The Oregon daily journal. (Portland, Or.) 1902-1972, January 11, 1904, Page 16, Image 16

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    -vt I'
ll, 1904.
16
THE OREGON DAILY JO UlffiAL, PORTLAND, MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY
PORTLAND REALTY
WITH
the
DEALS LAST WEEK
COMING DELEGATES
THE PACIFIC COAST
'DIP&
TRAINS PACKED
PACKING HOUSE EOR
J. K. STANTON, Mgr.
Our January Clearance Sale
Offers unlimited opportunities to the visiting members
of the different conventions to supply their needs , in
our line at a big saving in prices.
It will pay you to investigate every Stem in-this
grand offer. . , ' 1 "i
Twenty Items of Great Interest to
Every Prudent Housewife
You can buy a Xady's Coat,' worth S20.00, ' during our Clear- flJQ 7C
ance Bale for................... ...,.'. .P-f.l 0
Tou can buy a iady's Coat.1 worth. $15.00, .during our Clear- C C QC,
ance Sale for J . . . ....
Lady's Coat that sells regular for $8.50,; is marked for the fljl QC
Clearance Sale'at. 9Jyo
Child' Coat that can't be bought elsewhere for less than $3.60, CI Oft
, ' Clearance , Sale price Is,..........;....;. i,P7W
Good selection of Pine Furs,, excellent., values. Clearance Sale fl7 CA
prices. 8fto to. . . . .". . , . .i, ... . . ......... ... . . .... . . ... .V ' ,ou
Extra quality Oregon Wool Blankets, full alse. Clearance ff? QC
Sale price, each....,.........,..;.. '. v. i. .......
Superior quality white Oregon Wool Blankets, Clearance sale ! 1 Q C
wrw.wh. , utJa
Comforts' In all styles and sizes, filled with white filling, GL CA
Clearance Sal prices, 95e to. . ... . ... .
1 Bleached and Unbleached Muslins, Sheetings, Flannels, Linens, etc.,
all at Clearance Sale prices. ,
todies' Black Corsets, big lot of odd slses, Oearanee Sale price, JQ
Ladles' gool quality Black Cotton Hose. Clearance Sale price, per
pair .. ow
Ladles' extra good quality fleeced Vests and Pants, Clearance Sale 10.
price, ach. "'"V
Ladles' good, warm flannelette Night Gowns, extra value, Clearance 37
Sale price, each ............... .. ................. ... .... . .
Men's good quality heavy winter weight Shirts and Drawers, ; 25 c
Clearance Sale price, each ,-. .......... ......... ;7. wv
Men's extra good heavy Shirts and Drawers, worth 76o, Clearance C
Sale price, each...i... ..,.......,.........................
Men's fine quality beavy wool Shirts and Drawers, worth $1.25, CC
Clearance Sale price, each. ................................... OuVk
Men's good heavy wool Sox, fine and soft, Clearance Sale price, tfi f
per pair, SSo, ttSo and.......... IgW
Big showing of men's fine Silk Neckwear,! worth :25c, Clearance .1. f 2lr
Sale - price, each. ....,.... .........y.. . .......
Men's line quality heavy wool Overshlrts. Clearance Sale price, 7C
each, $U5, S1.00 and......................................... '
Men's Hats, good, assortment of styles. Clearance Sale price, mg- m
from OUC Up
WE WOULD BE PLEASED TO RECEIVE NAMES
(BY MAIL) OF BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL
PEOPLE WHO HAVE NOT RECEIVED OUR 1904
MEMORANDA CALENDAR, OR WHO WISH
MORE. F. W. BALTES & CO.. PRINTERS, FIRST
AND OAK STREETS. TELEPHONE US YOUR
ORDERS FOR PRINTING. -
We don't ask you to take it for
granted that the 'Perfect" Is the best yarm -air
furnace on the 'market, but we want to prove It to you. Will you
let US? .;.'. .. - : v ,
i .. ... -t . .. ; , . .;. ;-. .. ; .
w.o. Mcpherson company
' Heating and Ventilating Engineers
Evamrsv Qtrzsv.
