Oregon sentinel. (Jacksonville, Or.) 1858-1888, November 24, 1887, Image 1

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Published TlmrsdayB,
AT
JACKSONVILLE, OREGON.
ur
"WILL JACKSON & J. W. MERRITT.
TEHJIS:
OBe"eprrrirlH Adiance . . - - - g2.80
W&S&& IsJ&gA W&&
e?ggS: Sgggtga SgSegls:
fCz JL til
Advertising Hates:
Advertisements will be insetted la the
Sektcsel at the following rates:
Ten lines, one insertion J! SO
" " each smVcqucnt insertion.. 75
fe-Legal advertisements inserted reason
ably. locals, per line, first insertion, 13 cents;
each subseqnent insertion, 5 cents.
Job work Of nil kinds done on prompt no
tice and in woikman-like manner.
A Liberal DUcounl to Yearly Idvertlters
VOL. XXXII.
JACKSONVILLE, OEEGOff, THUBSDAY, NOVEMBEB 24, 1887.
NO. 48.
. -LJJ- III II I llllll1 ' -"""- J 'fir VI UN II Ill lUI'll J.Jifi.r.Tr-ir i " i"-EM
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Absolutely Purec
Official Directory.
STATE OF OREGON.
IT. 8. Senators, J. H. Mitchell, J. X. Dolph
ConBressinan, It. Hermann; Governor, 8.
rennover; Secretary of Bute, George W.
ilcBriHc; State Treasurer, Geo. ,ebb;
8tate Printer. F. C. Baker; Supt. Public In
truction, E. B. McElrov; Supreme Judges,
W. P. Lord, Cliief Justice W. W. Thajer,
R. S. Strshan.
FIloiT JUDICIAL DISTRICT.
Comprising Jackson, Josephine, Lake and
rHamath counties: Cirruit Judce, L. R.
Webster; District Attorney, AV. M. Colvig.
JACKWX COUSTT.
Senator, A. C. Stanley; Representatives,
J. T.Bon ditch, It. A. Miller; County Judge,
K. Del'eattt; Commissioners, lioni. Ilay
tnond, S. A. Carlton; Clerk, V. H. Parker;
Eheriir, B. W. Dean ; Tre-isurcr, N . I' (slier;
Asucssor, J. M Cliildcrs ; School Superinten
dent,. Wm. Priest; Surveyor, F. A. English;
I CJVrfmer, It. Fryce.
'J JOSFPIIINE COrSTT.
Senator, II. B. Miller: Rcprcentative, S.
U. Mitchell ; County Judge, N . Colvig ; tom
missioners, S. Messenger, J- M. Payne;
Clerk. C. K. Chanslor. Sheriff. T. G. Patter
son; Treasurer, J. W. Howard; Assessor,
J.B. Lewis; School Superintendent, k.
HathawayjSurveyor, W. N. Saunders; Cor
oner, Dr.'kremer.
KLAMATH COO.TY.
Joint Senator, U. M. Cartwiight of Wasco;
Representative, R. McLean of Klamath;
County Judge, G. W. Smith; Commis
sioners, J. L. Hanks, U. A. Eminitt; Clerk;
W. C. Hale; Sheriff, M D. Cliildcrs; Treas
urer, G. T. Baldwin ; Assessor. It. 11. Hatton ;
School Suiwrintendent, W. E. Greene; Sur
veyor, It. S. Moore.
LAKE COOTT
Senator, C. M. C.trtwright of Wasco Rep
resentative, R. McLean cf Kl-tniaih; County
Judgc. A. i"itts: Commissioners, Geo. If.
Jones, C. Loftus; Clerk, W. T. Boyd; fchrr
iir, A. J. Charlton; Treasur-r, A. MeCal
ltn; School Superintendent, A. U. FMier;
Assessor, O. L. Stanley.
mketim. or corsxs, etc.
The Supreme Conrt of Oregon meets at
Silem. regular term commencing on the
firt;Mondays in March and.Ociobcr.
