The Oregon daily journal. (Portland, Or.) 1902-1972, March 12, 1904, Page 5, Image 5

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    " THE OBEGON DAILY, JOTTKNAIj, POTlTLAin), SAT OH DAT. EVENING, MARCH 12, 1004.
WORLD OF SPORT
ERVELL BECK JOINS THE. BROWNS OSCAR KERRIGAN
IS CAPTAIN M. A. A. C. TRACK TEAM YOUNG CORBETT
RESUMES ACTIVE TRAINING BOWLING NOTES
EDITED, BY
J. . A. HORAN
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Journal Special Service.) : i
Bakersfleld. Cal.. March 12. Manager
Ely's men are (founding Into pennant
form, and tholr dally exercise has put
them In the pink of condition. : With
uul vile ur iwo vicviiuutip. mc wv uoto
all gotten rid. of the soreness" that was
generally prevalent among the latest, ar
rivals, i v , ,
Thielman has been working strenuous
ly, .and is still somewhat stiff and fore,
but expects to. be in fine-shape for the
Chicago game. .-4i ( .
The rnmlnar of th bis leasruera Is the.
topic, of the local fans in general, and
judging from the interest being mani
fested in ' the contest, there Will be a
record-breaking attendance at the game.
There are two men on the Portland team
who played against Joe Tinker, the for
mer Portland player, who plays short
stop on the Chicago team,. In 1901. They
ore Pitcher Thielman and Catcher Shea,
unaer mcyjosney ,m nai year,
Blvalry Among Pitchers.'
'" The rivalry among the Portland pitch
ers regarding who is to twirl against
Selee'a men is intense, all 'of them
even young . Druhot having petitioned
the manager for the chance.
It seems quite llkoly that Butler will
.be the man selected, for he is In the best
shape, although Manager Ely may do
clde to use more than one pitcher in the
game. If he should, then Shields or
' Thielman would be given a chance. The
Chlcagoans are in-Los Angeles, and from
accounts from that place they are work
ing out splendidly under the direction of
Capt. Frank Chance.
They are scheduled to play exhibition
games with Morley's men today and to'
morrow. . and the Portland players are
anxiously awaiting the result of these
games In order to get a line' on 'the An
gels as well as the big leaguers.
The Chicago team is composed of the
fallowing players; Pitchers, Jake Wel
mer, Carl Lundgren, John Wicker, "But
tons" Brlggs and Brown: catchers, John
O'Neill and Johnny Kllng; , first base,
Frank Chance , (captain) ; , second , base,
Johnny 'Elvers:," shortstop, Joseph D'
Tinker; third base, George Moriarlty;
.left field. .Jack McCarthy; center field,
" ,Toljn Slagle; right field. Davy Jones; util
ity man, Frank .Corrldon. , ,
Browns In Bead Work.
The cross-country-spins which are
part of the club's regular routine are
heartily enjoyed by the Portland men,
Who caper along the country roads like
a band of schoolboys at play. This
form of exercise' seems to be a new one
on most qf the men, who have taken to
It like a duck to water. Manager Ely Is
populai among all hla men. and'lj jok
ing and laughing with them 'most of the
"She 'manager end Shields, Castro and
rkleltftaa 1 Toally amuslng.j Thielman
has- .quaint manner of Imitating a Ger
man's broken English that - is quite
clever, and when Castro cuts In with
him Inimitable pidgin English there is
something doing.
Big Baxter is the butt' of a good many
jokes engineered by his comrades, but he
takes It good-naturedly and gets back
at the perpetrators whenever the oppor
tunity offers. McCreedie Is a big, quiet,
good-natured ' fellow, who seldom has
anything to say.
ErveU Back Arrives.
"' Erve Beck., the Browns' new second
baseman, about whom there has been so
much speculation as to his intention to
adhere to his contract, arrived here yes
terday and seems to be In excellent
shape. '. .
