The morning Astorian. (Astoria, Or.) 1899-1930, May 31, 1908, SECOND SECTION, Page 12, Image 12

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    SUNDAY. MAY 31. 1008.
12
THE MORNING ASTOUIAN, ASTORIA, OREGON. r"
EDWIN
0,
PIIHI
Typical Career of the American
Newspaper Man
TELLS OF ARLY STRUGGLE
Now Staff Writer on the Kansas City
Star. "Fates a Fiddler" His Latest
Piece of Fiction. About to be
Published.
nncrnv Mav 30. The number
JU" Nrf fc J " j
of practical newspaper men who have
broken into literature through the
medium of the novel almost passes
enumeration. One of the latest to
see a piece of his fiction between cov
ers is Edwin George Pinkham of the
Kansas City Star, whose first book,
"Fate's a Fiddler", is about to. be
produced by a Boston publishing
house. Mr Pinkham's career has
been so typical of that of a large
class of workers on American news
papers that some notes on it dictated
by him to his publishers can hardly
fail to be amusing. He says of him
self: "I did my first newspaper work in
Springfield, Mo., when I was four
teen or fifteen. I hung around a
newspaper office there doing what
ever they would let me. I set type,
worked the press, folded the papers.
They didn't ask me to do these things
but they took no active means of pre
venting me. At first, I believe, the
editor did warn me gruffly to keep
out, suspecting doubtless that I was
staying away from school. That
didn't disturb me greatly however,
because when he came down stairs
I went up anyway, and when he went
T ram., down. So long as we
didn't meet the fiction was maintain
ed that I wasn't there. But one day
he forgot and asked me to pull a
proof for him, and that settled it 1
was there officially.
"He was an indolent man, was my
editor, and I learned to take advan
tage of him. One day I wrote
story when he was out and left it on
his desk. When he came back I ex
plained that it had been left by a tall
stoop shouldered man who said his
name was Brown. It was printed.
Mr. Brown became a regular contri
butor after that always calling when
the editor was out. I have said that
my editor was indolent, perhaps he
was shrewd too, because pretty soon
he was letting Brown do most of the
work. I remember that he used to
get quite peevish if he failed to drop
in on his accustomed day and leave
some copy, -called him a shirker and
things like that. Thus Brown early
learned how thorny is the path of the
scribe.
"Our paper was called The Peo-
ple'sVoice. Whether the people
didn't recognize their voice when
they heard it or just didn't care, the
event was that they showed no great
disposition to listen to it and it grad
ually became smaller and stiller and
finally ceased. 1 1 drifted around
through the South and West, work
ing in printing offices mostly. I did
not know the trade but I was a use
ful cub I believe, and as I never
asked for any pay you can imagine
that I had no difficulty in finding an
imposing stont to sleep on."
Mr. Pinkham is 29 years old and
a native of Lynn, Mass. When he
was two years old the family moved
West. Of this period and of his
early struggles he says:
"It was always a guiding principle
in our family (and I have adhered to
it strictly) that when we became so
poor that we couldn's possibly exist
where we were that we should spend
a small fortune moving as far away
from there as possible. I think we
learned this secret from Ben Frank
lin's book 'The Road to Wealth'. I
may be mistaken about the author,
but let it pass.. Thus I have been
East and West and South, newspaper
man for a time and then something
else, newspaper man again and then
something else, and now newspaper
man again for a time."
Mr. Pinkham was engaged in busi
ness in Providence, R. I. for several
years and was latter connected with
a press bureau in Worcester, Mass.
For the past year he has been a staff
writer on the Kansas City Star.
CONSERVING THE LAND.
Prominent Men Pronounce
Birds a Great Factor.
Wild
NEW YORK, May 27.-That no
factor in the problem of conserving
the land, water and forest resources
of this nation equals that which Na
ture has provided in the feathered
wild life of the continent is the opin
ion expressed by leading ornitholog
ists in this city to-day. Following
the conference of governors in Wash
ington, officers of the National As
sociation of Audubon Societies have
decided to offer the cooperation of
their organization in this great work,
in pushing which the association has
been the pioneer and only active or
ganuation ever since its incorpora
tion. Although the workers for bird
preservation were not represented at
the gubernatorial conclave at the
White House, government author!
tics have assured them that the pro
tection of the insect eaters that in
sure life to crops, woods and water
ways should be one of the first prac
tical means to the general end.
