The Oregon daily journal. (Portland, Or.) 1902-1972, March 29, 1904, Page 12, Image 12

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.THU OREGON DAILY JOURNAL', PORTLAND, TUESDAY "EVENING, MARCH 29i 1C04.
The Greatest Jewelry Store In the Northwest
You Should Be Interested
enough In your eyes to give them
the best of attention. Ow optical
work Is reliable In every respect,
and we are prepared In the best
possible way to examine and test
your eyes, which we do. without
cost even though you may not
buy here. 1 w
. avavaaav m mr m wmsw m m sk- m m
Hnufactureri of Jewelry and Optical Coodi -. Cor. VASHINGTOII AND THIRD
' L l " ' m W
WHAT TIME IS IT?
Do you have to ask this of your friends or consult some neigh"
boring clock? If so, you shouldn't. Our plan of selling you
an $18.00 Elgin or Hampden for. $12,410 at
A DOLLAR A WEEK
should do away with such a question or consulting of friendly
clocks. - " i . , " ' ' ,
I. GEVURTZ & SONS
HOME
'FURNISHERS
173-175 FIRST ST.
219-227 YAMHILL ST.
4 .
Easter Lilies
, are Justly regarded as the emblem of
purity. In the same manner our wall
: papers can be regarded as 'the. emblem
'of beauty and daintiness. We carry
none but the best designs, all new and
original. Our mechanical facilities are
, also unsurpassed, and we are prepared
to paper one or any number of houses
" with artistic paper and suprlor work
manship. .
Ernest Miller
187 TOST ST.
Thona, Bed S82S.
Speaking of Luck
1
'3 Those who And their way to our Laundry are more than lucky, for they
'ff get- such careful and artistic laundry work that they are always more
W than -pleased. We make a specialty of fine work on evening shirts, col-
, lars and cuffs and fancy vests. Our work is artistic and beautiful in
4 every, way. have the appearance of those Just from the haberdasher's.
ii 1 uu i" particular uring your worn to us we 11 piease you.
Troy Laundry Company
WEST BXBB OmCI 109 riTTH STBIET, COB. WASBXVOTOBV
IS OREGON DAILY JOURNAL
A ; N IWS PAP R P O K AU THE PEOPLE
TRADE HARK REG.
THE
GOLDEN GATE ROSE
With its marvelous tints is typical of the delicacy
of complexion, produced -by the STANDARD .
nf ell T.tnni4 Pom Daii4u. .:, f.
U-AR-DAS.
rOK SALc BY ALL "..sJJe?
DRUQQISTS , Tl
Met
LOW RATES DID NOT
AFFECTCOAST MILLS
TAxirr rxov atxvBXAroxjs ov
' K.OT7B SIS NOT 8EPBXVS F0BT
&Ajro sous or OBXXBTAX
' TBASX, SATS T. 8. WH.C0X POOB
XV QUAllTY AITS WOT XV SXKAJTD
In the opinion of T. B. Wilcox, presl
dent of the Portland Fourlng Mills com
pany, neither the reduction made a year
ago In flour rates from Minneapolis to
the Pacific Coast nor the subsequent,
abolition of the rate has had much ef
fect on the local industry . Mr. Wilcox
avers that he was never Informed of the
40-cent rate made by President. Hill for
the benefit of the Minneapolis millers,
and which caused such a turmoil in
Washington during the past six months,
Neither,- said Mr. Wilcox today, bad he
been Informed that the old rate had been
restored.
The competition of Minneapolis mills
with Portland and northwest mills In the
Oriental trade has ao far not been a seri
ous factor, in Mr. Wilcox's opinion, bl
though with the aid of the northern lines
it might become a very serious one. he
says.
"Aside from the shipments of Minne
sota flour to Australia, the shipments to
the Orient have not been Important and
have not interfered with the volume of
business of the Paclflo Coast mills,'
said. Mr. Wilcox. "I do not deny, how
ever, that these shipments would be
come Important if a sufficient subsidy
Is given the Minnesota millers by the
transcontinental railroads.
"A small quantity of 'clears has been
shipped to the Orient by the Minnesota
mills, but It was generally too dark In
color to suit either the Chinese or Jap
anese trade.. -.
"The Oriental trade has been built up
bv the Pacific Coast millers bv the Qual
ity of the flour, and the Minnesota men
cannot compete with us, especially after
wheat went to $1. All the same, as I
said before, If the eastern millers are
given sufficient in the way of freight
rates ny the railroads, they might Intro
duce their flour In time.
reared Uvea tower Bates.
"The agitation against the cut rate
from Minnesota made by the northwest
mills was made not so much on account
of the rate that .existed, but as a fear
of what might result In the future. The
greatest agitation against the rate came
from eastern Washington farmers, who
in the race or the 14 rate on flour from
Minnesota to coast points had soma rea
son to expect a concession from the
13.40 to $3.85 wheat rate which was rul
ing from the interior to terminal points.
