The Coos Bay times. (Marshfield, Or.) 1906-1957, April 08, 1909, EVENING EDITION, Image 1

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NEWS
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IlKADING TUB COOS BAY TIMMS.
LOCAL AND TELEGRAPHIC NEWS
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MEMBER OP ASSOCIATED PRESS
VOL. Ill
MARSHFIELD, OREGON, THURSDAY. APRIL 8, 1909 EVENING EDITION EIGHT PAGES
No. 230.
mm
MADAME
I
LOS ANGELES EARLY TODAY
America's Most Famous
Tragedienne Succumbs Aft
er Long Illness.
WORLD FAMED FOR
HISTRONIC ABILITY
Body Will Be Taken to Early
Home In Cracow, Poland,
For Burial.
(By Associated Press.)
LOS ANGELES, April 8. Madame
Helen E. Modjeska, the famous Pol
ish tragenienne and one of the most
noted actresses on the American
stage, died at 10 o'clock today at
her Island home at Bay City in
Orange county, after an nines of two
months. She was C5 years old. For
several days she had been uncon
scious and her death was hourly ex
pected
Brlghts' disease compllcat-
ed with heart trouble was (he cause
She was surrounded by her family.
The body of the actress will bo
embalmed and taken to Los Angeles
where It will remain In a vault for
some time. Later County Bozenta,
Modjeska's husband, will take the
remains to Cracow, Poland, the
early home of Modjeska, for burial.
Madame Helena Modjeska, the
Countess Bozenta ChlapowskI, whose
eventful and brilliant life Is termi
nated, was born in Cracow, Austrian
Poland, October 12, 1S44. Her fath
er was a Polish patriot named
Benda, a man of great refinement of
character and education and a musi
cian of ability. He died while
Helena was yet a child, leaving the
family in moderate circumstances.
At an early age Helena gave
every evidence of a singular intensity
of feeling' and when, at the age of
seven she was taken by her mother
to the theatre for the first time, her
excitement over the mimic perform
ance was so evident that her mother
decided not to permit her to see an
other theatrical performance In
many years. The stage career of
Modjeska, began in the small but
historic town of Bochlnls. It was
cpncelved in charity, and in all her
life on the stage she' exercised the
noble impulses which caused her to
adopt the player's life. She was
etill in her 'teens when she went
io Bochlnls and there soon after her
nrrival she married M. Modjeska.
A son was born to the couple, Ralph
Moajeslca, who hastened recently
from Chicago at the news of his
mother's Illness Soon after his
oirth the husband and father was
killed in a catastrophe at Bochlnls.
It was immediately following this
disaster that the widow organized a
theatrical company to give perform
ances throughout the district, the
proceeds to be given to the widows
and orphans of the men who were
killed. The play, "The White Came
11a," was a success from the start,
and the author, attracted by Modjes
ka's remarkable acting, used his In
fluence to start her in theatrical work
In a larger field
The success of Modjeska on the
stage In Poland was immediate. She
was received with acclaim whenever
she appeared and gained a wide
reputation.
Mme. Modjeska married In 1S68
Charles ChlapowskI, the Count Bo
zenta, a man of aristocratic birth,
and a journalist of wide reputation.
Count Bozenta offended the Russlau
government with his writings In
187C and so unpleasant was It made
for him that In company with other
gentlemen of family, he came to the
United States and with them founded
an Utopian colony near Anaheim In
Southern California. The count
took to mining In Silverado Canyon
and there he built the beautiful,
home called "Arden," where many
years of the life of Mme. Modjeska
were spent. The colony failed and
Mme. Modjeska, In need of funds
turned to the American stage. She
made application to John McCul
lough, who was manager of the
ST
T MEN TO
Adjutant General Finzer Ready
to Organize Coast Artil
lery Company Here.
Adjutant General Finzer of the
Oregon Natlona' Guard who has
beon-delegated by the United States
War Department to organize a coast
artillery company on Coos Bay, has
written Walter I yon that he is ready
to come down and muster in the
company as soon as the requisite
number of enlistments can be secur
od. Mr. Lyon Is now conferring with
local men who are Interested In the
nronosed comnanv and will endeavor
t0 gecure nnmM of a whQ are ko.
ly to join.
When Mr. Finzer comes down and
the organization of the company is
assured, negotiations for the erec
tion of a suitable armory building
for tho company will be closed.
There are "several sites under con
sideration and the owners of allare
willing to .erect a suitable building
If assured that the government will
take a five-year lease on It.