There are not many people In this
world fortunate enough to have their
dreams of childhood realised, but Eng
land's fair queen is one who has had
her earliest wish fulfilled. One day
when she was sitting with her compan
ions she told them her dearest wish was
"above all things to be loved." How
different from theirs, which' were to be
leverana-Tenownea,Tieis Tariff powerful",
or to travel and see beautiful things in
other lands. It was a worthy wish, and
Three Famous Trains
THE PIONEER LIMITED
Btttvien Chicago, St. Paul and Minntapollt
THE OVERLAND LIMITED ,
.-.'.'.' ... i":;r:- . . .. 4, . . . ..
. Btwn Chicago and Omaha:
THE SOUTHWEST LIMITED
"" Bttwn Chicago and Kansat City.
Two train daily from Portland to Chicago and all points East
via all these routes.
H. S.HOWEj General Agent
134 Third Street, Portland.
FIRST AND SALMON STS.
in the celebrations of her birthday, De
cember 1, she had ample proof that it
had indeed come true. There is no
reigning monarch more dearly loved and
respected by. her friends and subjects.
Her whole life has been one to demand
that from all who came In contact with
or knew anything of her. She is as no
ble and true a woman as even her
mother could have, wished her to be. -
Cuffs and collars in bands of bright
embroidery make, a plain shirt waist look
smart ' , . - '-; ' '
BVZXSISO FEBXXT8 DTBIWG THS
TOST rXYU : DATS OT WSZX
AMO0KT TO $77,404, AS AOAIHST
39,825 TBS rBECEOIBa WEEK
MOBE PXOFEBTT 80X.9.
Permits.
Monday . . ......... t ,775
Tuesday . . 12,544
Wednesday . , ...... 10,100
Thursday , , ....... 10,600
Friday v 87,385
Transfers.
I UM0
. 35,463
l,39g
29,655
Total 5 days .
Previous week
.,...,177,404
...... 29,825
$125,900
' 67,091
Gain last week .(47,579- $58,809
There has been a wonderful improve'
ment In the real estate situation since
the- first. -of-the-new; yeHK Both "sales
and building permits are "showing a
large increase over the preceding weeks
and every day the gain grows larger.
The .: real estate transfers during the
first five days of the week were $125,900,
as against $67,091 the same period dur
ng the preceding week. This is a gain
of $58,809 in last week's business. The
building permits for the same period
amounted -to $77,404, as against 29,823
the previous week. This shows a gain
of $47,825 for the week s business.
. ..... jfcftity Shows Oaia.
Portland realty is showing wonderful
Improvement and valuations in all sec
tions of the city are on the increase.
New buildings are being constantly
begun and local architects.are. working
on the plans for structures which will
be built during the present year.
The foundation - work for William D.
Fen ton's six-story brick building on
Sixth street, between .Oak and Stark
streets, has been begun and the work
of constructing the building will be- be
gun as soon as it is completed. The
building will cost $70,000.
J. F. Shea has just taken out a per
mit for the erection of a new tbree-story
brick structure on the corner of Second
and Ankeny streets. The building will
cost $15,000, and will be triangle in
shape. It will be 46 feet, wide, at one
end and 15 feet at the other! . The length
will be 83 ft feet The excavation work
will be begun at. once. .The new struc
ture will be used by Mr. Shea as a
wholesale plumbing establishment.
Hew Stxuotores Going Up.
'Several cottages have been moved
from the corner of East Third and East
Burnslde streets to make room for the
construction of a three-story buildltiK
to be erected by R. A. Proudfoot The
building will be fitted up for stores and
lodgings. - The foundation - work has
been started. .
Work on the large structure for the
Marshall-Wei Is company on the north
west corner of Fourth and Pine streets
is being rushed through to completion,
i On account of the wet weather the
foundation work for the new Welnhard
building across - the-street - from Tt-the
Marshall-Wells structure has been de
layed.- ' ' ,:'
Perhaps Of all the suburbs of Port
land the one that is showing the great
est activity in all lines Is the new city
of St. Johns. Within the past 18
months the population of this place has
been increased many fold until . today
that section has a population of about
four times what It had In 1902. .