Circuit Court for Jackso-i county meets
f s first Mond iv l'l pnl, September and
I) ember; for Josephine, the li""dt Monday
in March ami Augit; for Klamath, the
stolid Monday in June and first Monday
in November; for Lako.the third Monday in
?Jy ad the second Monday m October.
For Jackson County. Probate and Com
missioners' conrU meet every month, com
WiicingTiith the firt Munilay; for Jose
phine conutv, the first Monday ill January,
April, July and September; Tor LAecounly
cv.-ry alternate nniith, comnn-iiHiig the
hrst Monday in January. For Klamath
co jnty the (frt Wednesday iu March, Ju e,
liptember andNovtmber.
PROFESSIONAL.
WILLARD CRAWFORR.
ATTORNEY AND ' COUNSEIOR AT LAW.
.Mcdrortl. OtraJii.
Will practi-e ill all lhe cnurNof the Slate.
Oilier in Ham'in'sbritkblo.k, upstairs.
IC1SNT,
C0UKSI2L0U-AT-LAW
JaeVfonl!le. Or.
Will practice in all the Courts of thii State.
Onlce on California street, opposite J. Hu
tun' store.
JOHN FILLER,
Manufacturer and Dealer in
GTnStS. PISTOLS,
ArxaisTiTioiv, ctjx-
JL.J3K.Y.
3TISHI ISTG- TACKLE,
HARDWARE, PAINTS, OILS, VAR
NISH, GLASS, ETC.
Culifbxniii St.
Jacksonville,
- - Oregon.
-jj'
i
t
HSXTSG FAILED TO CLOSE OUT
my bubincss in Jacksonville, as I
wished" to do, I have concluded to continue
the same on a larger scale than ever. I
was in San Francisco recently, where I laid
in one cf the largest and bes't stock of all
kinds of Hardware. Ammunition, Cutlery,
Fire-arms, and Sporting Goods, ever
brought to this market. Thce goods will
be sold at the lowest possible price.
I will guarantee these goods to be just
w hat I represent them to be. I feel thank
ful to my old customers for their past pat
ronage "so liberally bestowed, and would
respectfully solicit a continuani-e cf the
Mime. JoiikMiliee.
iax mum,
AT THE
osiOitioe
IS SELLING GOODS
Store,
AT
'Fins powder never varies. A marvel of
purity, snengtli and wholcsomen;ss
More economical than the ordinary
kinds, and cannot he sold in competition
with tlio multitude of low test, short
weight, filura or phosphate powders.
Sola only vi on RoYAI. DaKIXO Pcw
dek Co., 10K Wall-st. :N.Y.
M
Win. HAI7LST.
Cattle branded A
on left hip and side.
Earmarks: Swal
low fork in left car;
(Ton and srlit in
Salriehtear.
A
M&
3 13.
ATTORNEY &
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Jacxsonviixk. - -
Onr.aoN.
Will practice in all tho Courts of Oregon.
Office On Oregon Street, in Onh's Block.
X I?. Ii5I"M,
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR-AT-LAW,
Jacksonvillo, Or.
Will practice in all the courts of the State.
Office iu Court House.
J. W. Ronssos, M. D. B. M. Gill, M. D.
DBS. ROBINSON A GILL,
Physicians and Surgeons,
Jacksonville, Oregon.
Office on (ViifomU Street, in Mrs. Ga
nnng'.s building. ,
Cff-Calls promptly iittcndul day or uight.
J. O. ALIiSJT, K. D.
MEDFORD OREGON.
2gr-niseacs of women and children a
SPECIALITY.
AVILH. JACjvSOTST,
JACKSONVILLE, OHEGON
Teeth extracted at all hours
Laughing gas administered, if
'desirisl. for which extra charge
will be made. Office on corner of Califor
nia and 5th streets.
BED BOCK PRICE.
When von want anything fn the MER
CANTILE line, don't forget that he ha
always on hand a
FIRST.CLASS STOCK
OF
BOOTS
SHOES
- - - HATS-- -
CArs
CLOTHING
LADIES DEESS
GOODS.
