The Madras pioneer. (Madras, Crook County, Or.) 1904-current, June 16, 1910, Image 6

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SCHOOL TO CREDIT INDUS
TRIAL WORK AT HOME
Instructor Advances Ideas For Instill
ing Interest Of Children In
Home Industries
l By R. Alderman of University ot Oregon
I That civilization is founded
? on the home, all will agree.
The achool should be a real
helper of the home. How can
the school help the home? How
can it help the home establish
habits in the children of sys
tematic performance of home
duties, so that they will be efli
cient and joj'ful home helpers?
One way is for the school to
take into account home indus
trial Work, and honor it. It is
, my conviction, based upon care
ful and continuous observation,
that the school can greatly in
crease the interest the child will
take in home industrial work
. by making it a subject of con
sideration at school. A teacher
talked of sewing, and the girls
sewed. She talked of ironing,
and they wanted to learn to
iron neatly. She talked of work
ing with tools, and both girls
and boys made bird-houses,
kites, and other things of inter
est. A school garden was plan
ned in a city, and one of the
boys was employed to plow the
land. Seventy-five children
were watching for him to come
with the team. At last he came
driving around the corner. He
could manage a team. Pie drove
into the lot, and a hundred and
iifty eyes looked with admira
tion at the boy who cotild un
hitch from the sled and hitch on
to the plow, and then as he
"man fashon" lines over one
shoulder and under one arm
drove the big team around the
lield, all could feel the children's
admiration for the boy who
could do something worth while.
I have seen a girl who could
make good bread or set a table
nicely, get the real admiration
of her schoolmates.
The school can help make
better home builders. It can
help by industrial work done
in the school, but as that is al
ready receiving consideration
by the press and in a few schools,
I shall not in this short article
treat of it.
The plan, I have in mind will
cost no money, will take but
little school time, and can be
put into operation in every part
of the state at once. It will
create a demand for expert in
struction later on. It is to give
school credit for industrial work
done at home. The mother and
father are to be recognized as
teachers, and the school teacher
put into the position of one who
cures about the habits and tastes
of the whole child. Then tiie
teacher and parents will have
much in common. Every home
has the equipment for industrial
work and has somebody who
uses it with more or less skill.
The school has made so many
demands on the home that the
parents have, in some cases,
felt that all the timeol the child
must be given to the school.
But an important thing that the
child needs along with school
work is established habits of
home making, and these habitu
gun come only from real home
making. What one does de
pends us much upon habit as
upon knowledge. The criticism
that is most often made upon
industrial work at school is that
it is so different from the work
done at home that it does not
j ut the child into that sympa
thetic relation with the home,
which after all is for him and
the home the most important
thing in the world. Juvenile
institutions find that they must
be cureful not to institutionalize
the child to the extent that he
may not be contented in a real
home. In my opinion it will
be a great thing for the child to
want to help his parents do the
task that needs to be done and
to want to doit in the best pos
sible way. The reason that so
many country bays are now the
leading menof affairs is because
early in life they had the re
sponsibility of home thrust up
on them. I am sure that the
motto "Everybody Helps," is
a good one.
But one says, "how can it be
brought about? How can the
school give credit for industrial
work done at home?" This may
be accomplished by printed slips
asking the home to take account
of the work that the child does
at home under the instruction
of the home, and explaining
that credit will be given this
work on the school record.
These slips must be prepared
for children according to age so
that the child will not be asked
to do too much, for it must be
clearly recognized that children
must have time for real play.
The required tasks must not be
too arduous, yet they must be
real tasks. They must not be
tasks that will put extra work
on parents except in the matter
of instruction and observation.
They may well call for the care
of animals, and should include
garden work for both boys and
girls. Credit in school for home
industrial work (with the parents
consent) should count as much
as any one study in school.
To add interest to the work,
exhibitions should be given at
stated times so mat all may
learn from each other and the
best be the model for all. The
School Fairs in Yamhill, Polk,
Benton, LaMe, Wasco and Crook
Counties, together with the
school and home industrial work
done at Eugene, have convinced
me most thoroughly that these
plans are practicable, and that
school wont and home work,
school piny and home play, and
love for parents and respect for
teacher and fellow-pupils can
best be fostered by a more coin
plete cooperation between
school and home, so that the
whole child is taken into ac
count at all times.
