Oregon sentinel. (Jacksonville, Or.) 1858-1888, September 17, 1879, Image 2

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SfllE OREGON ' SEN TINEL
JACKSO.IVILLE t
Wednesday, September , 17: 1879
XIOUK.iraiC.lt SKETCHES.
Gkx. Jons E. Ross.
The name heading this biographical
sketch is familiar to the people of Ore
gon. General Ross was born in Madi
son county, Ohio, February I5th, 1818.
"When ten years of age ho emigrated
with his parents to Cook county, Illi
nois In 1840 he was married to Miss
Margaret Robison, daughter of Alex,
llobison, of Chicago. His wife survi
ved but eight months after her mar
riage, when she was taken suddenly ill
, and died in a few brief hours. In
1847 he came to Oregon, overland by
way of Fort Hall and the Snake river
route. At that time the Indians on
the plains were generally hostile and
when near John Day's river the Gener
al and his company saved a company
of emigrants from being massacred and
tiroufht them to The Dalles ia safety!
"The women oM.lie party had ueeti rob
bed of their clothing and, when rescued,
they were dressed in single garments
made of domestic which the savages
had permitted them to retain. He set
tled first in Oregon City and engaged
in the butchering business, in which
he continued but a bliort timo when he
volunteered with a company of Oregon
Riflemen to fight the Cayuso Indians.
He was commissioned First Lieutenant
under Captain Henry J. Lee, in which
capacity he served for a short time only,
when he was elected Captain of the
company, Captain Lee having been
promoted to Major in the regiment,
under Colonel Gillam, who was killed
during the war. Dan Barnes was Grst
and Nathan Olney second Lieutenants
under Ross. By virtue of his authori
ty he solemnized themarriage of Nathan
Olney and his first Indian wife, the
daughter of a famous chief. Gen. Ross
was in the first battle fought near The
Dalles on the 8th of January, 1848,
and in which Win. Berry was severely
wounded. This fij,ht was brought on
by Barlow it Bos well endeavoring to
re-take a band of stock stolen by the
Indians, ft par the close of the war he
returned to Oregon City and again en
gaged in. butchering. He continued
in the business for a short time only
when he purchased an interest in the
first threshing machine ever run on
Tualitan plains and started in to thresh
grain. News of the gold mines in Cal
ifornia caused the threshers to desert
their machine in the field and start
with their work horses packed for the
diggings. The party located on -Feather
river, where they mined for a short
time and then went to Haugtown to
Wiijjer. Gen. Ross was present when
tiie parties were -iiiMg trom whose
tragic fate the place derived its name,
lie next went to Bird's river where
he worked for a time with Flem. Hill.
During his mining operations he dis
covered the famous mines known as
Yankee Jim's diggings. He remained
in the mines until 1849 and returned
by water to Oregon. In 1850 here
turned to California and organized a
company of eleven men to go on an ex
pedition to discover the mouth of
Trinity river. They failed to find the
object of their search, and in crossing
the Klamath river they were attacked
by Indians and robbed of everything
they possessed but their arms and am
munition. During the fight the Gen
eral was shot through the thigh. Af
ter wandering in the mountains for sev
eral days the party was found by a
company of prospectors on the South
fork of Salmon river destitute of pro
visions and almost worn out with fa
tigue. After resting -a few days they
proceeded to Sacramento valley and
wintered. In tho Spring of 1851 they
returned to Yreka and Gen. Ross was
selected to command a company of
twenty men to go after the Indians who
robbed Bill Martin's corral 6f a band
of horses. After tho expedition was
ended he went to butchering and con
tinued in thebusiness for a few months.
He then went with an expedition to
Josephine county, Oregon, and discov
ered the Canyon creek diggings. After
a short stay at that place ho proceeded
to the Willammetto valley, bought a
drove of cattle and returned, locating
in Jacksonville. In the Fall of 1852
he was chosen Captain of a company
to rescue a train of emigrants surround
. cd by Indians at Tule lake. On the
way he was joined by Ben "Wright and
company from Yreka. Tho General
and his company after burying fourteen
dead bodies of emigrants, murdered by
tho savages, escorted the remainder in
to this valley and the company disband
ed. In January 1853 ho was married
to Miss Elizabeth Hopwood, the wed
ding being tho first ever solemnized in
Jacksonville- In December of the
sumo year ho located the ranch on
which be now resides, three miles from
this place, and was a short time there
after elected Colonel of the volunteer
forces called jout to subdue the Indians.