Many ew factories. ; ; ':-
New factories have been added to the
town's industrial institutions within the
past few years and several new ones
are contemplated. , The latest inquiry
after a location in that town is a ship
building concern, which proposed to
build its works in the lower part of that
town providing certain streets along the
water front are vacated by the St Johns
ctty council. J. C Scott, owner of the
St. Johns waterworks, is making prepa
rations to enlarge the plant from 7,000
gallons to one producing 50,000 gallons
each day. ' Mr. Scott says that the pop
ulation of that locality has Increased so
much of late that he will soon begin
the work of laying about 15,000 feet of
water pipe to supply the new residences.
The St Johns school board at a recent
meeting decided to enlarge the ' school
building by constructing two more
rooms. A few "years ago there were so
few children in that neighborhood that
the building was only half occupied.
Juan try for Property.
During the past week there has been
much Inquiry for small parcels of subur
ban property by workingmen , who
wanted to construct homes. This class
of property is changing hands more than
any other class and the total of the
week show them to be at least three
fourths of the sales.
There is also considerable Inquiry for
farm property from 'easterners who have
lately arrived in this city. Real estate
dealers report the sales of property of
this, class -as very-larger and -atlwxpress
the opinion that the year 1904 will be a
record-breaker In this state for farm
property. . ,
FOR RECLAMATION
WORK IN MALHEUR
.(Journal Special SerTlee.)
Vale, Or., Jan. 11. A mass meeting
was held January 6 in Vale for the pur
pose of urging speedy action on the part
of the federal government in the con
struction of reservoirs on the sites sur
veyed last summer by government offi
cials on Malheur river. Bully creek and
Willow creek In Malheur county.
At this meeting a permanent organiza
tion was effected with I. 8. Smith, chair
man, John E. Johnson, secretary, and E.
A. Clark, treasurer. J. W. McCulloch,
T. W, Hallday and F. M. Ricker were ap
pointed to draft constitution and by-laws
for the organization.
The proposed reservoirs will have esti
mated capacity of about 1,600,000 acre
feet of water, or sufficient to Irrigate
1.000,000 acres of land.
A serious obetaole to the government
beginning work on the above mentioned
reservoirs Is the uncertainty of making
an equitable exchange of a permanent
water right by the government for the
existing water rights now owned by Indi
viduals and corporations.
The following is an extract from a
resolution unanimously adopted: "We
agree and signify our willingness to cede
to the government of the United StatoB
our -vested water rights, in said above
mentioned streams. In exchange on an
equitable' basis for a perpetual water
right to be granted by the government of
the United States and agree to submit
to any adjustment of said water rights
that may be made by the secretary of
the interior.') v L
' C W. Mallett and W, O. Thomson were
elected delegates to g to Portland dur
ing the session of the National Livestock
association to be held in that city Janu
ary 11-1$, and lay the matter before Mr.
Newell, chief engineer. United States
geological survey, who wilt be then and
there in attendance.
' Scratch, scratch, sera tea; unable 'to
attend to business during the day or
sleep during the night. Itching plies
horrible nlusue. Dunn's Ointment cures.
Never falls. At any drug Itore, 50 cents.
rBABX , 3. EAOEBBABTS XZW
TXOXTED YOB PBESXDEBT OT THE
STOCK ASSOCIATION THE BOTEX.
FOBTXAZCD'S UHIQUB lOUYEHlB
Ajn xBwnr's babbits' eet.
' Trains from the East Into Portland
yesterday morning were so crowded with
livestock convention delegates and vis
itors that the conductors were compelled
at La Grande. Baker City and Pendle
ton to refuse to carry more passengers,
and a number were forced to take later
trains. The principal hotels, the Port-?
land, Imperial' and .Perkins, are filled
with guests, and the lobbies . remind
one of a political convention, except that
the conversations are somewhat along
different lines.
i..Among-thewell-known:.delegatesin
the city is A. H. Smith' of Denver, re
tired. This is Mr; Smith's first visit
to Portland, and he is very enthusiastic
concerning the town and the state of
Oregon. "The scenery along the Co
lumbia river," . he said, "Is something
wonderful. As to Portland's rain, why,
we need rain." - . :
Mr. Smith is of the opinion that Frank
J. Hagenbarth of Salt Lake is the com
ing president of the National Livestock
association. I - "Springer, If he would
care to run", he continued, ."would,, I
believe, be re-elected, but he says re
Is tired, and I think it is up to Hagen
barth, Springer's retirement from the
presidency will be greatly regretted by
a majority of the stock and sheepmen.