IKT PACT TI-IT3
Dry Goods department
-IS C02virTILaE-
I always have on hand, a fin stock of
seen A3
SUGAR,
TEA,
COFFEE,
SYJWP,
IIIOE,
TEA,
ETC.,
PRODUCE
TAKEN AT THE HIGHEST
CASH TRICE.
LUMBER!
I have a fine lot of Lumber and am
now ready to fill all orders for any
amount ucBired.
HANLEY& LOVE.
flATTLE AND HORSES IiRAXDED
J IILon lefi-Jup. Alo cat'le lrunded
II on left lr.p r id, alio cai'ie braiiitd
- nn left Mde cr hin. also linindcd with
a firure 2 on left side orhip. The car-marl:s
of the above brands are jJiort trup in le,t
ear, and ling crop in risht. Alo cstilc
branded with SP on left hin, and marked
crop in right car, hole and spul-out in left.
ROGUE RIVER DISTILLERY,
JOaZT A. HAULS"?, Fro.
CATON t GARRETT General Agents.
PURE UNADULTERATED
AKTICIX or
T. K. YOTJJs'G, 31. X.
Physician & Sui'geon,
CENTRAL TOINT, OR.
Calls promptly attended to at all hours.
:E3GTTS.:s':Kr, 3a."iTS3
A0
In tjuntities and at
Prices to Suit.
Satisfaction guaranteed.
JOHN A. IIANLEY.
Jacksonville Jan. 8th 1337.
NOTIONS cto.
SHAVING,
IIAIRDRF-SSING
ROOMS.
t BATH
CARI
rU'lTIXG AND BLEEDING
Kj fully performed.
C. B. ROSTEL.
Jackscmille Or., Dec 11. 1377.
O'JERLAND TO CALIFORNIA
VIA
Oregon & California Railroad.
And connections.
Ut.llEIHL .-VEIVS.
Bears are said to be making very free
with the orchards in the vicinity of Port
Townsend, W. T.
Grass is growing nicely oa the ranges
and stock of all kinds is. , doing well in
LTrnatilla county.
The fall rodero commenced last week,
the first station being at Lower Powd-r,
says a Baker city paper.
The grain crop of A. B. Coiiley,of Sand
Ridge, near the Cove, Union county,
amounts to 40,000 bushels.
Baker City Democrat : Many n e w con
tracts have been let for the erection of
dwelling houses in this city.
There is more mountain fever in this
valley at present than ever before known,
says the Wallowa Chieftain.
In Umatilla county prairie chickens,
grouse and pheasants never were so scarce
The cold rains of the spring killed the
j oung. .
A great deal of fall pawing is being
done, and there is a constant demand for
men to work onlhe farms, says the Wes
ton Leader.
Stockmen throughout 3aker county
are well supplied with food for the win
ter, and there is every probabiltiy that
stock will pull through the, winter safely.
Croeik connty now ha a good court
house and jail. I'rinevillo school district
has a commodious school house, but the
town of PrinevHlc has no council room or
fireman's halL , -
An excursion train wilf bo run from
San Francisco to Portland the 10th of
December. It will be thd first through
train over theCalifomiaand Oregon road.
Yreka Journal.
The county court lias fixed tho Baker
county tax levy at 20 mills. Last year
it was 22 mills. What tho state and
school will be is not yet known, but in
all probability it will be aVoat 9 mills.
Notwithstanding the fact that eighty
one new residences have been erected in
Astoria the past year, desirable houses
are scarce. This works a detriment to an
increase of population, says the Pioneer.
The late sirrm .eeni yietempentir'
pretty low o'TT.ifl Montana. Xn 'be Sun
river country and on the Yellowstone the
mercury touched 10 degrees Mow zero,
and at Butte it was 13 degrees below.
In Helena the lowest wasSdegrees above
zero.
SnxiTor. JlrrcnriA of Oregon, will try
to gt a bill through thus wintcrabs-olutely
prohibiting Chinose immigration. It will
hae to bs made f trong, braid and lush
to prevent the United States emirts from
putting Chinee through, round, or over
it Ex.