He served duriug the war under Gen.
Joo Lane. In 185t he was commission
ed Colonel by Governor Davis and
served through the wars of that and
tho two following years in Southern
Oregon. In tho Fall of 1855 he was
elected a member of the Territorial
council to fill a vacancy caused by the
resignation of Dr. Chambers. In 1866
ho was elected to a seat in the Lower
Houso of the State Legislature. He
was one of the first Directors of the
Oregon Central Railroad companv be
fore that franchise was transferred to
BenHolliday. In 1872 he was commis
sioned Brig. Gen. of the First Brigade,
Oregon State Militia and served in that
capacity during tho Modoc war. In
1878 he was chosen State Senator from
Jackson county and was ..selected as a
member of the committee appointed to
Jook into tho accounts of the State of
ficers who had just retired from office.
The. General is Independent in his po
litical views and sentiments, and liber-
riOXETR KE-CMOV.
The third annual re-union of the Pi
oneer Society of Southern Oregon, was
held in the "grove in tho vicinity of
Ashland, on Tuesday the 11 th inst.
David Linn President of the society,
presiding. A large number of the peo
plo from different parts of the valley
were present. The delegation from
Jacksonville, proceeded by the Brass
Band of the latter place, moved into
the town in a procession of vehicles.
The exercises of the day were opened
with music by the band. An appro
priate prayer was then offered by Rev.
M. A. Williams, the chaplain of the
day, after which the choir, led by Prof.
J. Q. Will its, sang an appropriate
piece with organ accompaniment
The Secretary of the Society was re
quested to read the resolutions reported
by the committees' appointed for the
purposes, on the death of the following
i -r -r et..i T -v::iL
meiuuera: ouuics ui. outi'jii, xbuu iun;
ler and Elizabeth Millei his wife an
U. S. Hay den, following which the
band played a dirge. Professor and
Mrs. L. L. Rogers then sang with or
gan accompainment, a beautiful solo
and chorus, in a manner to elicit the
highest .encomiums. The orator of the
day, James R. Neil, Esq., delivered an
excellent and appropriate address-
after which tho choir sang the song
of the Pioneers, which closed the exer
cises at the stand until after the dinner.
Tho audience, preceded by the band
marched to the tables, bountifully sup
plied with viands too numerous to
mention. Tho committees of ladies
deserve great praise for tho excellent
arrangement of the dinner. Jesse
Houck, tho chairman of the committee
of arrangements was everywhere exer
cising a general supervision for the
accommodation of those at the
tables.
After dinner the audience again
resorted to tho stand and off-hand
speeches were made by E. K. Ander
son, Judge Prim, Judge Tolraan and
Capt Thomas Smith. Thus the third
re-union of the Pioneers was ended for
the day, and tho general verdict of
those present was that the occasion
was most enjoyable in all respects and
the ctesire of all that tho annual re
union of tho society may be perpetua
ted. ' h:
iJirouTAXT to rAU5Ji:ns
The ''Rural Press," referrin
ing tthe
sent year's
prevalence of rust in the present ye:
wheat crop, calls to mind the fact that
in some localities the potato rot has al
so made its appearance. "Tho time
was when potato rot was unknown.
So too, with blight, rust and weavel,
in wheat, but we now know they exist
as a fact, and experience teaches us
that there is a cause and if this be
true, is thero not a remedy? There is
but little doubt, but that Oregon is to
day afflicted to a certain extent with
at least three of these undesirable draw
backs, the potato rot, blight and rust
in wheat As htated by us in our pa
per, a few numbers back, the year the
potato rot made its appearance in Ger
many the season was a wet one, and we
find without doubt that the three af
flictions are traceable to the same
cause as a general rule. Now if this
bo so. would it not be wise for each
farmer to at once make preparation to
adopt some plan of drainage."
Readers will remember the murder
of Judge Chrisholiu in DeKalb,
Mississippi, a year ago last April.
The victim's only crime was that he
was a Republican. For this grave of
fence he was set upon by a brutal
mob and shotto death. His daughter
and little son attempted to shield their
father and were also brutally slain.
