The Coos Bay times. (Marshfield, Or.) 1906-1957, July 25, 1907, Page 2, Image 2

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Coos Bay Times
AN lNnRPENDKST IlKI'n"r," V-"W3IAPKB
pDDU'junn uvKnv iy exckitixo Mon
day ANI ALbO WKHKLY BY
Tue Coos Bay Times Pum.ism.va Co,
FEED PASLEY, Editoh.
REX LARGE, Business Manaci.
The policy of Tho Coos Bay Times
Till bo Itepublican in politics, with the
Independence of which President lioose
volt is tho lending exponent.
Entered at tho postofllce at Mnrshflclil, Ore
gon, for transmission through tho malls ax
ccond eliss mallMnattcr.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Single copy, daily, - - 5 cents
Per mouth, daily, 50 cents
Three months, daily, - - $1 25
Bice months, daily - - $2 50
One year, daily, - - - $5 00
Weekly, per year - - $1 00
Address all communications to
COOS BAYJIMES
Marslifidd. Oregon.
OOVKUNMKXT OWXKitSIIlP.
MR. Bryan lias announced that
government ownership will not
be an issue in the coming national
campaign, but that the Issue will be
government regulation of railroads.
It is evident that unless the repub
lican party should escape entirely
from the Influence of Mr. Roosevelt
that the railroads will scarcely be
an Issue at all. Mr. Itoosevelt and
Mr. Bryan are both anxious to keep
the great corporations under gov
ernment control and prevent their
extortions and exactions. Should
Mr. Roosevelt be tho republican can
didate, hl3 practical course as shown
by a remarkably successful adminis
tration of his great olllce, will be
accepted as a guaranty of his future
energetic action In this direction of
government control. Nobody doubts
Mr. Bryan's earnestness In the same
direction, so that it i3 safe to say
that government regulation is al
ready assured.
As for government ownership,
even If It were desirable, It must be
regarded as entirely impracticable in
this country. There has never yot
risen in this or any nation a states
man capablo of solving a problem of
bucIi gigantic proportions as that In
volved in financing and taking over
so vast an interest as tho railroad
systems of this country. It Is easy
to supposo that tho' government
might tako possession of tho various
llue3 through the exorclso of Its right
of eminent domain. But to have that
right and to get tho people to ap
provo tho oxerclso of it, are two en
tirely different matters. The rail
road problem In all its ramifications
reaches so many diverse interests, as
to render its solution by radical
methods impossible. Regulation
does not seek to stem the current of
railroad progress, but only to con
fine and direct the current within its
proper channel and keep tho system
within bounds. It is possible and
practical, but when Mr. Bryan ac
cepts it as an issue, Is he not stealing
Mr. Roosevelt's thunder? Is ho not
retaliating on the president for what
ho, Mr. Bryan, has humorously
charged was Mr. Roosevelt's theft
of other issues claimed by Mr. Bry
an? There seems to bo a delightful
unanimity of sentiment between the
opposing factions of young America.
CITY STKKKT ItOLTiKItS.
uuhat utrx, wnetner prospoct-
A Ivo or actual, has many re
sponsibilities, and is obliged to main
tain an air of respectability and bo
always in fashion. It must havo
parks in which tho people can en
Joy recreation, and Its streets must
lio kept orderly, clean, safo and
sightly. It will not do to maintain
a plank pavement on its principal re
tall and business avenuo or to havo
that pavomont so rotten that it Is
necessary to drive a team through
-with moro caution than along a
mountain road. It will not do to
leave tho plank sidewalks in such a
condition that If a passenger Btops
on ono end of a plank tho other end
goes up and ho goes down. Abovo
all, tho city council of such a city
should uivor build u house in tho
atreot particularly ono of tho most
Important and sightly of Its streets
to keep its streot rollor in. It scorns
hardly credlblo that tho city council
of n city, prospectively or actually
great diruld go to great oxpenso to
buy a roller, uso that rollor on its
llro'ulwny and then build an un
sightly board shanty ovor tho side
walk and rolled street, to keep tho
roller in.
But It is not only tho duty of a
city council to rofralu from such
absurdities as that montloned, but
It Is their plain duty to grow-In dig
iiily as fast as their city grows out
of illlago littleness. A long plnnkod,
straight, splendid street ought not
to be dtBflgured, and when strangers
come Into tho city thoy should not
be disturbed by tho rough and rogrzod
THE DAILY
Harriman: "Gee,
appearance of the modern parts, no
matter how rough and ragged the
ancient water front may be. Both
people and government have some
responsibility with regard to their
city and its appearance. Especially
is this so where nature has made it
possible to make a "City Beautiful"
with very little expense.
CORHECTS ARTICLE OF IJECEXT
DATE.
Editor Coos Bay Times.
Dear SJr: I noticed an article in
your valuable paper of recent date
stating that M. S. Smith, superintend
ent of tho Bandon Woolen Mills, was
visiting in Marshfleld. I want you
to correct this at once. M. S. Smith
severed his connection with our com
pany some time ago; ho Is not super
intendent, and is not even in our em
ploy, and has not been for some time;
and furthermore, will not bo in our
employ at any future time, as long
as the company retains the present
manager.
BANDON WOOLEN MILLS.
By R. E, L. BedUlion, manager.
ARE ADMITTED
Coquille M. W. A. Initiate
Large Class Into Lodge
Mysteries.
THIRTY NEW ONES IN ALL
News In General From Coos' County
Seat Sheep Shearing Sea
ton Here.
(Times Special Service)
Coqulllo, July 24. Tho Modern
Woodmon initiated a largo class of
candidates into tho mysteries of
Woodcraft on Saturday night last.
