The Madras pioneer. (Madras, Crook County, Or.) 1904-current, May 28, 1908, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    The Madras Pioneer
MADRAS, CROOK COUNTY, OREGON. THURSDAY. MAY 28, 1908,
-i HI
NO. 41
y, 6, Hamilton
CaplUl Stock, $50,000
Deposit, 5230,000
I'KOI' ItlKTOR
DALLES.
DERTAKINC
SUPPLIES
Minifs Ron
I
W u K M a a H H B
MUH As; nDCorM
In. . -
HTORE &
Spring
nil IW .M MH N- MB..-. IMr(IM .
"4.
MOW UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
i l M L.n M r
. i ii.niTnirTiiii rnnnvaicu. nu nciicr mn n in i ,n.
iXeaon for the money, Your wants will be courteously
jttcnJed to. Headquarters for traveling men.
First-class Livery in Connection
j. W. UVUNQSTON, Proprietor
MADRAS, OKtiUON
miiniiH
Pres. F. T. llvMAvnr,'lc(i-Vn J. C.Fowmi:, CJshr,
EASTERN OREGON BANKING COMPANY
FOREIGN EXCHAHCE BOUGHT AND SOLD
DRAFTS ON ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD
t
SHANIKO, OREGON
t
A, E. CROSBY
n ' i m m w . w
Curltf romp no Mnc of liriiK. Medicine, Chomlcnlt, Household Kcmclc,
.mi am t f!.iiiBfi. in i uruA Nun iHiivirv tMmrmrtiimn. 1 mir nrrKf-riiuifiii
It.l'.ilm.i, Wiul.Vt Until 'Plinilix U III1I.KMAI.K A N II 1117111..
OREGON
LUMBER FOR SALE
We have plenty of lumber for sale at our
mill, located about 3 miles oapt of Grizzly'
post office on county road. Prices right
McMeekin & Eastwood
HARNESS
fully guaranteed
Whips, Urldlcs, Halters, Lace Lcntlicr
Neat Harness Repairing
NEW LINt; OF DRESS & WORK
SHOES
B. S. LARK IN
MADRAS, ORECON
J. C. &" M. A. ROBINSON
SUCCESSORS TO j. W. & M. A. ROBINSON & CO.
' GENERAL MERCHANTS
MADRAS, - - OREGON
and Summer
Agents for
Headers & binders
SUB-SURFACE PACKERS
HEAT TAKEN Nit AMOUNTS
t'KOPESSIONAL CARDS,
pnANK OSBORH
U. S. COMMISSIONER
Npnr Gropa ilotcj
MADKAfl
QI1KU0N
0, q. COLLVER
NOTARY PUBLIC
Jtt8tioo of tbo Ponco
CULVKR I'KKOJNOT
CULVER
OREQON
w.
ir. BNOOK
PHYSICIAN & SURGEON
Olllcc iii Prutf Store.
MApitAU
OKKOON
J H. HANER
ABSTRACTER OF TITLES
N OTA BY I'UUMC
Flro iiwiirnnrc, r.lo Iniurnncc, Htircty JloniU
ltenl l:tto, Cpiiroyanclng
WUNKVIM.K, OBEOON
fftty LUEDDEMANH
NOTARY PUBLIC
I'loncor Iliilldlng
MADRAS
OREGON
NO. 3851
The First National Bank
OF PRINEVILLE. OREGON
II. F. ALPSH, I'ronltlcnt. .
T. M. Baldwin, Caihler.
Will WuKiymicn Vice I'roi.
II, Bi.pin, Aut. Ctuliler.
T
ESTABLISHED 1008
OaIUI, Burjiliu nl ITtxlI vldcd
$100,000.00
Troll U
ELK DRUG STOR
Carries a good ftne of fresh
drugs and patents. Pre
scription work and family
recipes made a specialty
T. A. LONG
Physician and Druggist
MADRAS, ORECON
BAY PERCHERON STALLION
Will mnUc tho ki'iisoii until .Inly
'JO, us liillow.s: Minims, Moniluy,
TliuisdnvH anil Satiinliiys: Vi-nzlo
it Ilrovns. TncoilnyH mid cunes
iliiyrt. At iioniu rniicli Krldny.
TKHMS: S5 sImkIu survlce; S10
hinison; $16 to liisitro.