The murderers are now on trial and
the details of the horror, as given in
tho evidence, are without parallel in at-
trocity even in that land of cut throatr
and bulldozers. The trial will bo on
ly a farce. Justice wilf never over
take that class of criminals until they
meet at the cannon's mouth with the
strong arm of federal authority to ap
ply the match.
Dixon, who was assassinated by the
"Regular Democratic party" in Yazoo,
Mississippi, recently, was young when
the Rebellion commenced and went in
to the rebel army with all tho impetu
osity of a young Southerner, nis
father was brave enough to vote for
Lincoln in I860. Although young
Dixon fought bravely for the "Lost
cause." It was remembered that his
father was a "Lincoln man." Hence
to kill him was ouly a piece of sport
that any Southern "Slouch hat"
might indulge in without risk. And
this is the manner in which the Dem
mocracy expect to elect tho next
President. We shall see.
Wo regret to learn that Mart "V.
Brown, of the Albany "Democrat," is
seriously ill. Ex-Sheriff James Herren,
of Linn county, is also very low with
dropsy. "Wo hoge soon to be able to
announce their convalescence and
EDITORIAL .NOTE..
The Greenbackers of Massachusetts
have nominated Ben Butler for Gov
ernor and Wendell Phillips for Lieut
Governor. The Democratic State con
vention, soon to assemble, will doubt
less endorse them. There is a vast
difference between Democracy in Ore
gon and Democracy in Massachusetts
yet the principles of that party are
"unchangeable"
The Aighanistans have revolted from
British rule and the English Govern
ment is again sending vast armaments
to subdue them. Tho Afghans and the
Zulus are making it exceedingly merry
for Johnny Bull just at this time and
the probability seems fair for the sacri
fice of many more seedy scions of roy
alty before the tragedy is ended.
Grand preparations arc being made
by the citizens of San Francisco for the
reception of Gen. Grant Ha. is- er
ected to arrives in that city about' the
first of October. Mayor Bryant has
appointed a committee composed of
prominent men without distinction of
party who will have supervision of all
matters relating to giving the ex-President
a cordial greeting upon his arri
val. Another refreshing report reaches
us from Corvallis, of a wife beating a
husband. She not only "put a head on
him" but proceeded to demolish furni
ture, crash windows, eta, in first rate
masculino style. It causes the most
grateful emotions to swell in our bosom
when we read of such rare occurrences;
Wife beating has become stale and, as
variety is the spice of life, via like a
little change.
Gov. Perkins, the newly elected
Chief Magistrate of California, declares
that his administration shall not be
partizan, but that his appointments
shall be made on merit regardless of par
ty preference. These aro noble senti
ments but we trust that thero may not
be a general exodous of Democrats
from Oregon to solicit positions under
the new Republican Governor of our
neighboring State.
Dennis Kearney in a harangue at
the Sand Lots in San Francisco the
other day, declared that he would burn
Gen. Grant in effigy when he arrived
in that city. No cheer was given in
response te the infamous threat by his
urawny crotrd o Jipnrors. Should .e
patrejnpt su
peoplenig
such an insult to the American
people jri3,hide would be riddled so full
of holes tliait would'nt hold his un
certain principles.
J.!-
The New York Dpmocratic State
Convention met at SyracuSOjon the 10th
Tildens bar'l captured the organization
but his opponents yielded with very
poor grace He succeeded in securing
the nomination of a ticket friendly to
himself and by so doing did the Repub
licans a great favor.
After a temporary organization was
affected it soon become apparent that
tho Tammany delegates were determin
ed to resist the nomination of Lucicus
Robinson, Tilden's choice for governor,
to the last extremity. An effort was
made to nominate Jacobs,. as a
compromise candidate, but it failed.
The Robinson men had a majority and
persisted in their choice Finding
themselves powerless to change the re
sult the whole Tammany delegation,
representing the Democracy of the
city of New York, withdrew in a body
and nominated John Kelly, a Tammany
Chief, for Governor, pledging them
selves to his support Kelly accepted
the nomination and the Democrats of
the Empire state have now two candi
dates in tho field and are marching to
a certain and crushing defeat Tilden is
now practically laid on the shelf. His
Prettdential aspirations are, or had as
well be at an end. The next Demo
cratic candidate for President will be a
Western man and we predict that
Thurman or Hendricks will be the in
dividual. Should Tilden succeed in
securing tlie nomination his defeat
would be a foregone conclusion as well
as a matter of congratulation among,
not only Republicans, but conservative
Democrats every wlfere.
