spirit of the work, the
boys enjoyed the discipline.
The Newsboys' association is an oat
growth of a suggestion coming from ths
Sons and Daughters of the Revolution,
who are desirous of teaching young
America something about ' patriotism.
The boys, however, formed their own
organization, asking Mrs.' William Chap
in of the Daughters of the Revolution,
and Ralph Hoyt, of ths Sons, to act as
vice president and treaaurer, respective
ly. There are ISO members of ths as
sociation. .
Crops Not Big Enough.
From ths New York Tribune.
The year's crop estimates show that
com is stsll king, in acreage and yield.
with wheat in second place In area, but
third, after oats, in yield. To what ex
tent the acreage can be increased In fu
ture years is a dubious question, but;
there is no doubt that the average yield
should be and-could be increased. A
little over 25 bushels of corn and 15
of wheat is not a satisfactory record
for progressive American farmers.
Don't forget - to make a . arood road
record this ' year. .
"NEWSIES" HAVE BIG .
NIGHT IN GYMNASIUM
The alxth regular meeting of the
Newsboys' association was held last
evening at the People's institute.' About
75 boys, bubbling over with enthusiasm,
were present. It required all of Pro
fessor Kronin's large supply of tact to
get the boys lined up for their gymnaa-.
tic exercises, but line them up he did.
(grtaMlriied 1879)
Aa Inhalation for
WhoopIng-Cough, Croup,
Bronchitis, coughs,
Diphtheria, Catarrh.
Creaoleno Is m Boon to Asthmatlos.
Dofti it not Mam mora effectiY to breathe In a
remedy for diaeVuei of the breathing ergiuu taaa
to take tM iwrnedy Into toe nomacar
bmrne tb air, rendered
strongly antiuptlo, l( earroa over uw owhn
tnrtmM with -var-tf hmih. ffirinff DroloHCl BSd
oonsUat treatment, II Is Inraluable to mother
with rauul obildran.
Thoaa of a Cos
anmptire Tendency
will find immediate relief
from Coughs or inflamed
Condition of the throat. ,;
ALL DRUGGISTS.
' Send Doetel for da
aerlptive Booklet. .
Vapo-Cresolens V
ihu ruuon Btteei,
New York.
HOP
Magazine ; Writer praises; M rs.
Le Heine Helen Baker. Suf
fragist, for This Feat.,
Slnca the publication In The Journal
Monday or her startling interview on
the subject of babies being too numer
ous, Mrs. Le Rnlne Helen Baker, the
noted Spokane (Wash.) social equality
woraer ana leciurer, who is recuperat
ing at tha Hotel Portland, has been the
recipient of hundreds of complimentary
letters, ana personal and telephone
calls. . t .v ..' .... ', ,
Mrs. Baker stayed At the hotel nearly
all day yesterday receiving-callers and
telephone calls, and .reading . a great
mass of letters, '....
Pfople X.ik Xroagnilndsdnsss.
"People generally stak of the .broad-
mindedness of The Journal In publish
ing truths, aa X tried to point them out
In my Interviews without . rearranging ' " . " . "
anrf A.,nri.. k . "nergeiio. wora
modesty," said Mrs. Baker.
"Tea, it Is true," continued Mrs.
Baker, ''that myself and other Spokane
propie expect 10 corns 10 roriiana ror
the opening of ths Hotel Portland under
new management But I am not fully
oognisant of w. 8. Norman s plans, as
waa stated. Such a statement makes it
look as If I piied Into other people's
affairs. I simply know of some of Mr.
Norman's plans, as do 100 other Spo
kane people to whom he told them.''
In "Human Life" for January, 1910,
Alfred Henry 'Lewis, the writer, haa
made Mrs. Baker ths subject of an arti
cle headed "Nearest the Stars," under
"Celebrities Of the Day." He writes:
"Woman suffrage has been pro
claimed to many quarters of tha globe,
but it remalna for Mrs. Le Reins Helen
Baker of Spokane, Wash., to plant the
flag of the suffragists upon that snow
capped mountain top of Pikers Peak. '
"Ths woman who has Just accom
plished thla feat is one of the moat
ardent and Interesting workers In the
great suffrage movement In this coun
try, and her enthusiasm In proclaiming
suffrage from ths pinnacle of . the
Rockies, has added a feature to the va
rious methods of announcing equaf
rights.' "'.' - ' j
"Ths flag which Mrs. Baker unfurled
to ths Colorado winds which' play about
this lofty mountain's top was presented
to har by Mrs. O.' H. P. Belmont, the
New 'fork society leader, who is an
active leader In the auffrage movement
in .this. country. Ths banner, , which Is
black, bears. In letters at yellow ths
significant motto, 'Votes for Women.1
It cams originally from England, where
tha suffragettes haveeven If they ac
complish leas made mors nolae than In
any part of the country.
