Oregon sentinel. (Jacksonville, Or.) 1858-1888, May 09, 1874, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    r'pF&f?'V ??lj
i'"
?
1 "V-v-i,
1
1 d l '")- r -
f
'J
!
I" ' - -r . .
' i 'Tfi- rTF '
Oregon -Sentinel.
OREGONSENTEEL.
, " ?"
PUBLISHED SATURDAYS
AT "
J1CK0STILIE, JACKSON CODSTY, OREGON,
BT
B. F. POWELL.
TERMS;
'On Copy, one year $ 4 ; Ml Months, $3 SO
. XDVRTreiN(R'ATE8.
OE;iar-10iIwor ls Hrt.l:imtte.,.. I'N
- ltsiilnraat..InMcttea....... 1 oar
M 4M 3 montlit. .... ;..... 7-00-
" "" "6 1 ...........'.;.., ...r.- 10
On-tmrthColaili3month.. ....... ...."".". 30 00
.' - .............. -U, -
On-ilf " - .... :...r -
- " " to
On Column month... ...,,.. .. ... CDOO
" " " ..............: t.. -99 CQ
A-DUcnant to Vsurljr AtTtff.lMrJ .
VOL. XLX.-NO. 14.
JACKSONVILLE, OREGON:, MAY 9, 1874.
84 PEE T31AIU
r n-
i. i . t
rw-Tm-c
. " " "' ' J-'?
OREGON
SWTOtt
GKNERAL DIRECTORY.
CSITED STATES.
Preildsnt .....
Vie. President
Secretary al Bute
Secretary orthe Treasury.
....U. S Quit.
.Ueykt Miisox.
.ILmtitoi FlSH.
.0. E. BocrvtU.
necreiary or nar..
vv. w. BarsAf .
SecreUrjtf th. avy JQ.M. Itocuoif,
becreiaryot uie interior... ................. V delako.
Attorney Oeneral....... ...O. II. Wiuaasrs.
Postmaster General. .s J. A. J. Cuswiu.
U. S. SUPREME COUET.
Chief Justice M. It. -Waits
JUsodat. Justices Kelson. Clinord, Svrajne, Miller, Pa.
Til, Field, Strong and llradley. ,
STATE UP OltSeoS.
Cirmt SALEM, Marlon County.
Qovernor .....L.F.Grover
Secretary of Bute S. F. Cbadwick
Treasurer, ,......... ...... .....L.FIcischner
State Printer .m Knge-ie Semple
Circuit Judge (Fint Judicial District) P. P. ITlm
District Attorney " " " Jaa.R.leil
JACKSON COUSTT:
VJounty Judge. ...... .........E.B. Watson
County Co,nmUsloner. ::::::::::::::::;J'buW"
Sheriff. TbomM T. McKruzie
Clerk . P. Dunn
Trvamirsr .John Bllper
Assessor D. II.Tajlur
School 8oper.utei.dent . J. Sttnlrjr
Sorrejor J. S. Howard
COCftT SIITI5C5.
Circuit Court Second 5Iondj in February, Jane and
KoTember.
County Court First Monday in each month.
jesnexs or ini rucz.
JactsonTllle Wm.M. Turner
len b..Jaines P. Ilurni
Asbland Kd. lXl'oatt
Little Butte Creek James W. SImwn
Flounce Ituck U J. Hull
Table Rock All. M. Jiogers
Rock l'oiot C. SchlelTellu
Plasant Creek M. Makeman
Grant's Pass Wm.Kai.ler
Lelaod.... ..L. N. Browning
Foots Creek C. Draper
Applegate... Thos. Mee
Uniontown M. D. Stm-gts
Link Hirer N. Stephenson
TOWN OP JACICSONVILLC.
C C. Beet man, Pres
John Biljer,
, Kapper Kubli,
Trustees.
&oi cauis.
. I Henry Judge.
Recorder U. S.TTayden
Treasurer Henry I'ape
Marshal Frederick Orolw
Street Commissioner Peter Boschey
JACICSONVILLlTF. O. ItKGIisTEU.