The oldest editor in Oregon or Wash
ington Territory is the editor of tjie Ell
ensburgh (W. T.) Localizer. He dates
back to September 12j 1830, a little more
than thirtv-seven years, when he took
charge of the Spectator, the only piper
in Oregon, in the summer of ISoO.
Lincoln County Times: From an ex
change we see that a colony of buxom
maidens from Minnesota contemplate im
migrating to parts of Washington territo
ry. A prominent bachelor of this place
desires us to state that they will be re
ceived in Davenport with opvn arms.
Walla Walla Journal: A private let
ter was received from Fort Klamath last
week, ftating that orders had been re
ceived from headquarters tor the aban
donment of that post on April 1, nett.
Dr. W.ilker, formerly of this post, hss
been ordered elsewhere, and his place,
will ba supplied by Dr. JInnn.
Wokk Finished. Col. Elliott' and C.
L. Richardson, governtnent 'and state
swamp land agents, who have been en
gased at The Dalls foreomo time in mak
ing up a report of the hnds examined by
them, have finished their task and gone
to Portland. Their report will make a
volume of several hundred pages. States-
1IISTORYOF TUB CRIME.
The IlmTmarkct niot..How II Came About
and How ft Ended.
Chicago, Nov. 11. A more striking
procession of civic events may never
again bo witnessed than the one having
its latest out come to-day.
The supposed absurdly theatrical dem
onstrations with red banners and black
that took place in Chicago not two win
ters ago, followed soon afterward by the
picturesque, yet ominous, Sunday gath
erings of tatterdemalions, foreigners and
demagogues on the broad common at the
lake front are now recalled as the quick
forerunners of secret cellar drillings by
hundreds of ignorant, fanatical riflemen
in the purlieus throughout the city.
3" THE MT. SHASTA ROUTE
u. s.
TEL,
L. X.. AVUITXEY M. D.,
KAGLE POINT, OR.
Having located at this place, I ask a share
of the patronage of this section. Call? at
tended to at any time.
DR. W. H. SOMMSRS,
Physician, Surgeon and Aceouchcr
JrkonIUc, Orrxoa.
rtONSULATION IN GERMAN AND
J English. Calls promptly answered both
day and night.
Office in the1nilding formerly occupied
by Dr. Aiken on California street.
Cor.3d &; Csilifoi-iiUi St.:
JACKSONVILLE, OR.
Havinc taken charcc of this hotel, the
undcrigncd takes pleasure in announcing
to the public that a complete ehange will be
made.
THE TABLE
will be supplied with everything the mar-
Kei acorns, aim a general renovation oi uic
JL$eI:s and Rooms
will be made,
is solicited.
The patronage of the pnslic
J. DeROBOAM
IF". IR.XOIBLajEl.ZD,
practical
Watchmaker ad Jewxlkr,
MAKES a specialty of cleaning .ind re
pairing watches and clocks. 31
charges are reasonable Give sae a call
I. BELFIXS,
PRACTICAL
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER,
Cnliromia Strict,
MAKES a speciality of cleaning and
repairing watches and clocks.
Charges reasonable. Give me a call.
Close connections made at Ashland with
stages of the California, Oregon and Idaho
Stage Co.
J70iaT 20"Miixs or Stagiko.-I
Time between Sledford and San Franckco,
St hours.
CALIFOKMA nirCESS TKAISS DAILY,
South
4:00 pm
8:03 am
8:30 a H
( North
Leave Portland Arme 10-40am
Leave Medford Leave 1 Cffirs
Arrive Ashland Leave 5 : tO p M
CITY BARBER SHOP.
Califoecta St.
JACKSONVILLE, OREGON.
TIIEUNDERSIRNED 19 FULLY PRE-
pared to do all work In his line in the best
manner ana si reasonamc prices.
GEORGE SCIIUMPF,
Pullman Buffet Sleepers
daily between Portland and Ashland.
SfsKlycus and California,
EMIGRANT SLEF.PING CARS, between
Portland and Ashland, Sisdvous and
San Francisco, FREE OF CHARGE.