Crops flourish and forests stand to
conserve land and water largely
through the activities of the existing
bird guard that ceaselessly tights
their natural destroyers, the investi
gators of the government point out
With a known loss of over $800,000
000 to the crops of the country last
ear due to killing oil their guardian
flocks, the corresponding effect on
woods and water may be reckoned in
the billions of dollars, the Audubon
workers declare. Uniform laws for
bird Drotection. if adopted by the
states, would go far to ward off these
growing inroads of insects and other
pests, they say, and this might well
be the first step to be taken follow
ing the deliberations of the house of
governors.
While the value of the birds to the
farmer, orchardist and planter has
for years been recognized, it is be
lieved by the authorities that their
mportance in preserving the forests
not generally known. According
to a recent report of the government,
insects alone cause an annual loss to
the trees of the country estimated at
over a hundred million dollars. On
the oak alone four hundred species of
insects which are sought and con
sumed by the birds of the forest, prey
constantly, the experts of the Biolo
gical Survey have discovered. On
the willow 186 such species constant
ly attempt its destruction, on the
pine 165, on the hickory 170, on the
birch 105 and on the elm 80. Careful
analysis of the stomachs of thousand
of woodpeckers, titmice, creepers,
kinglets, wood warblers, wrens fly
catchers, swallows, nut hatches and
other birds of the woods show that
their constant labor is to consume
just these devastating insects.
Ranked next to the insect, which
is the chief enemy of the forests, are
destructive vegetable growth and the
attacks of mice, wood rats, rabbits
and other small animals. Careful
.-innlvsis of their food shows that
many species of wood birds make
away with the unwholesome vegeta
ble matter. Hawks, owls and other
larger birds of prey are constantly
on the watch to check the inroads of
the harmful animal life about the
trees. Robins and other feathered
races have been snown to De me
greatest natural agency in distribut
mg seed far and wide and causing
the forests to thicken and expand.
ornithologists asserted here to-day.
"As a national asset and resource.
the life and labors of the birds comes
clearly within the scope of the dec
laration of principles of tthe Gover
nors' conference"; said William
Dutcher, president of the Xational
Association of Audubon Societies at
its headquarters, 141 Broadway to
dav. "We agree with this distin
guished body that 'this conservation
of our natural resources is a subject
of transcendent importance, which
should engage unremittingly the at
tention of the nation, the states, and
the people in earnest cooperation'.
For years we have labored, practi
cally alone in the field to force the
nation to see the prime conserving
force of its bird life pn the crops,
woods and waters. That we shall
keep up this unflagging fight the lead
ers of this national movement may be
assured. If the governors would
work for uniform laws for bird pro
tection I feel sure they would find
no better means of forwarding the
great work which they have under
taken."
flEii Mb 1b liiiiEi;
By
A
&
L. S.
War Story of Watching
and Waiting &
MILLS
Copyright, 1908, by I. S. Mills.
3
1 "
NESTLED
among the
given hills of
western Connecti
cut there stand
today, a little way
back from the
lonely country
road, a brown,
weather beaten
farmhouse On
each side of the
door the wood
blue climbs, and
overhead It forms
in an arch of 11 v
tug greeu.
Ou the west vide
by the low bank
wall the old fash
he died In hit If nn hour.
After this they Had toiled on, Henry
growing stronger and mere manly
overcoming gradually the lorrow caua-
L COMR PACK
TO YOU."
toned red roses bloom In all their
springtime splendor. Hero ofttluies a
few years ago merry Behoolglrls, with
cheeks that matched the glow of the
roses, paused to gather a bouquet for
teacher's desk or to place beneath the
flags In the little graveyard on the hill
side on Memorial day. And ofttluies.
too. they paused to listen to the quiet
words of Mrs. Maynard, who lived
here alone. They wondered at the
Badness of her voice as she said:
'"Yes; you are welcome to the roses."
Then sudden hope would light her
face as she added, "When Henry
comes home he'll tidy up the yard
bit and pick a rose for me as he did
once long a?o."
After the sun had set aud the shad
ows bad crept down the hillside
through the graveyard and filled all tin
valley with darkness the lamp was lit
and placed hi the window, where Its
rays lighted the pathway leading to
the road. By the table Mary Maynard
would sit, her hands folded. She was
waiting for Henry.