SI apes lnve Jorksonlllo ns Fultovat
For Rock Point, O runt's raw and RcwebUTE, Tery day at
8 4i a. m. Mall clones at 8 o'clock a in.
For Ashland, Yreka and RedJUng, CoL, every dsy at 1020
a. m. Mail closes at 10 am.
For Apnleffatc, Kerbrrtllc, Waldo and Crescent City, t.
cry Monday and Thursday mominc at 3 o'clock. Mall
closes at 8 p. m. the preceding evening
The mall for Central Point, tAi TloCk, Engle Pnt,
Rrownsborongh and gam's Tetlcy leuiei Vi ednjisJy
nioruings1cloini;tbfl preceding eToning.
The mail for LlnkTilte, Hot springs, Yainax and Lake
City leave Ashland every Mundny morning.
Idol ley Order Offlce open frmn 9 to 5 o'clock
cacli lny, except Nun tin .
Office Hours,.... Vrom 7 o'clock A. JI. 1o 7 P. 51.
Office open Snndays 30 minutes after stage arrirals.
Mull Blatter mmt ttv In on time or It must
nualt the snxt Stn;',
MAX JIULLER.P.M.
nKNKVOLKNT SOCIKIIKk
Wnrren l.oile No. 10,
AF.AND A. M-IIOLD TIICIR 1I1MCI.AU a
. communications ou the Mcdnelay een tfA
logs preceding the full moon, at JaAaonwlle.Or Cy
egon. Brethren In good stitudtug are itnited to'
attend. T. O. REAMS. VT.il.
Mx SInxiB, Secretary.
Jacksonville l.otlge '. IO.
IO.O.F, HOLDS IIS REGULAR MEETINGS O.X
Saturday evenings, at Cid ellos Hall. Druthers
In goot standing are imlteU to attend.
0. W. Satioi, Sec. KASl'J-.R KUBLI, N, 0.
Trastrcs S. J. Bay, John Boyer, John Bilger.
Oregon Division So. I,
S0X8 AND DAUGHTERS OF TEMPERANCE, rtf
meets on Wetlnesdar evening of each week, in ViQ
RED MEN'S ItALL. gg
Jacksonville. Brothers and sisters In good stand
ing are Invited to attend. JOHN BOYEK, W. P.
A. P. OWIKS, R. S.
Orrgonian I'ticnlioiita. Tribe
NO. 1.1MI'1W ED ORDEIt OF RED MEN, HOLDS ITS
Stated Councils at the lied Men's Hall tli" third ran
in every seven suns. In the eighth run. A cordial invita
tion to-attend is extended to brothers In good standing.
P. D. PaUOSS, a of R. A. P. 0 WEN S, S.
Jacksonville Stnnim
VTO. US, U.0.R.M, HOLDS ITS REGULAK MEET
i! Ingl every Thursday evening at4)dd lellows Hall.
Brothers In f&ot standing are invited to attend.
Fain. OaoBI, R. 8. K. JACOBS, 0. C.
Ruth Jit-liekali
DEGREE LODGE NO. 4, 1.0. 0. F- HOLDS ITS REG
ular meings on every other Mond-ty evening; at
Odd Fellows' Hall. Members in good starxWttar Invited
toattend. !. rTFUKIt, S:0.
JANE KUBLI, R.S.
-FORWARDING MERCHANTS.
E. S, MOKGAN & CO.,
FORJVARDING and COMMISSION
. M '
AXoroXxcutxtas., '
KOSEBUIIG OEEGOX,
TTEXD FAmiFUIXT TO ALL BUSINESS EN
" trusted to our care. From and attrrjhis date our
Forwarding and Storage Charges
vlU be uniform with the charges at Crescent City and
Redding. Soliciting the continued patronage of all our
blends, and the public generally,
We are, respectfully,
K S. MORGAN & CO.
Reeeburg: June II, ISTJtf
J. G. 1VALX.,
FORWARDING and COMMISSION
CBtscEXT crrr, caufoesia.
1 3iXfivA'AKt0CR ooods ci.or j
UVL CHy.lend aUUils U
r-I.G.1V..Crea-
t lading and shir nine
ncaipu for m of good, rent, freight- and charge. Pya
in. vkxo biiy.cnntuveryoi gvoas.
