The Oregon daily journal. (Portland, Or.) 1902-1972, November 22, 1902, Page 11, Image 11

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    I , i
"fim OTJEGOK daily jotthnai.
FORTIiAKP SATXJBDAY r EYZriyr 'NOTEMIIEB 22, 1902.-
HOW-MeLEMMDUiPsg
"cALVl'ni ' ffltlUQ,
- Manaaer. ,-
' x. . T v
MiRQtJAM GRAND THEATRE
! "?. one
Main V
W MONDAY and TIESDAY WGHTS:,WiV; &&XfttlwW
im'; ! I IV I it - JsT I j. M MM M :JkMJf
l-. :.. , - y a;:,.
-:t :- .. .. 1
NIGHTS
w '. k '7
UWl
. ... ,. --" . - . .. T ' " .
A Promoter Told Him a False ;: Story, bat It Was His
.:'i' "l .
Making
. . I "- .
A group .of vi war sitting In on
f the lawyers" office In what Is caljed
"lAwyers" Row." lu Baker City: recently,
The utJeot under discussion was a trial
for horsestealing- of a notorious stock
rustler. . "What will the jury do about it,
.Jt'Bcle .Pave- inquired one of the law
yers. "Witt " they Wilis; in a verdict of
; futltr, do yow think?"
Uncle Dave brought, the front legs of
his chair down on the floor, he had been
leaning back against the wall," gave the
floor an emphatic rap with his cane and
aid: . "If It wat anybody else they would
n't convict tan on that evidence, but It
being him, I think the verdict will be
guilty. Though the evidence is not con
elusive I don't suppose anybody doubts
that he took the horse all right . He made
a picked brand of It and changed the I C
to H O by pioking out the hair to make
It look Ilk an old brand."
While the rest of the group went over
the evidence .and discussed the reliability
Of the testimony I vainly grope1 In my
mind for the association of that name
"Uncle Dave." Suddenly the whole thing
flashed upon me. This keen-eyed, gray
bearded whlte-iiatred old man who an-
, swered to the name of Uncle Dave, mast
be Uncle Dave Llttlefleld, of whom I had
read as the pioneer of Baker County.
; OLD UNCLE DAVE.
'Taking the first opportunity I said to
htm: "Is your name David Llttlefleld?"
He turned hie keen gray eyes on me in
quisitively and said: "That's the name I
Was christened, but I've been Uncle Dave
for a good many years past here In
1 taker." My evident interest In the early
history of the discovery of gold was the
open sesame to the treasures of bis varied
experiences. Uncle Dave is as Interesting
a character as Kben Holden or David
Harum, and quite as original and quaint.
He deserves to be discovered by some au
thor who wields a pen capable of doing
him justice. He Is full of odd conceits
storehouse of pioneer anecdote and remi
niscence. He is witty, but his wit has a
kindly flavor. He does not scruple to tell
a good story merely because the joke is
on himself.
We talked till the lengthened shadows
of the trees admonished us that supper
time had arrived. In the evening I found
my way to his home. He gave me a
hearty welcome In which you felt there
was no insincerity. His white hair was
swept from a high forehead and made
him look like a patriarchal Huguenot.
When he had gotten his briarwood puff
ing he said:
HI3 INTERESTING STORY.
"Well, to start at the beginning of the
story, I came out to California in 1850.
My father, who came in '49, sent back not
only good reports but a sack of dust and.
nuggets, so I went to Califolrila. Fifty-'
eight found me in Fraaer- River and in
18S1 my partner.. Henry Griffin, and my
self, struck' out for the Oro Flno diggings
in Washington Territory. We had gotten
.as Jar . aat Portland when we. ran across
two other 'tartieads.' William" Stafford and
a. W. Bcbriver. They had Just com from
Oro Fino and told us there was nothing
there. We decided to'aUy -in Portland
till we could hear of sots good camp.
' "I waa walking, down he main street
one day when I saw a little group, of men
gathered around m fellow who stood on a
tSrygoodsvbor airthev.edge0f the sWe
walk. He seemed to be preaohing or sell
ing something, so I walked pver and joine,l
the crowd. I listened a few moments and
he kept epeakhig'of tM-BIue Bucket
mines. I toad never heard Of such a place.
He said that the. party of .emigrants that
Bteve Meek a brother 'of 'Joe Meek had
guided into Oregon In 1845 had. while
looking for some lost cattle, picked up
some large nugget n one ef the tributa
ries of the Malheur, He said they claimed
they could, have filled their blue water
buckets foil or the stuff if they had
known that it waa gold, '
STORIEJB OF'jbNES.