District Deputy B. M. Watson, of
Grant's Pass, and N. C. Kelly, clerk
of this camp, rounded up about thirty
for membership In tho lodgo. After
tho coromonies woro over, tho young
pooplo served a delicious lunch and
sovoral happy hours woro whllod
away. Every ono enjoyed a social
visit, long to bo remembered. Ono
of tho now mombors gave a short
address which was listened to with
deop Interest. An excursion to tho
sounding sea, where tho bluo waves
of old Pacific roll, Is being planned
for tho future Beaver Camp lodgo
Is only eighteen months old, but now
has 100 mombors.
J. Quick and his threo daughtors,
Mrs. ChaB. Lovlne, who lives here,
and Misses Flora and Mary, who are
here on n visit from Pondleton, have
gone to Bandon bench to camp for
two or threo weeks.
T. C. Itoblson and wife woro down
from Fishtrny ono day this week
visiting at B. B. Paul's and also
having soma dontnl work attended
to. Mr. Roblon reports tho hay
crop fine, gardens and fruit also.
Sheopshearlng (a on hand. Peter
Nichols went to Flahtray today to
engage la shearing. He expects to
relloro fifty sheep of their coats in
onaday, ,,.., '
H
COOS BAY TIM ES, MARSHFIELD, OREGON, THURSDAY, JULY 25, 190L .
that startled mel"
May In Detroit Journal.
J. G. Fish returned from Portland
Saturday, where he took Mrs. Fish
for medical aid. She had been oper
ated on and was doing finely when
Mr. Fish started homo.
Mart Sherrard, of Port Orford,
was at the county seat on Saturday.
W. M. Hamilton, of FIshtrap, vis
ited our town Saturday.
Corey Stillwoll, of Bandon, was
on our streets on Monday.
J. W. Brlggs has finished flooring
and railing the Henry street bridge.
It looks well, and peoplo appreciate
it.
Mrs. William Gauntlett, of Seattle, '
Wash., passed through town Wed-
nesday en route to her old homo In I
Curry county.
saamuoi nouen, of FIshtrap, has
bought the Harry Baldwin place at
Bandon for $2,300. It is ono of the
finest residences in Bandon.
H. J. Radabaugh, from Norway,
was able to visit our town on Satur
day, after a long siege of sickness.
I. A. Otto, of Bancroft, had busi
ness In town Saturday.
Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Farmer were
shopping hero last Monday. They
aro living at Cody's camp.
Dr. Wotmore made a professional
visit to Myrtle Point Tuesday.
.u. uoyrio ana family, fiom Port-
land, -are htro visiting his mother.
Thomas Ashton, of Parkersburg,
visited town on Friday.
Will Oddy, tho real estate man, has
gone to Portland.
Mr) and Mrs. Fred. Moslor, of
Gravol Ford, were in town the othtr
day.
C
Price, from RIverton, rodo
tho Woodman's goat last Saturday
night.
John Perry starts for Idaho soon.
CITY & COUNTRY
PROPERTY,
TIMMRJBM
anA- t
COAL LAND.
"MfUHPIEU),
. TRAIN 111
Coroner's Jury Finds That
Jesse Thomas Met Acci
dental Death.
FUNERAL THIS AFTERNOON
Services Will lie Held nt Resilience
of David Cowan at Ono
O'clock Today.
The inquest over the body of
Jesse Thomas, who was killed at the
Eagle Point log boom on Tuesday
was held at the Johnson undertak
ing rooms yesterday forenoon. Tho
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jury consisted of Emerson Fcrroy,
J. D. Johnson, M. Poyntz, I. S. Kauf
man, Capt. Llghtner and Charles
Marsh.
The witnesses examined vcr4 Ed.
Dulley and Lester Summerlln, brake
men on " the train, Conductor Ily
Wright, Dr. McCormnc, Dr. Tnggart,
Thomas Coke, a scaler, and Mr. Ab
bot, train dispatcher.
Nothing more was learned of tho
accident than was recorded in yes
terday's Times. Mr. Coke stated
that Thomas had been put in charge
of the work at tho boom on Monday
last. He further said ho believed
that Thomas was engaged in trying
to get something out of his eye when
the logs started. Immediately be
fore the' accident, Thomas had said
to him that ho had something In his
eye, and though Coke could not see
Thomas when the logs started, ho
thought the deceased was engaged
as stated.
Tho evidence brought out tho fact
that the stakes on tho cars are put
before tho train Is pulled up to the
skidway, as the rails are somewhat
slanting at this point, and should
tho stakes bo loosened after the cars
.if rtATFiti
,a Sl VH- BWrO-.tIl M
HAIN
HAN
$2.75 Freight aodyoeliver
GootiS jr
bv wkit mx! weeks
m - amp -j - w
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W. R. HAINES
MUSIC COMPANY
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AND C STS.
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aro placed there, tho danger would
bo much creator than otherwise.
Coko saw tho logs starting and tried
to give warning. There were six
logs on tho car, only three of which
rolled off. When Thomas was taken
from tho water ho waa between tho
two logs which rollcn into tho water.
Dr. McCormnc gnvo evidence that
tho deceased was employed by both
tho Southern Pacific railroad com
pany and himself, each interested
party paying half his wages.
Tho jury returned a verdict of ac
cidental death.
Tho funeral will bo hold this af
ternoon at the resldenco of David
Cowan, in West Marshfleld, at ono
o'clock, and tho burial will tako
place in tho Odd Fellows' cemetery.
Attention, Ited Men! The mem
bers of tho order aro requested to
meet at tho Ited Men's Hall today at
12:30 o'clock, to attend tho funeral a
oi our uuccusuu uiuuiur, .icsso
Thomas.
By order of
HUGH McLAIN, Sachem.
si
Freight
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