. "An - added significance ' to Mrs.
Baker's planting this banner upon the
tdp of Pike's Peak la ths fact that she
is ths largest taxpayer in the stats of
Washington. She came all the way
from her horns state on purpose to nail
ths. motto next , ths stars. A special
train was necessitated, , and ths cog
road, now closed for ths winter, was
opened for the ascension. pis woman
whose convictions have led her to as
cend Pike's Peak so that tha fry of
equal, surrrags may be flaunted In the
face ttt high' heaven Itself, is . one of
ths foremost suffragists' of the coun
try, although she greatly objects to be
ing classed with the- militant suffra
gettes. " .';.' ,
"Although a young woman. Mrs.
Baker has been active In public, affairs
for ths last six years. . Refined and
gentle in her manner, she la ths last
person opt would-imaglne as burning
with ths firs of enthusiasm which
would lead her to 'ths cold summit of
Pike's Peak to plant an equal suffrage
flag. , ' r.v -,'..,,! .
"Her belief that it Is every woman's
duty to do some good In the world haa
not been Interpreted merely through
equal suffrage, for her work among
children stands side by side with her!
in the suffrage, causa,
Many times 'a - millionaire in her own
right. . Mrs. . Baker spends large sums
yearly In bettering tha . condition of
children the world over. On her, way
to Manltou shs entertained 100 news
boys In Denver, Colo., and a large num
ber in Colorado Springs. "
'.n Washington, she Is Interested In
numerous homes for children, and Is
known to svery "newsy' In Spokane. Shs
is a great friend of Judge Ben B. Lind
say, Denver's famous Juvenile Judge.
and haa worked along the lines sst down
by. this children's friend in her. own' ao
oompllshments. ' -.
"Mrs. Baker says shs does ths Work
shs .s following because stts believes In
the brotherhood of man in Its fullest
sense. For that' reason she works for
equal suffrsge and for the children with
the same spirit, saying that "Children
of today are the men of tomorrow.' "
i i ....
X , .'II I I. I ' II . , t
: !
Wife Also' Accuses Husband of
, : Kicking Her in Stomach
: ;:' 'When Angry';
Portland to Seattle and Ta-
coma Sleeping Cars.
The Pullman sleeping cars for Seattle
and Tacoma on ths Oregon Jk Washing
ton owl train, leaving Portland at 11:48
p.' m.. Is at ths disposal of passengers
after 9:t9 p. m. This oar may be oc
cupied until t o'clock tha following
morning, thus " enabling travelers - to
obtain a full night's sleep without ths
loss of an hour.
Reservations and . tlcketa, city ticket
office. Third 'and Washington streets,
or Union depot. t. . - ,
Hair pulling was- a 'favorite 'paetlms
with James J. Mears, according to a
complaint for. divorce filed by Blanche
B. Mears in tbs circuit court Bhf
enumerates many occasions when shs
lost handfulls of her flowing tresses.
In 1908, she says her husband cele
brated, the. Fourth of July with a halt
pulling exploit- , ' ' -.
Ths Vamlly stovs was also a facto
of trouble. ' Mrs. Mears explains that
shs failed to set ths stovs ths wi
Mears wanted It whereupon he struck
her with the "stove lifter 'and kicked
her In the' stomach." ' k '
Mrs. Mears also tells of times whetl
she was hit with a curtain pole, beaten
with a mirror, and when her husband
tors her clothing from her to stamp
on it. After she began ths divorce suit
Mears filed a complaint Ja ths Juvenile
court, alleging that shs Is not fit ts
care tot the children. They wars taken
to ths detention home, bat restored to
ths mother yesterday afternoon, by or
der of Judge Bronaugh, pending the out
come of the, divorce case.
Having settled property rights out of
court ths path ' of divorce " becams
smoottC for Mrs. Luella C. Parrlsh yes
terdsy afternoon. Clroult Judge Gatena
granted her a decree ; from Edward K.
Parrlsh of Albany on grounds of deser
tion and cruelty, he falling to appear. ",
Under ths settlement finally reached
Mrs. Parrlsh will receive 12760 In 10
days In lieu of all claims for alimony,
will dismiss a separata suit for mainte
nance and will also dismiss her suit for
110,000 damages for slander against J.