Tri O fz.C. Tt-R Fprrv makes rrmnprrinn
with all the regular trains on the East Side
Division from foot of I". street.
West Side Division;
BETWEEN PORTLAND & COR VALLIS
MAIL TRACT H ULYf, EXCEPT StTin VT.)
7:30am
12:25pji
Leave Portland Arrive i
Arrive Corvallis Leave
U.15PM
1:30pm
EXPRESS TBACt DALLY (EICErT ECXDIY.)
9:00 AM
5:15 am
4:50
8.00
PM
Leave Portland Arrive
ArN-eM'Mi'nvilleLe've
At Albany and Corvallis connect
with trains of the Oregon Pacific Railroad
R. KOEIILER, E.P. ROGERS,
Manager. Q, f. & Pass. Agent.
Workbas been resumed at the Cascade
locks, and thoe in charge claim they
have 240 men at work. The lower end
of the canal is tilled with sand which is
being taken out. A gang of about twenty
men are employed in recutting some of
the stone which was cut several years
ago, and another gang is putting up some
buildings and repairing others.
Seattle, W.T., Nov. 16. Albert Fred
ericks wa3 tried to-day and found guilty
of murder in the first degree, for killing
Julius Sherbering, by shooting him in
the back of he head in July list. They
went fora walk on tho trestle bridge
about a mile from town, and when
th"y reached a secluded spot, Frederick
placed a pistol behind Sherbering'ii ear
and fired the fatal Fhot. The victim lived
long enough to indentify the murderer.
New AVooles Mill. Articles were re
cently filed with tho secretary of state
incoporating the Inland Empire Woolen
Manufacturing company; incoporators,
A. E. Eaton, W. T. Wright, and F.F.
Baker; capital stock, $125,000; place of
business, Union, Union county. The
principle object of this incoporation is to
purchase, own; and sell wool and cotton,
and to rmnufacture the same into cloth,
thread or other articles for the market,
and to sell the same at wholesale and re
tail ; with such other Dowers to purchase
machinery, water rights, etc., as are
necessarv to erect and maintain a woolen
mill. Statesman.
Then came the cool, deliberate dynamite
experiments by carefully selected masked
representatives in the woods skirting the
suburbs. Later on, secluded in the quiet
of down town backrooms, dark conclaves
of wild-idead but brainy, unscrupulous
leaders eagerly discussed as their long
coveted opportunity the just beginning
development of the workingmen's con
certed movement for a uniform eight
hour day.
How thegig.mtic, peaceful strikes were
turned into riots, how the entire world
was startled by the blood-chilling Lomb
massacre in thehaymarket, then the ma
jestic trial, the amazing bravado of the
one American defendant, the horribly
grotesque marriage of another one of the
prisoners every detail of these strange
occurrences and the extraordinary train
succeeding, now presents itself again as
if the whole had passed but yesterday.
The key-note of it all is found in the
platform of the I. A. A., International
Arbsiter (Workingmen's) Association
of which organization August Spies and
his 6e.en co-defendants were leading
members and upholders. In tho interna
tional platform it is urged that "the pres
ent system under which property is own
ed by individuals should be destroyed,
and that all capital which has been pro
duced by labor should be transformed in
to common property "by force." Eighty
"irroups" of this dangerous association
existed in the United. States, chiefly at
the great indjjstrKl centers, Chicago
alone being the ill-starred possessor of
seen. Only a portion of the members
were armed, yet the number of this class
in Chicago exceeded G000, eery man of
whom attended regular military drills,
had his on n rifle and revolver, and could
obtain dynamite and bombs for tho ask
ing. Tho unarmed members of the
groups were constantly in contact with
their armed brethren and in hearty sym
pathy with their purposes and their prin
ciples. It was this compact, well-disciplined
I. A. A, that had for its organs
three now noted newspapers the Abett
er Zeitun, the Alarm and the Anarchist.