Sfjrwarebouse. ocasist of two trick and on. .test
AMUrtng my patrons that no paint Vin r itpareAln
looking Jd TUir uteres, I ask tx a onctlsnacc. ir&Mr.
J.0.WA,
tPBOFKSMUNAL CAHDSi
B. F. SOWELL. ' H. KKIXT
DOWELL & KELLY,
ATlOBHEYS-iT-LAW,
JACKSONVILLE, OHEGON. v
Will practice in the Circuit Court, of Oregon, and iu the
District and Circuit Courts of the Uilied Stair", -at
Portland. Oregou: also In, the Supreme Court of the
United States, at Washington, D. C. 49- Special at
tention given to collections.
c vr. earlkr.
K. B. WATSOS
KAHLER & WATSON,
ATTOKNEYS-AT-LAW,
JACKSONVILLE, OnEGON.
Will practice in all the Courts of this State: obtain Pat
ents for a 1 classes of public lands, both cineral and
agricultural ; attend promptly to collections and attend
to all county and Probate busiues. OFFICE opposite
the court house. June 17,lb;2tf.
W. G. LANGFORD,
ATTOENEY-AT-LAW,
(Formerly of Walla Walla, W, T.)
Will prsctice in all of the Courts and Departments of the
United States, and Courts of the District. OFFICE
S23 Four-and-ahalf street, Washington, D. C. nllv!8
DR. L. DANFORTn,
pHYSICIAN AND STJEGEON,
JACKSONVILLE, ORECON.
Ilaving located in Jacksonville I ofTermy professional
services to the public Ofltco In Cnton's new building,
adjoining Ryan s brick storeroom. Residence on I lfth
street, caht of Methodist church. dec 23, 72tf
J. GREY JEWELL, M. D.,
pHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
JACKSONVILLE, OREGON.
DR JEWELL Is a graduate of the Medical Department
of 0rtgeto-n(l.C) University, and respectfull of
frrs his services to the citizens of Jacksonville and the
surrounding country. 49-OfHCE IN OKTH'S
BUILDING. Octl7,1673tf-
DR. J. C. BELT,
pHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
JACKSONVILLE, OP.iiOON. " "
Having located in the low n of Jacksonville for the pur
pose of piactfsing Snrgery and other branches of my
jimfeshion. I respectlully ak a portion if nblic pat
ronage. t'i-Oil ICE Second door north of the U. S.
Hotel. uov22,,;3tf
DENTISTRY.
nH. W. JACKSON, DENTIST,
JACKSONVILLE.
All styles jf Plate Work made, such as
Ut-ld, Silver, Platlna, Alniuiiinm and 1 libber. Ppem)
attention given to CliIMreu's Teeth. Mlnu lixldr
fUuiHiiiug Gas) ititcl fitr pAlitIe fxtrnrllmi of
l'-ih. 3-Will Uit Ashland annually on the 1ft of
March; also, Kcrbvillebu the fourth Monday hi October.
43CnlI null JCxnmIiirpieliiieii Voilt.Ca,
OFFICE Comer of Ca Iforn a and Fifth Streets. !;?
ideticeopivosite the Court Ilousn. iiov3072jl.
HOTELS. ETC.
FRANCO-AMERICAN
HOTElf AM) jjRESTAlIRAST
ASD GEXERAL STAGE JIOUSE,
Opposite Odd Fellows' Kail,
JACKSONVILLE OREGOX,
.MADAME PIOLT,
Proprietress.
TUAVELLKItS AND lUEIDENT BOARDERS WILL
find the moat comfortable lodpncs at this houw to
be met with anywhere In this iart of the State.
The Beds and Bedding
Will alwavs be found of first class character and kept in
a neat and clean condition, while
The Rooms
Are newly furnished and will always le kept In neat and
homelike condition. A plentiful supply of the bent of
everything the market affords wilt be
Spread on
H&
UoavTalrie.
