The Madras pioneer. (Madras, Crook County, Or.) 1904-current, January 04, 1906, Image 1

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Mad
Pioneer
MADRAS, CROOK COUNTY. O R EGO M i. f .Bl&3.B A Y JAN. 4) 1$0B.
NO. 20
JT AS
i
SSIONAL CARDS.
m. PEASE
L uAnRAS JEWELER
fHt nin-. . nEPAIRINC
f""' OREGON
Idras . .
DENTIST
. .....vtri'oWcpr(cM,
..iKEViUAonisflOM
NOTARY PUBLIC
Idras
OREGON
HOTABY PUBLIC AND
(.5. COMMISSIONER
OKKCION
. COILVER
NOTARY
PUBLIC
Jiwirt or t" I'tA('K
U'LVKIt I'KWINCT
K.VER
OREGON
1B0OK
HYSICIAH AND
OfltelnDnigHiore
bus
Oil BOON
UIOKG
HYSICIAH & SURGEON
W'rtCitr JUdru Mct Market
Oiitttouriii. v. to 3 r. .
OREOOM
f.l'jiJ.l'rtildtut,
T. M. lULIiWIX, CMlilvr.
itfnmiiu Vice I'rm.
II. iiutmlX, ,-4l. faultier.
NO, 3651.
Fist National Bank
I OF PRINEVILLE, OREGON
ESTABLISHED 1000
Eot!ni iid I'nitlvlilcd
$30,000.00
1'rontc
lliliOW CftEEK
AWMILL
C&UPTON & M'MEEKIN, Props.
lt mwmlll Ih l
applied with nil kinds of rough
'UMBER
I lUtnber Oil hniul
l - .... u w u i I t
wonw lor olttiiliiic.
Oregon
klM.i ... , . . .
K ",p cwhirh-il up to
SCRIP FOR SALE
FcnrlBf mi .. .i, . . .
iik, . . " 01 iKivornmtmt
L '"wnce or lmiirm-.,i1imit
,amt t..t. 1 '
i-iirei. write uit for full nar
F80N LAND CO.
W8Aiua, onuuok.
SONTHFRN
RAILWAY CO.
TABLENO. 10.
Active Juir a, lwvl.
"NTTFtir
injmiil
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llru
linlly
lll.Wj.tn'.
' in,
Old !,.,,
L.W(i.i.
I&.Mmii.
Wi m,'
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Wmii.I
Aril
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Oregon.
Or,,
MADRAS TO HAVE ROAD
Construction to Bbgln in
the Spring.
TRANSPORTATION PROB
LEM MAY BE SOLVED
Strong Probability that Madras WIN
bo Readied by Railroad Inside
of a Year,
W. F. Nelao.n, of Seattle, vice
president of iJie Great. Southern
Railroad, arrived ill' Madras
yesterday and ia making an ex
amination of this country as to
its magnitude and producing
abilities. lie goes toPrinoville
this morning in a father exami
nation of (he county.
Like all railroad officials, Mr.
Nelson is very reticent in re
nrd to how far the Great
Southern will extend south of
Dufur. lie says, however, that
construction work will again
commence in the early spring
but that the extent of extension
will depend on whether the rail
road officials feel that they can
hold the traffic they secure by
this extension against compet
ing railroads which will eventu
ally build into this territory.
Though ho intimated strongly
that the Great Southern will ex
teud into the Agency Plains
country. His surveying party
will be in Madras within a week,
and from the conversation had
with Nelson yeatorday theloca
tton which the party is now niak
ing, will in all probability be the
place upon which ties and rails
will bo laid within a year. Mr,
Nelson says that inside of live
years there will probably be
three railroad Bystems travers
ing this Central Oregon country,
and any roud coming in now
will have to feel its footing
well in order to guard against
losing its commercial promi
nonce in the future.
Speaking of the grip the Har
rim an system has on this Cen
tral Oregon empire Mr. Nelson
8ay.s that so loig as the 0. It.
& N. has no opposition and can
make a long haul to Baker City
and Ontario from Portland of
freight destined to this inland
country there will bo no con
struction by the Ilarrimansys
tern into Central Oregon, and
the same applies as regards the
Union Pacllc on the south and
the Southern Pacific on the
west. This country must nave
a transcontinental lino compet
ing with the Harriman system.
Nowithstanding the uncom-
municativeness or isir. ixeison
concerning the probable extent
of extension of the Great South
ern, there can bo but little doftbt
but that this road will extend
to the south so that it will be
connected with some transcon
tinental system. This is the
only solution by which such a
roud can hope to uonimnnu a
luurjuive traffic and maintain its
commercial vitality.