Beck recently suffered . an accident
which came near costing him the loss
of an eye. It happened on one of his
hunting excursions shortly after the sea
son closed last fall, when his gun ex
ploded, and It was thought for a while
that the eye was totally destroyed, but
he secured the best specialist In Toledo,
.whose treatment remedied any ill ef
fects that might have resulted from the
accident Beck Is powerfully built
fellow, of medium height, and he cer
tainly can hit the ball, as ho easily
demonstrated yesterday while Shields
was pitching to him in practice.
Hanlon Wants 91,200 for Castro
Manager Ely has received a, oom ,nu
filcatlon from President Bert, In which
Bert says Hanlon asks $1,200 for the
release of Castro. Manager Ely' thinks
this price exorbitant and refuses to pay
that sum, but has written Hanlon of
fering a more reasonable amount
Should this not be acceptable Hanlon
will be out both player and money, as
Castro says that he will play In the
California State league in preference to
going to Baltimore.
ALBINA BOYS WIN
FROM HIGH SCHOOL
. The Alblna boys' branch of the T, M.
C. A. defeated the high-school boys' bas
ketball learn last night by a final score
of 20 to 18. The game was a fast one,
both sides doing their best, particularly
In the last half. The Alblna boys, how
ever, seemed to have the best of It right
through the game, the score at the end
of the first half being 13 to 11 In their
favor. When time was called at the
close of the last half the score stood
17 all. In the play-off both sides went
in to win. The high school scored the
first point on a foul throw, closely fol
lowed by another by the Alblna boys
After this the game became fast and
furious until Keep, of the Alblna team
tossed a neat oasxet ana scored the need-
ed points, thus winning the game. His
enthusiastic admirers picked him up and
carried him on me neia on tneir snoui
HIGH EXPLOSIVE BILL
IS NOT FAVORED
The local chamber of commerce is tip
in arms over the proposed senate bill
4319, which classes sporting cartridges
as high explosives.' The Portland body
is sustained by a score of like associa
tions throughout all parts of the coun
try. The San Francisco board of trade
has taken up the matter with vigor,
and In compliance with a telegram from
that body the local secretary of the
chamber of commerce has been Instruct
ed to ask Senators Mitchell and Fulton
to attempt to defeat the measure.
It is clearly, defined irt the bill that
cartridges of the sporirig ' description
cannot be carried only in original pack
ages, and as high explosives must be
transported to their destination in steam
ers set aside by federal inspectors for
that purpose, or in powder-cars, either
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RESUMES TRAINING
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THE COMUfO SEASOV.
The Multnomah Amateur Athletic
clilb's track team held a meeting last
night at the call of the manager. H. W.
Kerrigan. . H. W. Kerrigan was re
elected manager of'.the team, and his
redoubtable young brother, Oscar I. Ker
rigan, was chosen to captain the track
team.
Young Kerrigan has been coming rap
idly to the front during the past year
or so. and bids fair to equal the Dru-
liant record of his elder brother, who is
the acknowledged kingpin of the local
athletes.
Oscar Kerrigan Is probably the most
capable man that could have been se
lected to handle the club track team, for
he has all the necessary requisites for
an nthletin instructor. He certainly de
serves- the honor, if any one does, tor
he has worked hard and faithfully for
the honor of the winged "M ' on the
athletlo field whenever the occasion of
fered. ,:- !
Enthusiasm In -track athletics has not
been worked up to its highest pitch as
yet owing no doubt to the Inclement
weather, which probably had a aamp-
ening effect on the ardor of some of
the club's athletes, who were conspicu
ous by their absence from the meeting
last evening.
Some of the more facetious members
were Inclined to joke about the flooded
condition of Multnomah field and pro
posed to organize a swimming club, but
their levity was not appreciated ana they
were subdued.
At the coming.athletlc meet to be held
at Columbia university the clubmen pro
pose to be well represented and expect
to win new honors,
JACXSOB POtTOHT A KEATTWEIOBT
(Journal Special service.)