RUSSIA WILL
Governor of Caucasus Orders
Them Denied Admission at
Springs.
(By Associated Press.)
ST. PETERSBURG, April S. A
dispatch from Pyatigorsk, a water
ing place In Ciscaucasia,, says tho
governor of that province has issued
orders that Jews be denied admis
sion to health resorts, in Caucasus
the coming season. Jewish musi
cians are also barred from playing in
government orchestras.
California Theatre in San Francisco,
and was given a p'.ace in his com-
Ipany in July, 1877. Her first ap
pearance on an American stage was
at the California. It was at this
time that her name was simplified
to "Modjeska," by Barton Hill.
Modjeska toured the United
States with great success later and
In March, 18G0, she went to London
and appeared at the Court Theatre
under the management of Wilson
Barrett. In the fcudience were tho
Prince and Princess of Wales, 'and
royalty applauded with the' rest. The
play was "Heartesse," an adaptation
of "Camille." aijd for two years she
repeated it In England, always with
the same measure of success.
Mme. Modjeska returned to the
United States in 1882, and since that
time her home has been In Southern
California though she has toured the
cpuntry on several occasions. Some
years ago a. throat trouble compelled
her to give up the stage forever.
Her last appearanco was In the char
acter role of Lady Macbeth, at a
benefit performance In this city for
the Italian earthquake sufferers,
about three months ago.
Prominent among her characteriz
ations were Juliet, Cleopatra, Ophe
lia, Rosalind, Katharine, Beatrice,
Portia, Imogene Mary Stuart, and
Lady Macbeth. In all, she played
more than 200 characters. It was,
however, as "Lady Macbeth" and
"Sweet Lady Constance" that 'she
won most of her fame.
LADIES of Coos Bay should not
miss seeing the superb line of
EASTEK MILLINERY at tho Clarke
Millinery-. New styles and reason
able prices.
W
MILITIA
WHEAT REACHES
May Delivery Sells Up to $1.26
3-8 In Chicago Today But
Drops Back a Cent Before
the Close. &
(By Associated Prees.)
CHICAGO, April 8. Wheat for
May delivery again established a new
high record, touching $1.26 3-8 but
closed over cent off from this. July
W. S.' Chandler Disposes of
Tract to Christian Herrmann
and Wife.
Christian Herrmap and wife, this
morning closed a deal for the pur
chase of the W. S. Chandler ranch
on Coos River below the forks. The
ranch consists of 133 acres of which
about 65 acres is bottom land. It
Is well Improved and stocked. It Is
understood that $15,000 was the
price paid for the property, Includ
ing the stock and everything. The
deal was negotiated by the Stutsman
agency.
The ranch is onev of the best In
this section. It was purchased a few
years ago by W. S. Chandler for
$12,500 but he expended a couple
of thousand dollars In equipment,
buildings and stock so that he comes
out "u little better than even on the
deal.
Irving Chandler has had the man
agement of the property. He will
return to San Francisco.
Mr. and Mrs Herrman will take
possession of t!e place this after-
noon. Mr. Herrman was an officer
in the German rrmy for fifteen years
and is not famllir.r with agriculture.
However, ho brought Rudloph Rat-
tey, an expert agriculturist, from
Germanv With him tn ,isslsf Mm in
conauczing me place. While Mr.
oos
00
Rattey is not familiar with condl-jand
tlons In this section, he believes that
the principles that have made farms
and ranches in Germany among the
most productful In the world will which was last week grant
make a success here. Ud a franchise for an electric
.Mr. Herrmanr's first wlfo was a
Coos Bay pioneer, Mrs. John Nor-
man. iurs. Gorman returned to Ger-that his company had not even In
many after the df ath of her first tlmated that they would build an
husband here anr" there married Mr. j electric lino from Coqullle to Rose
Herrmann. Slje died several years ( burg. He said that someone had
ago, bequeathing him considerable asked him about It and ho had told
property on Coos Bay. Mr. Herr- thorn that his company would fur
mann married again a few ysars ago nlsh the electric power for the road
and Mrs. Herrmann Is hero with If someone else would build and
him. This Is their first visit to this operate the line Ho said that they
section but they are enthusiastic would be able to furnish the nower
over It.
Padro Estella Who Produced
712 Pounds of Butter In
12 Months, Dies.
(By Associated Pres.)