"If the rate from Minnesota has been
withdrawn. It is a case of recognition
of Justice to the farmers rather than as
any concession to the millers, and per
haps to relieve a rather uncomfortable
political situation in Washington with
which the railroads have had to deal.
"With the low transcontinental rate
abolished, I apprehend that the steamer
rates from Pacific coast points to the
Orient will be increased." '
In answer to a report that the war In
the Orient caused a large number of
mills in Minnesota to shut down, Mr,
Wilcox said: '
.. Declines Orders rrom War Boa.
"It is customary to do business In
north China and Siberia on a basis of
guaranteed delivery. On account of our
advices of the approach of war In the
Orient we declined all orders for flour
for Siberia and north China last Octo
ber, leaving other millers to do the busi
ness with all Its risks. The result is
that all the orders have been canceled
and the Minnesota mills who received
them were forced to shut-down.
. "At the present time the Hongkong
market . is heavily overstocked with
flour, it being estimated that there are
at least 17,000,000 bags there now. This is
ah unusually heavy amount to be car
rlefl so near to the heated term, which
begins either in 'April or May, and the
result is generally that a large amount
or, Hour is spoiled.
"Japan Is now taking only a moder
ate" quantity , of flour, of established
brands, and we do not look for any mate
rial demand until the new-crop wheat
arrives witn us lower prices. .
TALK OF PLANS FOR
FREE SANATORIUM
A meeting of the special committee
appointed by the state board of health
to arrange for the establishment of a
free sanatorium for consumptives was
held yesterday afternoon In the office of
Dr. Woods Hutchinson, secretary of the
state board, various plans were sur
geftted and discussed, but no formal
report was made. , It Is likely that the
committee will make its report to the
medical association of this city before
final action is taken. The matter will
be brought before the attention of the
medical society at its next meeting.
SURQEONS RESORT
TO THE KNIFE
When Simple Borne Bemedy Cares.
Why do physicians always advise an
operation for. the cure of hemorrhoids,
or piles? Are they unconsciously in
fluenced by the .dicta of operating
surgeons, who stoutly assert and main
tain that all other treatments are merely
palliative, and that the knife affords
the only means of cure?
There could be no greater fallacy, as
the worst possible cases of piles are per
manently cured Dy the use of Pyramid
Pile Cure, which is In suppository form.
Is applied directly to the source of the
complaint, and removes the cause,
which an operation does not
"I have been a sufferer from, piles for
over forty years, and after trying ev
erything I could hear or read of, with
out benefit or relief, I came to the con
clusion to give Tyramld Pile Cure a
trial and I can truly say it has given
me entire satisfaction; it Is a wonder
ful remedy. The bleeding has entirely
ceased, the protruding ; has stopped,
there is no longer any Itching, and I
feel no swelling of the parts; In fact,
I feel like a new man.
"I had to wear a truss for several
years, to keep the bowel up, but I have
now discarded it, after using six boxes
of Pyramid Pile Cure. I think after
forty years of suffering, . the six boxes
was a small amount to make such an
agreeable change, as I was unable to do
any work that required stooping In the
last eight years. I recommend Pryamld
Pile Cure to every one with whom I
come in- contact, as I consider It beyond
price.". George W. - Ivey, Confederate
Boldters Home, Richmond, Va.
We vouch for the truth and accuracy
of the above testimonial, and urge all
sufferers to purchase a fifty cent pack
age of this famous remedy at the near
est drug store, and give it a trial tonight-
.Accept no substitutes, and re
member there is 00 remedy "just as
good." . , y
The Pyramid Drug Co., Marshall.,
Mien., publish a little book on the
causes and cure of piles, and will gladly
send it free- to any. address, -
EVEN CONDUCTORS
. HAVE TROUBLES
People who have to wait on the corner
of First and :Bornslde ' for home-bound
cars do not have to while away the time
by shuffling uneasy feet There is al
ways life on this corner' and ft defect in
the, trolley circuit supplies amusement
As Union avenue cars swing around
this corner their trolleys generally part
from the overhead wire and go bump
ing up among the cross wires, sending
out showers of purple and green sparks.
It is the corpulent conductor's duty to
hop off behind the car on the run. reset
the trolley and then. Jump on the car
again. To save time the motormen
leave the "juice" turned on at the. half
way notch and when the trolley meets
the wire the car bounds forward at a
lively speed until the foot of the Burn
side bridge Is reached and the heavy
grade makes progress less rapid.
- The usual program Is as follows: As
the car hits the curve the fat conductor'
savagely alights and grasps at the trol
ley rope. ' He never, imagines that the
trolley is going off until it does. ' A wild
Jerk or two and the little brass! wheel
hits the slender copper wire and the car
starts with a jerk, the conductor trot
Mng along behind tying the trolley rope
in place. Then, as the car gains speed,
he tries to run around and catchrthe
rear step. But he never does, for the
cobble stone pavement is slippery and
root racing is no .sinecure.