Excepting handsome, 3'outhful Louis
Lingg, w ho, though taking a conspicuous
part, was a mere acting agent, each of
the eight Haymarket defendants was di
rectly connected with one of these papers.
August Spies, a keen, cynical Hessian,
witii the subtle intellectual vigor of an
Iago, was editor-in-chief of the Arbeiter.
The jaunty, dare-devil little Texan, Al
bert R. Prsons, brother of a confederate
general, presided over the Alarm. At
the head of the Anarchist, George Engel,
iinother Hessian, nut of a coarse brutal
type, out-Heroded the most blood-thirsty
utterances of his compeers. AVhile Sam
Fielden, the Englishman, sullen-looking,
shaggy and forbidding, but as an agitator
simply volcanic, and Oscar Ncebe, the
polished, attractive German-American
organizer, were more especially concern
ed in other than journalistic branches of
the propaganda, they were, nevertheless,
among the directors respectively of tho
Alarm and Arbctier Zeitung. The gaunt
Bavarian Michael Schwab was Spies' as
sistant editor, and his fellow-countryman,
Adolph Fischer, he of the poisoned dag
ger, was the Arbeiter's head foreman.
Not one of these men however they
might split hairs, could candidly deny
that he was instrumental to a greater or
less degree in helping on the catastrophe
at the Haymarket. Of the legal guilt of
each nothing need be said further than
that its certainty was put to tests seldom
if ever paralleled.
During the long months preceding the
bomb-throwing tho defendants one and
all were incessantly active in
derided as their special champions. The
period of confusion developing from the
mammoth strikes of the first of May,
18S6, was definitely announced months
before as the time when the fearful bolt
should fall. Pitiless as was this pro
gramme and dificult as a belief is that it
was ever contemplated by men, tho facts
as stated were abundantly proven in
court.
The diabolism was fully shared in by
women. Especially so was this tho case
in the fantastic public demonstrations
like the red-flag processions of ragamuf
fins with torches that attempted at night
to enter the magnificent new board of
trade when tho dedication festivi
ties of the institution had for the time be
ing transformed the huge building into a
scene of social brilliance without local
precedence. The repulsive, blaspheming
intruders wero forced back at tho muz
zles of three dozen police revolvers. In
affairs like this the dusky wife of Parsons,
and other no less desperate women,
seemed in their proper element. Of the
many other queer outbreaks preceding
the Haymarket tragedy, the mot start
ling at this time, perhaps, was the parade
Thanksgiving day, when in ridicule of
President Cleveland's proclamation near
ly a thousand uncouth men and women
of the slums, headed by banners of black
and red, traversed the choice residenco
avenues wildly yelling and scoffing at the
well-dressed people who crowded to the
windows, anxious to learn the cause of
the tumult.
Tho city.authorities affected for some
reason to ignore all ebulitionsof tho mob.
As a result of this official indifference,
when the time came at last for the eight
hour labor disturbances and the simulta
neous inauguration of the secretly cherish
ed "revolution," the anarchists were a
power indeed, and the police were igno
rant of danger. It is true that the Chica
go papers contained timely intimations ot
the plots, but owing to tho peculiar alti
tude of the high municipal authorities,
tho articles were treated as rank sensa
tional ism..,
Just one day before the time set for the
strikes Louis Lingg, the bomb-maker,
slipped into his lodgings a heavy, suspic
ious looking box, three feet in length.
The box contained a largeohvoice of dy
namite. Its delivery at Lingg's lodgings
was tho first immediate preparation for
THE BLOODY RESULT
Of five days later. Tormany weeks pre
vious Lingg had been purchasing and ex
perimenting witli dynamite as the paid
agent of one of the seven international
"groups," but subsequent events showed
beyond anv reasonable doubt that this
on tho way, and in an instant the thou
sand windows of tho factory were being.
shivered in countless fragments. Then it
was that patrol wagons, loaded with po
lice, the hoies covered with foam,
dashed through the crowd from behind.