Her house will be kept open all night, and SQUARE
MEALS' can be obtained at any hour of the day or night
OYSTERS PREPARED 15.
EVERY STYLE.
&
And lunches to be had at any time. Stage passengers,
and others who may be out late at night, can always find
a pxtd fire, hot meals and pood beds at this honse.
Ko trouble will be e-ared to deserve the patronage of
the travelling as w ell as the permanent cnramonily.
Jan. 3, lS74tf Give xue a call.
Absolute Divorces.
OBTAIN ED FROM COURTS OFJIFFERENT STATES
for desertion, Xc. Io publicity required. No charge
until divorce granted.
Address 1L HOUSE,
ntuvismn
Attorney. 194 Broadvay, N. T.
BREWERIES.
THE CITYBREWERY.
YEIT SCHOTZ, Proprietor.
I WOULD MOST RESrECTFCLLT Ef. --
form the citizens of Jacksonville and thorapl
world at Urge, that they can find, at any time. ifsBBBBBsm
At my Bre.ery.th best of lager beer, in nj.
quantity ine purchaser may uesire. siy nouse is conve
niently situated and my rooms are always in order. A
visit will please you janlS.TOf
EAGLE BREWERY!
JOSEPH WETTERER,
"Proprietor.
' OrecoB St., JacksoBTille.
npHE BEST 'pr'TiCEll'BEEll ALWAR.
JL aept;ooiandanareaa;roraaie Dy in.
THE PRESIDENT'S VETO.
The following is President Grant's
message to the Senate, containing his
reasons for vetoing the bill for increas--
ing legal tender note3 and United
States banE notes':
To the Senate rfllie United States :
Herewith, I return Senate bill No. 617,
entitled "An act to fix the amount of
United States notes and the circulation
ot National Banks and1 for other purposes,"-
without ray -approval. In do
lupso, I must express my regret at not
beigg able to give rpy assent to a meas
ure which has received the sanction ot
a majority ot legislators, chosen by the
people to make laws for their guidance
and have sought to find sufficient ar
gument to justify such assent, but un
(Successfully. Practically, it is a-ques
tion whether the measure under discus,
sion would giie an additional dollar to
the irredeemable paper currency of the
country or not, and whether "by requir
ing three fourths of the reserves to be
retained by the banks and prohibiting
interest to be received on balances it
might prove a contraction. But the
fact cannot be concealed that, theoret
ically, the bill increases the paper cir
culation one bundled million dollars,
less only the amount ot reserves re
strained from circulation by the pro
visions ot the second section. The
measure has been supported on the
theory that it would give an increased
circulation- It is fair inference there
fore, that if in practice the measure
should fail to create tho abundance of
circulation expected of it, the "friends
of the measure, particularly, thoso out
of Congress, would clamor for such in
fl.uion as would give the expected re
lief. The theory, in my belief, is a de
parture from thu true principles of
finance, National interest, National obli
gations to creditors, Congressional
promises, pledges on the part of politi.
cal partiesand of the personal views
and promises made by me in every an
nual message sent to Congress, and in
each inaugural address. In my annual
address to Congress ot Decembert1869,
the loljowing passages appear: . .
"Amioiijj tlie eiils glowing out of
the Rebellion is that of an irredeem
able currency. It is an evil which I
hopo will receive your most earnest
attention. It is the duty and one of
the highest duties of the Government
to secure to the citizen a medium of
exchange, of fixed, unuiiu; value.
This implies a return to specie basis,
and jio substitute tor it an be leised.
It should be commenced Miow and
reached at the earliest practicable mo
nient consistent with -a fair regaid to
the interests to the debtor class. Im
mediate usiimplion, it piacticable,
would nut be desirable. It would com
pel the debtor class to pay beyond
iheircoiiliacts, the premium on cold
at the dale ot their purchase, and would
bring bankruptcy and i uiu tuthousauds.
Fluctuation, however, iu the paper
alue ol the-ineasureot all values, gofd,
is detrimental to the interests of trade.
It makes the man ot business an invol
untary gambler; lor in saies where
tuture payment is to be made, both
parties speculate' as to what will be the
value ot the currency to be paid and
reeei ed.
