Oregon sentinel. (Jacksonville, Or.) 1858-1888, May 07, 1879, Image 1

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Oregon sentinel
Oregon sentinel
PUBLISHED WEDNESDAYS
AT
JICKOMLLF. ACKSOX COUNTY, OREGON
BT
KRAUSE &. TURNER.
ADVERTISING RATES.
Oaeiqoti lOUnetorlrt fint Initrtlon.T 9 1 tn
hubseinent intrtion. .,.... 109
"J wont hi..
fi
On-foarthColnia 3 monlha.
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OnchIf " 3 "
" 6 "
T CO
19 M
700,
MO
MM
uool
TERMS:
One copr. PerYrtntlTne, 3 50
One Column 3 monthi CO CO
6 " WM
A DlKonnt to Ycirly Ad-rtlar.
f'jjr
: -vj - " ,
- -
. 5 .
VOI. XXIV--NO. 17.
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
J. W. ROBINSON, M. D.
pHYSICIAK AND SURGEON,
JACKSONVILLE, OREGON.
OfBeo nn California it., nprmlter. J. RjnV ,
Itnld.nco t D. F. Dowell'a.
L. DAN FORTH, M. D.,
nnYSIGrAN.AND 8ORGE0N
- " - - f - ?&i - - fe -
Jacksonville, Oregon.
OBm on California utreet, opponlte V. 3. Ryan's
tore. Calli promptly attended to, day or night.
G. II. AIKEN, M. D.,
DHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
"JACKSONVILLE, OREGON.
M&Ottlct eppolte P.J. ISjran'a Mora.
MARTIN YROOMAN, l. D.
DHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
JACKSONVILLE, OREGON.
Trwimtn rnmM lir with 1li Intrntlnnnf per-
n'ttlT 1-ieatln! IliTflf III til- irnctir of
hit prnlM'tan, la rIiiite. n.l. from Iwpntv
evrn rKT xpirlrnr In the ltc-"e incMriit to
thl Coit. tlitteni himself aj Iwlne; able to glte
reaeral tlicll'-n.
-Offlca it Kaliler A Dru'i Drug Stun.
CHAS. J. HOWARD,
-fUJNTT AMI) MINERAL SURVEYOR
JACKSONVILLE, OREGON.
kilning ur"". ail all other SoIne In my line
p rumptlj a'-tended to.
H. II. AUTENKIETH,
A TTORNEY-AT-LAW.
JACKSONVILLE, OREGON.
Will -rarllrr In all the CnrU "f the Slat-, rrnmft
ltnt.n cf-n all tuning left tn luy rar.
Mt-Omn In Orth'a liric luill-llng.
B. F. IiOWEl.l,
TTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Jacksonville, orkgos.
vAMVatne.R plvel In mr hnl will receive prompt
atteilitn. 3-4pflcial attention given tu Collec
lloat. J S. HOWARD,
A TINER-L SURVEYOR,
JACKSONVILLE, OREGON.
.J. P. lIOWARn. liTlncleen ilnly nprlnl-d V. S.
Mineral SurT-yr f,r the countiei of Jvicnon. Jose
phine ami Cnrrr. State of Orecon will mle of
Belal turTeJivfluinlng clainii.
WILL. JACKSON,
,r E N T I S T,
JACKSONVILLE, OREGON.
TKKTR EXIUCTKD AT AM.
houre. Lanchlng sae ail
mlntiiteretl.tr.leeired.for which extra
rliarirrt will lie male.
OHlce and reiUence ou corner of California and
Fifth itroeti.
BERTH OLD ROSTEL,
WHY:, SHOULDN'T
The People of this Valley Save
THEIR MONEY
WHEN THEY CAN BUY
Dry-Goods ind fancy-Goods
GROCERIES,
BOOTS AND SHOES,
- TOBACCO & LIQUORS,
-j -.
U - - - . sls5a.-eixsx'c? -- - v -- -
MERCHANDISE !
FOR
ALL KINDS OF PRODUCE
BY GOING TO
.. DP jLsIm.tar cC C
RYAN'S BUILDING,
Nest door to Post Office,
JACKSONVILLE, OREGON.
Where Highest Cash Prices
arc paid.
fiS-CALf, AXD SEE US.-a
CITY MARKET,
CALIFORNIA ST.,
WILLIAM BYBEE, - Proprietor.
PUIS WELL KNOWN MARKET. OPPO
L file Knhlcr & Uio.'h druiiMnrt1 is hcl
tiT prepiinil thnu evrr to fnrnifh the pub
lic willi tli clioicisl (juulity uf
FRESH HEEF,
PORK, VEAL,
MU'lTON, HAM,
SALT MEATS,
I5AC0N,
nivr or.