I
PETER AlARNACH, Owner
Are Selling
RAPIDLY
AND TRADE
Prince Corbet
Goods
WHAT ABOUT SAL
MON PROTECTION?
Tliat the food finli of our Htato need
better protection than la now afforded
ia agreed.
You Jiavo already or doubtless will re
ceive considerable litcraturo on the sub
ject, but no matter how attractive the
argument, stop and consider how much
it may bo colored by selMntercst.
The United Stales Bur:iu of Fisheries
are the greatest expert authorities on
tho subject and have no nxc to grind.
Head what they say:
Department of.Coramcrce and Lalior
Office of tbo Bocretary. Washington, D. 0.
Hon. Charles W. Fulton,
U. H, Senate, Washipgton. P. 0.
Sir: The pepartment realizes the
iifijiprtanco pf tho various questions af
fecting tho salmon fishery in the Colum
bia river brought up in your letter of the
18th ultimo, and has tajten this oppor?
tunity to make a thorough investigation
of the matter. There can bo no ques
tipn that thp status pf the fishery is tin.
satisfactory, apd that pnder existing
conditions tho trend may be expected
to be steadily downward, with the re
sult that in a comparatively few years
the run of salmon wijl bo reduced to
such a degree that thousands of fisher
men may be thrown out of employment
and much capital rendered idle. The
federal government la wjthout any jur
isdiction whatever in tho premises, and
the duty of conserving the salmon sup
ply in the Columbia devplves on the
states of Oregon, "Washington and Ida
ho: but this department has been
charged by Congress wjth the imjior
tant fish-cultural operations in the Co
lumbia basin, and has fe)t impelled from
tijno to timo to direct attention to the
necessity for giving adequate protection
to the various species of salmon fre
quenting that Btreain. The department
is convinced that the run of salmon in
the Columbia cap be amply maintained
for an indefinite period jf artificial prop:
ligation is supplemented by rational pro
tection ; but artificial propagation alone
cannot cope with the situation, and, aa
a matter of fact, tho recent experience
of the Department Ima shown that its
beneficent labors are rondored almost
futile by the failure of the states to ap
preciate this fact.
The department sees no reaeon for tho
elimination of fish wheels from the river
as there is no evidence to show that this
form of apparatus is particularly de
structive to salmon. A condition that
is specially favorable for the passage of
salmon namely, very high water ren
ders tho wheels unserviceable and, on
the other hand, periods of very low wa
ter, when tho fish are much restricted
in theii movements, are also unfavora
ble for the wheels. During the nast two
or three fceasons the catch of salmon bv
wheels has been comparatively small;
but even if it wore very large it would
bo a fact of no special significance, in the
present connection.
vno ioiuiiiuiii river in, iiowcver, mane
to yield a quantity of salmon far creator
than regard for the future supply per
mits, and tho drain is yearly becoming
more perious. Xo one familiar with tho
situation can fail to appreciate tho men
ace to the perpetuity of the industry that
is furnished by the concentration of a tre
mendous amount of fixed and floating ap
paratus ot capture in or near tlie mouth
of the river. This apparatus comprises
about 400 pound nets or traps, over 80
.a. .
til!
long-sweep seines, ami moro
in raw
gill nets, tho last having an aggregate
approximate length of over 570 miles;
and these appliances capturo moro than
Do per cent of tho fish taken in tho Oro-
gon and Washington waters of tho river,
tho figures for 1004 being nearly 34,000,
000 pounds, or 08.7 per cent of the total
yield. Under such conditions, it is self
evident that but comparatively few llsh
aro permitted to reach tho upper waters
whc.ro the spawning grounds aro located,
Tho details of the measures necessary
to placo tho salmon industry of tho Co
lumbia river on a permanent basis can
not bo elaborated ly tho department at
this time, but in general it may bo said
that there should bo (1) a restriction on
tho amount of apparatus employed in a
given section; (!2i an adequate weekly
closo season covering-possibly two days
at first, but reduced later if circum
stances warrant it; (8) an annual closo
season, proferably at tho beginning of
tlio salmon run, and (4) joint arrango
inent between tho States, so that pro
tective measures may bu harmonious.
Respectfully yours,
(Signed) OSOAH S. STRAUS
Secrotary,
1)111 No. 318 embodies Government
recommendations and should pass. It
Is a square doflt for all.