Baltimore, March 12. Toung Peter
Jackson met Claude Brooks, a colored
heavyweight of MerchantvlUe, N. 3., In
a lS-round fight last evening. Brooks
outweighed Jackson some 25 pounds, but
the fight resulted in a draw?. ...
" QUSEHAN TO MEET OXXTPOBO.
(Journal Special Bcrrice.) .
Salt Lake City, March' 11 Perry
Queennn of Seattle has been 'matched
to meet Jack Clifford of Butte in a 20
rojind bout before the Salt Lake Ath
letlo club about March 26.
ATHLETES ARE ACTIVE
AT PACIFIC 'VARSITY
(Journal 8pcUl Service'.)
Pacific University. March 12. The
gymnasium class gave a benefit last
night In the college gymnasium. . The
purpose of the performance was to raise
money to buy outfits for the track ath
letics. , The show was gotten up on tne
sour of the moment, but proved very
Interesting to the spectators, and a suc
cess financially. The large, attendance
was due to the fact that there were
several delegations to the state orator
ical contest In town. A. C. Gilbert
champion wrestler (12S lba) Paclflo
northwest and Harvey Gates, P. U.
champion (1S5 lbs.) had a contest that
was Intensely interesting. uiiDert,
however, secured two out of three falls.
There wa another bout between 1L
Ferrln and L. Adams for P. U. cham
plorishlp (115, lbs.), Adams being the
victor.
Sweek and Guynn boxed four rounds,
and the audience was well paid for go
ing to the show. H. E. Wilson, assisted
by Williams, did the Illuminated club-
wlnging act that pleased those pres
ent very much.
A. C. Gilbert who was captain of tne
New York Chautauqua gymnastio team
last summer, performed upon the nort
contal bars. Clifford Brown assisted
him. These two lads can do stunts on
the horizontal bars - that would make
many professionals look cheap. It is
needless to say that Mr. Gilbert's per
formances are always looked forward to
with great Interest
Paolflo Track Team.
The Paclflo track team Is training
regularly every evening. When the
weather permits theAoys go out on the
field, and when it is rainy, captain oil
bert takes the boys through the regular
work in the tralntng shed. The pros
sects were never brighter at Paclflo
University for a winning track team,
and all the. boys are working with
will. Some good material is being de
veloped among the new. men, and a few
of them are showing up In an excep
tionally fine manner. The meet to be
held at Columbia University early In
April is a great Incentive to the team
and - Paclflo will undoubtedly send
strong contingent v
BTUBT CLUB PAPEB CXAgE. -
The meet for the paper chase of the
Portland Hunt club, Saturday, March 12,
will be at Park and Burnslde streets at
2 b. m. The start win be rrom wiberg'
lane and Sandy road at 8 p. m., and the
finish on West avenue. The next event
will be a "point to point race" on March
Eastern and, California races by direct
wires. We accept commissions - by
"phone" on anove races rrom rospon
Bible parties. We also receive commis.
inna fnr nil leadintr SDortina events ir
any port of the world,, at Portland Club,
130 i'lrtn street.
(Journal Special Service.) ,
San Francisco, March 12. "Nobody is
to know my weight but Harry Tuthlll
and Tim McGrath, my trainers," de
clared Young Corbett the other day in.
response to a question as to how much
he had taken on In flesh since he de
feated Dave Sullivan. "Every time I .
have trained here tho public has seemed
to take more Interest in what I. weighed
than in the fight Itself, and I have been
worried half to death by gratuitous ad
vice. This time the secret remains be
tween us three. I have made 127 pounds
here and 130 pounds ringside without
nearly as much trouble as I have been
given credit for, and you notice tnai
am always there when tne oeu taps,
will do It again, and that should be
enough. Since the Sullivan fight I have
been tryln to gain as mucn as possiDie,
and to show you that 1 am not worried
over, the prospects I did not go near a
scale until I returned here to the beach
to resume work. It will be light exar-
else with me for awhile. When a man
trains hard for three weeks he ls4lable
to go stale, . and I am not going to
take any chances."