J. Whitney and Percy R. Kelly.
Mrs. rarrlsh, in her testimony yes
terday, said her husband has failed to
provide for ' her, and for 14 years hs
forced her to cars for his tnsans sister,
wearing down her health. She told of
having been sued by hay k,usband for
divorco in Albany in 190, thla case go
ing to ths supreme court. - Shs said her
husband sent her furniture to her after
hs had cut ths woodwork and ths plush
with a knife.,, .
COLDt CAtTBl XXASACCT
LAXATIVE BROMO Qnlntne. the world wide
Gold and Orip remedy, removes raaee. Okll for
full name. Look tor signature . W. Grove. Mo.
rmn pott ti
Tie lEdip
H .:
Emm
. We have sold over seventeen' thousand
of these "Eclipse" Steel Ranges in Port
land in the past, 16 years and we have
never hieard the least complaint against,
the rangef-its baking' Qualities ' or ' its'
durability. V '
The Range With a ReputaUon
for Quick Baking
It requires less fuel than any range btfilt.
It is positively the quickest ;and surest
baker of all ranges.--ft is"
iiiUttp. Bal"
And that is precisely what yop want of a
good range to bake bread and pastries
perfectlv. There are other ranges that
"look as' pretty," but they "fall down" in
service -and service, is what you are
paying for. ' ' '
Prices Range Up From $40.00
The size of the oven regulates the price.
We can sell you a good high-class range
for $40.00. '
Arid You Pay $1.00 a Week
itt
i stomach troubles of any kind should ntory frame dwelllna. Tuerart street
iU!e Stuart's Dyspepsia Tablets, which ! bvtween East Thirty-seventh and Thir-
will rsmow'atirb troubles In a yery pymlnthi biiUder, J. B. Edgar; 12000.
short limn. ' fiurchase 'hnt frnm vmir f ' ' - - ' -' .
3. . t Tl, . t i , ; , . - .
i "rir in t uui ict-Hciic 'increase in tn
flow of water (n the Athena arteslAn
well. The drHl has passed through th
boulders and If now -at a depth of 988
feet ; . f'V n s-;: ..'
L(irugg!t and : fend us name and ad
, Hi-ens for fiee saniple. Address F. A.
Ktuart Ov 160 ftuart building, Mar
HiaJLjJIIch, , ,, t.
We Give Awi
Absolutely Free of Cost
Tbe People's Common Sense Medical Adviser, in Plain'
English, or Medicine Simplified, by R. V, Pierce, M. D.,
Chief Consulting Physician to the Invalids' Hotel and Sur
ical Institute at Buffalo, a book of 1008 large ratfei and
Over 700 illustration, is strong paper covers, to any one. sending 21 one-cent
stamps to cover cost of mailing sjr, or, ia French Cloth binding for 31 stamps
Over 680,000 copies pf this complete Family Doctor Book were soid In cloth
binding at regular price of $1.50. Afterwards, one and a half million copies
were given away as above. A new, up-to-date revised edition is now ready
for mailing. Better send NOW, before all are. gone. Address Wold's Dig'
MNSAar Mimcat Association, R. V. Pierce, M. D President, Buffalo, N. Y.
DR. PIERCE'S FAVORITE PRESCRIPTION
THE ONE REMEDY for woman ' peculiar ailments ood enongh
that iu makers are not afraid tor print on. its outaids wrapper iti
Yery ingredient. No Secrets No Deception. : ... - V '"i; . -;
I THE ONE REMEDY fo women which .contains no alconol and
po nabit-lormuag drngs. , Mads from native medicinal forest roots
of well established curative veto e. ' ' - . r'yy-i
Gevurfz Special1
Sewing Machines for
Elegant Oak Case, drop Head, high arm machine,
with all the latest improvementsequal to any
$60 machine on , the ' market. ' All attachments,
vvortn yo.vu, given tree
with each machine
sqld. Thousands have
been sold in Portland.
Pay only
$1.00 Down
and then pay but '
50c a Wccfc
1 1 An tittou.fi S
'H as ) a M- .m r ti si it a. -m. a mm. d J
Wear the Watch
WhUeYouPay
A fine gold-filled -Watch; with 20
year guarantee, Walthaiu or. Elgin
movement, will cost you . this
month but $18. Make a small cash
. deposit and wear it while you" i
Pay $1 a Week
4'
ffA V - M l .1 I I N
First and '
. VamhUl
Second and
YamhUl
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