VOTE 818XYES
Bill No. 833 Was framed, to foster tho
solflah Interests of a siuglo locality, It
is against tho Government recommen
dations, and will mean a heavy tax on
thp Stalo to carry out its provisions.
It favors monopoly and is unfair. It
should not pass.
VOTE
RAILROAD MAY BUILD
DURING THIS YEAR
Outlook Is Now More En
couraging HARftlMAN IS RAISING
FUNDS FOR EXTENSION
$50,000,000 For Completion Of Ex
tensions Ralso Tho Hopes Of
Central Oregon.
There js a well-grounded belief that
the present year will witness the com
mencemept of actual construction on a
railroad into Central Oregon. The ex
pression well-grounded'' iB psed advis
edly, for there are unquestionably the
most convincing reasons for believing
that tho transportation problem of Cen
tral Oregon is at last to be solved by the
advent of a Iiarriman line, and possibly
by the construction of one of the elec
tric lines projected .to tap this territory.
The present activity in Iiarriman rail
road circles, however, is the most hope
ful sign, for it appears to mean that the
railroad King iB at last being ,forced to
furnish transportation to tjiia section,
by the threatened encroachments of his
competitors. Tho announced plan of the
Gould interests to extend tlieir "Western
Pacific across Central Oregon and find a
way into Portland ; the threatened inva
sion of tliis territory by the Hill inter
ests through the constructiop of a line
dowp the Descfiutes, or through the as
similation of one of the projected inde
pendent lines into this section, which
coujd easily be made a feeder for
the fill North bank; rpad by bridging
the Columbia at ono of several easy
crqssings; the activity of the Mt. Hood
electric road, these are .he obstacles
tq any further delay in the Iiarriman
plan's.
The threatened invasion of his terri
tory is doubtless the-eason for immedi
ate haste in the maturing of the Iiarri
man plans, but there is no doubt that
Iiarriman has long intended to build the
Central Oregon lipe, It is a generally
accepted fact that construction work
would have been Btarted last Fall J)Ut
for tho condition of the money market.
Following the visit of tho Kruttschnidt
party, and later of , Iiarriman himself,
work was being pushed on the survey of
the Corvallis & Eastern extension, and
that line would have been under con
struction now but for tho unexpected
and far-reaching financial panic.
Whether that work is to be resumed, of
whether some other of tho Iiarriman
surveys will be followed, no definite in
formation is available, but ono thing
may oe put uown among ttio reasonably
cortain things, and that is that during
the present year tho Iiarriman exten
sion into tcntnu Oregon will ne an
nounced and construction will follow
immediately. Tho Iiarriman interests
must be taken into consideration when
over the railroad situation is reviowed,
and tho belief is growing that n Iiarri
man line will be tho first built into
this section.
Of interest in this connection is the
fact that tho Union Pacific, at Mr. Hnr-
rhnan'a request, recently authorized the
issuance of a hundred million dollars in
bonds, half of which was to be expressly
used in tho completion of proposed ex
tensions. Regarding the expenditure to
bo mado in Central Oregon out of that
sum, a Portland paper df recont date
says :
Tho Oregon Eastern, which is to bo
built under tho jurisdiction of the Ore
gon Short Lino, with subsidiary lines to
Lakoviow and Klamath Falls, and
points irt northern California, will also
bo among tho first construction projects
started. There aro unmistakable signs
that this action has been determined
upon. Tho Oregon Eastern will cost in
tho neighborhood of $10,000,000, and a
branch to Klamath Falls will cost
$2,000,000 more? There is also a lino
surveyed north from this lino to Madras
that will cost a similar sum. While tho
completion of Mho Oregon Eastorn will
givo direct access from Portland to tho
Lako and Harnoy county rogions, it will
also opou up tho whole of Central Ore
gon's richest trade field to tho com
merce of San Francisco.
DRY FARM BILL IS"
KILLED BY THE HOUSE
A Washington dispatch says that tho
bill to lncreu8u dry laud homesteads to
820 acreB, known as tho dry farm billj
wftB killed in the House after a Bpirlted
fight botweon tho advocates and oppo1
nentsof thpbil). T)i(o cajise of thp dp;
feat of the meiiBiip jyaa flip pop-rcsj;
denco provision, tho insertion pi wjijcij
in tho bill had been insisted upop
Senator" Smoot, and which arouHed op";
position on tho ground that it was in
tho interest of the large cattlemen of
the West.