He is the best' presiding officer I ever
saw. and he understands thoroughly the
sheep and cattle industries and the needs
of each."
The Portland hotelhas a catchy sou
venir in the shape of a small cow on one
side of which Is printed "Lewis and
Clark." -
"What's thlsr asked "Iriwn of' St
Joe," as M. B. Irwin, the energetic traf
fic manager of the St, Joseph, Missouri
Stockyards company, is called, as he
picked up one of Manager Bowers'
badges.
"Why, that's a souvenir of the Port
land hotel,1" was the reply.
'Well, Lewis and Clark." and the
Mlssourian wrinkled his brow, "they
must be the proprietors of the place."'
"They are," was the retort; "they
founded It in 1802,'V
And while the laugh went around,
"Irwin of St. Joe," produced a number ot
St Joseph badges and pinned them on
his friends. They consist of a bar with
the words "St. Joseph." suspended to
which is a small cowboy hat and under
neath the hat a rabbit's foot Every
delegate' has been clamoring for one of
these unique keepsakes, and Mr. Irwin's
headquarters in room 219, the Portland,
are always crowded., '
"After the dose of the Kansas City
convention," said Mr. Irwin, "these
badges sold as high as $10 each to those
so unfortunate as to be unable tq, get
one," . ...
Speaking-! -rabbits' feet-3. TK Wood
of Salt Lake, president of the Wood
Livestock company, operating extensive
sheep ranges in Idaho and cattle lands
in old Mexico, doesn't need auch a safe
guard to his luck. He has It anyway.
Mr. Wood has speculated in minerals
and oil somewhat and as an Instance
of his good fortune the following story
Is related: , . .
Wood, one day a few years ago, tur
chased 10,000 shares of Daly West min
ing stock at $9.50 a share. The Daly
West is located at Park City, Utah. In
less than a month the stock had ad
vanced to $57 a share, and Wood realized
a fortune. He already owned a large
amount of the stock, and from this se
cured a monthly dividend of 64 per cent
ADVOCATE ISSUE
OE SCHOOL BONDS
1IXMBEB8 OV TUB . TAZrATEBS'
XEAatTB TATOB TSX8 XZTXOB OT
OBTADrara - isobebb school
BUXXDnrOB AXCO WXZA BB w-w at
AT THE CrnXEHS' XEZTXVa.
The taxpayers' league will be repre
sented and heard at the public meeting
of the taxpayers to be held at the high
school building next Thursday evening
to consider the school tax levy for 1904.
President Mulkey Is In the East and
Vice-President Fried is also out of the
city. Secretary Goldsmith said today
that he does not feel like assuming the
authority ' to -call . mfietlng,but would
consult with J, N. Teal and other mem
bers about it He said a meeting would,
in all probability, be held by the league
not later than next Wednesday evening.
All members with whom he had con
versed on the subject had expressed the
opinion that the league ought to get to
gether on the question of the school tax
leyy and the proposed issuance of bonds.
He thought that after the league had de
cided on the position it would talcs in
the matter, a committee would be ap
pointed to represent It at the, public
meetings of the taxpayers.
A prominent member of the taxpay-
era' league, who proferred not to have
have his name mentioned, said today:
"The issuance of bonds is in my Judg
ment the best method of getting the
money necessary to build new schools.
think bonds for $260,000 or $600,000
should be floated and the Portland pub
Ho schools put in as good shape as any
in the Pacific Northwest There Is no
use In attempting to conceal the fact
that In public school buildings and fa
cilities we are far behind Seattle and
even behind Tacoma, We haven't a single
first-class, modern and complete public
school building in Portland. We are now
making greater metropolitan pretensions
than ever, and if the. Lewis and Clark
exposition becomes the big success that
we hope and feel confident it will be,
the eyes of the world will be turned on
Portland and its civic advantages and
disadvantages. We should make good.