"Well, I stood there listening to his talk
but not taking much . stock in It till he
aid he had been there himself and he
could hare made a stake" if the. Indian
had not enased. him out. With- that he
pulled autosome nuggets and. began pass
ing them around for the crowd to inspect.
He said he had secured the nuggets there
and he wanted tot go beck with a party
strong enough to keep the" Indians away.
The crowd was composed .mostly of Wb
foot farmers and they did not believe that
what he showed 'was gold. He asked if
there was a miner In the crowd. I, said
t was. He asked m to tell- the crowd
whether the nuggets were gold or not. I
looked at them, hefted them, and said,
'They certainly are, and" a good quality
ef gold at that.' . .
CHANCE TO GET RICH.
"The fellow's name was 'Adams. Griffin
and I talked It over. We were going to
go somewhere atid we thought here was
a chance of getlng lntt. new and rich dlg-gmtai'-Oftt
rWtt "frtenuVrw&tf ' Had1 ""peeH
miners in California, William Stafford and
O. W,. Schrlver, .went In With us and with
about 40 or 60 Webfooter we started for
the Blue- Bucket mine with Adams as
guide. We were well equipped to fight
Indians and to .mine. .'.Each of us had
one riding horse "and two. packhorses. We
took the Barlow wagon road across the
Cascade Mountains, crossing the Des
chutes River where the 8ve Meek party
crossed it in 184i. We kept up the east
side of the Dps Chutes and followed up
one of Its tributaries to Its headwaters.
About thfa time a rumor spread through
the company that Adams had never been
to the Blue Bucket mines.. We were In a
dry and barren country, many of the
farmers In our 'company had left their
grain standing, thinking that they could
afford to. Jet it jro. nnhar.WSSted M they
could scoop up pockets full of nuggets. We
questioned Adams closely. He maintained
that he had been-.tber. . ,
"Through a young- 4lkW. named Bill
Cranston," who Adams had claimed had
been ther with him When he had found
nuB-eiiv- we -got-s, "-oonfeinlo!V that
Adams had not been there. He said
Adams had gotten him to tell that' story
so they 'could have a strong party with
them to go out and hunt for IbeMost dig
glngs. ' US ' .
ADAMS UNDER FIRfi. ."-V
"Well, wa were all pretty mad, at Adams',
deception, -especially he farmers, wno naa
abandoned their crops to come on such a
wild-goose cliase. We gave him a week
to And the diggings. After a week' hard
traveling through a rough country we
were still hunting.. Borne of. the. party
wanted to lynch Adams, but a few of us,
who were cooler-headed, persuaded. then)
to give him a day's jgrace. ..Ha spent t ,
pretty strenuous day and that night w
set a watch on him as he had tried to
escape the night before. We had , been
working toward the Malheur River coun
try and were now near the headwater of
Burnt River. The night before, when
Adams had tried to escape, most of the
party wanted to shoot him at once. "Wa
discussed the question till the middle of
the forenoon, when we took a vote and
decided to try him for hi life. Griffin and
1 and Stafford and Schrlver and son of
the others, wanted htm turned loose. The
majority, however, was for killing him.
A JIJRT SELECTED. ' ; ' .
"We selected a Jury, appointed one ol
the party to defend him and one to prose
cut him, aad then began taking testi
mony. The testimony didn;t help' ht
reputation any. Young Cranston and the
other two fellows from the valley failed
to support any of his statements. On the
whole . It looked pretty black for, him.
The trial lasted ail day and the jury de
bated the verdict all night. Well, sir,
they brought in the strangest verdict I
ever heard of. The dcolslon was that he
was guilty. His horse and all his equip
ment, including his gun, was to be taken
from him. Without any food, firearms or
blankets, he was to be escorted out of
to get away ana H, srter me lapse ox mai
time, he was In range, any one of the
party had leave to shoot him. Before he
left we had him sign a paper saying he
was a liar and had deceived us.
"Well, now that the Blue Bucket mines
were settled, most of the party wanted to
lose no. time getting back to the Willam
ette Valley to tend their crops and save
them, lit possible. We divided. One party
started direct for the valley and the rest
of us struck out to And the old emigrant
road that we thought must lie north and
east from where we were. The night after
we separated 1 couldn' 'help thinking of
Adams. Nary a gun to kill game with,
no chance to defend himself from Indian
or varmints. Not a bite to eat. No pros
n,t nt ircitlnir nnvthinar. I SDoke to One
pf our party, that.. night. an4 ,tpd,m I,
wished we could cacne some gruo ior
Adams. I hated to think of him starving
in death. He told me not to mention it
to the rest; but after dark he would go;
back and look for Adams.
"He pokjeime grub with him and left..