I earnestly recommend to yon such
legislation as will inure a cradual re
turn to specie payments, and put an
immediate stop to fluctuations in the
alueol currency."
I btill adhere to the views' then ex
pressed. As early as December 4, 1 865,
the House of Representatives passed a
resolution by a vole of 144 to 6, con
curring in the views ot the Secretary
ot thtsJTnjasury n relation to the- ne
oevsiiy lor a contraction of the currency
with the view ol as early a resumption
ot specie payment as the business inter
ests of the country would permit,
pledging cooperative action to this
end as speedily a- possible.
The first Act passed by the Forty
first Congress, on the 18th ot March,
16G9, was "An aot to strengthen the
public credit ot the United States."
Here the Act referred to is inserted in
full. This Act still remains as a
pledge of the taith ol the United States
to make provision at the earliest prac
ticable moment for a redemption ot
Uniied States notes in coin. The dec
laration contained in the Act ot June
20, 1804, created the obligation that
the total amount of United Stales notes
issued or to be issued should never ex
ceed fouHiundred million dollars. The
amount in circulation was actually re
duced to three hundred and fifty six
millions, at which point Congress pass
ed the Act ot February 4, 1868, sus-
pendinga turtber reduction ot currency.
The forty-four million .have ever been
regarded as a reserve, to be used only
in a case of emergency, such as have
occurred on several occasion", and
must occur when from- any cause the
revenues suddenly fall below the ex
penditures, and such reserve is neces
sary, because the fractional currency,
amounting lo fty, million, dollars, is
redeemable in Ieal-tendera on call.
It may1 be said that such return ot frac
tional currency for redemption is im
probable, but let steps ibe taken - for '&
return to a specie basis and it will be
found that silver will take-t,he place ot
fractional currency as rapidly as itcan
be supplied.
When the premium on gold reaches
a sufficiently low point, with the
amount of United Stales notes to be
issued fixed permanently within proper
limits, and the Treaury is strengthened
as to be able to redeem them in coin
on detuaed, it will be safe .to inaugu
rate a, system of free banking, with
ttisfura 1-ii-mrtcirt.ria on ts mnL'a iftTiinili3fti'tr
the redemption of circulating notes o.fMlj treachery, J. soldier without
. " Inrtiolt.v onn n vit.finv ivllliont murmur.
banks, in coin or United States notes
themselves redeemable and made equiv
alent to coin.
Asa measure preparatory to free
banking1, or for placing the Govern
ment in a position to redeem its notes
in coin at the earliest practicable mo
ment, the revenues ol the country
should be increased, so as to pay the
current expenses; provide, for, the sink
ing fund required by law and also a
surplus to be retained in the, Treasury
in gold.
I am not a believer in any artificial
method ot making paper money equal
to coin, when the coin is not owned or
held ready to redeem these promises to
pay; for paper money is nothing more
than promises to pay, and valuable ex
aclly in proportion to the amount of
coin it can be converted into. While
coin is not used as a circulating me
dium and the currency ot the country
is no con very Die into u ai par, n De
comes an article ot commerce as any
product. The surplus will seek a for
eign market, as will any other surplus.
The balance'of trade has nothing to
do with the question. Duties on im
ports be'iDg lequired in coin, creates a
limited demand tor gold and about
enough to satisfy that remains' in the
country. To increase this supply I
see no way open but by the Goxern-
meut boarding through the means
above given and possible by requiring
National Banks to aid.
It is claimed by the advocates of tho
measure Herewith returnedv that theie
is an unequal distribution ot the bank
ing capital of the country. I was dis-
Dobcd to. cive weight to tins view ol
the question at first, but on reflection
it will be remembered there stills re--mains
8100,000,000 ot unauthorized
bank note circulation, assigned to
Slates, having their quota, not yet
taken. In addition to this, btaies Iiav-
ri! lees than their quota of bank cir
culation, have the option ot $200,000,
000 more, to be taken from those
States having more than their propor
tion. "When this is all taken up, or
when specie payments are fully restor
ed, or are in rapid ptocess ot restora
tion, will be the time to consider the
question of more currency.