Ydu have never seen the aid at ms .
best." piped Harry , Tuthlll. "He will
surprise a few people around here when
he lets out a link. He Is sure to be -Tight'
this time and no mistake, and
there will be soine mourning in Cali
fornia when the show is oyer."
Corbett Kits Back. . N
This fellow Brltt is taking a great
interest In my welfare ,for a chap who
expects to knock my roof off." resumed
the champion. "He says he is afraid, I
will hurt myself in that automobile.
Now, Just to show how I feel, he can '
go on and do a parachute jump if he .
wishes, and that is on the square."
There was a peculiar little gleam 1 In
Corbett's eyes when he said this that
carried an unspoken story with it. The
breach has widened between this oair of '
boxers until it amounts to a chasm, and
there will be more than a mere battle
for the championship when . they get
into the ring at Woodward's pavilion
on March 25. coroett s agreement to
box Sullivan In the meantime after ar
ticles were signed with Brltt started
the ball rolling. Petty grievances have
kept the trouble moving nicely, until
now neither of -, the gladiators likes a
hair of the other's head. They are. not
saying much about It but their inti
mates know that the coming affair 1s
going to be intensified In fierceness by
the ' aversion. , '
Corbett started to work yesterday, but .
did no more than start a alight perspira
tion in the gymnasium and take a vig
orous rubdown. He has promised not to
leave the beach again during the day
time until fte arrives -down . town to
the Columbia- to renew old acquaintance
with friends in the "Silver Slipper."-
SWEET PEPPER.
This is the first photograph yet published of the real Sweet Pepper filly and not the counterfeit skate which was shown in ( the New Orleans paddo
ck recently,' when ex-Jockey Griffin fooled the bookmakers and cost the ring thousands of dollars by ; his tricks.
A HER SHOULD
BE AN EXPERT
nr BOLSura the watch oh ax
ATBXETIO BTBBT, THE CLOCXEB
SHOULD BB AB ADEPT ZB OATCH
ZBO THE OOBBEOT TIKE AH XX
PEHSITB WATCH HECESSABT.
Timing various sporting events looks
such a simple task that almost any one
considers himself capable, of holding a
stop-watch and catching the correct
time. Only veteran sportsmen doubt
their own ability In this line.
In fact champion athletes pay little
or no attention to the time caught by a
novice at clocking raoes. . They know
from experience that such timing Is un
reliable and likely to lead them astray
as to their ability.
When fast time Is made In any kind or
a race, the first question asked by a vet
eran sportsman is, "Who held the
watch?" If the name given is un
known, but little credence is put In the
time.
I have been timing athletlo contests
of various kinds for 20 years. During
that time I have seldom tefin an lnex
perlehced timer agree with the time r'
turned with the oia nanas at ciocaing.
Temperament and experience count for
a great deal In timing, but having a
first-class watch is the main thing.
Expensive Watch Heoessary.
I might say that It is practically lm
possible to be of much 1 service as a
timer with a cheap piece of mechanism.
Once In a great while you may run
across a low-priced watch that will
agree with a watch of superb work
manshlp, but it is very-seldom.
There Is not much difference when
timing short distance events. Then
cheap chronometer may only register
one or two fifths of a second off, de
pending somewhat on "the man who
holds it.
How poor cheap watches are become
plainly evident in a long-distance event
I have seen cheap timepieces register
from three seconds to almost a minute
off in a 15-mlriiite contest. Even if you
have a flrsticlass watch you must keep
it carefully regulated.