CROOKED RIVER
VERY NEAR DRY
Worm Wonthor In Enrly Sprlnn Tnkos
Snow Out Of MountainsMill
And Ranchers Suffer
Crooked ltiver is making a
great lot of trouble about Pr'nm
ville. The river is practically
dry there and the Homing mill
of D. F. Stewart which operates
by power from the river is clos
ed down on account of the wa
ter Bhortuge. The Hour mill
company has filed an injunction
in the circuit court asking that
ranchers living above Prineville
all along the river be restrained
from diverting the water for ir
rigation purposes on thegroiinds
that the mill company made
prior filings for water. It seems
that if the condition of low wa
ter continues that either one o
t wn fnliiniilies must occur. T
ranchers must loose their crop
for want of water or the Hon
mill go to a big expense to pu
in steam power or quit grinuin
The Review savs: Not on
this, but along the lower rive
the ranchers are reduced to
state of desperation by the ce
tainty of losing their seconc'
crops of alfalfa entirely and one
quarter or more of iheir first
crops. Not a drop of water is
running in the big ditch across
the river, nor is any available;
and when it is understood thai
the ditch is 14 mile3 long and
serves from lf to 20 big hay
ranches and is usually running
bank full in the June growing
season, it can be readily seen
that conditions are indeed des
perate. From this city to
Oneil, 13 1-2 miles distant, not
one farm is receiving water
from this souice, and it esti
mated conservatively that the
loss on the river bottom will be
close to $50,000 this summer.
Every farm down the river, with
the exception of the Tom
3harpe place, will be a loser
from the diouth to a greater or
less extent.
In addition to this, it is feared
that destruction of the second
crop of alfalfa will necessitate
reseediug of vast areas of des
troyed acreage and consequent
ly little or no crop next ear.
All this because Crooked River
has failed at a critical time.
i.i nmiver noints come re
ports of a similar shortage in
snmilvnnd a menace
to the total hay crop. Condi
tions there, however, are not as
desnoiato as here, owing to the
soil being of nlinor texture ami
capable of retaining a little
moi8ture for a much longer po
riodthan is possible with a
great quantity of water in the
(,oarsesoil along the river here.
But even up tlu're, cIosh to the
mountains, there is anxiety to
no inconsideiable degree as to
the hay crop's prospects for the
season.
ITEMS OF INTEREST
i0ST About 5 nvu mill's from MiulniH
on ARtiicy lMaiiiH, Tlmrstlny, June 2,
rout i-ontniiiliiB 1M' vul"il
owner only. Hnltublo reward kIvwi
f..r leaving at Pioneer ollleo. JIO-lH P
"rUH Model Hakery A Cnfo will here
after ho known as FUSS'S DKI.ICAT
KSSKN' HAKHUY, having dimwitm
ued serving warm meals and dovoiinj:
attention to all kinds of lmkery pro
ducts, serving cold lnnclies, ice crmun
and buttermilk. All kinds of cold
roast meats will also be kepi on cale.
THKUSIIINO Ol'TFIT For Siile.-Kim-sell
macbino complete; 10 li. p. en
nine; :!-' inch cylinder, 51 in. separa
tor, cook liouee and derrick, '2 pair
trucks. For particulars call at no-
m- ' mm
mm
t
LIVERY, &sale STA
MADRAS, ORKGON
HOOD & STANTfi
Your Orders Prompt Atte
f Transient Stock Given Best Of
FesrJAridCi
T. S. Hamilton, Pres. M. II. Kiik.sth, Vleo-Prei. .I.P.I'om
EASTERN
OREGON
Banking Ci
FOREIGN EXCHANGE DOUCIIT AND SOLD
DRAFTS ON ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD
Dopolt, $280,000 SHANIKO, OREfJ
tJ
neer 'IVIeiihone it Telegraph Co.
FOR SALE Ouo hlx-liolo Superior
hteel miiKu, nearly new, with hoi
water iitlHcluneiitH. Iniiiiro of I..
1 Itice, C. 0. Merc Co., Mudru.
LOST Ntur MnilruH, a yellow Shep
herd iloir, with white stripe In lace.
Partly clipped, white ring around
neck. Return IoTIioiuhh W. Kilmer.
Union Sunday school services will be
held every Sunday at 10 a. m at the
Opal Prairie chinch. Preaching nt 11 a.
in. and 7 p. in. Everybody cordially
invited to attend
Lost One (iray borne, branded "J"
on right hip, about 700 lbn. Keturii
to Madras and receive reward 01 5.