Next rrifernfiWl- wehCtipr nd foufWi 'him tn
in., ii. .1.1 ... t . ..'I.. . l. .11. " !
1ES
POPULAR WITH . THE PEOPLE
CORDRAY'S THEATRE
JOHN F. CORDRAY, Manager.
Thanksgiving Week Sunday, Nov. 23
'' i ,
Special Matinee Thahksgiving Day
-feoduced
Exactly
the Same
as it was
300
Times in"
New York,
lOOTfmes
in Boston
and 50
Times in
Chicago.
EDS I
mf a vinftTPCPy
TIME
HERE.
IT IS
EXHIL-
ERAT
ING, MUSICAL,
SENSA
TIONAL AND
WHOLE-
? SOME?
Usual Matinee Saturday. fS,0?Sc M(1i0c,!KSunlay Sa1"
7 4y ftTATINEES-zSc to any part of house; children 10c
PRICES THANKSGIVING MATINEE SAME AS EVENING.
Next Week....RUDOLPll AND ADOLPH" Next Week-
HEARTS
OF OAK
) COMPANION PLAY TO "SHORE ACRES "
The Best of Them AIII '
'.'..'..; . . ; ,
' . SIR0G ANO RUG&ED AS THE ROCK-BOUND
if COAST OF NEW ENGLAND I
Pure as the Ocean Breezes!
; Presented by an Excellent Company with Magnificent New Scenery and Startling Electrical Effects
DIRECTION OF flRS. JAMES A. HERNE; - ' : .
PRICES: Lower Floor, except last 3 rows, $1; last Z rows, 75c. Balcony, first 6 rows, 75c; last 6 rows, SOc. Gallery, 3Sc and 33c.
Box and Loges, $7. SO. SEATS MOW SELLING. Carriage at IO.SO o'clock. ,
MARQUAM GRAND THEATRE.
CALVIN HEILIQ, Manager.
THANKSGIVING ATTRACTION j
i - ilfigvgeiiiznt IZXtimXf&ihtw FfiasonS Actor
MR;: STUART R.OBSON
'.'.Vjv AND "IS EXCELLENT COnPANY
Wednesday night, November 26 and Thursday Matinee, November 27
j ; - SHAKESPEARE'S IMMORTAL COriEDY
"Tlift Cbmedy of Errors"
Thursday Night (Thanksgiving) November 27, Bronson Howard's Masterpiece
Ev n'nj Pri.es-Entlrc lower floor, $1.50. Balcony, first three rows, $1.00. Second
lhr.ee rows. 75c. . . Last six rows, jjog, Gallery, 3sq and 2$c. Boxnd LOKesr 4io.oo. .,. ..
SpacUl Holiday Matinee Prices Entire lower f loir, $1.00. Bakony, Jtrst three rows,
$i. Second three rows, 75c. Last six rows, soc. Gallery, 35 and 35c. Boxes and Loges, $7.50-
, NOTE Advance sale of seats wlU open next Monday mornlnz at 10 o'clock, when not
more than ten seats will be sold to any one person for any single performance. Carriages at 10:50.
file
if'
OEO. L. BAKER
ftanager
THE BAKER THEATRE
Phones: Columbia 906
Oregon North 1076 v.
CONCEDED BY EVERYBODY THE MOST POPULAR PLAYHOUSE IN THE CITY.
PLAYING TO STANDING ROOfl ONLY EVERY NI0HT.
THANKSGIVING WEEK
STARTING SUNDAY MATINEE
NOVEMBER 23
-MATINEES SUNDAY AND 5ATURDAY. SPECIAL THANKSQIVINQ MATINEE THURSDAY-
Nat C. Goodwin's Greatest Success
1 V ilil 1 N eff
ELSIE B8MOND,
oooo
PRESENTED BY THE INCOMPARABLE,
NEILL STOCK COMPANY.
f - .'ff "j
I i
V-' i
lfe . . . ' J
WILLIAM RNARO. j
Staged with the same great care to detail that has marked our previous productions. A New York production at popular
prices. The Baker Prices never change. Evening, 15-35-35.500.
NOTE Thanksgiving Matinee the same as Saturday and Sunday Matinees, I0-15-25C
Week starting Sunday, Nov. 30, Henry Arthur Jones' great play "THE MASQUERADERS,"
camp. When he grot a chance he tolJ
me he had hunted nearly all night. He
had finally found Adams, grtven htm the
food and arranged to leave grub at every
camping' place. Adams would follow us
ub and ret AU nroacnaa ins. suojeei
ana iouna no on wan vrry Rnxinus 10 sin
Adams. W'c sci.t ouL. located AJama ant)
brousht him into camp. We 1st him travel
with us.