SAUSAGE, LAI!I), E'lCT;
Ihomo't rivnralili iiiilnc- incut' ri.TiTfrl
to p'ttioiu. n-il mi tlT'irt will lie sjurcil to
witnl Kivmg gfiiiral sali-fHc-linn.
VM. IJYIIKB
OUT BAUBEE SHOP
AND
BATH PlOOMS.
California St.,
Jacksonville, - - - Oregon.
rrlK UNPEBSIUNKD IS FULLY
1. prpirril tn tin all ork in his line in
llie beft maimer uml ut l'a(lnul)It- prices.
HOT OR COLD BATHS
Ciin be but ut this place at all hours of the
day.
GEORGE SOU UMPF.
P. TONKGrJsJX
GENERAL BLACKSMITHING
-AND-t-
HORSE SHOEING,
Cor., of Second and California St.
LL KINDS OF MARKETABLE
L produce taken in exclianze lor work.
P. DON KG AX.
JACKSONVILLE. OREGON: MAY
r
C1TYBAKEBY
AND
SA.L002ST,
In Masonic Building, Oregon St.,
jacksonville, ogn.,
TIIK UNDERSIGNED HEREBY DE
rires to announce tn the public that
tbey are now prepared to 611 all orders for
cakrs or every description, such ns weddinp
Cakff;aks..ln' nurtiys, wine cakei al0o
browu and rye brtalf, ginger"' snaps n'wf
crackers.
A lunch bon?e will also be kept at this
place, where oysters in all styles, Limburger
and SchweitZT cheese, can be had at all
hours of the d ty or night.
BSy-Fresh-bread every day.
Prices reasonable and satisfaction guar
anteed. GROB & ULRICH.
TABLE ROCK SALOON,
OREGON STREET,
iriJVTJJEW avel HELMS,
proprietors.
THE PROPRIETORS OF THIS
well-known and popular resort would
inform their friends and the public generally
that a complete and first cla-s clock of the
best brands of liquors, wines, cigar.', ale and
porter, etc., are constantly ki pt on hand
They will be pleased to have their friend'
'call and smile."
CABINET.
A Cabinet of Curiosities may aten be
found hi re. We would be pleaw-d to have
person? pojspfsinjr curiosities and specimen"
brin;: tlicin in, and we will plase them in
the Cubinet foi inspection.
WIXTJEN& HELMS.
"C. O. D." SALOON.
CALIFORNIA ST.,
.1. P. McDniiit-l - - Piopiirtor.
'PUIS POPULVR RESORT, UNDER
1 new maimuimeiit. i furiiihiug the Ic-kI
waoJj (if Vtm-wit-,sn'l rigrirs. - Tim .
reading Mine, ii -itpjiii. n willi riAsiern prt
idicalu and I ling papers of the Coat
G:ve me a call
S. P. HANftA,
WAGON-MAKER,
Jacksonville, Oregon,
TN CRONEillLT.Elt'.S BUILDING 13 IN
L receipt or a lull aortnH'iil of material
ind prepared lo do nlLwoik in his line on
ehnrt notice and in a workmanlike manner
Vehicles of every description made to or
d r
Terms reafonable and satirfuction guaran
teed. Uepiiring a speciality
S. P IIANNA.
Jack'onville. Felirnary. 2D, I87.
RE-OPENED!
JACOBllEYEE,
PltlXEER WAGOX.3IAKER,
HVS RESUMED BUSINESS AT
the stand of :he late J. L. Badger
uml h prepared to execute all work in his
line willi promptness and dispatch and at
very reasonable rates. All kinds of vehi
cles ronslructed. Repairing a specialty.
Hood work and low prices cunranteed.
Give me a call. J.MEYER.
F.RITSCHARD,
praotical.
Watchmaker and Jeweler.
.-f.E.
R. REAMES.
REAMES'BROS.,
California st.,
Jacksonville, Oregon.
1
AHEAD ASfUSUAL ! !
M
,BYADQP3BfG
A CASH BASIS !!
THE GREATEST REDUCTION
' TN PRICES
AND THE
LARGEST STOCK
GENERAL' NERCIIAIVDIS
THE-
GREATEST VARIETY
TO 8ELECT FROM IN
Any One Store in Southern
Oregon or Northern
California.
ALL FOR CASH!!