H. ThompHou.
Lost Hucknkin borne; weight, 1100;
branded italic F on right hhoulder;
cut on right foot by barb wire. $10
reward. See A. U. Sanfonl, MudraH.
FARMLOANS!! Madras Stale Bant
For Hfnt Good paBture, II vo miles
Houth of Madras, Inquire at IhiHolllce
WANTED-l'ndght teams wanted In
haul lumber liy thousand from near
(irlzzly. Porler Hrolhern.
MONEY TO LOAN on upproved farm
property. Inquire of Howurd W.
Turner, Madras, Oregon.
I
THINK OF IT! AND THINK HARD! Why do you not invest from $100 to f 150 where the Hill and llarriman
railroads invest millions and millions of dollars? They expect to make returriB on their investment, and tiiey never
have failed. SOUNDS GOOD, DOESN'T IT? Why not take a chance and buy a lot in the
BOYCE AND RAILROAD ADDITIONS
TO MADRAS
The First Terminus of the
and Harriman Lines
Hill
The HusIestTown In Deschutes
Valley, Central Oregon
I
An Opportunity for You to Build a Fortune
750,000 acres of wheat land are tributary to Madras and products will lie shipped from this
city. Cabbages, onionB, melons, corn, root crops, and many other vegetables, also fruits, uro
specialties in this locality. There were stores enough for the old town of Madras, but not
enough for the new City of Madras -None near the railroad. There were holela enough
heretofore for the people, but they are overcrowded today.-None near the railroad There
were enough rooming houses, but every one is crowded now, and the demand is 'growinn
greater dailv.-None near the railroad. Where 2000 laborers will bo kept busy for the
next 12 mnntliR. 1 """j uiu
next 12 months.
RAILROAD AND BOYCE ADDITIONS TO MADRAS
cated. You muBt make money by buying lota
an alley. The prices are from $100 to IG0
, imlanco easy payments. Don't wait until the
is the place where the It. U. Yards will be located
nere. you can't lail. J.ols are 00x100 to an
accoruing to locauon. Terms one-third cash
oest selections are gone. (Jomo tomorrow. Ho the first.
We are the exclusive selling agents for the Rail
road and Boyce Additions to
MADRAS
FOREIdN
DEPARTMENT
Union Bank & Trust Go,
235 Stark St. Portland, Oregon
UNION BANK & TRUST CO
2!I5 Stark St., Portland, Oregon,
Gentlemeri: Kindly mail mo plat and litera
ture of Kailroad and iloyco Additions to Madras.
Namo
Address
1 I I I
Watet&
FEED STATIOH
Water 80 cts. per 1000 gallons
ROLLED FEED FOR SALE
All kinds ot grinding dona for ctuli or toll
Toed Steam o' Dry Rolled
KMEliV WOIIK DONK
FRED H. GREEN
FARMS,
i
AND PERSONAL ftd
HANDLED BY
D. W.
BARK
MA OKAS, OROOW
to Mfclru.
iiist cuiTH
m w i- j Jtr j. JTi. A A a .
m m w w -w w w v w w w r -mr wwwwvwwa
FARM L 0 A A
EIGHT PKU CENT PER ANNUM
NO DELAYS
TWO I'Ell CUNT COMMISSION
m . m u . . m ..1111
See Sanford & McKlnnoy, Madras, Oregon
MARK
MADRAS MEAT
Campbell, Stroud & Co., Props,
Uf nrrN 1 J O rthr 1 I I lOSl V.
We have the best line of Fresh Aleats In the countfj
ALL KINDS OF GARDEN VEGETABLES IN THEIR t
m - . ..
r
I Automobile Stage Ii
A I I MPA QTI inPRAlF.R AUTOS
C l- ; i nit s s-. I a rve
t3iicuuiu, via iTictui cij -
DAILY TRIPS EACH WAV
FOR KATES APPLY AT STAGE OFFICE
Cornet! Staae & Stable t
a cj -
Blaisdoii Glory Ul
RFHIQTCDCn QUWV .QTAIi Ofl
Will make the season 1910 at Haycreek, Oregon.
ments for breeding can be made by applying to the
BALDWIN SHEEP & LAND
IIAYOREEK, OREGON