It is admitted by Spie3 tint he ordered
tho mob, many of whom wero flourish
ing rovolvers, to resist the attempt of tha
police to quell the riot. Of courso tho
victors wore the police, but that to Spies,
according to bis own accounts, was not
of main concern. The blood of work
ingmen had been drawn, and when ho
satisfied himself that such a result was;
produced , tho anarchist leader coollyjwith
drew, though the battlo was at itsheight.
Taking a street car direct to the Arbei
ter Zeitung office, Spies, after a hurried
consulation with Schwab, Neobe and
others, decided to call the Haymarket
mass meeting, and then wrote.
THE" IMFAMOUS "REVEJQE CIRCULAR."
Twenty-five hundred copies wero issued
as quickly as printers could work, and
everything was now ripo for tho murder
compact meeting that night in Griefs
basement, tho same that had been called
by the Aebeiter Zeitung that day and tho
day before. In this connection the exact
wording of the circular, especially tho
latter portion, foreshadowing the slaughter
of tho morrow, the fatal 4th of May, poss
esses peculiar interest. Spies wruto :
"REVENGE! REVENGE 1
WORKMEN, TO ARMS 1"
"Men of labor, this afternoon tho blood
hounds of your oppressors, murdered six
of your brothers at MeCormickV. ?kY
did they murder them? Because the
dared to be dissatisfied with the lot which
your oppressors- have assigned to them.
They demanded bread and the gavo
them lead for an ans i-r, mindful of tho
far;t that thus people are most effectively
silenced. You have for many, many
years endured every humiliation without
protest ; have drudged from early in tho
morning until lato at night; have suf
fered all sorts ot privation, have even
sacrificed your children. You havo done
everything to fill the coffers of your mas
ters evcrythingforthem ; andnow,when
yu approach them and implore them to
make your burden a little lighter, as a
reward for your sacrifices they send their
bloodhounds the police -at you in order
to cure you, with bullets, of your dissat
isfaction. Slaves, we ask and conjure
you, by all that is sacred and dear to you,
avenge the atrocious murder which has
been committed on your brothers to-day,
and which will likely bo committed upon
you to-morrow. Laboring men, Iler
I'tiL'S, you have arrived at the crdssway.
Which way will you deode? For slav-
particular explosive made the bomb that ' ery and hunger or for freedomand bread?
AGITATING AND ORGAMZLVG.
in "demonstrations" and "experiments.'
Their speeches and articles fairly bristled
with impassioned appeals for the loboring
people to provide themselves with fire
arms and dynamite. Specific instruc
tions were given how to handle and use
the explosive, and how to make bombs
and how topiocure weapons. All this was
stated by the conspirators to be making
ready for the coming "social revolution."
What was meant by "social revolution"
was not left to lx vaguely inferred, nor
wa3 the time when it was to be inaugu
rated a dim uncertainty of the future.
The "revolution" was frequently define
ed in s'peech and writing as a sudden
bloody, forcible upheaval of the right of
private ownership of property, then the
bringing about of a state of society in
which all property should be held in
common. .
Incredible as it may seem, tho avowed
purpose was to deluge the city in blood
was heard round the world the bomb,
with fifty others manufactured by Lingg
uiidcr the auspices of the International
association, which furnished the money,
and of which the celebrated defendants
were not members simply, but leaders.
Next diy, May 1, the eight-hour strikes
began in earnest, and by nightfall, when
the first intelligent estimates wcreobtain-
able, 30,000 men walked the streets idle.
Promptly in tho morning, Sunday, when
the churches were resounding with swell
ing hosannas, the stuffy little Bohemian
hall on Emma street was crowded with
members of the Lehr and Wehr Verein,
an inner circle of the omnipresent Inter
national. Detailed plans for the cear-at-hand
conflict with the police wero sub
mitted by Editor Englo and listened to
by Spies' Lieutenant, Fischer. These
plans were the ones follow ed almost to
the letter at tho Haymarket, but the de
cision to do so was not reached at this
meeting. Instead it was determined to
take action at anothei gathering of the
Lehr and Wehr in a larger hall and more
central location, to be assefhbled within
twenty-four hours. This was to be in
Greif's hall, Monday night, May 3.