"Our party wanted to travel slowly and
prospect, but :t was past th- middle of
October and the rest of the party was
In a hurry to press along. Wo -did not
stop the pack train for dinner but always
went into camp at 4 o'clock to t'lvo the
animals a chance to grate and rest.
A -COLOrLJjE- GOLD.
"We prospected and got colors on a
creek afterwards called China Creek. We
crossed the divide after tea v in Burnt
River and dropped down hito Fowder
River. The Hudson Bay Company named
that river Powder River because one of
their trappers
stream. We crossel Blue Canyon, wtnt
over the ridgr anff, after crossing- Elk
Creek, went Into cams. We took turns
at 'poking and. In tending to the horses.
There was four in one mess, t was on
duty that weak while Orltftu, being his off
week, put in his time prospecting. He
dug bole an a bar near camp, but didn't
get to bedrock. He told me he thought It
was a good prospect and said he would
like to stay If the rest of the party were
not in such a hurry. Next morning Henry
and I got up at daylight and put that
hole down to bedrock .. W. . paiuWa the
rvel on bedrock and got from 50 cents
a dollar a pan,- That settlsd It. We
had struck as good as the Blue BurKet
diggings. We spent that day In measuring
off claims, Ws gave Griffin the discovery
claim and one more. The rest of us drew
lots for th other claim. We gave Adams
one also. Ws sunk holes on our claims,
organised a mining. district and got plans
under way to divert the waters of Elk
Creek Into this gulch and named It Grift.
fir' rinifh. AH but Qrlffin SlaftoriJU
Schrlver and myself struck out for the
valley to winter there. We four decided
to stsy by our claims and work them If
possible. We rode to Walla Walla, taking
our packhorses to get provisions for the
winter. We tried to hire a man there to
ittt a.few extra packharaea-la.
bring supplies. We couldn't get one for
love or money. They told us It was mad
ness for us to go back. .
"We. returned to Walla Walla after a
serle of adventures and told our story
of the finding of the nuggets. Now this
la the history of the finding of gold in
Powder River." .' . -
MOftE CADETS FOR" ANNAPOLIS.
While Secretary Moody has not begm
the preparation of his annual report, he
has determined on the oharaoter of the
vonnmmAndfitlttnii tn . Lm mu'de tor un In-
4 erws-l,i- UmJ. .uumbexr.oj ediamisatDncd.
l lino oBlcers, - ,
ThlsrHr -resardact It Mr." Moodr as the
most lHiportant matter confronting tho
naval adminlatra.Uon, and It will be
treated aa such la the report. He be
lieves that an Immediate increase In the
commissioned personnel la necessary, but
Is not in favor of making appointments
to the line from civil life. The only safe
policy In his opinion. Is to pursue the
slower, but more satisfaon'. rfur" nf
'TSvTng allTine officers educated at the
Naval Academy. He will. Uiererore. rec.
nmm eml that each Sonatdr and Repre
sentatlve be. given the nomination of two
midshipmen, instead of one each, as at
present, and that the nominations shall
jmade hi- eaeh-Spnntnr andby th
Renreaentnuve of every congressional dis
trict and the delegate in Congress front
each territory', every three years.
Last year some measure of relief tn the
existing conditions of a shortage of line
officers was afforded by Congress by pro.
vldinK that each Senator should have one
nomination, the President Of. the United
States should have 15 instead Of 10, and
that the nominations should be mads in
each case every four years instead ot
every six years. L'p to that time Sena
tors had not the right-to make nomina
lUfe. H,.:vMrl -ir -,.r,a ":
adopted- the- number af -ealehlBS at-the
Kval Academy will be almost doubled.
Tinder the law passed at the last sasslon ;
of Congress, the numlwr of cadets Wps
was increased to 493. distributed vh
four years. The new arrangement . conr,, ,
templates 971 cadetships diatrlhutM over
three years. These figures apply to the
Increased representation of th Housa Of
Wepr.nlntlve.i elected On last TVjtMiay
r rnmimiurn -
It js oeiieveu iimi wuh i.liw.-t-
cadets there will be enough line offlcers
to care for all the ships in commission
four years from now. lnoiudlns; those- vn
der construction. Washington Times. ;
run " . ,
r. . v. . I. . . 41m. nt th. fl R.
& N ChWvgo-Portlsjid Special. " filun
Portland to ChtcJtlrr rnprjn. ,
ihg at o'clock. Inqfllrsolty ticket of Acs,
Third and Washlnpan. : ,
Queen Bes la Indeed Queen of all Cmtsh
props. Sold by druggists and cneeiitm
ara. . --.-'r: i ";
1".
v
if -,
' S -'
'- t