OUR STOCK CONSISTS OF
FALL & WINTER DRY-GOODS,
FANCY GOODS,
LAPIES' DRESS GOODS. CASHMERE,
AND DIAG0NLS. SII.KS. AND
SATINS, HOOTS A ttHOES,
CLOTHING, ETC.,
LADIES' CAL, MADE CLOAKS
WE CALL THE ATTENTION OF THE
ladies lo the fact that wr ham now
n hand Hie largivt and best wli-ct'd aort
iiienti.fLDIKS' DRESS GOODS a-idFN-CY
GOODS or every dectiition in South
tii Oregon, and we will liiriC'-fnrlh mak
this line or goods our sp-culity and t-ell
them at
Cheaper than the Cheapest.
To the gentlemen we will fay. if you want
A No. 1 SUIT OF CLOTHE-; yon must go
lo Rearacs IJros. In buy tbewi a wit claim lo
have the liext STOCK OF CLOTHING in
Jackson county and will allow none to un
dersell us.
Thes goods were all purchased by a mem
tier or our firm from FIRST CLSS House
ir San FrancUco and New York. and wi will
wairant every article and sell tliemas cheap
for cash as any house fn the county.
We also keep on haud a lull slock of
GROCERIES.
Hardware, CcTLERYf Glassware,
T. G. REAMES.
7, IS79-
mimm: notea.
From good and reliable authority I
am tliis week enabled to give your
many readers mining news that is not
mythical. First then about Silver
creek. From S. T. White, Chapman
and Thornton, I learn that only two
claims have been prospected to any ex
tent, the principal one being that of
Redman & Co., who in thirty days
work last Fall, including prospecting,
took out on an average fifteen dollars
iper ilay to the hand, the other claim
Htveftiirin iroursvto jdr&J ubUanr-ttsr
day; and now that the water is getting
lower greater results will be shown
shortly, and no doubt slugs that will
astonish the natives will be taken out.
As but little prospecting has j'ct been
done on the main creek, and none on
the seven tributaries, except Tod's
creek, the final result, no doubt, will
cause such a stir in mining circles that
has not been heard of in these latter
days. Besides the creeks named and
the ono partly prospected, there is a
territory of twenty or thirty miles
square that has never been prospected,
and, no doubt, as rich and perhaps,
richer mines will yet be discovered in
that region. As to the ground to be
worked it varies from three to eight
feet in depth, but on the flat above
the falls and below it is thought to be
very deep. The quality of the gold is
very fine, as high as 01S.25 per ounce
having been received for it, besides the
gold is nil clean and coarse, valueing
from 25 cent to 25 pieces. Below
the falls of Silver creek, (which are
said to be very fine, the water falling
100 feet perpendicular, then GO feet;
from there to level 140 feet rapids)
Byers, Since fe Co. nro running a tun
nel and have already got in thirty feet,
but are lwthered by the heavy head of
water issuing from it They are very
.sanguine of success as they are sure tho
nld channel was fillexl up by a slide and
the creek 'now is of recent times.
There in a large basin of about ono
Section that is without doubt an old
lake, and which is U' d r'.aye 1 by a
body of gravel, perhaps 100 feet in
depth. This is immediately above the
falls and will soon be prospected.
The Briggs' creek mines are as good
and even better than Silver creek, and
I am told by Mr. Thornton that it will
be the principal camp. Another pros
pector tells me that it is by far the
best of the two, for the mines will be
more permanent. .
So far as the country has been pros
pected the claims arc all taken, and it
would be well for people going in there
to be prepared to board and bed them
selves, as provision. are quite high.
As far as I can learn tramps and loaf
ers are not wanted.
A well known party, being rather
short of means, concluded to go down
to Red Dog, a tributary of Briggs'
creek, and with but little knowledge of
mining worked "alone and without
sluice lioxes, and picked up off the bed
rock six hundred dollars. Another
man went down on a bar, formed by
last winter's freshet, and worked dili
gently for a few hours on the clean
washed gravel but was not paid for his
trouble, which danijiened his mining ar
dor in that region.
l'KOUKKHS OF OREPOX.
The following intelligence we glean
fronj a pamphlet by the Portland
Board of Trade, written by Wni. Reid,
Secretary:
The progress made by the State of
Oregon during the last ten years is
remarkable and brought about by no
speculative movement, but by a gradual
increase of jiopulation and mutual con
fidence based upon the fact that we had
here, on this North Pacific Coast, all
the resources which constitutes material
vsvwlih. SfeJuiy.fi ron'luded. nat a
retrospective glance of our progress
since 1868 will make our readers fix
with confidence that future which
surely awaits our people.
On the 1st January, 1867, the pop
ulation of the entire state was 80,161.
Of this number scarcely 10,000 persons
were then located in Eastern Oregon.
Two years later on, 1st of January,
1870, the state's population was 90,
983 Jay Cooke it Co.'s failure and stop
page of the building of the North
Pacific Railroad, together with cessa
sion of the proposed extension of the
Oregon ifc California and Oregon Cen
tral railroads, give the people reason
to believe that hard times were com
ing, and numbers of residents then left
the state in search of new homes, re
turning, as the majority of them did,
the following and succeeding years.