Census day will be Juno 1, 1880.
On that date about twenty thousand
enumerators will commence their labors
those in the cities being required
to complete their work in two weekr.
while others will be allowed the whole
month of June. Persons alive on the
1st of June, but dying before an enumer
ator reaches them, will be counted in the
census; birjhs subsequent to the 1st of
June will not be counted. Special
agents will be employed to collect sta
tistics relating to education, mining,
manufacturing, agriculture and various
other departments of trado and in-
dustry.
The Portland "Daily Standard"-is
rapidly gaining jibpularity as a first
class newspaper. Its local department
i3 unexcelled and had. it the advantage
O
of the telegrams its circulation would
be increased fourfold. We like enter
prise anil liberality though it be in a-
ICIEST
Jacksonville Musical Conservatory
CONDUCTED BY
THEO. KVGLER.
c-o
'"THE MUSICAL COURSE OP THIS INSTITUTE WILL OPEN ONTHE FIRST
J. of September and.is divided in four quarters, each comprising twenty-four lessons.
SCALE OF rBICESl
Piano, per term. . ." $15 00
Singing, per term 15 00
Violin, " " .' 24 00
Cithern, " ',' 24 00
Instructions in Composing and Thorough Bass 30 00
Calling at private residences, per term of 24 lessons 24 00
TJso oflnstrumezit $X3LdciLtioz3.n.l vi3VXozxtli.
Pupils are received at any period, and special attention is paid to those who have but
limited time.
"For further particulars apply at tho Musical Institute.
CHEAPER
thAn thb
CHEAPEST
MORRIS MENSOR,
'"tfSft, ,
VAT-'THE -
New-York Store,
Jacksonville, Oregon.
4v -
Sf :
WEEKIs? CURRENT PRICE:
"Wrl
--.' S-
GROCERIES ETC.
"San Franciffti refined snijnr. . 71b 81 00
hxtra costa nca-ci,uee 4to 100
Hope ol all s'ze per lb lficts
Uverpobl salt 3
Extra choice tea 30cls & upwnrd
Tobacco 62Jci .,
Candles-per box S3 50
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, ETC.
Prints 15yds 81 00
Muslin 9cls per jil & upward
Mens hat?, each S 1.00
Mens boots per pair 3.50.,
Shoes.... 75
Slippers.. ,, ....... 63 r
Gotten flannel shirts and . .
drawer, rneh 63
Mens cloth suits 89 00
worth 15.00
Mens cloth pants 83.50. .
worth 6.00
And various other articles too nomerons to
mention. Call and exaroin as it costs noth
ing to satisfy yomstlf.
TO TAG FROM 10JR !
WITH A
NEW STOCK OF GOODS
FRESH FROM
SATS JRANCISCO.
GEORGE W. LLIOTT.
-rKOS UiTB TO CALL THK ATTENTION OF
t the public to the Tact tbat be h just rctnro
ed from Sau francisco with fall stock of
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
Which be Is Belling tt
PRICES THAT DEFY COMPETITION
: ALSO
LADIES' FANCY GOODS
OF
EVERY VARIETY
Gents' and Boys' Clothing
Y
; OF THE
AMD AT
Prices That Will Astonish the
PURCHASER.
MENS AND BOYS' SHIRTS.
JL fall insortmtntfrom the finest to the tnoit
common.
Spectacles and Jewelry.
The fineit W of Spectacles and eya glasses nrer
brought to the market and Watches
and Jewelry nf every
description.
MENS' AND BOYS' HATS
-JHE
veryjAtest style.
, : Call 'and be Convinced?
YEAE.
ASHLAND HARNESS SHOP,
m m
C K. KLTJM,
MANUFACTURER OF, AND DEALER IN
Saddlery and Harness,
ASHLAND, OREGON.
KEEPS A GENERAL ASSORTMENT OF
goods in bis line of trade.
Ladles', Mens' and nor' Huddled, a
8ptf laity.
TEAM, BUGGY AND
PLOW HARNESS,
WHIPS,
ROBES,
DUSTERS.
-i-AND-j-
HORSE BLANKETS.
ALSO
Winchester Repeating Rifles
(commonly called Henry Rifles) of
model of 1866, 1873, and 1876.
Pistols, Cartridges, Etc.