COLUMBIA, Mo., April 8. Padro
Estella, tho champion Jersey butter
cow of the world Is dead. Sho died
at her home at the Missouri Agricul
tural College last night. In twelvo
months sho produced 712 'pounds of
butter.
FREE! FREE!
For the romalnder of tho week
wo will -present each of our Boys'
Suit Customers with a pair of Side
walk Roller Skates. Tho Woolon
Mill Store.
DANCE SATURDAY night, April
10, at Knights of Finland hall.
DANCE at SUMNER APRIL 10.
CHAM
GOV
ffi
W
HEW HIGH MARK
advanced to $1.12 7-8. Trading was
comparatively quiet.
Tho prices of wheat sagged today
at tho opening owing to qulto gen
eral selling by commission houses
and leading holders. May opened at
$1.25; July $1.11 5-8 to 7-8; May
sold off to $1.24 7-8 and July to
$1.11 3-8.
The closing wheat prices were:
May, $1.24 7-8- July, $1.11 3-4;
Soptember, $1.04
ALLEY TALKS
OF
SE
Roseburg Man Intimates Com
pany Plans On Electric
Line Here.
Frank E. Alley, a well-known
Roseburg attroney and capitalist
who has general charge of the C. A.
Smith land holdings in Oregon, pass
ed through Marshfleld last night en
route, from Curry county where he
had been on business. While hero,
ho made Inquiries of a number con
cerning the possibility of a com
pany, In which he is Interested, se
curing a franchise for an electric
railway. He said that his company
had made application for a franchise
In Roseburg and expected to secure
it soon. Ho sa'd that the company
would put up n bond for $5,000 as
a guarantee of their good faith.
Mr. Alley, while he did not deflne-
tely state so, intimated that his com
pany would shortly make applica
tion here. From the fact that tho
company is negotiating for the Rose
burg franchise and wants one on
Coos Bay, it would seem that- tho
linking up of the two systems by a
trolley line to be known as the
! Roseburg and Cos Bay road would
.be the next move.
Coquillo In Enthusiastic.
The electric line fever is rampant
at Coqullle, according parties coming
Invuf fmm fhn Vnltnv
I ' " .....
TJioif flnnlnna
.that the air is full of railroad talk
many roads have been built on
I paper within the last few days,
I Manager Smith of tho Coquillo
'Mill and Mercantile Company
light and nower nlant and also for
an electric railway In Coquillo said
cheaply.
IS KILLED BY
AN AUTOMOBILE
Samuel Lauber Run Down On
Streets of Portland
Today.
(By Associated Press.)
PORTLAND, Ore., April 8. Sam
uel Lauber, a tailor, was run down
and killed by an auto driven by J.
II. Ponnay today. The machine Is
owned by a real estate firm. Lauber
leaves a widow and tvo children.
WILL SHUT SALOONS.
Santa Fo City Council Voles to Close
Them December !ll.
(By Associated Press.)
SANTA FE, N. M., April 8. The
city cquncll of Santa Fo by a vote
of 5 to 4 last night passed an ordin
ance closing all saloons In the city
December 31, 1909. In tho mean
time, fhe licenses feo of saloons will
bo doubled.
LUNATIC TERRORIZES AURORA
IN BLOODY
France Decides to Expel Him
From the Island of
Martinique.
(By Associated Press.)
PARIS, April 8. The French
government decided to expel Castro
from tho Island of Martinique on tho
ground that his presence there Is
likely to foment a revolution In
Venezuela. About the only course
open for Castro Is to tako refuge on
one of the Dutch West Ind'a Islands
or returning to Europe.
CASTRO IS ILL.
(By Associated Frew.)
FORT DE FRANCE, April 8.
Shortly after returning from a drive
this morning, Cnstro became 111 and
Is suffering great pain. Tho scar
of the operations performed at Ber
lin has opened for a distance of sev
eral centimetres. His condition is
undoubtedly grave. Ho did not be
lieve tho news thnt tho French gov
ernment had decided to oxpel him
from Martinique
JAS. COSTILLO
Former Ship Owner and Ore
gon Pioneer Succumbs
at Coquille.
COQUILLE, Ore., April 8. James
Costlllo, familiarly known along tho
coast as "Jlmmle tho Corker," died
at tho County Infirmary last, week.