Xt this moment' the time arrives for
the conductor to yell like a Commanche,
while the waiting travelers laugh Joy
ously. , He reaches. Front street breath
less, gasping strange adjectives and
clutching at the, receding car. Then he
catches up Just -as the car' strikes the
bridge. He has his revenge when ' he
tells the motorman his real opinion of
the latter's mental qualifications for his
high position. 4 By this time your own
car has arrived.,
WAS LOST TO ALL r
SAVE MEMORY DEAR
There Is one (at dog In Portland that
will have the , heaves and probably the
whooping cough for six months if he
does not speedily die of acute disgust
This particular dog la a fat and some
what ancient pug. On his ugly wrinkles
and even in his bristly back's curves
can be seen ft profound distaste for the
common herd and the cynic sticks out
even In his dust colored hide. . ,
Mr. Pug and mistress proudly waddled
and walked from a downtown store to
day.' Mistress had found pug too heavy
and he was forced to waddle along as
best he might A car was hailed by
the lady and the pug followed proudly.
But pug did not like that particular
car, and supposing. .that mistress would
follow, strutted down the opposite side
of the car. The car started with a jerk
and an aged pug found himself without
available means of support alone and
friendless on, Washington street ...',
. The car r quickly , vanished and there
was only one possible way to rejoin
friends and coxy surroundings.1' That
was to "hike" out "after the car as fast
as a double pair of bowed and wavering
legs could carry him.
The dash. of the pug at the start, was
scarcely cyclonic. It was a very modest
amble, but as the car turned on First
street and disappeared pug warmed to
the work and a really respectable pace
was attained. Those standing on First
street who observed the dog saw that
he was gamely. k keeping the pace and
that already the tight curl of the tall
was beginning to limber out into a mere
hairy string. Down the muddy, slippery
street trotted a very tired and desolate
pug and on across Burnslde bridge,
where he was lost among the teams and
cars of that busy structure. '
ANNUAL MEETING
OF WOMEN'S CLUBS
The City Federation of Women's
clubs will hold Its annual meeting this
evening in the Selllng-Hlrsch building.
The revision of the constitution will be
considered first At present only one
public meeting a year is provided for.
If the proposed constitution' Is adopted
there will be three meetings annually,
one social, one literary and one for the
election of officers. ,
The present system of electing officers
by Informal ballot is very tedious and
sometimes takes until midnight The
new constitution will provide for a
nominating committee, made up of 'the
presidents of the auxiliary clubs, which
shall meet before the annual meeting
to nominate candidates for office. - The
meeting this evening is set for 7:30
o'clock .and should no change be made
in the constitution there will be an
other meeting tomorrow evening, whes
the annual election of officers will take
place, .
HOW ABOUT THOSE
NEW SHIRTS?-
, : : :
' .' - ' ' , .
" '
1
OUR stock of Fancy Shirts offers imUinited op
portunities in the choice of styles and patterns.
We have a Shirt for every fancy and at a price
that willl please 1
rR,cuVSSS $L00 to $3.00
BUFFVM& PENDLETON
Sole Agents for Alfred Benjamin Correct Clothes I
Clothiers , Hatters . Furnishers
311 Morrison St. QPP. P0STOFF1CE
PILOTS MUST FACE
PERILS OF SEA
K wbo omsa sio shxts nrro
YOST TAKB X.XTXS ZST TXEim
XAJTBS BOUOX WEATHXB AT
BAX CAUSES SAMAGB ASTO&ZA'S
rXOrOSBD 8EA WAUL.
Capt C, 8. Ounderson, who has seen
service as a bar pilot for many years
at the mouth of the Columbia river, is a
visitor in Portland. That more pilots
do not lose their lives in boarding ves-
nl outsMa the bar ha attributes to a
lucky combination of circumstancea
During his time he says that three of
the best men who ever piloted a ship
have lost their lives in the treacherous
waters Just off the mouth of the river,
He says that those who have not been
actively engaged in the business can
have but a faint conception of the dan
gers which are attached to. the work.
During a storm particularly, he says,
the small boat which conducts the pilots
to the ships is frequently at the mercy
of the waves, and when one attempts to
board the waiting vessel out in the turb
ulent sea he simply takes his life In his
hands. The small boat rocks up and
down on the waves, and the least false
step would probably be the means of
sending him plunging into the sea. He
states that Pilot Woods almost lost his
life In this manner a short time ago
while attempting to board the steamer
Claverlng of the China Commercial com
pany's line. . VI '
"The proposed plan of building a sea
wall at Astoria, concluded the captain,
changing the subject, "Is at last assum
ing definite shape. A committee has
been . appointed to ascertain Just what
the sentiments of the cltlsens are In this
respect A communication will be sent
to the city council at Its next meeting
asking-for an opinion from that body as
to the advisability of the project The
great majority of the citizens appear to
be in favor of it
"To carry out such a gigantic enter
prise will mean . the expenditure of a
great amount of money. It is the inten
tion to flu the bay underneath the road
way of the Columbia River & Astoria
railroad with rock and gravel for a
distance of about two miles. By doing
this it is believed that the harbor will
be greatly Improved."