Forty-five years ago on May 29 Hen
ry brought home Mary, his fair young
bride, saying: "Mother, here la my
The Palace Restaurant
The ever-increasing popularity of
the Palace Restaurant is evidence of
the good management, and the serv
ice, at this popular dining room. For
a long time the reputation of the
house has been of the best and il
does not wane as time progresses.
The system used, that of furnishing
the finest the market affords, and all
can be obtained, in season, is a plan
that will always win, coupled as it it
with the best of cooking and prompt
service. A common saying nowaday:
is "Get the Palace habit"
For Rubber Stamps and Typewriter
Supplies see Lenora Benoit, public
stenographer, 447 Commercial street
: FACB WAS THB FACE BBS SAW IN Hell
DBEAX
wife. Love her as you love me. and
don't let her be lonely, for tomorrow 1
go to the front; but, God being willing.
I'll come hack."
On the following day earth and Bky
seemed blended In perfect harmony.
The roses bloomed In splendor. On
the grassy bank they sat, Mary and
Henry, beside the clustering blossoms.
Henry had picked one of the roses
aud lovingly placed It In Mary's hair.
Fair was she then, In all the freshness
of youth's bright morning. Tenderly
she placed her hand on Henry's shoul
der and with loving, pleading eyes
whispered:
"Henry, please don't go." I
Sadly, slowly, he replied: "Mary, I
must. But watch for me. I'll come
back to you."
So they parted on that fateful day,
and the birds saug, the breezes crept
softly by, and the roses scented the
air. But Mary alone on the doorstep
and Henry marching out of the valley
heeded them not
Those were trying days for north
and south. The nation's best were
slaying each other In terrible battles.
After Burnside's defeat at the battle
of Fredericksburg in December, 1862,
there had been a call for more men to
fill the broken ranks, and Henry May
nard bad enlisted. Dearly as he loved
Mary Harper, be could not resist the
nation's call any longer. At first Mary
pleaded with blm. Then she realized
the need and bravely gave her con
sent, only requesting that they be mur-
ried before he went When on thut
last day as they sat together by the
roses, though she whispered him to re
main, she knew he would go that
above all the sorrow at parting Bbe
wished him to go wished blm the
brave, true soldier of her dreams.
Thus it was tbat Henry went, and
Mary came to live with Henry's moth
erJust those two in the little farm
house, for Henry's father had been
killed years back while hauling logs
from the wood lot The sled had over
turned coming down the steep hillside
Henry's mother had seen It from the
window where she sat knitting and.
calling Henry from the wood shed
went to his aid. Crushed and bleed
ing, tbey brought him home Just at
the close of the cold winter's day, and
ed by bis father's death. But bis moth
ers heart seemed burled out lu the
lonely grave ou the hillside with he
husband, ami, though she gave Henry
unbounded love, she cared for little
else till Mary came and Henry wont
Then she talked of Henry and found In
Mary a ready listener. So tho two be
came fast friends with ouo hope the
safe return f Henry.
The weeks weut by, and together
they read the paper tolling of the war,
Henry, too, wrote sometimes to his
mother, but more often to Mary. His
letters told of the weary waiting and
the seemingly useless marching and
countermanding, yet he was alway
the same brave, loving Henry. Soon
the war would be over, aud Mary
would meet him, aud they would sit I
the rosebushes again.
In her dreams she saw blm, her sol
dler, her "boy In blue," amid the roar
and smoke of battle. "They win the
crest; he takes the flag; he Is a hero.
The dream changed, and she saw him
alight from the train at the village
station. The neighbors had reud of bis
brave deed In the papers and had
come to cheer Iilm. Once more the vl
slon chanced, aud hand In hand tlxty
at by the rosebushes. He placed
rose in her hair and, gently kissing he
cheek, whispered:
"Mary, we won't part any more."
And, looking to his well beloved
face to reud the love his voice ex
pressed. It seemed the face of Henry
but old, mo old, and his hair so gray.
One day there came news of Lee's
wlft advance northward In July,
1813. There would be a battle. Mary
wrote n long letter full of love and
cheer to Henry. But no answer came,
In the paper were rumors of a great
battle being fought It was at Get
tysburg. Would Lee win? The sub
pense was awful to millions of north
em people as. they waited with bated
breath for news from the front "Lee
retreats!" This was the report that
came on the fourth day, and the drawn
faces relaxed. Then followed columns
of "killed," "wounded," "missing."