I use two valuable watohes for 'tim
lng purposes. The best, of 'timepieces
will get cranky at times, so when one
of my watches Is a bit off color I use
the other.' The split second watches I
use are valued at $276 and , $S60 re
spectively. Reliable timepieces cannot
be had for much less money. - -
Bow Many Beoorde Are Broken t j ,
Many men act as timers who know
little or nothing of sport These kind
Of men. with poor watches In 5 their
hands, often announce remarkable time.
This accounts for the marvelous : per
formance of athletes in rural districts,
so -frequently reported. It accdunts for
the failure of these athletes to ' make
good their recoraa-when they come to
the city,. It is unnecessary to kneel or
lie down when timing a 100-yard dash.
Simply stand at the side of the tape
stretched across the track. 8tart the
watch at the flash of the pistol and stop
It as soon as a body touches the tape.
This Is simple, but how few men can
do it right The novices become ex
cited, start their watches when the men
leap forward Instead of taking the flash,
and then in their anxiety to recognize
the winner they either stop their watch
too soon or too late.
I once attended a set of games where
two of my fellow timers were horse
men. One of them timed -the race with
his watch In his pocket The man with
the watch in his pocket had 9 4-5 seconds
and the other 10 seconds as the time
for the race. I and the other expert
timers caught the time as 10 2-6 seconds.
This would seem to show that horse
men are rather careless timers. Ner
vous men are never safe timers.
It takes a cool head to get the time
right
When there are several expert ttm
era present with good chronometers the
watches will seldom vary more than
2-6 of a second for any distance. When
Duffy put the world's record for 100
yards to 9 2-1 seconds four watches
registered 9 8-5 seconds, and one 9 4-5
seconds. Veterans timed this race, and
you see how well It was done. Some
tyros caught the time 2-5 seconds and
others 10 seconds.
Timing in Handicaps.
Rowing races are timed in about the
same way as running and cycling events
The watches are started with the flash
and stopped when the flag falls on the
Judges' boat. When the flag rises the
time of the second boat is taken.
When timing a run In which he
handicap is ir? time Instead of yards.
the watch is started with the limit man.
His handicap is then deducted to get his
actual time at the finish. For boxing
bouts, a split-second watch is desirable.
When one of the boxers is floored, one
hand of the watch can be stopped, and
the other' hand can be used to measure
the 10 seconds for the counting-out pro
cess. The watch can prove tne correct
ness of the count. A split-second watch
is also handy to secure the time of the
second man in a race.
- For football, basketball, hockey and
other games In which time Is taken out
when there is a pause in the contest
"there is a special watch known as an
"actual time" watch. The hand on this
watch can be stopped and then started
again from the point where it stopped.
AN EXPERT TIMER.
, JXJC OOBBETT BEOlBETST'
(Journal Spaclal Barrlca.)
New York, March 12. ; "Gentleman
Jim" Corbett says that he regrets his
recent barroom scrap with Charles
Boyle, the former Dartmouth college
football player, and declares that It was
the first affair of Its kind that he was
ever mixed In. ''Gentleman Jim" prob
ablr for are ts the run In he had with
Charley Mitchell at a Bowery theatre
in 1892, also the affray with Robert
Fltxstmmons In a Philadelphia " hotel,
Corbett, It would seem, should keep
diary. - , , .
'.X M;.:
GOLF CLUB ISSUES
SPRING PROGRAM
The Waverly Golf club has issued its
program for the annual spring meeting
which opens on 'April 6 and continues
to the 9th.
The events are as follows:
Wednesday, April 6 12:S0 to 2 p. m..
mixed foursome, handicap, 18 holes,
medal play, entrance fee, $1 each; 12
to 6 p. m clock' golf, three hole com
petition, dally prize.
Thursday, April 7 10 to 11 a m..
women's foursome, handicap, nine holes,
medal play, entrance fee, 60 cents each;
12:30 to 2 p. m., men's open champion
ship of Oregon, 18 holes, match play.
entrance fee, $1; 1 to 2:30 p. m., women's
open championship of Oregon, nine
holes, match play, entrance fee, $1; 10
a. m. to 6 p. m., clock golf, three hole
competition, dally prize.
