The Madras pioneer. (Madras, Crook County, Or.) 1904-current, November 02, 1911, Image 7

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    ERNEST ROBINSON
r
THE
ACQUITTED OF MURDER
Central Dregon Mercantile Co.
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
Agents for
Brandegee
Kincaid's
Clothing
Red UrUg
Agents for
Royal
Worcester
Corsets
Company
Sister's Testimony Saves
Brother's Life
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:RelJab!c-'-Fancy Stationery
Mimes, Toilet Articles and
ltfell assorted line of
LOWNEVSCHOCLAiua
rMoore was found guilty
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imp and on November 1 opened
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!6IXTH'ET
,urind, Ore.
TRIAL CREATES INTEREST
Prosecutor Charges 18-Ycnr-01d Ruth
Robinson With Heine Party
to Murder
Ernest Robinson, on trial for
his life for the murder of Louis
McAllister, was acquitted last
Saturday morning after the jury
had been out about fifteen hours.
The jury accepted the testi
mony of 18-year-old Ruth Robin
son, who said from the chair
that the fatal shot had been fired
in self defense. This, despite a
vicious attack by District Attor
ney Wilson, in which he charged
that the girl had been a party to
the pre-determined murder.
The case went to the jury at
six o'clock Friday night. Early
the next morning four of the
jurors standing for conviction of
murder in the second degree
weakened and the jury finally
brought in a verdict at 9 o'clock
in the morning for acquittal.
Owing to the prominence of
the principals in the tragedy,
and the numerous friends on
both sides, the case has attracted
more than unusual interest
throughout the county.
The trouble which resulted in
the murder was started between
the two over the possession of a
gold mine in the Ochoco district
last May. Ruth stated that she
herself had fired at McAllister
with a 22-caliber rifle she was
carrying at the time, ane said
this shot was not accidental but
was fired through fear that Mc
Allister was about to open fire on
her brother. The phot struck
the ground at the feet of McAllister.
The girl testified that she and
her brother were coming down
the hillside when they saw Mc
Allister tampering with her
brother's ditch. She declared
that when accosted by Ernest,
McAllister hurled a shovel at
them, which struck Ernest. At
the same time McAllister at
tempted to reach for a weapon.
At this moment, she declared,
her brother fired. Still in the
ditch she saw the injured man
reach for his gun when her broth
er fired again, the bullet taking
instant effect. The report from
her own rifle was almost simul
taneous with that of her brother's
revolver.
Mr. Wilson centered his attack
on the girl. He said there was
no doubt but that the murder
was of the most cold-blooded na
ture possible. He said the cou
ple were going down the hillside
out of their way and there could
be no question but that when
they encountered McAllister they
hail determined to kill him. Wil
son 'pictured the girl to the jury
as determined on revenge for an
alleged wrong done to the Rob
inson dam.
It was shown during the testi
mony that McAllister had no
weapon, and in fact was not ac
customed to carry weapons of
any kind.
RAILROAD OFFICIAL
GOES TO LAND SHOW
Groat Display of Farm Products Cre
ating Interest In the East Mad
ras Wo 1 1 Represented
Fred W. Graham, western in
dustrial and immigration agent
of the Great Northern Railway,
who was in Madras a short time
ago left the first of the week
from Portland to attend the first
annual land show to be held at 1
Wear Brandegee Kincaid & Go., Clothes
CLOTHES. ,
ft
The "English"
Here is a style which New York, Boston and the
great Eastern cities have gone wild over. It combines
the practicablencss so characteristic of American st3'les,
with that smart London "air."
It's made up in many bright weaves, has shoulders
which snug up to your own, is slightly form-fitting at the
waist and has an elegant sweep of skirt. In fact, the
"English is a model after your own heart. A sure
winner. A real, corking style that will make decided
"hit" with you. Of course, if you prefer the looser ef
fects, we have dozens of them, tailored with precisely
the same care that the "English" is, but built on
broader lines.