On the 1st of January, 1874, the state's
jiopulation aggregated 95,673 persons.
Immigration had so much fallen off
in 1874, that the writer, who then
arrived in the stite of Oregon, found
only forty-eight persons on board the
steamer forOregon and this was in tho
month of May, which is now generally
considered the heaviest month in the
year for tho arrival of immigrants.
From 1875 to 1878, the population of
the state had increased wonderfully
Oregon being estimated to contain
150,000 persons. But the most rapid
strides in population has been in
Eastern Oregon. In 1874, the entire
number of white persons therein
amounted to only 12,000, and to-day
official statistics show there are now
in Eastern Oregon and Washington
Territory close on to 50,000 persons.
tiie rREMD&vrs virro jir.ss.icr.
New York, April 29th a. m.
The ''Times" says: The veto message
will make about three-quarters of a
column. The President is reported to
be indignant at tho haste manifested,
the messenger having arrived at the
White House with the bill between 7
and 8 in tho evening, as though the
President contemplated running away.
In the message the President takes the
ground that the attempted enactment
of a political amendment or "rider" to
the Army bill is a direct infringement
upon the prerogative of tho Executive,
and an encroachment upon rights clear
ly guaranteed in the national Constitu
tion. The message declares further
that the manner in which this uncon
stitutional legislation is sought to be
enacted in other words, its addition
to the bill for the support of the Gov
ernment is an unworthy and unfair
effort to coerce the action of the Execu
tive; that such coercion was never
$3 PER YE AK
EXCITING INDIAN SEVfS.
Through the kindness of the editor
of the Walla Walla. "Statesman," the,
"Inland Empire" is furm'shed wjh, tho
following facts: On April 1st, Willis
Thorp, acting under ordtrs from Sht r
iff Schnebly, of Yakima county, ar
rested three Indians, romped Has-tle-to,
To-wce-talt and Inspice, for complicity
in Perkins' murder and firing on thq
Burbank boys near the scene. Thorp
kept them until he was prepared to
start Sus-susp-chin, Chief of tho
Okanagans, gavethetn up veryre?
IUU ICAUIiy Ul XUCb. UI1U U1IS CUUZWU-.uC
party to be watchful and suspicious.
He finally started, and on tho 18th
when within twenty miles of tho
Grand Cooly, near the camp of Moses'
Indians, three Indians camo into their
camp after a talk, during which, Thorp
demanded their intentions and asked
them to give their guns up in token o
good faith. Certain suspicious actions;
on their part occurred, and in reaching
for the gun of the father of one of tho
prisoners, he suddenly drew back and
fired his rifle point blank at Thqrp.
Not wishing to bo blamed for precipi
tating another Indian war, he told his
men not to fire, but the other two In?
dians commenced firing, and in attempt?
ing to fire his pistol he was grappled
by the two prisoners; then Pleasant
Bounds fired at the oid Indian and hit
him. The prisoners then tried to stab
Thorp, who got one arm free and
knocked one of the prisoners down.
The action then became pretty general,
One prisoner received a pistol shot in
his center, which caused him to fall for
ward and drop. The Indians then re
treated toward their horses and mount
ing, rode off with all of Thorp's horses
(eighteen) and their own. Martin
Rosell, another pf Thorp's men receiv.
ed three wounds in tho hand and arm.
It is the action of a little indepent par
ty, and ns the Indians around there do
not endorse the auPaTraTSrrha'
ised to recapture and return the pris
oners and horses I don't think anything
will como out of it.
H.lKl.tF. .MATTERS.
We are not at liberty to publish pri
vate dispatches, nor would we flbuso
confidence reposed in us to .that extent,
concerning the negotiations and agree-.
inents of those concerned in the San,
Francisco, Astoria, and Portjand lines,
but this much we are privileged to say,
that it Is very doubtful if there will bo
any more opposition. And on this
point we may say that we shall not feel
any deep regrets, for various reasons,
chief of which is that ruinously low rates
arc not of benefit to tho state nor to tho
owners of vessels, Mr, Cornwall has
no doubt purchased the steamship
Knickerbocker, and the new steamship
State of California will be here soon ;
but all will share alike, should Mr.
Cornwall put the Knickerbocker on,and
freights and fares will very likely bo
as follows
First cabin $15 00
Second cabin 10 0Q
Steerage , 8 00
Freight per ton ....,,,... 2 50
Bona fide immigrants will be passed
at half rates, first and second cabin, or
steerage, according to their choice,
California Street
1 ,! no-.?..- t1T It '.