Wheat taken at tho Highest Market
Rates in Exchange for goods.
E. C. BROOKS,
' DEALER IN
Watches, Clocks, Jewelry,
SjPEOTAO 33 S,
SCHOOL BOOKS, STATIONEUT FANCT 000D3,
SIIF.ET MUSIC, FIELD
GLASSES, VIOLINS, CITHERNS,
HARPS
AND STRING? FOR THE SAME.
ALSO;
DRUGS, MDIimS, TOILET SOAPS AXD
PE FUMERY.
Needles and Best Sperm Oil for
Sewing Machines,
HE HAS SOLD OUT HIS
r tock of American dewing Machine
a numlrer of times, hut has another lot of
them on band. This is the ligtheot and
mot rapid running, as well a durable,
midline there is made, and so simple that
little girls (We or fix years old make their
patchwork on them.
This is the place to boy good watches,
clocks and jewelry, and he will ecll obeap
jewelry cheaper than any ono.
3J-Watcbes, clocks, jewelry and
sewing machines cleaned and repaired at a
reduced price.
JOHN MILLER'S
Is the place to go for anything in
the hardwnre lino. He has a large
and superior stock of Rifles, Shot
Guns and Sporting Materia, and
in fact everything from an Anvil
to a
SKELLTON
Kay. IIo sells at LESS than Bed
rock prices FOR CASH, and all
those purchasing Building Hard
ware, Tools of every kind, L'aints.
Glass, Cordage, Brushes &c, have
FOUND
That he is determined to under
sell any one in tho market, and
people who wish Cutler, Quartz
or Spy Glasses, or anything made
of iron,
IN
Fact people from every place or
from .
ASHLAND
Will find that he means business,
and will get bargains by calling
on him bofore going elsewhere.
ASHLAND ANDllWlLLl
II. P. Phillips
Proprietor.
T AM NOW RUNNING A DAILY LINI
L be'wcn tbc above point', leaving Arhlaml
with coach on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Fridays. retutn'ng next day On Tnedar
Thursday and Saturday of each week a Irirk
board will start from Ashland returjing on
the following day.
PAUE, (t ach -nray) $S.W.
Connection made at Linkvllle with backs
for Lakeview.
K.IUJBLI,
Odd Fellow's Building JaeksonTiHr, Ortjw
DEALER AND WORKER IN
TIN, SHEET IRON, COPPER, LEAD
Pumps,
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS,
NAILS,
A FIRST-CLASS STOCK. OF STOVES
HARDWARE, TINWARE.
POWDER OF EVERT DESCRIPTION
Fuse and Caps, .
WOODFN & WILLOW WARE.
ROPE, NAILS,
Paints. Oils, Vnrnisli, Glass
CUTLERY, WIRE,
Shot, Brushes, Chains, Hose
ETC., ETC:
I hwe tecum the ervlccs of a flrt-cla
Mechanic, and am prepared ta do all repair
ing promptly and in superior style.
N CONNECTION- V1Tn TnE AHOVK
I I am receiving nn.l bavp rnnHantly
baud a full and first-class stock of
GROCERIES,
DRY-GOODS, GCM ROOTS, TOPACCO
READY MADE CLOTHING),
GLASSWARE. CROCKERY, 4c.
9"Evrr) thing sold atrca.rnaMf rati.
K. KUBLI
Jacksonville March. S '878.
Msjsjnsfj
"""
mr-Kvetj Bout 1ms uGL'A RANT EE
STAMI inidf,and Ur Merchtnt or whom
you Uiy them is authonz-d to return youi
money if you are not cati.-Bod with the
Hoots, ltu
The Best
RUBBER BOOT
In tha market. Ask for !t anil takt no other.
HJJCECTBROa.cfcCO,
Sax Fraxcisco,
SSoJLe C'-mw-jra.seac'JK.
We carrT ,ne largest stock of Boots and
Shoes of all kinds of any bouse iu America
GREAT
SLAUGHTER IN PRICES
AT
E. JACOBS' STORE
Oregon Street, Jacksonville
WHEIIEA COMPLETE AKD
niagnvflcicul aflorlitiMfit of new iooil
hf jnt bf-en received, couNtm iu part of
CLOTHING,
DRY-GOODS,
GROCERIES,
FANCY GOODS,
BOOTS & SHOES,
SCHOOL BOOKS,
HATS AND CAPS,
TOBACCOS J: CIGARS,
HARDWARE AND
CARPETS, TINWARE,
ALL KINDS PAINTS.