U. &.URAXT.
Wife-Catciiisg. T h e marriage
ceremony is performed curiously by
the .Esquimaux. When a boy kills a
Hilar hi'.ir. ft is considered sufficient
proof ot his ability to maintain a lamily;
he is therefore told to0 and catcb a
wile. Watclun;' Ins opportunity at
night, he pounces on a victim and at
tempts to carry her off. She, however,
struggles and shrikes until she has col
Iected around her a group ot sympa
thizers. She then turn upon her cap
tor, aud biles and scratches him until
he is obliged to release her, then she
darts into the crowd and attempts to
escape. The expectant bridegroom
foilows-her, but not unmolested. All
the-old women take scourges ot dritd
seal skin and flagellate him unmerci
fully as he passes, making at the same
time every effort to arrest him iu his
course. If, despite these little impedi
ments to matrimonal bliss, he should
catch his victim, tbe'biting and scratch
ing scene is renewed, and, in all prob
ability, he is compelled to release her,
and the chase, with its attendant dis
comforts, is resumedt Should he over
come all obstacles, the third capture
proves effectual, and the victim, ceas
ing her struggles, is led away amid the
acclamations and rejoicings ot the as
sembled multitude.
Washington-, APrl1 24. The Presi
dent has received a request from the
President of the Agentine Republic
ak:ng the privilege of placing at the
West Point Academy six young men,
graduates ot the military school .estab
lished by that republic. The Argen
tine Government proposes to pay the
expenses of the young men. As the
President has no authority in'the prem
ises, the letter has been laid before the
House Committee on Military Affairs
for action.
A clergyman "with a keen eye to bus
iness recently -attended 'a funeral in.
Howland.'Me., and before the corpse
had. been 'taken to the'grave made opt
a bill at five dollars for his 'services
and gave it Info the bands ot a cousta-
eus lor couecuon.
CHARACTER OF" GEN. LEE.
In hi.. late speech, delivered at At.
lanta, Gen. B. F. Hill. pays his, deserv
ed tribute to the character of "Robert
JLLee
"When the future historian cornea to
survey the character ot Lee, he will
find it' rising like a huge mountain
above the undulating plain ot humanity,
and he will have to lift his eyes high
toward heaven to catch its summit.
He possessed every virtue of tho other
great commauders witboul tbeir vices.
He .was a foe
without hate, a friend
cruelty, and a victim without murmur-
ing. He was a public omcer without
vices, a private citiz'en without wrong,
a christian without hypocrisy, and a
man without guile. He, was Ctesar
without his ambition, Frederick with
out his tyranny, Napoleon wilhput his
selfishness, and Washington without
bis reward. He was obedient to au
thority as a servant, aud royal in au
thority as a true king. He was as
gentle as a women in life, modest aud
pure as a virgin in thought, watchlul
as a Roman vestal in duty, submissive
to law as Socrates, and grand in .bat
tle as Achilles."
Changes of a Century. The nine
teenlh ceulury has witnessed many and
great discoveries.
In 1808 Fulton took out the first pat
ent lor the invention ot a steamboat.
The first steamboats which made
regular trips across the Atlantic Ocean
were the Sirius and Great Western, iu
1830.
The first public application to prao
tice the use ot gas lor illuminating was
made iifl802.
In 18l3 the streets of, London were
tor the first time lighted wi(h gass.
In 1813 there was built at Waltham,
Mass., a mill believed to have been the
first in the world, which combined all
the requirements for .making finished
cloth Irum raw goods.
In 1790 there were only twenty-five
post offices in the whole country, and
up tor JS37 the rates of postage were
twenty live cents tor a letter sent over
tour hundred miles.
In 1P07 wooden clocks commenced
to be made by machinery. I his
ushered in the era of cheap clocks.
About the year 1813 tho first,.rail-
road of any considerable length in the
United Stales was constructed.
In '1829 the first experiment in pho
tography was made by Dajjuerre.
About 1840 the first express business
was established.
The anthracite coal business may be
said to hae begun in 1820.
In 183C the first patent for the in
vention of matches was granted.