Mr. Costlllo enmo to this coast
from Now York GO years ago, and
at one time was the owner of four
or five vessels two of which were
lost In one storm and fate followed
the others soon which broke him In
spirit as well as financially, and for
many years ho followed tho avoca
tion of corker about tho shipyards
along tho California and Oregon
const. He was a man of education
and good raising, well Informed on
most subjects of general Interest,
and bore the friendship of all with
whom ho became acquainted. His
remains were laid to rest Saturday
In a casket furnished by Arthur El
Hngson, who had known tho old gen
tloman since ho himself was a child,
and they had worked many months
sldo by sldo In the shipyards of tho
lower river, from which many crafts
aro now sailing with scams securely
corked by his hands. The deceased
was about 85 years of ago.
EAGLES WILL ABSORB
MARSHFIELD ACME BAND
Entire Membership of Musical Or
ganization to He Initiated und
Niuno to Ho Changed.
Tho Acme Band will be absorbed
by tho Eagles and will Bhortly be
como "Tho Eagle? Band." In order
to do this, It will bo necespary to
lnltlato all members rf tho baud.
All of tho members .who hfcvo been
seen so far have signified their wil
lingness to wear the feathers and
tho dato for the big do'lnga will bo
shortly fixed.
Tho oxecutlvo commlttoo of tho
Marshfleld Aerlo has also started
negotiations to loaBo tho first floor
of their proposed lodge building on
South Second streot. to tho govern
ment as an armory for tho proposod
coast artillery company hero.
Cracked Corn $2.25 at HAINES'.
ORDER CASTRO
TO GET OUT
CRUSADE TODAY
Kills Best Friend, Wounds An
other and Ends His Own
Life.
STARTED OUT WITH
GUNS AND BOMBS
Hallucinations of Weakened
Mind Lead to Awful
Slaughter.
(By Associated Press.)
AURORA, 111.. April 8. John An
derson, a plumber whose mind had
become affected, today armed him
self with two pistols, a shotgun and
three bombs which he fastened -to
his person. He then started out to
kill the inhabitants of n .city block
in which he said malicious gossip
.concerning himself had been clr-
i culated. He killed one woman, unr-
'rowly missed slaying her husband,
wounded another woman and then
committed suicide,
The dead Mrs.
John McVlcker and John Anderson,
the murderer. Tho Injured woman
Is Mrs. John BelJord.
Anderson's violent manner and in
sane armament terrorized a score of
persons to whom ho had announced
his Intentions That his already
weakened mind had completely given
way was obvious. Doors were lock
ed and women and children -fled -to
collars and attics as tho maniac
walked along the streot scrutinizing
tho houses as If ho was undecided
where to begin The first stop of
Anderson was at tho homo of Mrs.
John MeVIcker, probably his oldest
and best friend With a pistol In
each hand, Anderson began firing.
The first bullet grazed McVlcker'-s
scalp. Mrs. McVlcker ran toward
tho kitchen whero her children were
playing but received a bullet in tho
heart and fell dead on tho ihresli
hold. Anderson then went to tho home of.
I John Bolford whoro Mrs. Belford and
her mother, aged eighty and blind,
wer'o alone. Mrs. Belford was Bbot
twice but Anderson paid no attention
to her mother. By this time; the
neighborhood was aroused. Ander
son wont to the window, peered Into
tho street and returned to tho center
of the room and blow off his own.
head.
FIRE IN NEW HAMPSHIRE.
Sixty Buildings In Four Blocks -of
Manchester Burned.
(By Associated Prefia.)
MANCHESTER, N. H., April S.
Fire which started In a large tene
ment house this morning destroyed
wholly or partially over sixty liulld
lngs In four blocks. 'The damage
will exceed $100,000.
MESSINA SHAKEN AGAIN,
(By Associated Pross.)
MESSINA, April 8. A violent
earthquake occurred last night. It
was accompanied by subterranean
rumblings and almost caused a
panic.
TO VOTE BONDS FOR
NEW SCHOOL HOUSE
Hunker Hill mid Buy Park Residents
Vote On Question at Special Elec
tion Thin Afternoon.
A special election Is bulng held in
School District No, 85, which m
braces Bunker Hill and Bay Park
Additions, south of Marshfleld, to
vote a ? 10,0 00 bond Issue to dBfray
tho cost of a now school building.
It Is believed that the bond Insue1
will carry by a Jargo vote on the
Bontlment has seemingly boon great
ly In favor of It.
If tho bonds are votod, It ! plan
nod to start the new building at once
and ondenvor to have It roady lor
occupancy when school opens Ja Eop
toinbor. DANCE SATURDAY night. April
10, at Knights of Finland hnll
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