Thousands of homes were plunged In
gloom, for many a husbands name
and many a son's name and many
lover's same was there.
A neighbor's boy brought the papers
that evening. Though he came ou
swiftly, Mary couldn't wait, but ran
out to meet hi in. Together Mary and
Henry's mother looked down the long
Hut of "killed." Not there! Thank
God! Then the list of "wounded."
Not there! Then "missing" Henry
Maynard!
There Is hope," said Mary. But
she sat with the paper tightly clasp
ed. All night she sat thus aud heeded
not the time nor saw the neighbors
who en mo to comfort her. As the sun
light stole in the east window they
gently lifted her and placed her on the
bed.
After a lime she slept and dreamed
of Henry. He was ou the crest of a
bill behind n low bank of earth. Hun
dreds of men were at bis right and
left Before him, advancing up the
hill, were thousands of meu with gray
uniforms. Then began the rour of ar
tillery, and the smoke of battle rolled
over all, und she saw him no more. Yet,
half waking, half Bleeping, she seemed
to hear him say, as on tbat day of
parting: "Watch for me! I'll come
back to you !"
Then began the years of waiting
weary years. In the afternoon when
the work was
done many and
f
mi'
many a day Mary
sat on the door
step looking down
the road looking
for Henry. To
the many friends
who came and
went Mary sel
dom spoke. She
waa like one pre
occupied, her
thought! far
away and a
looking fob henry, dreamy look In
her eyes. So the time passed.
Each succeeding- year stole something
away from her beauty.
Leaving behind It, broader and deeper,
the gloom and the shadow.
Henry's mother died and was laid
away In the quiet graveyard, and the
years rolled on; the snows came and
went; the roses bloomed. Schoolgirls
came for them and In time grew to
womanhood, and other girls came.
Each evening the lamp was placed In
the window. Each day Mary watched
and waited.
The sympathetic neighbors kindly
had been before, il mid become a
merchant la a small wny nt first, but
gradually Increased his business till
nt tho time of bis sickness he bud be
Mine a man of menus with a small
fortune, Still, be had remained unmar
ried. All day he had tossed about It) fever.
Tonight there will be a chnngo," the
doctor aid, and tho nurso watched
patiently till be seemed to grow quint,
und finally he slept. Then sho knew
tho crisis wus past.
When ho awoke hi the morning he
was Hubert Smith no more, but Henry
Mayuard, and all tho remembrance of
Mary and home came over blm, Ho
had been wounded In tho bend at the
battle of Gettysburg, In a seemingly
lifeless com! Il Urn he was left on tho
field until after the battle. Ho was
eared for by n farmer and when partly
recovered wandered away, giving no
niuiio, How be reached Australln be
never learned.
His recovery was soedy. and he
hastened to America lo find Mary If
possible. "Oh. Mary, are you walling?
Shall I Bee you?" ho tried. And all
night be paced the steamer's dock over
whelmed with love and longing,
e t
On May 30, 1IHX1, Mary sat In the
doorway, looking down the road, fler
bnlr, ouco black, was now streaked
with gray. She luul been looking t the
roses and thinking of Houry. "Will bi
come today?" An hour Inter as old
man came slowly up the road and
turned up tho pathway to the boom.
Mary, waiting on tho doorstep, knew II
was Henry, for the fact was the face
ho Raw In her dream.
"Henry I"
"Maryl"
Tbat Is nil those two Mid u tbty
clasped hands and tat onct mora on
tbe grassy bank where the rosea bloom
But heart spoke to heart In lot and
joy deeper than all word and deeper
than all thought
New Grocery Store.
Try our own mixture ot eolfee th
J, 1'. H, Fresh fruit and vegetables,
Dt!ollrl & Co,, grocers. I'hone Main
1281. '
Cheap Round-Trip Rates to the East.
The O, R. & N, Company will tell
round-trip tickets to Eastern points
on June 5, 6, 19 and 20; July 6, 7, 22
und 25; August 6, 7, 21 and 22. For
particulars call on
' G. W. ROBERTS Agent,
O. R. & N. Dock.
FAT FOLKS
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M A JTI-CORPU reducea FAT from 3 to 5 pounds a week. It reduce
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C. F. WISE. Prop.