Iu 1845 the first telecram was sent.
Steel pens were introduced tor use in
1830.
The first successful reaper was con
structed in 1833.
In 184G Elias Howe obtained a
ent lor the first sewing machine.
pat-
Be (TuiEFDL. Emerson says : "Do
not hang a dismal picture on the wall,
and do not deal with sables and gloom
in your conversation." Beecher fol
lows with : "Away with these fellows
who go howling through Hie and all
the while passing lor birds of paradise
He that cannot laugh and be cay
should look well -to himself. He
should fast and pray until his face
breaks forth into light." Talmage
then takes up the strain : "Some peo
ple have an idea that they comlort the
afflicted when they groan over them.
Won't drive a hearse through a man s
soul. When you bind up a broken
bone of the soul, and you want splints,
do not make them of cast-iron." After
such counseling and. admonitions, lay
aside your long faces.
Old man Bender and his wife, the
famous Kansas murderers, have at last
been arrested and taken back to Kan
sas for trial. A Kansas telegram ot the
26ili8ays: "There was gjeat excite
ment at Topeka, yesterday, over the
arrival ot old man Bender and his wife.
Thousands flocked around the j nl to
seethe butchers, who were fully identi
fied by many who had seen them when
in Kansas." It has been almost a year
sincd their crimes were exposed and
their cscap-j known, and they hive
been unceasingly tracked ever since by
shrewdest detectives, without success
until a few days ago, wihen an accident
revealed their whereabouts and se
cured their capture.
Some boiler makers at Dubuque put
a boy in a boiler to hold., a hammer
head to the rivets as they were driven
in, and when all was completed he was
found too big to come out ot the, hole.
He stripped to the buff and greased his
6kin, but it was po nse and it took, six,
men three hours to cut, the solid boiler
irou before "he could be got; out.
, tLove is .an egotism of. two. The first
iigh is tk'alak xA wisdom.
KiPUBLICAN, PLATT0BJL
ADOPTED IX CO.XTE.TTIO.! AT, SALES, ORtOOif,
ATBU. 8, 1874.
1. The Republican party of tbe State ot
Oregon, in CvtiveQliun ov-embWd, diclare that
the end ot guvrromcnl is Iu Secure renin! and
exact jnsl.ice 10 all its cttzens,wilh 3 littler
iuirmrmeat as pussib e upoa individual free
diim;ibat tbe govrrnmenl uf the people, by
Hie pmp'e and forlhe people, intrrpreled and
fureiluduWrd by tbe lAcIarmleu ot independ
ence,. Is ibe true American idm; but!lhis Idea,
can only be realized by ibe tleciion of honest
and capable men to public t ffice, and by.coo-cuctiD-fUiblicnflairs-vrilh
tirtct prudence and
in necMitnx wiHVie souud.aml approved
rrjaxmi&nf bueid political teulpmy.
2. llrpaiiy-Of J.i.iiiiio:'rr5ttrTtiI and
Be--s.ty,;imrttut rfHe weuretTjid Jf th "
bir li uiiiITifstorj-otntie ltepablic.il parly, ws
reo n Ze no such allegiance To po'irtcal ujjo
cinlioni as sualr prevent our fair and Candid
criticism of the acts of all public men, and
that every case of negligence, wastefulness or
disbontsiy oo ibe part of ihose having control
of public m ney ought to be promptly investi
gated and te?erely punished, wuhuut fear or
lavor; that we expect ol our Slate I.gi?'ators
and State .officers the strictest integrity and
economy, tbe largest possible rebel from: the
burden of taxatiou, tbe maintenance of public
education, tbe preservation of the purity and
freedom of tbe ballot box. tbe enforcement of
such laws as will secure to all entitled tosuf-'
fr.gt: ibe right to" its exercise, and fuch as will
at the same time exclude all fraudulent voting.
3. Thut we insist upon tbe rijdit and duty
of the Slate to control every franchise, of what
ever kind, it grauis, and while we do not wistf
thai-any injustice shall be done to individuals
or corporations investing Capital or industry iq
enterprises of this kind, we yet demand that -no
franchise fhall be granted which is prejudicial
to the public, fn winch the rights and interests
of the State and tbe people are not carefully
and fully guarded.