. ALSO:
GROCERIES.
A FINE ASSOUTME1VT
OF
LADIES' HATS AND
FLOWERS, &c.,&c.
In fact everything to be found In a flm
cU's flock of General Merchandise, which
will be oM at prices
That Defy Competition.
The bighst price allowed for country pro.
duce.
-wy-OWemon call at my eBtablifhmein
In thu Masonic building and be convinced
PIONEER HARDWARE ST0BE
MRS J. BILGER
AT TH E OLD STAND OF JOIIN BILGER
Calhrnia street, JartienTillt, Orison,
DEALER IS
TIN, SDEKT IRON. CfcTFER 4RK
Stoves,
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS
' -c
PUMPS and PIPES,
Paints, Oils, GIuss, Varnish
Powder & Pnso
A General Assortment of
SHELF HARDWARE,
FINE WOSTENHOLM CUTLERY"
ROPE & TWINE.
A flrt-cla mechanic wilt attend t
Job Work with neatness and dispatch.
I will always keep constantly on hand a
large stock of
liquors and Tobacco.
Asent for the PAOIFKJ RUBBER PAINT
The bet in the World.
Particular attention paid tu Frmirr
want, and the snpplyinr cf extras for Farm
Machinery, anT all information as tn smsf
irt:c!ci. rnmMied cheerfully, on anp'uMtiot
Nopninf ulll be upartd to Itirni.ili mir
cutomoin with the but pn.'dj in market. In.
our lino. and nt the lnwejt price". "
Our motto shall he prompt and fair dol
ing with all. Call a'id cxamiii- our ilmlc
bforezoing tlesfwhcre. Satisfaction t;sr
nte"d IMPORTAHT NOTICE I
Information for the People
I HAVE HKCErVEO- AXOTilEIt
larco consisnmnnt of the cehbrattd Sin
ner Sewine Muchinfs. wh'ch are fur sale on.
the usual liberal trrma ami at Hip rfenlnr
prirr8 established by the enmpnny. There
fore waste no lime, money and patienet; on
inferior machines when y.n enn purchase v
genuine S!prer at the sme figures I" bay
ing n Singer yon get a machine nl acknowl-
dffed merit and established rrpntniion. an I
are certuin of hitvins value received for your
money, as every machine is warranted by the
companv.
The Singer Company now sell thrre-quar-tera
ol nil the machine sold in the world. the
rapacity of their work at Elizibeth. e
Jersey, enabling them to turn out over a
thnnsand machines a day. and they linve
4,500 offices for the sale of these jnilly cele
brated sewing machines, which have tuken
the
rUlT FIUZE
Over all competitors more than two hund
red times.
After the Chicneo fire the Re'iff Com
mittee undertook to furnish sewing marhims
to the needy women of (hat city, and appli
cants were permitted to chnoc from six dif
ferent kind of miichinfs. 2 944 applicant
were furnished with machines, of winch nnm
her 2 427 choe &inrer niucMne uml MT
distributed thtir choice amomr the five othir
kinds ofmnchine. 1 hey were to earn tiieir
living on these machines, and took the Sin
ger, because
IT IS THE ""EST.
The people bonght Singer machines as
follows "TO lCTMflm-frMMhlnM.
1VTI JS.1.2H0 " -
18T2 519.TSS " -
ts:s 232,-m
1T4 111,679 "
1T5 2I9.P32 " "
IPTU KS231H
1177 282.MS "
1878 356,433 " "
D. ir. FKATIIRItX,
.tgsn for Jwksnn ami Jotphin Gmnlles.
llesdqiurters, Jncksont Utt, Or.
Mra.P. P. Film. Jin. Ella Print.
NEWMILLINERY STORE
SPRING OPENING.
We have just received i new and complete!,
stock ol Millinery goods, consisting .f
HATS OF ALL STYLES,,
Itlbbons, Pratliers, Flwerrr
RUCHINGS.
COLLARS AND CUFFSr
"V JsliJJUNTO.
ORNAMENTS, SILKS,
LACES,
GENTLENESS' A1D LAMES
HANDKERCHIEF?.
Call and see their at the building formerly
Ur. Hnbinsnr. mi fMifnrn'i