Bonds, which would compel the succeed!
inn aeueru.iiuii w ump ijr lur mo acnooi
advantages it will, enjoy, are by far the
best and fairest way of. providing for
these buildings. The hew buildings
should be of brick and modern in every
respect ' Attention should be paid to
facilities for safe and, easy escape in
cam of fire, as I believe. The Journal has
I already-suggested.,. Let .us put our pub
lic schools in such a condition that we
may be proud of them. , We shall have
to make these improvements sooner or
later. Why not issue bonds and do It
now?"
C ASTOR I A
. For Infant! and Children.
The Kind You Hava Always Bought
Bears the
Gignataro of
FBESXDEBT SPBIMOEB DECU.BES
OHB XB BADX.T XfEEDED BXU.HES
BAXXBOABS rOB HOT XXEFIBa
BATE . AOBEEStXBT X)ECXABES
TOB XSTimXAH CAHAXk
"We are not fighting the big packing
concerns and do not wish to be against
them, but we believe in honest comneti
f ion and if they will not allow it, we
must find a remedy," said Hon. John
M. Springer. Of Denver, Col., president
t the National Livestock association,
bringing his closed hand down upon his
desk as he spoke, and there came into
his face a look of "I mean what I say,",
tar. opnngor arrived in Portland yes
terday morning and. Is quartered in, par
lar F. Portland hotel. ' ,
"Right here on tbe- Pacific- coast'i.he
continued, "a big packing house - is
needed, for what is the necessity of
snipping your products across the con
tinent to be prepared for the consumer,
when such can be done at home?" .
Mr. Springer In . his- attitude toward
the railroads is easy to understand. "The
Portland convention," he declared, "will
not be so large-as some of the others,
and the failure of the- transportation
companies to make satisfactory rates
is to blame, I feel confident that the
convention will be very successful and
that we will have a gathering of at
least 1,000. but there are but few dele
gates from California and the South
west coming because of the railroad
rates. Think of a roundtrlp rate of $33
from San Francisco. It is simply ab
aurd. FulIy-i0flCaUtQmta8tpckmen
would have attended the meeting but for
the action of the roads.
"The. roads have not done what , they
agreed to, We were promised . a " One
fare rate for the round trip and we
didn't get It As to the local lines, the
rate is one and one-third. The whole
fault in thK respect, however, lies with
the Northern . Pacific, That road lay
back and refused to come down to the
one fare proposition and won.
"From Demlng here, via the Southern.
Pacific, no attempt was made to sell , low
rate tickets. X know this for I came" to
Portland by the Southern Pacific on pur
pose to investigate. Any broad-minded
road will see that if the Lewis and
Clark exposition is to be a success it
must bring the people to Portland, and
this convention may be the means of
giving the fair 'great assistance. ' A rail
road may make or mar a convention or
exposition, and if the people of Port
land desire their fair to be successful,
they had better get together and have
everything down in black and white
with the transportation companies. If
they, don't the roads will dilly-dally
along until the time for the exposition
to open and then make any old sort of
a rate they may choose." '
The future of -the West was a theme
Mr. Springer discussed with enthusiasm.
"The broad-minded and expansive pol
icy of the government," he said, ' "and
the present Administration if continued
ir bound to make one of the greatest
commercial empires In the Northwest
that was ever known. Far-seeing
Thomas Jefferson, that grand old ex
pansionist knew what he was about
when he reached out toward the Pacific.
I am an American, and an American
stands for progress and development
We must and will build the canal at the
isthmus.- Railroad money has retarded
the progress of this great waterway be
tween the oceans, but in spite of that
it will be constructed. The theory of a
strict construction of the constitution
Is dead. The constitution of the United
States Is a wonderful document Inas
much as it has stood for a hundred
years. It Is surprising that It has held
for so long a time. . We are living In a
different age than the one in which It
was drafted. Then they had no electric
ity, steam or telegraph and the world
was Just awakening. Conditions have
altered to such an extent that such an
instrument should not . be expected to
remain as it was. r - .