"DAGO" NOT CAUSE
FOR SLANDER SUIT
The suit for slander preferred against
3. Dechenbach by D. C. Rlma in the
state circuit court was withdrawn yes-
terdav bv EL R. MendenhalL renresent-
Ins Rlma. It Is stated that the language
used relative to Rime by Dechenbach
has been retracted.
In one way the case is noteworthy,
On a demurrer to the complaint being
filed, John B. ClelaUd, the presiding
Judge, held that three clauses should
be stricken out because they did not
accuse Deohenbach of a crime." The
court stated that the term "Dago"
might or might not be offensive, but
that being called such was hardly being
accused of a'cntr . ,
Miirao coktPAjrr xsoobtobatxd
The routine In the office of Frank S.
Fields, county clerk; was 'broken yes
terday by D. I McLeod, who- filed arti
cles of Incorporation of the Mount Pitt
Hydraulic and Quarts Mining company.
He carried a sack or nuggets which he
claimed came from his mining company.
one of which was worth 123, and the
cupidity of the clerks caused them to
desert their -desks and gather around
McLeod in a body. All had to handle
the big nugget and remark on Its
beauty and weight' The Incorporators
of the company ; ,sre" McLeod, A. C.
Hoofer and Frank O'NeuY The capital
stock li 150,000., ,
WIELDED A RAZOR
BUT MEANT NO HARM
The case against Charles Mays, who
surrendered himself to the police last
Saturday night having heard that there
was a warrant out for his arrest was
dismissed yesterday by Municipal Judge
Hogue. Mays was charged by Henry
Oundelach, a logger, with flourishing a
razor near his race in an effort to
frighten him into buying more drinks.
"Judge, that was the. drunkest 4runk
I ever had in my life," said Mays. "1
remember that Oandelach aiW I had
several drinks together last Saturday af
ternoon. I also remember that I had
a dull rasor in my pocket which I was
taking up to get sharpened. I might
have passed it about the air a bit. "but
no harm was Intended. When Ounde
lach .left me I went somewhere and foil
asleep, during which- time some one
stole my watch and what little money
I had. When I woke up I learned that
a warrant was out for my arrest Sure,
it was an interesting Saturday for me
all around, that Is, in a hard luck
way."
As - Gundelach did not push the
charges and as Mays had had a steady
run of 111 luck for some time, the case
was dismissed.
JTJBOB OXOBOB BXCOTXBS.
The bench in department 4 of the
state circuit court was again occupied
by Judge M. C. George yesterday. He was
recently attacked by a severe cold, and
on convalescing sufficiently to leave his
house went to eastern Oregon to re
THE PORTLAND
rOBTXAJTB, OBSOOS
AMERICAN
PLAN .
- i i
$3 Per Day
and Upward
JXADQOAXTERS FOB TOURISTS AND COMMERCIAL TSATELES1
Special rates made e faaaflies aad single geatleme. The msiiegeiiienl
.wtti ke pleased at ell txates to shew rooms aad give wrtees. A seeders
XWklsft vatt establishment la tke hoieL
...... at a BtnrxBi,
DRINK THE OLD AND RENOWNED .
GAMBRINUS LAGER BEER
SEND ORDERS FOR BOTTLED BEER
TO OFFICB, 793 WASHINGTON ST.
TELEPHONE No. MAIN 49. BOTH PHONES. I
..... ......,..... .:
VhQ JOURNAL for IO Cents a Week
v i Mr i
J ' .'e. -El Jl'Jkl
Mm.
5
Easter Bells Will Soon
oe lunging
Are you prepared for the occasion?
If vou are Reasonable and Aooreciative we will v
be able to convince you of the excellence of our ?
stock and show you a money-saving place to trade. M
. New Easter Ties, Cloves j(
Hats, Shirts, Shoes, Etc.
The New Easter Suits
SHOWINQ AT $12.50 to $25. 5
Are worthy of your most careful consideration; .1?
same values as up-town stores get $15 to $30 for. M
AND DON'T, FORGET '
That some one of our customers gets $10, absolutely free, f
I
; "I
MORHISjON
Saturday night, April 2. This may mean you.
COME DOWN AND SEE US
1
'.VAN ?v.::v: ''' v.'v:;:;';:-V:'-:-v''',' V : - r .