4. That while we recognizs the full right of
every citizen to express and act upon bis con
victions, upon all questions of public or Slate
interest, no person holding a Federal or State
offlce bas tbe fight to seek to influence the ac
tion of his subordinates, by exciting their fears
of loss of place if iheir opinions or actions
shall differ from bis own; and that we aie op
posed to all interference, or participation by
them, in Conventions of the people for tbe
nomination of'candidates for office.
5. That we are desirous of p6litical reform,
and for bonest economy and purity in all offi
cial administration; that to secure this is tbe
duty ol evrrj1 citizen; that to. (hit end every
good man should feel bound to participate -in
politics and to make an end or bad men lorcing
their eleclioo'by securing a party nomination;
that we believe there are us good men in the
R-publican party as out of it, and only tbe
best aneu should be nominated for office, and
only such are entitled to receive tbe support of
ihs people.
6. That we sympathize with every move
ment to secure Tor agriculture and labor iheir
due influence, interest and rights, and the Re
publ can parly will be their ally in every just
tfTirt to attain that end.
7. That tbe interests of this State demand,
in its commercial relutions with other Stales
of the Union, both present and prospective, and
will warrant a liberal expenditure on the part
of our N'utioual Government iu the Improve
ment of our liatbors and if our river chunue'r;
and it is the true policy of our people that they
should be so represented in Congress as shall
the iiiihi eHVclirely secure this result.
8. That trne economy in the management of
public lands of the United States, as well as
the settlement of our vast domain and the de
velopment ol its resources, demands liberal
grants of ibe public lands to aid in the con
struction of railrtratls arid other public works,
with such limitations and retrtrrioi&wll3'will
secure the uliimatcsale to nctii.il settlers.
9. That we arc in favor of Congressional aid
to the Portland, Dalles and Sail Luke Rail
road ; for the improvement ol the Columbia
River at the Dalles and Cascades ; to aid the
extension of the Oregon Central Railroad from
St Joe through the counties of Polk and Hen
ton, to lis Junction with ibe Urrgnn and Cill
fornia Railroad, and the improvement of tbe
Willamette River.
10 That we favor Corizressional aid for the
construction of a wagon road from some point
in Rojjue River Valley to the neatest practi
cable point on ibe coast ; and that we favor
the injiiiediate contrus4ion of a unod and ser
viceable wagon rad along the sontb bunk of
the Columbia River from -the moulh of tbe
Sandy to the Dalles.
11. That we are opposed to the purchase or
leasing by this S'a'e uf ibe canul and locks at
the Falls of the Willamette River.
12. That we demind the repeal of tbe Liti
gant Law, the Portland Police Hill. Ibe un
constitutional act tncreainr the emoluments
and salaries of State and judicial officers, the
acts increacini; tbe fees of Clerk9 and Sheriffs
and ihe UKxIifiiralioiH of schiHil laws so 19 to
relieve Ibe people of lire fthool bonk monopoly.
13. That we are in favor of the speedy pay
ment in fall of all just claims of citizens and
volunteers for supplies furnished ai.d services
rendered in the enppres"ion of Indian hostilities
in Southern Oregon in tbe years 1872and 1873',
14. That we are in favor of1 such legitlition
tp re-.'u'ate the sale ol intoxicating' honors as
will retrain the abuses grgnlmr 0111.10C indis
criminate license and operate m u salutury and,
needful cbeck upon the growing evi's'of to
temperance. ' n
15. That we are in favor of opening Wal
low. Val ey to settlement.
16.c That we are in favor of the construc
tion, by be Frderaf. Government, or a break
water at Port Orford, Ourry county. . .
There are two men now, living in
New Bedtbrd,Mass.,whose united ages
are over 170 years, who, ruorp than
sixty years ago, were doinn business
together. "In the tailoring department
of their business,.at that tirrieuor very
soon atter,.tbey had in their employ
four lemalewho are also now, living
in that city and whose united ages are
abxnS30 years. t 4
E3 102.0