Tho Arbeiter Zeitung, of which Spies
and Schwab were editors and managers,
called together the armed men who were
to engage in this compact to murder. The
Sunday evening edion published a few
hours after the Bohemian hall meeting
contained tho cabalistic legend; "Y
Komme Montag Abend." (Y Come
Monday night.) This,was the summons
to the armed sections to meet,ns they did,
Monday night at Griefs. The call was
published again Monday afternoon, indi
cating tho importance of tho matters to
como before the meeting. Tho Sunday
issue of the Arbeiter had a significant ar
ticle urging "quick and immediate
action," adding: "By Monday or Tues
day the conflict must have reached its
highest intensity, else success will then
be doubtful." Almost before the ink on
this could dry, Spies w as at the 'Snnday
afternoon meeting of the Central Labor
Union arranging to have himself dispatch
ed to McCormick's factory the following
day to address the thousands of strikers
out along the old black Road.
From the top of a freight car, on the
prairie near MeCormick's, next after
noon Monday Spies belched into the
ears of 12,000 excited strikers, mostly
foreigners, the hottest harangue ever ut
tered by him in public. He spoke in the
German language, of which ho is more
master even than of English. Tho effect
oi his words was like magic.
"OX TO MCCORMICK'S 1" '
was tile cry. The maddened honlo, ur
ged forwardby Spies, Lingg and other
darinz anarchists present, rushed at the
of the property owning classes, first de- great factory like so many wild beasts,
Etroying the police and militia, who were They had caught up bow Idera and clubs
If yon decide for the latter, then do not
delay a moment; then, people, to arms 1
This must be your motto. Think of tho
heroes whose blood has fertilized the
road to progress, liberty and humanity,
and strive to become worthy of them.
YOUR BROTHERS."
Neebe and other uotables of the I. A.
A. took horse, and in person scattered
the circularbroadcast, not failing to leavo
copies with the International "armed sec
tions" gathered in Greif s hall 54 West
Lake street. Thatthe" circular'gave tho
impulse to the action of the armed sec
tions at this Monday night meeting, and
inspired the adoption of
THE rLAN OF BOMB-THROWCrO
Agreed upon, is apparent from tho fact
thatits contents wero first fully discussed.
Then the complete detailed plan of the
particular method of inaugurating tho
wholesale murder for which they origi
nally organized was formally considered
and adopted, the timo for the slaughter
being left for the Arbeiter Zeitung, to
designate by publishing the word "ruhe"
(peace). This latter feature wa3 the
work-of Adolph Fischer, who had como
to the meeting straight from the Arbeiter
Zeitung, where he had been assisting
Spies and Schwab. That Fischer wa
carrying out the plans of his superiors ap
pears more clearly from tho circum
stances that it was he who manocuvered
the "armed sections" out of their idea of
holding the Haymarket meeting in the
morning instead of at night, as Spies and
the other leaders had decided.
A darker picture is not to be found in
history than this spectacle of four-scoro
murderous conspirators in the wretched
saloon basemeut,rcrr.orslessly plotting tho
massacre that occurred not a, hundred
yards distant, before another midnight
passed. Rudolph Schnaubelt, the throw
er of the Haymarket bomb, was among
the eighty or more assassins who com
posed thLr horrible meeting. Though ad
journment did not come till long after 11
it was not 7 o'clock next, morning, Tues
day, when Louis Lingg, a member of
this identical "armed section,"'.opened
the chest of dynamite that had Iain un
touched in his lodgings since .four days
before. Under his expert directions six
of the men who attended the murder
meeting of the provions night, quickly xe
to work then and there filling globular
shells with dynamite.
Early as was the hour, Fischer was also
at work getting out tho hand-bills calling
the Haymarket mass meeting. The
hand-bill's last words were : "Working
men, arm yourselves and appear in full
force I" What Spies, Schwab and the
other leaders were doing that day may
bo partly inferred from the
BCRXDia APPEALS FOR RESISTANCE
and calls "To Arms I" that appeared in
continued on fourth page.