Tho dry farm bill had pasecd the Sen
ate and been amended by the House so
as to meet the requirements of the pub
lic land committee, and it was upon
consideration of the conference report
on tho bill that the measure met defeat.
The principal objection was the inser
tion of Senator Smoot's amendment al
lowing persopa to, purchase the enlarged
homesteads without residing upon them.
Senator Bmoot insisted upon this featj
ure, and tho House would not stand fop
it. An effort was made to send the bilj
back to conference, but thq efforts werf,
futilp, the report and bill being final
defeated by a vote of 103 to 138.
NEW ROADS ESTABLISHED -
The following items taken from thjj
report of the proceedings qf the County
Court will be of interest to tho residents
of this section:
Thd viewers' report pn Fred Dayjs
road was approved, Road declare q
public highway and ordered opened.
Clerk ordered to nptify road superyisop
thereof and also of an agreement pf I. D.
Iirown to build fencp.
The viewers' report on the Frank GaU
loway road was approyed. Road do
clared a public highway and ordered
opened. CJerk directed to notify rpad
supervisor thereof.
Viewers' report on M. Brown ant
proved. Road declared a public highr
way and ordered opened.
in tne matter flf a county rqad hy B,
. Gillet and ptljers. Petition approyejj,
Viewers and suryeyors ordered to meet
at beginning of road, view out and rer
port on same.
The viewers' report on the McTaggarl
road was approved. The damages
claimed was not allowed. Road declared
a public highway and cVdered opeped,
Clerk ordered to potify road supervisor
thereof.
County roads aro known by tho namo
of the first signer on the petition. Thp
Fred Dayis road isjhe new road south
of Madras as changed between thisplaca
and the Halm ranch. Tho Frank Gaf
loway road is over in the Round Rutto
district. The M. Braun road is a short
road leading off to the West from thp
top of Agency Plains grade, and-giving
an outlet to settlers in that locality,
The McTaggart road is the new road
leading up Willow Creek and opening up
a now route between this p)ace and La-
monta. Tho Gillett road is tho pro
posed change in ttie Prineville road pel
ginning about bix miles south of tins
place. "
NELLIE BROCAN DEAD
Died, at her homo near Antelope, on
Friday, May 22, 190S, Nellie, tho daugb.
terof Mr. and Mrs, Thomas Broca'n.
ed IS years. Deceased had been in bad .
health for moro titan a year past, and
although cvervthjnc which love and so-
Ikituiiu could prompt was dona for her,
Death claimed her Friday eveing. Tho
body was taken to Tho Dalles, whoro
interment was hail in tho Catholic cem
etery last Sunday afternoon. Deceased
was a sister of Mrs. J. C. Robinson of
this place, who left for Antelope Satur
day upon receipt of tho sad news.
Mr. Mind Mrg. Brogan and all tho
members of their family have tlit deep
sympathy of their friends in this, tlieir
third t bereavement in tho past year.
Two other daughters have been claimed
by death in tho past 12 months, and
their burden of sorrow is a heavy ono. -
' LOCATION OF FIRST WELL
The Madras Oil &. Gas Company has
definitely decided to sink its first well
on the old Joo Taylor place near La
monta, now owned by Oscar Cox, and
tho machinery for drilling has been
hauled there and is being sot up. The
land upon which tho first well will bo
drilled is located upon tho West side of
Grizzly mountain, and tho decision to
drill thero was mado after a careful in
spection of all tho ground leased by tho
company was mado by Mr. Ross, the.
expert. The indications of oil ate sail!
to bo very favorable at that point, mtin-
orous "seepages" of oil having .been ob
served there for years past.
RICHARDSON-LEE
Manied, at the residence of the bride's
parents, on Sunday, May 24, 1908, Miss
Alma B. Lee and Mr. Samuel Vance
Richardson, ReV. 1, D, Brown officiating.
About 50 invited guests' were present to
witness the solemnization of the happy
evertti and an elaborate dinner was served
after the wedding ceremony. The bride
Is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jamei
Lee, while the groom is a young ranclief
owning a homestead near Madras, wherd
lie and his bride will rcsidn.