Mr Nelson was delighted
with this inlaild country and is
of the opinion !t will eventually
become one of thr mostpopu-
oua portions of the state. . , ,
The public school again Commenced
work Tuesday morning aer a vaVnlinn
Vor the holidays. Four or five new pupils
V.: iij .,.. VM...t'.. '. Vr
were cmoucn. miss oiuiui,
ie mimarv. n verv'mucli improved from
tltevievcrc cold frojl yhlch site was silf-
ferwjj before the holidays.!
Mllud ofpnil1rWHlvltjlDV
M.paoqldltijr, door- and vrjedoyv
ftypa udVbVitalw Rt the Grlaely Lake
A GREAT TURKEY STATE
Jiastern Oregon is bound to
become the great turkey raising
section oi tno iNortlivvest, in the
opinion of G. A. Rhea, of this
city, wno na just returned from
a visit to Gilliam and Morrow
counties.
"Thoy herd turkeys on those
prairies just as they used to
herd sheep, in great droves," he
said today, "and the birds
thrive from the time they are
hatched until they are ready for
market at Thanksgiving.
"One farmer near Sissons, on
the Willow Creek Railroad, had
a band of 500 turkeys last fall,
and the herder , used to take
them on to the stubble fields in
the morning and drive them
back to the corral at night.
The turkeys fattened on the
scattered grain in the fields, and
as they did not eat tthe grass,
the owners of the fields did not
care how many turkeys were
herded in the field. Finally
Just before Thanksgiving the
big band of turkeys were driven
to Coyote station and placed on
board the cars for Portland.
The producer was paid CO cents
a head for the,, birds, and
thought he did wsll, while the
same turkeys cost the consum
ers here from $1.50 to $3 apiece.
"The climatp of Eastern Ore
gon is peculiarly adatped to
turkeys, being dry and clear for
the better part of the year. The
birds are allowed to roam over
a vast area in search of grain
and seefle, but the herder must
be on the lookout constantly
for poyotes, for the, animals
have discovered that turkey
meat is juicy and tender, and
they will often take chances on
being shot while in quest of a
bird for supper.
"That region used to be de
voted to sheep pasture, when
tiro land belonged to the Gov
ernment and range was free. It
is all cut up into ranches now,
and farming has taken the place
of woolgrowing. The turkey
does not interfere with the farm
ing as sheep would."
OREGON HAS MUCH TIMBER
Four blllioti feet of lubiber were cut
In Waablugton lu tho year 1005. Two
hundred million feut are still atuuding,
euough, ut the rute of lust year's cut-
tint;, tu aupply ml I la for 11 fly years.
This la the eHtlmute made on the year's
lumber buaitieBa hi this state by K. L.
McCormlck, secretary of the Weyer
haeuser Timber Company.
"uregou nas twice ns muou uinuur
htaudiug and is not cutting as favt-as
Washington." continued Mr. McCor-
imok. "lu the timber belt extending
from British Columbia to California
there Is today standing 1000 billion of
feet. There was more demand for
lumber lu this state than ever before.
"Our company sold more timber
lamia in Washington last year than it
bought. Extraordinary activity of
demand in Washington this year wiib
due lu I'irge muasure to the fact that
titles aro clearer hero and there is less
suspiolon'of any land frauds. Ex
posures at Portland huvo hurt sales In
Oregon and tho absence of any sioh
frauds has turned money into Washing."
The mock trial given by the literary
society was well attended last Saturday
evening. Court convened with Judge
Mason on the bench. Owing to too
many witnesses and many irrelevant quest
ion's asked by the attorneys, only the
plaintiffs witnesses-ill the breach of prom
ise suit were heard- i he case was con
tinued until nextf Saturday evening whei
it will be decided' by the jury. ,
, ; 4-' ,
PRIMARY LAW IN, FORCE
THE NEXT ELECTION
M. WfllNkeyson, a rancher near Sage
Druiti sjflTCk was in town yesteiday.
Ic?has"renfly arrived from Portland
and ground getting ncnuajnted. j 4 k,
Perry Reed' ' and1 family spent New
Years dny in this city.
Tho direct primary law,
whic.li will bo used throughout
the state for the iUst time next
year,, incorporates so many
qpmplications relative to pri
mary elections, petitions, filing
of certificates, etc, that both
lawyers and politicians find it
np easy task to straighten out
the variations in the language
of the statues. The law, how
ever, applies to Crook county
as well as to all others and its
proviflion8-f;mu8t be lived up to
next spring and summer if the
new county officers ,.step into
their respective offices with
'egal garb upon their shoulders.