"Dotted here and there - over the
world," and the speaker Illustrated his
remarks by indicating imaginary spots
on the table with his fingers, "we need
places where our goods and products
may be centered, and where our vessels
may coal and distribute supplies. A
man who Is not arr expansionist Is not
a true' American."
The president of the National Live
stock association is for Roosevelt, first
and last, and he predicts the re-election
of the nation's chief executive by the
largest popular vote ever given a presi
dential candidate. "Even old woolly
Texas, that has never been known to go
Republican, wilt give him her vote,
though I am afraid soma of her people
will die of heart disease when they cast
their ballots."
Mr. Springer reiterated the statements
of his friends that he will not again be
a candidate for re-election to the head
of the national association. "I have
hefd the ppsltion seven consecutive
years." he smiled, "ever since the as
sociation was organized, and have never
met any opposition. I feel it Is time
someone else took up the work, for I
have served long enough and the condi
tion of my wife's health and my busi
ness require that X give up the place.
"The livestock association can never
be called, a one-man affair. Its mem
bership represents an Industry of al
most $4,000,000,000. I do not know who
my successor will be, but he will be
elected in a fair and open manner, for
we are business men and are organized
for business reasons." o
Sunday afternoon Mr. Springer and
a number of the'delegates were enter
tained at the home of Richard Scott at
Milwaukle and enjoyed a tour over his
model stock farm.
IF A STOCKMAN
' Should Get
a Dose of Toothache
He probably knows what to do with his
Jaw. If he don't let him send it to
us and we'll return it to him without an
ache or pain. Such - transactions as
these are in our line.
71
The Alba Dentists
otttaeasi Corner of rirst ana Morrison.
Telephone, Slain 3790,
Yh '
?
-
U ' Si i
, i j , , , ; . i. . ii i"' ' i' : ...
A full page of the Sunday Ore
Ionian was devoted to OUfC
GREAT! JANUATCY SALE.
. Ten full pages of the Oregonian
would not suffice to fully exploit
the thousands, of bargains that are
on sale here today.
1; 'Every new fabric, the latest
and best ; ready-t9wear garments, j
all furnishings for your home, all
articles for personal use, all the
thousands of articles that are in
this establishment are greatly re- V
duced in price.
You can save many ' dollars by
purchasing here right how.
r' JV JfDDlTIOX YOV HJiVB THS SATISFACTION
Of KMOW1MG THAT ALL THE ' MERCHANDISE IS
FIRST CLASS AND ENTIRELY NEW THIS SEASON.
at 25c. Each
Come early and get your pick. We have all the latest muslo for' you.
REMEMBER 25 CKNT8 buys the best cylinder record ever made;' why
pay twice as much for othersT v
We ore Manufacturing Headquarters for Talking Machines and luppllea
and Make a Specialty of the Installment Business.
For $5 Down and $1 Per Week
You can have one of our best machines -complete
with records
Columbia Phonograph Co.
The Largest Talking Machine House in the World -
Wholesale and Retail. 138 Seventh Street
Retail Branch. 345 Vahlnton Streett
ARE YOUR PANCAKES WHAT
PANCAKE FLOUR
SELF-RISING
jjjittMjB
TOR SALE BY ALL GROCERS. "A BIT A PACKAGE
PEERLESS PURE FOODS CO.
Mill and Office 4th and Hoyt Streets, Portland, .Oregon .
WE HAVE
THE STOCK
Genuine Hard
Molded Records for 1
Phonographs or
Graphophones
YOU WOULD LIKE THEM TO BE?
Is ready for the griddle
at a moment's notice.
Ready for the table a
moment - later. Tho
lightest, flakiest, most
tempting brown cakes.
"A bit" a package.
i
"Yum -by Gosh
They Are Cood"
Is Made From
Health Products
Pancakes made .from .
this flour are wholesome
and healthy and can be
digested by the weakest
stomach,
Use no salt,' no yeast,
no baking powder, sim
ply mix batter, - using
milk or water.
; DIRECTIONS
Take one cup of water
or milk for each cup of
pancake flour: have grid
dle ; hot. before . mixing
batter.
t