Friday, April 89 to 10:80 a. m.,
men's open championship; 10 to 11 a.
m., women's open championship; 12:80
to 2 p. m., men's open championship;
1 to 2:30 p. m.. women's open champion
ship; 10 a. m. to 6 p. m.( clock golf, three
hole competition, dally prize.
Saturday, April 9 9 to 10:30 a m.,
men's open championship; 10 to 11 a. m
women's open championship, 18 holes,
finals; 9:30 to 10:30 a. m., men's foursomes,-
handicap, 18 holes, medal play,
entrance fee,.$l each, must be eight en
tries; 12:30 to 2 p.'m., men's open cham
pionship, finals; 12:30 to 2 p. m., men's
open handicap, 18 holes,, medal play, en
trance fee, 21 each; 1:30 to 3 p. m.. wo
men's open handicap, nine holes, medal
play, entrance fee 60 cents each; 10 to
6 p. m., championship putting, approach
ing and driving.
Competitors must "tee oft" between
the hours above stated for each event.
The open championship events are
open to amateurs belonging to clubs on
he Pacific coast.
Entries for ' the open championship
events will be received by the secretary
either by mall or wire, up to 12 noon,
Tuesday April 5,1904.
Entries for all other events may be
made with the committeeman acting as
starter at the links.
wAll other events are open to amateur
golfers belonging to any club.
For further Information apply to T.
A. Llnthlcum, chairman handicap com
mittee, and 8 North Front street, Port
land, Or. ' Telephone main 126.
Cars leave First and Alder streets
every 20 minutes for the links.
KZXXOAB- PETE OOE9J TO JAXL.
way causing an exorbitant expense.
Another and even more serious fault
Is that of the original package, which,
according to the wording of the bill, can
not be opened and distributed only by
government inspection, or in other words
there must be certain depots designated
in only the large cities.
According to dealers in Portland, the
expression is given that merchants in
small towns will be unable to procure
goods, as they are prohibited from han
dling original packages, and goods can
not be transmitted In any other way.
BOWLERS PLAN TO,
FORM A' LEAGUE
The managers of the several bowling
teams . (ten pins) of . this city, are to
hold a meeting at . the Portland alleys
tomorrow-morning to formally organise
a city league, in order to promote the
Interests of the sport'
Aa matters now stand there are no
regular rules adhered to by the bowlers
and it is the object of the proposed
organization to have all contests gov
erned by the same rules. Those who
will represent the various teams at the
meeting are: F. McManamy, Lewis and
Clarks; Con J. Senner, Schlllers; Hug
Slebels, George Lawrences; Dr. Sam
Hamby, Wlllamettes; C J. McMenomy,
Portlands; W. M. Cook. Irvlngtons, and
Ed Capen of the Blake-McFalla. -
(Journal Special Sarriee.)
Guthrie, Okla., March 12. -Mexican
Pete Everett and heavyweight Tom
Tracey were- sentenced to one year each
in the penitentiary at Tecumseh for en
gaging in a prise fight In Oklahoma
EBTEB PALXA TBOPKT COBTEST.
, ' (Journal Special Service.)
New York, March 13. The world's
expert' riflemen are receiving invitations
to participate in the shoot for the
Patma trophy to be contested for at
Seagirt, N. J..-on September L- r
Mir J
hi
w
7E WEEK.
YOU WfAPAB.
, mi"" i
WATCH
WHY MOT OWN M
A
If you do not already possess one? Waltharn, Elgin and
Hampden, Watches on easy payments. A guarantee for 23
1 years goes with every. Elgin or Hampden Watch.
$1.00 Week
. That's all. - You don't have to "cough up? the whole amount.
, Easy-way Home Furnishers , . "
173-175 FIRST ST.
219-225 YAMHILU ST,
.V
1