Secretary of State Dunbar
and Attorney Qeneral Crawford
have spent considerable time
getting light through the maze
of complications in the provis
ions of the direct primary law,
and the following list flives all
the dates of interest to both the
canidate and voter:
Registration books opened
by county clerks, Tuesday, Jan
uary 2
Registration, books closed for
primary election, April 10,5 p.
m;
Registration books opened
after primary election April 25.
Registration books plosed for
general electitin, May 15, 5 p. m.
Numbers of signers required
to initiate laws of amendments,
7489.
Last day for filing initiative
petitions Februajry 5.
Last day for filing pamphlets
advocating measures, December
30, 1905. ,
Last day for filing pamphlets
oppossing measures, February
5.
County clerks give notice of
primary election not later than
March 21.
Last day for filing petitions
for placing names !on ballot for
state, congressional and district
offices, March 30.
Last day for filing petitions
for county offices, April 4.
Date of primary election,
April 20.
Canvassing votes of primary
election for state offices, Ma'
5.
Last'day for filing certificates
of nomination for state offices
by assembly of electors. April
10.
Last day for1 filing nominating
petitions for state offices, May
4.
Last day for filing certificates
of nomination for county officers
by assembly of electors, May 5.
Last day for filing nominat
ing petitions for county offices,
May 10.
General election, June 4.
I AF; W Miy Yoiir t
The Madras Gfce Club.
Sever! of the people of this vicinity in'
terestcd in singing met on last Sunday
afternoon for the purpose ot organizing a
singing club. A. D. Anderson, Mrs, A.
Eagles and Mrs. Snook were appointed ft
committee to draft constitution and by.
laws.
An adjourned meeting was held Wed
nesday evening when the constitution and
by-laws were adopted, organization com
pleted, and the following officers elected:
Pres., S. D. Percivalj Sec.-treas., Miss
Marie Galloway; conductor of music, A.
pf Andersom An initiation fee of 25c
will be collected, and a monthly due of
ipe niH be charged.
The next meeting will' be held on next
Tuesday evening, :oo p. mt at mc l ag:
r art & Dye's hall. It is earnestly re-
quested mat an singers nunc 11 puiui w
be present and join this glee club,
OUR NEW FALL GOODS fk HERE
Ladies' and Children's Hate, Caps and Bonnets
Buy a new Jacket. All gping at Hair, Price
Eyery man needs a new Fall Hat; bomlin and see.Oiiii
We can fit you out In any kind of a Suit, from a
Sunday Suit to a Mackinaw.
BUY A NEW PAIR Of kHCES
Before tlie wet -weatlier
Afk Don't Forget We Sell k
Nice, Clean Lin6 of Qir6ceries
LENA M. LAMB, Prb.
Palmohn Building " . I
MADRAS,, - OREGON
t
t
AT THL OLD STAND..,
Horseshoeing, Blacksmiiiig, Wagonmaking
F. J. BROOKS, Madras, Ore.
We SELb jric'al Implements; Machinery and Barbed Wire
r
, ....FOR SALE.i.,
GOWLES & OERHAM Sawkill
on IDes Clatites E53!vrer t0.r :
FIRST-CLASS LUMBER AT LOWEST,, PRICES
Rough lumber ilelived at Madras $13.50 Perm. ;
l- Ajldlmenslcn lurribor will be Fir if desired at same price.
SEND ALL ORDERS TO THE MILtl f
MADRAS, - OREGON I
4V
V it
M -
if
Shahikb, Warehouse
QENERA, BORAGE ,ANp FORWARDING
vi 'a
Lompany $
Special attention to Wool Grading and Baling for Eastern ship
ments. Dealers In Blacksmith Coal, Lime and Builders' Material
of all kinds. Sulphur, Wool and Grain Sacks and Twine, Grain,
Flour and Feed. Highest price paid for Hidea and Pelts. . Stock
Yards with all the latoBt and best facilities for handling Stock,
. ' Mark Goods Care of
SSSL W. Go' . . .
T. G. CONDON, Manager.
Mr
Cornet! Stage & Stable Co.
MADRAS,
TO
SHAfilKO ' ; "5
DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY
Speolal attention given to carrying Express Matttfr.
Fare $4.50; R9uhd trip,1 $8. '
, Agent at MAIIR AS HOTEL.
The Madras - Pioneer
$i.5o per Year
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