7
Choice Wine, Liquor Merchant Lunch Frtm
and Cigar !i:30 a. m. to i:jo f. m.
Hot Lunch at All Hours, as Cent
Corner Eleventh and Commercial
ASTORIA, - - . . OREGON
June
: I'
Tide Tables
Compiled by the U. S. Government for
Astoria and Vicinity.
JUNE, 1908.
JUNE, 1908.
High Water,
Date.
A. M. P.
Monday
Tuesday . 2
Wednesday 8
Thursday
Friday 6
Saturday
SUNDAY
Monday 8
Tuesday ..
Wednesday .....10
Thursday 11
Friday 12
Saturday 18
SUNDAY 14
Monday 15
Tuesday ., 16
Wednesday 17
Thursday 18
M.
h.m. ft. h.mTf ft.
eared for her few wants. Manv letters
had been sent to the war department, " i
niiuiuni ! wv
SUNDAY 21
Monday 22
Tuesday 28
Wednesday 24
Thurfldn.v SR
In a pleasant room In Melbourne, Friday 26
Australia, nubert Smith lay sick. Over Friday 26
forty years ago he had come to Austra- j Simn a v oq
Ha, or bad found himself there, but Monday T..;.'.' 29
with no remembrance of where hejTuesday'!!!!!.'.!!3oj
inquiring for Henry Maynard, but
"Missing after the battle of Gettya
burg" was all the reply.
1:40
2:15
2:60
8:80
4:15
5:08
6:18
7:52
8:62
9:50
10:48
11:42
0:00
0:42
1:80
2:16
3:10
4:08
6:15
6:30
7:50
9:05
10:15
11:15
0:06
0:44
1:20
8.5
8.1
7
7
6.8
6
6
6.0
6.2
6.5
6
7.1
9.2
9.3
9.1
8.9
8.4
7.8
7.2
6.8
6.8
6.8
6.8
6.9
8.7
8.6
8.3
8:08
8:60
4:80
5:04
6:46
6:86
7:22
8:08
8:55
9:48
10:32
11:18
12:32
1:24
2:12
3:04
3:50
4:42
6:84
6:28
7:24
8:16
9:09
9:58
10:45
12:06
11:28
12:65
1:85
2:15
2:50
7.2
7.0
7.0
J7.1
7.2
7.8
7.6
7.7
8.1
8.4
8.8
9.0
7.8
7.5
7.9
7.9
8.0
8.0
8.1
8.2
8.4
8.4
8.5
8.7
8.8
7.2
8.9
7.3
7.8
7.8
7.3
Low Water.
Date.
I A, M.
h.mTf ft?
P. M.
h.m. ft.
Monday ..
Tuesday .
Wednexdaj
Thursday
Saturday
SUNDAY
Tuesday ...
Wednesday
SUNDAY
Monday ,,
TuesJay .
Saturday
SUNDAY
1 8:44 -0.6 8:40
2 9:20-0.2 9:24
3 9:52 0.2 10:06
4 10:28 0.6 11:00
611:04 1.011:66
611:45 1.4
7 0:48 8.3 12:84
8 1:48 2.8 1:82
9 2:48 2.1 2:28
0 3:45 1.3 8:25
1 4:85 0.5 4:20
2 6:25 -0.3 6:12
3 6:10 -0.9 6:00
4 6:55 -1.4 6:64
5 7:42 -1.6 7:46
S 8:80 -1.6 8:40
7 9:20 -1.8 9:86
810:10 -0.9 10:40
9 11:00 -0.211:48
J 11:55 0.5
1 0:65 2.2 12:62
2 2:00 1.7 1:54
8:08 1.1 2:58
I 4:10 0.6 4:00
5:04-0.1 4:50
1 6:50 -0.6 6:42
r 6:25 -0.9 6:80
1 7:16-0.9 7:10
7:62 -0.8 7:60
8:25 -0.5 8:28
1.7
3.8
3.9
3.9
8.7
1.9
2.3
2.5
2.8
2.3
8.0
8.1
8.2
8.S
3.1
8.9
8.0
2.7
:a
1.8
2.S
2.7
8.0
8.8
3.4
8.0
8.7
8.7