I R"n DEC E t KINCAID A C O:
CLOTHES
The "Stroller"
You must not think from the name of this overcoat
that it is one of those affairs which have so much style
it can only be worn on special occasions or for just
strolling. It is a great coat to wear on a tramp or a
stroll, but it's equally appropriate for business. Its collar
turns up about the neck and ears. Its length gives;
ample protection to the limbs. The shoulders are mod
erately broad. The fabrics are of various colors and'
mixtures any or all of which are charming as. can be.
You'll not be happy without a Stroller once ypu. let., us
show it to you.
Other smart outergarments including the famous
Raglans are here in great number. Don't put off see
ing them until the season is too far advanced to warrant
a good choice.
$15.00 to $40.00
I
New York. The show will open
November 3 and closes Novem
ber 12.
The Great Northern has con
tracted for a display booth more
than 100 feet in length, in which
specimen products of Oregon and
other Northwestern states will
be exhibited. Agents of the road
have been busy gathering these
samples for the last three months
and have at last succeeded in
collecting a representative dis
play from the agricultural, hor
ticultural, dairying, stockraising
and gardening districts of the
state. Among the exhibits from
Madras will be many of the
exhibits which won prizes for
Tillman Reuter at the Dry-Farm
ing Congress held recently at
Colorado Springs. After the
close of the New York show the
collection of products will be
taken to Chicago and St. Paul
where similar exhibits will be
held.
-4B
LOWER FUEL PRICES
IN CENTRAL OREGON
$6.00 a ton to Bend. The present
rate to Madras is $6.25. These
rates, it is believed, will enable
dealers in Central Oregon cities
to sell coal at Portland prices.
Rates on cordwood and slab
wood from Portland, Bridal Veil
Falls, Cascade Locks and Hood
River will be $2.50 a cord to Opal
City and $2.80 a cord to Bend.
The coal rate from Centralia,
Wash., where much fuel is ob
tained, will be $4.25 to Madras
and $4.75 to Bend, corresponding
rates to intermediate points.
The lumber rate from Bend to
Eastern common points will be
the same as those from Portland
to the same points.
Cut In Freight Rate Will Enable
Dealers to Sell Coal at Port
land Prices
Fuel prices in Central Oregon
will be materially reduced as a
result of the wood and coal
tariffs just announced by the O.
W. R. & N. and Oregon Trunk
roads.
Effective November 1, the rate
on coal from Rock Srings, Wyo,,
the base of most local supply,
will be $5.50 a ton to Madras and
ASSASSIN'S VICTIM
BURIED AT ALBANY
Business Houses Close and Fife Bell
Tolls During Funeral of Shan
Iko's Doad Mayor
The funeral of J. C. Fowlie,
Mayor of Shaniko and cashier of
the Eastern Oregon Banking Co.,
who was shot by Del Howell last
week was held at Albany Octo
ber 27. Tho services were held
in the United Presbyterian
church and were conducted by
Rev. F. H. Geselbracht, pastor
of the First Presbyterian church,
and Rev. W. P. White, pastor of
the United Presbyterian church.
A largo number of friends and
acquaintances of the dead Mayor
attended the services.
Out of respect for the late J.
C. Fowlie the business houses
and public school at Shaniko
were closed and the fire bell tol
led at the hour the funeral took
place at Albany.
J. H. HANER, Pies. C. WONDERLEY, Vice Pre.. L. M. BECHTELL. Sec. 2
The J. H. Haner Abslradt . Co.
Incorporated
Prineville - Oregon
Capital slock $5000.00 Surplus $3000.00 fully paid up.
Abstracts of title to all real property in Crook county.
Carefully prepared photograph copies of all records and
city plats at low cost.
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A. E. CROSBY
EVERYTHING IN
DRUGS AND KODAKS
THE DALLES, OREGON
LL gf ttSSSSSSBSSSM
BssBiififlHFa
bbbbbKSIIbssHI
Exclusive Agent For
EASTMAN
Kodak Co.
Rochester, N. Y.
A full line of Pho
to supplies always
on hand. Printing
and developing
done. Mailorders
will receive our
prompt attention.
Write lor 'our new
1911 CATALOG
Try a bottle of Mur-
imu sumnoi Devel
oper. Will develop
any plute or paper.
A. E. CROSBY
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